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  • Ull (Norse mythology)

    Ull, in Norse mythology, a god associated with skis and the bow, according to the Icelandic poet and historian Snorri Sturluson in his Prose Edda. Ull is said there to be the handsome son of Sif and the stepson of her husband Thor. Ull possessed warrior-like attributes and was called upon for aid

  • Ulladulla (New South Wales, Australia)

    Ulladulla, town, southeastern New South Wales, southeastern Australia. It is situated on the Tasman Sea coast along the Princes Highway, 40 miles (65 km) south of Jervis Bay. The town was established in the 1820s as an anchorage for ships importing cedarwood to Sydney (about 110 miles [180 km]

  • Ullal (India)

    Mangaluru: The suburb of Ullal produces hosiery and coir yarn. Mangaluru maintains a large bazaar near its coastal landing place.

  • Ullambana (Buddhism)

    Buddhism: All Souls festival: The importance of the virtues of filial piety and the reverence of ancestors in China and Japan have established Ullambana, or All Souls Day, as one of the major Buddhist festivals in those countries. In China worshipers in Buddhist temples make fachuan…

  • Ullathorne, William Bernard (British bishop)

    William Bernard Ullathorne, Roman Catholic missionary to Australia and first bishop of Birmingham, Eng. He was influential in securing the final abolition (1857) of the British system of transporting convicts to Australia. Ullathorne was a descendant of Sir Thomas More. He served as a cabin boy

  • Ullikummi (Hurrian mythology)

    Anatolian religion: Mythology: …epic of the struggle against Ullikummi, and the Theogony, though written in Hittite, are Hurrian in origin and refer to Hurrian and even Mesopotamian deities. The Theogony tells of the struggle for kingship among the gods. Alalu, after holding the kingship for nine years, was defeated by Anu (the Babylonian…

  • Ullikummi, Song of (Anatolian mythology)

    Anatolian religion: Mythology: The “Song of Ullikummi” tells of a plot by Kumarbi to depose Teshub from his supremacy by begetting a monstrous stone as champion. Ullikummi, the stone monster, grows in the sea, which reaches his waist, while his head touches the sky; he stands on the shoulder…

  • Ullman, Edward (American geographer)

    central-place theory: Edward Ullman introduced central-place theory to American scholars in 1941. Since then geographers have sought to test its validity. Iowa and Wisconsin have been two areas of empirical research that have come closest to meeting Christaller’s theoretical assumptions.

  • Ullman, Trace (British American actress, singer, and writer)

    Tracey Ullman, British-American actress, singer, and writer who was a uniquely gifted mimic and comic, perhaps best known for a series of self-titled sketch-comedy programs in the United States. Ullman was born to a Polish father and British mother. When she was six years old, her father died

  • Ullman, Tracey (British American actress, singer, and writer)

    Tracey Ullman, British-American actress, singer, and writer who was a uniquely gifted mimic and comic, perhaps best known for a series of self-titled sketch-comedy programs in the United States. Ullman was born to a Polish father and British mother. When she was six years old, her father died

  • Ullmann, Liv (Norwegian actress)

    Liv Ullmann, Norwegian actress known for her natural beauty and intelligent, complex performances. Her name is closely linked to that of Swedish director Ingmar Bergman, with whom she worked in several films. Ullmann’s father was a Norwegian engineer whose work demanded extensive travel. As a

  • Ullmann, Liv Johanne (Norwegian actress)

    Liv Ullmann, Norwegian actress known for her natural beauty and intelligent, complex performances. Her name is closely linked to that of Swedish director Ingmar Bergman, with whom she worked in several films. Ullmann’s father was a Norwegian engineer whose work demanded extensive travel. As a

  • Ulloa, Francisco de (Spanish explorer)

    Gulf of California: In 1539 Spanish explorer Francisco de Ulloa proved that Baja California was a peninsula rather than an island, and he named the gulf Mar Bermejo (“Vermilion Sea”) because of the impressive red plankton that is found in its waters. Nevertheless, the myth that the gulf was an island perpetuated…

  • Ullor (Indian poet)

    South Asian arts: Malayalam: Ullor wrote in the classical tradition, on the basis of which he appealed for universal love, while Vallathol (died 1958) responded to the human significance of social progress.

