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  • Union Solidarity and Development Association (political party, Myanmar)

    Myanmar: Myanmar since 1988: …a new social organization, the Union Solidarity and Development Association (USDA), the aims of which paralleled those of the SLORC. By the early 21st century, more than one-fifth of the country’s population belonged to the organization. To guarantee its control of the economy in the event that it relinquished titular…

  • Union Solidarity and Development Party (political party, Myanmar)

    Myanmar: Myanmar since 1988: …a new social organization, the Union Solidarity and Development Association (USDA), the aims of which paralleled those of the SLORC. By the early 21st century, more than one-fifth of the country’s population belonged to the organization. To guarantee its control of the economy in the event that it relinquished titular…

  • Union Square (film by Savoca [2011])

    Mira Sorvino: Her later movies included Union Square (2011), Space Warriors (2013), Quitters (2015), and The Red Maple Leaf (2016). In addition, she acted in television shows, including Intruders (2014) and Falling Skies (2014–15). In 2018 Sorvino joined the cast of the spy series Condor, inspired by Sydney Pollack

  • Union Station (American band)

    Alison Krauss: …in collaboration with her band, Union Station—performed folk, gospel, country, pop, and rock songs in the unamplified bluegrass style and played a major role in the early 21st-century revival of interest in bluegrass music.

  • Union Station (building, Washington D.C., United States)

    Washington, D.C.: Northeast: Union Station (1907), the city’s magnificent train depot located on the southern edge of NoMa, was renovated, revitalized, and reopened during this time. In 1993 the old Post Office building (1914), which abuts Union Station on the west, became the home of the National Postal…

  • Union Station massacre (mass murder, Kansas City, Missouri, United States [1933])

    Pretty Boy Floyd: …of having participated in the Union Station massacre, in which three police officers, an FBI agent, and a prisoner were killed in Kansas City. Though Floyd denied involvement in the incident, authorities intensified efforts to capture him, and the following year he was gunned down by FBI agents who were…

  • Union Sulphur Company (American company)

    Herman Frasch: The Union Sulphur Company, of which he was president, became the world’s leading sulfur-mining firm.

  • Union Tank Car Company (American company)

    R. Buckminster Fuller: Life: Louis, Another, the Union Tank Car Company’s dome, was built in 1958 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and, at the time of its construction, was the largest clear-span structure in existence, 384 feet (117 metres) in diameter and 116 feet (35 metres) in height.

  • union territory (Indian government)

    India: Constitutional structure: …and dissolve any of the union territories, whose powers are more limited than those of the states. Although the states exercise either sole or joint control over a substantial range of issues, the constitution establishes a more dominant role for the union government.

  • Union Tunisienne de l’Industrie, du Commerce et de l’Artisanat (Tunisian organization)

    National Dialogue Quartet: …des Avocats de Tunisie), the Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts (Union Tunisienne de l’Industrie, du Commerce et de l’Artisinat; UTICA), and the Tunisian Human Rights League (La Ligue Tunisienne pour la Défense des Droits de l’Homme; LTDH)—that was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2015 for its efforts…

  • Union, Act of (United Kingdom [1801])

    Act of Union, (Jan. 1, 1801), legislative agreement uniting Great Britain (England and Scotland) and Ireland under the name of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The Irish Rebellion of 1798 brought the Irish question forcibly to the attention of the British Cabinet; and William Pitt

  • Union, Act of (England and Wales [1536])

    Wales: Union with England: In 1536 Henry VIII’s government enacted a measure that made important changes in the government of Wales. Whereas the Statute of Wales (1284) had annexed Wales to the crown of England, the new act declared the king’s wish to incorporate Wales within…

  • Union, Act of (Great Britain [1707])

    Act of Union, (May 1, 1707), treaty that effected the union of England and Scotland under the name of Great Britain. Since 1603 England and Scotland had been under the same monarchs. After revolutions in 1688–89 (see Glorious Revolution) and 1702–03, projects for a closer union miscarried, and in

  • Union, Act of (Iceland [1918])

    Iceland: Home rule and sovereignty (1904–44): On December 1, 1918, Iceland became a separate state under the Danish crown, with only foreign affairs remaining under Danish control. Either party, however, had the right to call for a review of the treaty, and if negotiations about its renewal proved fruitless at the end…

  • union, axiom of (set theory)

    set theory: Axioms for compounding sets: …in the table—axiom of pairing, axiom of union, and axiom of power set—are of this sort.