  • Ullr (Norse mythology)

    Ull, in Norse mythology, a god associated with skis and the bow, according to the Icelandic poet and historian Snorri Sturluson in his Prose Edda. Ull is said there to be the handsome son of Sif and the stepson of her husband Thor. Ull possessed warrior-like attributes and was called upon for aid

  • Ullsten, Ola (prime minister of Sweden)

    Sweden: Domestic affairs through the 1990s: Ola Ullsten, leader of the People’s Party (widely known as the Liberal Party and officially the Liberal People’s Party from 1990), succeeded him as prime minister, forming a minority government in which one-third of the ministers were women. Following a general election in 1979, the…

  • Ullswater (lake, England, United Kingdom)

    Ullswater, lake, in the administrative county of Cumbria, on the border between the historic counties of Cumberland and Westmorland in the Lake District of England. It is the Lake District’s second largest lake, about 7.5 miles (12 km) long and 0.5 mile (0.8 km) wide with an area of about 3 square

  • Ullŭng Island (island, South Korea)

    Ullŭng Island, volcanic island, North Kyŏngsang do (province), South Korea. It lies in the East Sea (Sea of Japan), 75 miles (120 km) off the northeastern coast of South Korea, and has an area of 28 square miles (73 square km). Before its domination by the Silla kingdom (57 bc–ad 935) in 512, it

  • Ulm (Germany)

    Ulm, city, Baden-Württemberg Land (state), southwestern Germany. It lies on the left bank of the Danube River at its junction with the Iller and the Blau, opposite the Bavarian town of Neu Ulm. Ulm was first mentioned as a royal domain in 854 and was chartered in the 12th century by the

  • Ulm Design School (school, Ulm, Germany)

    industrial design: American hegemony and challenges from abroad: …Gestaltung in Ulm, or the Ulm Design School (1953–68), which was often considered a successor to the Bauhaus. One of its founders was the typeface designer Otl Aicher, a corporate-branding specialist, noted author of graphic standards manuals for his clients, and designer whose clients included Lufthansa and Munich’s transportation authority.…

  • Ulm School of Design (school, Ulm, Germany)

    Max Bill: …was rector (1951–56) of the Ulm School of Design, Germany. He designed the school’s buildings, planned its curriculum, and was director of the department of architecture and product design there. He then served as a professor of environmental design at the State Institute of Fine Arts, Hamburg (1967–74). In 1987…

  • Ulm, Battle of (German history)

    Battle of Ulm, (Sept. 25–Oct. 20, 1805), major strategic triumph of Napoleon, conducted by his Grand Army of about 210,000 men against an Austrian Army of about 72,000 under the command of Baron Karl Mack von Leiberich. Austria had joined the Anglo-Russian alliance (Third Coalition) against

  • Ulmaceae (plant family)

    Ulmaceae, the elm family (order Rosales), with 6–7 genera of about 45 species of trees and shrubs, distributed primarily throughout temperate regions. Several members of the family are cultivated as ornamental plants, and some are important for their wood. Members of the family are deciduous or

  • Ulman, Douglas Elton (American actor)

    Douglas Fairbanks, American motion picture actor and producer who was one of the first and greatest of the swashbuckling screen heroes. His athletic prowess, gallant romanticism, and natural sincerity made him “King of Hollywood” during the 1920s. After college study Fairbanks began playing stage

  • Ulmanis, Kārlis (prime minister of Latvia)

    Kārlis Ulmanis, a leader in the fight for Latvian independence in the early decades of the 20th century. He was the first head of the Latvian Republic in 1918 and again in 1936–40 and was premier in 1918, 1919–21, 1925–26, 1931–32, and 1934–40. Ulmanis studied agronomy in Germany as a young man and

  • Ulmann, Doris (American photographer)

    Doris Ulmann, American photographer known for her portraits of people living in rural parts of the American South. Born into a well-to-do New York family, Ulmann received a progressive education at the Ethical Culture School and took courses in psychology and law at Columbia University. She studied

  • Ulmer, Edgar G. (American director)

    Edgar G. Ulmer, American director known as a supreme stylist of the B-film. His movies, many of which were shot in a week and made on a minuscule budget, notably include The Black Cat (1934) and Detour (1945). Ulmer studied architecture while designing sets in Vienna. Max Reinhardt hired the

  • Ulmer, Edgar George (American director)

    Edgar G. Ulmer, American director known as a supreme stylist of the B-film. His movies, many of which were shot in a week and made on a minuscule budget, notably include The Black Cat (1934) and Detour (1945). Ulmer studied architecture while designing sets in Vienna. Max Reinhardt hired the

  • Ulmo tree (tree)

    Eucryphia: E. cordifolia, which grows to a height of 12 m (40 feet), and E. glutinosa, up to 4.5 m (14.8 feet), have produced the hybrid E. ×nymansensis, hardier than E. cordifolia and tolerant of alkaline soils.

  • Ulmus (tree)

    Elm, (genus Ulmus), genus of about 35 species of forest and ornamental shade trees of the family Ulmaceae, native primarily to north temperate areas. Many are cultivated for their height and attractive foliage. Elm wood is used in constructing boats and farm buildings because it is durable

  • Ulmus americana (tree)

    elm: Major species: The American elm (Ulmus americana), of eastern North America, may grow 24 to 30 metres (about 80 to 100 feet) tall. It has dark gray, ridged bark and elliptical leaves. Populations in the United States have been decimated by Dutch elm disease.

  • Ulmus carpinifolia (tree)

    Dutch elm disease: …susceptible in varying degrees, the smooth leaf (Ulmus carpinifolia), Chinese (U. parvifolia), and Siberian (U. pumila) elms have shown good resistance, and experiments with hybrids of American and Asiatic elms have met with much success.

  • Ulmus glabra (tree)

    elm: Major species: …crown and deeply fissured bark; Wych elm (U. glabra), with smoother bark; and Camperdown elm (U. glabra camperdownii), a variety of Wych elm also known as umbrella elm because of its drooping branches. The fast-growing Siberian elm (U. pumila), a brittle-twigged weak-wooded tree, is sometimes planted for quick shade and…

  • Ulmus glabra camperdownii (plant)

    elm: Major species: glabra), with smoother bark; and Camperdown elm (U. glabra camperdownii), a variety of Wych elm also known as umbrella elm because of its drooping branches. The fast-growing Siberian elm (U. pumila), a brittle-twigged weak-wooded tree, is sometimes planted for quick shade and for windbreaks.

  • Ulmus parvifolia (plant)

    elm: Major species: …species planted as ornamentals include Chinese elm (U. parvifolia), a small-leaved species with interesting mottled bark; English elm (U. procera), with a compact crown and deeply fissured bark; Wych elm (U. glabra), with smoother bark; and Camperdown elm (U. glabra camperdownii), a variety of Wych elm also known as umbrella…

  • Ulmus procera (tree)

    elm: Major species: …species with interesting mottled bark; English elm (U. procera), with a compact crown and deeply fissured bark; Wych elm (U. glabra), with smoother bark; and Camperdown elm (U. glabra camperdownii), a variety of Wych elm also known as umbrella elm because of its drooping branches. The fast-growing Siberian elm (U.…

  • Ulmus pumila (tree)

    elm: Major species: The fast-growing Siberian elm (U. pumila), a brittle-twigged weak-wooded tree, is sometimes planted for quick shade and for windbreaks.