  • Union, Basis of (Canadian religious history)

    United Church of Canada: …unity, and by 1908 the Basis of Union was prepared. It stated the principles of doctrine, church government, the ministry, administration, and law that would apply to the new church. The Methodists and Congregationalists soon approved the basis and declared their readiness to unite. A strong minority among the Presbyterians,…

  • Union, Council of (Iraqi government)

    Iraq: Constitutional framework: …on the issue of the Council of Union, the structure, duties, and powers of which apparently will be left to later legislation. The constitution only notes that this body will include representatives of the regions and governorates, suggesting that it will likely take the form of an upper house.

  • Union, Decree of (Eastern Orthodoxy)

    Eastern Orthodoxy: Relations with the Western church: …signatures of approval on the Decree of Union, also known as the Union of Florence (July 6, 1439). The metropolitan of Ephesus, Mark Eugenicus, alone refused to sign. Upon their return to Constantinople, most other delegates also renounced their acceptance of the council and no significant change occurred in the…

  • union, divine

    Christianity: The union with God: Christian mystics claim that the soul may be lifted into a union with God so close and so complete that it is merged in the being of God and loses the sense of any separate existence. Jan van Ruysbroeck wrote that in…

  • Union, Edict of (France [1588])

    War of the Three Henrys: …impose; and he signed the Edict of Union (1588), in which he named Guise lieutenant general of the kingdom and declared that no heretic could succeed to the throne. Unable to endure the humiliation, Henry III that same winter had the duke and the cardinal of Guise assassinated and many…

  • Union, Formula of (Christianity)

    patristic literature: The Chalcedonian Fathers: …probably responsible for drafting the Formula of Union (433) that became the basis of the Chalcedonian Definition. Proclus was an outstanding pulpit orator, and several of his sermons as well as seven letters concerned with the controversy have been preserved; he worked indefatigably to reconcile the warring factions. Cassian prepared…

  • Union, Fort (historical fort, North Dakota, United States)

    Williston: …American Fur Company representatives at Fort Union, built in 1828 near the junction of the Yellowstone and Missouri rivers (about 25 miles [40 km] southwest of the city; now Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site). Originally called Little Muddy, the site was first settled in the 1870s by Robert…

  • Unión, La (El Salvador)

    La Unión, city, eastern El Salvador. It is located at the northern foot of Conchagua Volcano (about 4,100 feet [1,250 m]), on La Unión Bay, an inlet of the Gulf of Fonseca. The city’s economic activity centres on a tortoiseshell industry and beach resort facilities. The nearby port of Cutuco, once

  • union, trade (labour organization)

    Trade union, association of workers in a particular trade, industry, or company created for the purpose of securing improvements in pay, benefits, working conditions, or social and political status through collective bargaining. As an organized movement, trade unionism (also called organized

  • Union; or, A Treatise of the Consanguinity and Affinity Between Christ and His Church (work by Relly)

    James Relly: In his Union; or, A Treatise of the Consanguinity and Affinity Between Christ and His Church (1759), Relly presented scriptural texts supporting the view that universal salvation is assured. He profoundly influenced the English Methodist John Murray (1741–1815), who worked to spread Universalism in the United States.

  • Unionacea (mollusk)

    mussel: The largest family of freshwater mussels is the Unionidae, with about 750 species, the greatest number of which occur in the United States. Many unionid species also live in Southeast Asian waters. Several North American unionids are threatened by habitat degradation, damming, and the invasion of zebra mussels.

  • Unione Democratica di Centro (political party, Switzerland)

    Swiss People’s Party, conservative Swiss political party. The Swiss People’s Party (SVP) was founded in 1971 by the merger of the Farmers, Artisans, and Citizens’ Party—generally known as the Agrarian Party—with the Democratic Party. It has pursued conservative social and economic policies,

  • Unione Europea (European organization)

    European Union (EU), international organization comprising 27 European countries and governing common economic, social, and security policies. Originally confined to western Europe, the EU undertook a robust expansion into central and eastern Europe in the early 21st century. The EU’s members are

  • Unione Italiana del Lavoro (Italian labour organization)

    Italian Labour Union, Italian trade union federation with more than a million and a half members. The UIL was formed in 1950 in opposition to the communist-dominated Italian General Confederation of Labour, Italy’s largest trade union federation, and the Roman Catholic-supported Italian

  • Unione Siciliana (Sicilian fraternal organization)

    Frankie Yale: …its heyday (1918–28), of the Unione Siciliane, a Sicilian fraternal organization that by World War I had become a crime cartel operating in several U.S. cities and active in robbery, prostitution, labour-union extortion, and other rackets.