  • Ulmus rubra (plant)

    Slippery elm, Large-leaved elm (Ulmus rubra or U. fulva) of eastern North America that has hard wood and fragrant inner bark. A gluelike substance in the inner bark has long been steeped in water as a remedy for throat ailments, powdered for use in poultices, and chewed as a thirst quencher, among

  • Ulmus thomasii (plant)

    elm: Major species: Rock, or cork, elm (U. thomasii) has hard wood and twigs that often develop corky ridges.

  • ulna (anatomy)

    Ulna, inner of two bones of the forearm when viewed with the palm facing forward. (The other, shorter bone of the forearm is the radius.) The upper end of the ulna presents a large C-shaped notch—the semilunar, or trochlear, notch—which articulates with the trochlea of the humerus (upper arm bone)

  • ulnar artery (anatomy)

    human cardiovascular system: The aorta and its principal branches: …terminal branches, the radial and ulnar arteries, the radial passing downward on the distal (thumb) side of the forearm, the ulnar on the medial side. Interconnections (anastomoses) between the two, with branches at the level of the palm, supply the hand and wrist.

  • ulnar nerve (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Brachial plexus: The ulnar nerve serves two flexor muscles and a variety of small muscles of the wrist and hand.

  • ulnar vein (anatomy)

    human cardiovascular system: Superior vena cava and its tributaries: …hand and wrist, and the ulnar veins, both veins following the course of the associated artery. The radial and ulnar veins converge at the elbow to form the brachial vein; this, in turn, unites with the basilic vein at the level of the shoulder to produce the axillary vein. At…

  • uloborid spider (arachnid)

    spider: Annotated classification: Family Uloboridae About 260 species worldwide. Cribellum; lack poison glands; 3 tarsal claws; eyes in 3 rows; anal tubercle large; make orb webs; Hyptiotes are called triangle spiders. Family Scytodidae (spitting spiders) 160 species mostly in tropical and subtropical regions. 6 eyes arranged in 3

  • Uloboridae (arachnid)

    spider: Annotated classification: Family Uloboridae About 260 species worldwide. Cribellum; lack poison glands; 3 tarsal claws; eyes in 3 rows; anal tubercle large; make orb webs; Hyptiotes are called triangle spiders. Family Scytodidae (spitting spiders) 160 species mostly in tropical and subtropical regions. 6 eyes arranged in 3

  • Ulodidae (insect family)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Ulodidae Found mainly in New Zealand and Australia; example genera Meryx, Brouniphylax, and Syrphetodes. Family Zopheridae Few species, mostly in America. There are many different opinions

  • Ulothrix (green algae)

    Ulothrix, genus of filamentous green algae (family Ulotrichaceae) found in marine and fresh waters. Each cell contains a distinct nucleus, a central vacuole, and a large thin chloroplast with at least one pyrenoid. The specialized cell for attachment is called the holdfast, and the filaments are

  • Ulozheniye of 1649 (Russian history)

    Boris Ivanovich Morozov: …in the formulation of the ulozheniye (code of laws) of 1649, which granted a number of rights to the gentry and equalized taxation on the townspeople. However, it also formally tied serfs to the estates on which they resided.

  • Ulpia Pautalia (Bulgaria)

    Kyustendil, town, southwestern Bulgaria. It lies on the margin of a small alluvial basin in the Struma River valley at the foot of the Osogov Mountains. It was known in Roman times as Pautalia, or Ulpia Pautalia. Located on the site of a Thracian fortified settlement, it became an important town

  • Ulpian (Roman jurist)

    Ulpian, Roman jurist and imperial official whose writings supplied one-third of the total content of the Byzantine emperor Justinian I’s monumental Digest, or Pandects (completed 533). He was a subordinate to Papinian when that older jurist was praetorian prefect (chief adviser to the emperor and

  • Ulpius Traianus, Marcus (Roman emperor)

    Trajan, Roman emperor (98–117 ce) who sought to extend the boundaries of the empire to the east (notably in Dacia, Arabia, Armenia, and Mesopotamia), undertook a vast building program, and enlarged social welfare. Marcus Ulpius Traianus was born in the Roman province of Baetica (the area roughly

  • Ulric, Saint (German bishop)

    Saint Ulrich, ; canonized 993; feast day July 4), bishop and patron saint of Augsburg, the first person known to have been canonized by a pope. Of noble birth, he studied at the monastic school of Sankt Gallen (St. Gall), Switz., and was then trained by his uncle Bishop Adalbero of Augsburg. He

  • Ulrich (Hungarian count)

    Ladislas V: …the feud between his guardian Ulrich, count of Cilli, and the Hunyadi family of Hungary.

  • Ulrich (duke of Württemberg)

    Ulrich, duke of Württemberg (1498–1519, 1534–50), a prominent figure in the German religious Reformation. A grandson of Ulrich V, count of Württemberg, he succeeded his kinsman Eberhard II as duke of Württemberg in 1498, being declared of age in 1503. He obtained territories from the Palatinate

  • Ulrich von Hutten (German knight)

    Ulrich von Hutten, Franconian knight and humanist, famed as a German patriot, satirist, and supporter of Martin Luther’s cause. His restless, adventurous life, reflecting the turbulent Reformation period, was occupied with public and private quarrels, pursued with both pen and sword. As a supporter

  • Ulrich, Lars (American musician)

    Metallica: ), drummer Lars Ulrich (b. December 26, 1963, Gentofte, Denmark), lead guitarist Kirk Hammett (b. November 18, 1962, San Francisco, California), and bassist Cliff Burton (b. February 10, 1962, San Francisco—d. September 27, 1986, near Stockholm, Sweden). Jason Newsted (b. March 4, 1963, Battle Creek, Michigan) took…

  • Ulrich, Saint (German bishop)

    Saint Ulrich, ; canonized 993; feast day July 4), bishop and patron saint of Augsburg, the first person known to have been canonized by a pope. Of noble birth, he studied at the monastic school of Sankt Gallen (St. Gall), Switz., and was then trained by his uncle Bishop Adalbero of Augsburg. He

  • Ulrika Eleonora (queen of Sweden)

    Ulrika Eleonora, Swedish queen whose short reign (1718–20) led to Sweden’s Age of Freedom—a 52-year decline of absolutism in favour of parliamentary government. Ulrika Eleonora was a sister of the unmarried king Charles XII; after the death of her elder sister Hedvig Sofia in 1708, she became heir

  • Ulsan (South Korea)

    Ulsan, metropolitan city, southeastern South Korea. Ulsan has the status of a metropolitan city under the direct control of the central government, with administrative status equal to that of a province. At the eastern end of the T’aebaek Mountains, facing the East Sea (Sea of Japan), on Ulsan Bay,

  • Ulster (county, New York, United States)

    Ulster, county, southeastern New York state, U.S., bordered by the Hudson River to the east and the Catskill Mountains to the northwest. The varied terrain is drained by the Wallkill and Neversink (west and east branches) rivers; lakes include Ashokan Reservoir. Much of the county is occupied by

  • Ulster (historic province, Ireland)

    Ulster, one of the ancient provinces of Ireland and subsequently the northernmost of Ireland’s four traditional provinces (the others being Leinster, Munster, and Connaught [Connacht]). Because of the Ulster cycle of Irish literature, which recounts the exploits of Cú Chulainn and many other Ulster

  • Ulster Conservatives and Unionists–New Force (political organization, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Ulster Unionist Party: Policy and structure: …a joint ticket as “Ulster Conservatives and Unionists–New Force” (UCUNF).