  • Unione Siciliane (Sicilian fraternal organization)

    Frankie Yale: …its heyday (1918–28), of the Unione Siciliane, a Sicilian fraternal organization that by World War I had become a crime cartel operating in several U.S. cities and active in robbery, prostitution, labour-union extortion, and other rackets.

  • Unionidae (mollusk family)

    conservation: Freshwater mussels and clams: …of the bivalve mollusk families Unionidae and Margaritiferidae. Of these, 21 have become extinct in the past century, and 70 percent are in danger of extinction. During this same period, engineers have extensively dammed and channeled North America’s rivers. The Tennessee River, for example, is dammed along its entire length…

  • unionism

    Organized labour, association and activities of workers in a trade or industry for the purpose of obtaining or assuring improvements in working conditions through their collective action. British trade unionism has a long and continuous history. Medieval guilds, which regulated craft production,

  • unionism, enterprise (Japanese society)

    Enterprise unionism, the organization of a single trade union within one plant or multiplant enterprise rather than within a craft or industry. It is especially prevalent in Japan, where nearly all Japanese unions, representing the vast majority of union membership, are of the enterprise type. A

  • Unionist (political party, Portugal)

    Portugal: The First Republic, 1910–26: …by António José de Almeida; Unionists (centre party), led by Manuel de Brito Camacho; and Democrats (the leftist core of the original party), led by Afonso Costa. A number of prominent republicans had no specific party. The whirligig of republican political life offered little improvement on the monarchist regime, and…

  • Unionist Party (political party, Ethiopia)

    eastern Africa: Eritrean nationalism: The Christians joined the Unionist Party, sponsored by the Ethiopian government, which simultaneously sought international support for regaining its coastal province. The Ethiopians were assisted by an international fact-finding commission that visited Eritrea in late 1948 and concluded that there was no national consciousness to nourish statehood and that…

  • Unionoida (bivalve order)

    bivalve: Annotated classification: Order Unionoida Large, equivalve, varying from round to elongate and with equally variable sculpture; shell of outer prismatic layer and inner layers of nacre; hinge schizodont; dimyarian; ctenidia eulamellibranch with either 1 or both demibranchs functioning as an incubatory marsupium; ovoviviparous; parasitically larviparous; freshwater; some cemented…

  • Unions (poetry by Corn)

    Alfred Corn: Corn’s 11th poetry collection, Unions, was published in 2014.

  • Unions, Union of (political group, Russia)

    Pavel Nikolayevich Milyukov: Political journalism: …was active in forming the Union of Unions, a broad alliance of professional associations, and subsequently the Constitutional Democratic, or Kadet, Party. As editor of the Kadet daily newspaper, Rech (“Speech”), and a member of the party’s Central Committee, he directed its tactics in Russia’s first nationwide election, which brought…

  • Uniontown (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Uniontown, city, seat (1784) of Fayette county, southwestern Pennsylvania, U.S. It lies along Redstone Creek, among the rugged foothills of the Allegheny Mountains, 45 miles (72 km) southeast of Pittsburgh. Settled in 1768 and laid out (1776) by Henry Beeson, a Quaker, it was first known as

  • Unionville (Illinois, United States)

    Streator, city, La Salle county, north-central Illinois, U.S. It lies on the Vermilion (locally Vermillion) River, about 90 miles (145 km) southwest of Chicago. The first permanent settlement in the area, established in the mid-19th century, was called Hardscrabble, for the difficult climb up from

  • Unionville (Illinois, United States)

    Collinsville, city, Madison and St. Clair counties, southwestern Illinois, U.S. It lies a few miles east of the Mississippi River, opposite St. Louis, Missouri. First settled in 1810 by John Cook of Virginia, the community was laid out in 1837 on bluffs above the river’s floodplain. The village was

  • Unionville (South Carolina, United States)

    Union, city, seat of Union county, northern South Carolina, U.S. It lies in hilly piedmont country near the Broad River, 68 miles (109 km) northwest of Columbia. Union was first settled in 1791 as Unionville around Union Church (1765), which was used by various denominations. During the American

  • Unionville (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Scranton, city, seat (1878) of Lackawanna county, northeastern Pennsylvania, U.S., in the Lackawanna River valley, on the western fringes of the Pocono Mountains. It is the centre of an urbanized industrial complex that includes Carbondale and Wilkes-Barre. The area was inhabited by

  • UNIP (political party, Zambia)

    Southern Africa: Malawi and Zambia: …Hastings Kamuzu Banda and the United National Independence Party (UNIP) under Kenneth Kaunda won the first universal suffrage elections in Nyasaland and Northern Rhodesia, respectively, and led them into independence as Malawi and Zambia.

  • uniparental disomy (genetics)

    genomic imprinting: Imprinting and fetal development: … (or Russell-Silver syndrome), a maternal uniparental disomy (both copies of a chromosome or partial chromosome are inherited from one parent), growth restriction is present. Similar effects are found in other cases of disordered imprinting. Preeclampsia, for example, in which disordered imprinting has been implicated, also demonstrates growth restriction in utero.…

  • unipolar neuron (anatomy)

    human nervous system: The peripheral nervous system: …making up these ganglia are unipolar. Shaped much like a golf ball on a tee, they have round or slightly oval cell bodies with concentrically located nuclei, and they give rise to a single fibre that undergoes a T-shaped bifurcation, one branch going to the periphery and the other entering…

  • uniprocessor (computing)
  • unique DNA (genetics)

    heredity: Repetitive DNA: …categories of repetitive DNA: (1) single copy DNA, which contains the structural genes (protein-coding sequences), (2) families of DNA, in which one gene somehow copies itself, and the repeats are located in small clusters (tandem repeats) or spread throughout the genome (dispersed repeats), and (3) satellite DNA, which contains short…

  • unique factorization theorem

    Fundamental theorem of arithmetic, Fundamental principle of number theory proved by Carl Friedrich Gauss in 1801. It states that any integer greater than 1 can be expressed as the product of prime numbers in only one

  • Unique Forms of Continuity in Space (work by Boccioni)

    Western sculpture: Avant-garde sculpture (1909–20): In “Unique Forms of Continuity in Space” and “Head + House + Light” (1911), he carried out his theories that the sculptor should model objects as they interact with their environment, thus revealing the dynamic essence of reality.

  • unique-headed bug (insect)

    Unique-headed bug, (family Enicocephalidae), any of about 130 species of bugs (order Heteroptera) that have an unusual elongated head that is constricted behind the eyes and also at the base. The unique-headed bug is found throughout the world and is about 4 mm (0.2 inch) long. These bugs are also

  • UNIR (political party, Togo)

    Faure Gnassingbé: Presidency: …formed a new party, the Union for the Republic (Union pour la République; UNIR). Many RPT members were part of the UNIR, and it replaced the RPT as the ruling party. The UNIR won a majority of National Assembly seats in the 2013 elections, and in the next year legislation…

  • unireme (ship)

    naval ship: Greece: The first galleys, called uniremes (Latin: remus, “oar”), mounted their oars in a single bank and were undecked or only partially decked. They were fast and graceful with high, curving stem and stern. In Homeric times some carried an embolon, a beak or ram, which became standard in succeeding…

  • Uniroyal Holdings, Inc. (company)

    B.F. Goodrich Company: …tire operations with those of Uniroyal to form the Uniroyal-Goodrich Tire Company. In the following year Goodrich sold off its remaining interest in Uniroyal-Goodrich, and in 1989 the venture was bought by French tire maker Michelin, which subsequently used BFGoodrich as a trademarked brand name of a line of tires.…

  • Uniroyal, Inc. (company)

    B.F. Goodrich Company: …tire operations with those of Uniroyal to form the Uniroyal-Goodrich Tire Company. In the following year Goodrich sold off its remaining interest in Uniroyal-Goodrich, and in 1989 the venture was bought by French tire maker Michelin, which subsequently used BFGoodrich as a trademarked brand name of a line of tires.…

  • Uniroyal-Goodrich Tire Company

    B.F. Goodrich Company: …of Uniroyal to form the Uniroyal-Goodrich Tire Company. In the following year Goodrich sold off its remaining interest in Uniroyal-Goodrich, and in 1989 the venture was bought by French tire maker Michelin, which subsequently used BFGoodrich as a trademarked brand name of a line of tires. Meanwhile, the BFGoodrich Company…

  • unisexual reproduction

    Parthenogenesis, a reproductive strategy that involves development of a female (rarely a male) gamete (sex cell) without fertilization. It occurs commonly among lower plants and invertebrate animals (particularly rotifers, aphids, ants, wasps, and bees) and rarely among higher vertebrates. An egg

  • unisexuality (biology)