  • Ulster Covenant (British-Irish history [1912])

    Ireland: The 20th-century crisis: Thousands of Ulstermen signed the Solemn League and Covenant to resist Home Rule (1912), and in January 1913 the Ulster unionists established a paramilitary army, the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), to coordinate armed resistance. In September 1913 Carson announced that a provisional government of Ulster would be established in the…

  • Ulster cycle (Irish Gaelic literature)

    Ulster cycle, in ancient Irish literature, a group of legends and tales dealing with the heroic age of the Ulaids, a people of northeast Ireland from whom the modern name Ulster derives. The stories, set in the 1st century bc, were recorded from oral tradition between the 8th and 11th century and

  • Ulster Defence Association (Irish paramilitary group)

    Ulster Defence Association (UDA), loyalist organization founded in Northern Ireland in 1971 to coordinate the efforts of local Protestant vigilante groups in the sectarian conflict in the province. Originally based in the Shankill Road area of Belfast, the UDA was responsible for political murders

  • Ulster Defence Regiment (Northern Ireland police)

    the Troubles: Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), and Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR; from 1992 called the Royal Irish Regiment), and their avowed purpose was to play a peacekeeping role, most prominently between the nationalist Irish Republican Army (IRA), which viewed the conflict as a guerrilla war for national independence, and the unionist paramilitary…

  • Ulster Democratic Party (political party, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Ulster Defence Association: …changed its name to the Ulster Democratic Party (UDP). Led by Gary McMichael, son of a murdered UDA man, the UDP won enough electoral support to participate in the multiparty peace talks that led to the Good Friday Agreement (April 1998), but it did not secure any seats in subsequent…

  • Ulster Democratic Unionist Party (political party, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), unionist political party in Northern Ireland. The DUP was cofounded by Ian Paisley, who led it from 1971 to 2008. The party traditionally competes for votes among Northern Ireland’s unionist Protestant community with the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP). Founded in 1971

  • Ulster Folk and Transport Museum (museum, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Northern Ireland: Cultural institutions: The Ulster Folk and Transport Museum in Cultra provides a particularly interesting link with the peasant origins of Northern Ireland and includes an open-air folk museum.

  • Ulster Freedom Fighters (Irish paramilitary group)

    Ulster Defence Association (UDA), loyalist organization founded in Northern Ireland in 1971 to coordinate the efforts of local Protestant vigilante groups in the sectarian conflict in the province. Originally based in the Shankill Road area of Belfast, the UDA was responsible for political murders

  • Ulster Loyalist Democratic Party (political party, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Ulster Defence Association: …changed its name to the Ulster Democratic Party (UDP). Led by Gary McMichael, son of a murdered UDA man, the UDP won enough electoral support to participate in the multiparty peace talks that led to the Good Friday Agreement (April 1998), but it did not secure any seats in subsequent…

  • Ulster Office (government organization, Ireland)

    heraldry: Ireland: …Office became known as the Genealogical Office. A civil servant was then appointed as Chief Herald of Ireland. The office of Ulster King of Arms has now been united with that of Norroy King of Arms in the College of Arms in London. The Irish Herald undertakes the duties formerly…

  • Ulster Unionist Party (political party, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), oldest and traditionally most successful unionist political party in Northern Ireland, though its influence waned dramatically after the Good Friday Agreement (1998). It was the party of government in the province from 1921 to 1972. The UUP had strong links with the

  • Ulster Volunteer Force (Irish military force [1913])

    Ireland: The 20th-century crisis: …established a paramilitary army, the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), to coordinate armed resistance. In September 1913 Carson announced that a provisional government of Ulster would be established in the event of Home Rule’s coming into effect. After at first seeking to reject Home Rule for all of Ireland, the unionists…

  • Ulster Volunteer Force (Northern Ireland military organization [1966])

    Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), Protestant paramilitary organization founded in Northern Ireland in 1966. Its name was taken from a Protestant force organized in 1912 to fight against Irish Home Rule. Augustus (Gusty) Spence was the group’s best-known leader. The UVF was affiliated with the

  • Ulster, Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of (English noble)

    Edmund Mortimer, 5th earl of March, friend of the Lancastrian king Henry V and an unwilling royal claimant advanced by rebel barons. Edmund was the great-grandson of Lionel, duke of Clarence, the second surviving son of Edward III, and was considered by some to be the heir presumptive of the

  • Ulster, Hugh de Lacy, earl of (Anglo-Norman lord)

    Hugh de Lacy, earl of Ulster, one of the most powerful Anglo-Norman lords in Ulster (in Ireland) in the first half of the 13th century. He was the younger son of Hugh de Lacy, 1st lord of Meath. For a time he was coadjutor of John de Courci in Leinster and Munster, but after 1200 the rivalry

  • Ulster, Lionel of Antwerp, Earl of (English noble)

    Lionel of Antwerp, duke of Clarence, second surviving son of King Edward III of England and ancestor of Edward IV. Before he was four years of age Lionel was betrothed to Elizabeth (d. 1363), daughter and heiress of William de Burgh, earl of Ulster (d. 1333), and he entered nominally into

  • Ulster, Richard de Burgh, 2nd Earl of (Irish noble)

    Richard de Burgh, 2nd earl of Ulster, one of the most powerful Irish nobles of the late 13th and early 14th centuries, a member of a historic Anglo-Irish family, the Burghs, and son of Walter de Burgh (c. 1230–71), the 1st earl of Ulster (of the second creation). In 1286 he ravaged Connaught and

  • Ulster, University of (university, Londonderry, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Northern Ireland: Education: The University of Ulster was established in 1984 by the merger of the New University of Ulster (at Coleraine) and the Ulster Polytechnic. It has campuses at Coleraine, Jordanstown, Derry, and Belfast.

  • Ulster, Walter de Burgh, 1st earl of (Anglo-Irish noble)

    Richard de Burgh, 2nd earl of Ulster: 1230–71), the 1st earl of Ulster (of the second creation).

  • Ulster-American Folk Park (outdoor museum, Omagh, Northern Ireland)

    Omagh: The Ulster American Folk Park north of Omagh is an outdoor display site depicting tools, buildings, and conveyances used by Ulster’s 18th- and 19th-century Roman Catholic and Protestant emigrants to the United States.

  • Ultem (chemical compound)

    major industrial polymers: Polyimides: …Torlon by Amoco Corporation) and polyetherimide (PEI; trademark Ultem); these two compounds combine the imide function with amide and ether groups, respectively.

  • Ultima (electronic game series)

    Richard Garriott: The Ultima series that followed established him as a major player in the computer-gaming industry, and in 1983 Garriott cofounded Origin Systems, Inc. Garriott’s in-game avatar, Lord British, ruled the kingdom of Britannia, and players engaged in quests to defeat a series of evils. With the…

  • Ultima IV: Quest of the Avatar (electronic game)

    Richard Garriott: With the debut of Ultima IV: Quest of the Avatar (1985), players were faced with ethical dilemmas as well as challenges of might and magic. Nonplayer characters (NPCs) could converse more realistically, and Britannia was now a fully realized world, with shifting winds and a predictable lunar cycle. In…

  • última niebla, La (work by Bombal)

    María Luisa Bombal: …niebla as the basis for The House of Mist (1947), an English-language novel that she considered an entirely new work. The House of Mist details an unloving marriage between Daniel, who clings to the memory of his first wife, and Helga, who takes a mysterious blind lover who may or…

  • última noche que pasé contigo, La (novel by Montero)

    Latin American literature: Post-boom writers: …noche que pasé contigo (1991; The Last Night I Spent with You) is Montero’s best-known novel. Its hilarious plot involves couples who meet during a Caribbean cruise. Chaviano’s El hombre la hembra y el hambre (1998; “Man, Woman, and Hunger”) is about a young woman in contemporary Cuba who works…

  • Ultima Online (electronic game)

    Richard Garriott: …Garriott and his team created Ultima Online, a pioneer in the burgeoning genre of online computer games. Three years later he started Destination Games, which later became part of NCsoft, the world’s largest online-game developer and publisher. In November 2007 he launched the multiplayer online computer game Tabula Rasa.