    Unisexuality, in biology, the condition of an organism or species capable of producing only male or female gametes (sex cells) but never both. A unisexual organism of a bisexual species is one in which the male and female gonads are found in separate individuals. In plants this condition is often

  • UNISON (British labour union)

    UNISON, British labour union, an affiliate of the Trades Union Congress, the national organization of British trade unions. UNISON was created in 1993 through the merger of several unions, including the National Union of Public Employees (formed 1905) and the Confederation of Health Service

  • Unisoni, Accademia degli (Italian intellectual group)

    Barbara Strozzi: …subset of the Incogniti, the Accademia degli Unisoni (“Academy of the Like-Minded,” also a pun on the musical term unison), which did count musicians as members; Barbara presided over this group, performing as a singer (likely including performances of her own compositions) and suggesting topics of discussion. She was the…

  • Unisys Corporation (American company)

    Unisys Corporation, American technology consulting company that originated as a manufacturer of computer systems. The company was formed in 1986 from the merger of the Sperry Corporation and the Burroughs Corporation. The Sperry Corporation arose out of the merger of North American Aviation

  • unit (measurement)

    measurement system: …are the concepts of uniformity, units, and standards. Uniformity, the essence of any system of weights and measures, requires accurate, reliable standards of mass and length and agreed-on units. A unit is the name of a quantity, such as kilogram or pound. A standard is the physical embodiment of a…

  • Unit 731 (Japanese military unit [World War II])

    World War II: The horror of war in pictures: Unit 731 of the Imperial Japanese Army carried out horrific medical experiments on thousands of prisoners of war and civilians; men and women were subjected to chemical and biological agents and vivisected to survey the results.

  • unit banking

    money market: The unit banking system: This system has led inevitably to striking differences between money market arrangements in the United States and those of other countries. At times, some smaller banks almost inevitably find that the wholesale facilities of the money market cannot provide promptly the funds…

  • unit body (mechanics)

    automobile: Chassis: …this arrangement, called unit-body (or unibody) construction, the steel body shell is reinforced with braces that make it rigid enough to resist the forces that are applied to it. Separate frames or partial “stub” frames have been used for some cars to achieve better noise-isolation characteristics. The heavier-gauge steel present…

  • unit cell (crystallography)

    axis: …number of identical blocks, or unit cells. The intersecting edges of one of these unit cells are chosen as the crystallographic axes, and their lengths are called lattice constants. The relative lengths of these edges and the angles between them place the solid into one of the seven crystal systems.…

  • unit charge (physics)

    Sir John Sealy Townsend: …first direct measurement of the unit electrical charge (e).

  • unit construction

    Marcel Breuer: …of Walter Gropius in espousing unit construction—i.e., the combination of standardized units to form a technologically simple but functionally complex whole. In 1925, inspired by the design of bicycle handlebars, he invented the tubular metal chair; his original version is known as the Wassily chair.

  • unit cost (finance)

    accounting: Cost of goods sold: …last-in, first-out (LIFO), or (3) average cost. The LIFO method is widely used in the United States, where it is also an acceptable costing method for income tax purposes; companies in most other countries measure inventory cost and the cost of goods sold by some variant of the FIFO or…

  • unit electrical charge (physics)

    Sir John Sealy Townsend: …first direct measurement of the unit electrical charge (e).

  • unit heater

    construction: Environmental control: …commonly used element is the unit heater, in which an electric fan blows air through a coil heated by hot water, steam, electric resistance, or gas combustion and provides a directed supply of warm air where needed. Another system involves radiant heating using electric resistance coils backed by reflectors or…

  • unit idea (philosophy)

    historiography: Intellectual history: …on what he called “unit ideas,” such as the notion of a Great Chain of Being extending from God through the angels to humans down to the least-complicated life-forms. Lovejoy traced this idea from its classical roots through the 19th century in both philosophical and literary elaborations. Philosophical or…

  • unit load

    logistics: Packaging: …of warehouses, railcars, and trucks, Pallet loads are also called “unit loads” and are the most common way of handling packaged freight. Goods that are not packaged are often handled in bulk. Examples are iron ore, coal, and grains that move in trainload, truckload, and shipload lots. They are loaded,…

  • unit machinery (farm equipment)

    origins of agriculture: Unit machinery: After World War II, there was an increase in the use of self-propelled machines in which the motive power and the equipment for performing a particular task formed one unit. Though the grain combine is the most important of these single-unit machines, self-propelled…