  • Ultima Thule (astronomy)

    New Horizons: …encounter another Kuiper belt object, 2014 MU69 (nicknamed “Ultima Thule”), on January 1, 2019.

  • ultima Thule (literature and geography)

    Ultima Thule, in literature, the furthest possible place in the world. Thule was the northernmost part of the habitable ancient world. (See Thule culture.) References to ultima Thule in modern literature appear in works by Edgar Allan Poe, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and the Australian writer Henry

  • Ultima Thule (work by Richardson)

    Australian literature: Nationalism and expansion: The last volume, Ultima Thule, graphically describes conditions in the goldfields and brings its character studies of the temperamentally opposite spouses Richard and Mary to a profoundly moving climax. Katharine Susannah Prichard’s realism in Working Bullocks (1926) and in Coonardoo (1929), her sympathetic portrait of an Aboriginal woman,…

  • ultimate analysis (coal processing)

    coal: Chemical content and properties: …form of “proximate” and “ultimate” analyses, whose analytical conditions are prescribed by organizations such as ASTM. A typical proximate analysis includes the moisture, ash, volatile matter, and fixed carbon contents. (Fixed carbon is the material, other than ash, that does not vaporize when heated in the absence of air.…

  • ultimate baselevel (Earth science)

    Sea level, position of the air-sea interface, to which all terrestrial elevations and submarine depths are referred. The sea level constantly changes at every locality with the changes in tides, atmospheric pressure, and wind conditions. Longer-term changes in sea level are influenced by Earth’s

  • ultimate cause (philosophy and behaviour)

    animal social behaviour: Proximate versus ultimate causation: …arises in animals) from its ultimate cause (that is, the evolutionary history and functional utility of the behaviour). Proximate causes include hereditary, developmental, structural, cognitive, psychological, and physiological aspects of behaviour. In other words, proximate causes are the mechanisms directly underlying the behaviour. For example, an animal separated from the…

  • Ultimate Good Luck, The (novel by Ford)

    Richard Ford: The Ultimate Good Luck (1981) presents an American in Mexico who is drawn reluctantly into violence and murder as he tries to get his girlfriend’s brother out of jail. Frank Bascombe, the protagonist of The Sportswriter (1986), is an alienated middle-aged sportswriter reflecting on his…

  • ultimate tensile stress (mechanics)

    metallurgy: Testing mechanical properties: …the sample, is called the ultimate tensile stress (UTS). The final length minus the initial length, divided by the initial length, is called the elongation. Yield stress, UTS, and elongation are the most commonly tabulated mechanical properties of metals.

  • Ultimate Warrior (American professional wrestler)

    James Brian Hellwig, (“Ultimate Warrior”), American professional wrestler (born June 16, 1959, Crawfordsville, Ind.—died April 8, 2014, Scottsdale, Ariz.), was billed as the “Ultimate Warrior,” one of the most popular and enduring characters in the history of the World Wrestling Federation (WWF;

  • ultime lettere di Jacopo Ortis, Le (work by Foscolo)

    Ugo Foscolo: …lettere di Jacopo Ortis (1802; The Last Letters of Jacopo Ortis, 1970) contains a bitter denunciation of that transaction and shows the author’s disgust with Italy’s social and political situation. Some critics consider this story the first modern Italian novel.

  • ultimi casi de Romagna, Gli (work by D’Azeglio)

    Massimo Taparelli, marquis d'Azeglio: His chief work, Gli ultimi casi de Romagna (1846; “The Last Chances for Romagna”), is a trenchant political critique of the papal government of Romagna; it demanded that its populace renounce local revolts and show confidence in the Piedmontese king of Sardinia, Charles Albert, who would head a…

  • Último adiós (poem by Rizal)

    José Rizal: …Fort Santiago, Rizal wrote “Último adiós” (“Last Farewell”), a masterpiece of 19th-century Spanish verse.

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