  • unit matrix (mathematics)

    matrix: …everywhere else is called a unit matrix. It is denoted by I or In to show that its order is n. If B is any square matrix and I and O are the unit and zero matrices of the same order, it is always true that B + O =…

  • unit membrane (biology)

    virus: The lipoprotein envelope: …icosahedral symmetry are lipoprotein envelopes, unit membranes of two lipid layers interspersed with protein molecules (lipoprotein bilayer). These viral membranes are composed of phospholipids and neutral lipids (largely cholesterol) derived from cell membranes during the process known as budding. Virtually all proteins of the cell membrane, however, are replaced by…

  • Unit One (British modern art group)

    Henry Moore: Travel and further artistic influences: …artists who in 1933 formed Unit One in a deliberate attempt to make the indifferent English public aware of the international modern movement in art and architecture. The driving spirit behind Unit One was the painter Paul Nash, but the leading members were Barbara Hepworth and her painter husband, Ben…

  • unit operation (chemical engineering)

    chemical engineering: History: …led to the concept of unit operations. This was first enunciated by the American chemical engineer Arthur D. Little in 1915 and formed the basis for a classification of chemical engineering that dominated the subject for the next 40 years. The number of unit operations—the building blocks of a chemical…

  • unit operation (mining)

    mining: Unit operations: The largest open-pit operations can move almost one million tons of material (both ore and waste) per day. In smaller operations the rate may be only a couple of thousand tons per day. In most of these mines there are four unit operations:…

  • Unit Orchestra (musical instrument)

    Wurlitzer Family: …later famous as the “Mighty Wurlitzer” was developed.

  • unit process (chemical process)

    chemical engineering: History: …classified into certain groups, or unit processes (e.g., polymerizations, esterifications, and nitrations), having common characteristics. This classification into unit processes brought rationalization to the study of process engineering.

  • unit terminal (airports)

    airport: Unit terminals: The term unit terminal is used wherever an airport passenger terminal system comprises more than one terminal. Unit terminals may be made up of a number of terminals of similar design (e.g., Dallas–Fort Worth and Kansas City in the United States), terminals of…

  • unit train (freight transportation)

    Unit train, freight train composed of cars carrying a single type of commodity that are all bound for the same destination. By hauling only one kind of freight for one destination, a unit train does not need to switch cars at various intermediate junctions and so can make nonstop runs between two

  • unit trust (finance)

    Mutual fund, company that invests the funds of its subscribers in diversified securities and in return issues units representing shares in those holdings. It differs from the investment trust (q.v.), which issues shares in its own capital. In contrast to closed-end investment companies, which have

  • Unit, The (Israeli commando unit)

    Sayeret Matkal, elite commando unit of the Israeli Defense Force (IDF) founded in 1957 by IDF officer Avraham Arnan, who petitioned the IDF General Staff for a combat unit in enemy territory to conduct top secret intelligence-gathering missions. Since its founding, the unit has carried out numerous

  • UNITA (political organization, Angola)

    UNITA, Angolan political party that was originally founded to free the nation from Portuguese colonial rule. UNITA was organized in 1966 by elements formerly associated with the National Front for the Liberation of Angola (FNLA) and the Popular Union of Angola, the latter led by Jonas Savimbi, who

  • Unità Sanitarie Locali (Italian government)

    Italy: Health and welfare: …in 1978 and based on Local Medical Units (Unità Sanitarie Locali, USL; later renamed Aziende Sanitarie Locali, ASL). In 1992–99 a radical reorganization of the national health system was carried out. Key features of the new system were the rationalization of public expenditures and the improvement of patient care services.

  • UNITA-R (political movement, Angola)

    UNITA: …group calling itself UNITA-Renavado (UNITA-Renewal; UNITA-R) suspended him and became the self-declared leadership of the party. Yet another division occurred soon after, and from that point UNITA was split into three factions, with the government and the Southern African Development Community recognizing UNITA-R as the official representatives of UNITA. Despite…

  • UNITAF (peace-enforcement mission)

    UNOSOM: …peace-enforcement mission known as the Unified Task Force (UNITAF), to which 24 countries contributed some 37,000 troops. The task force’s mandate was to secure the environment to allow the provision of humanitarian relief. The more heavily armed military personnel of UNITAF had greater success than did UNOSOM I, managing to…

  • UNITAR (international organization)

    United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), United Nations organization established in 1965 to provide high-priority training and research projects to help facilitate the UN objectives of world peace and security and of economic and social progress. A Board of Trustees of up to 30

  • Unitarian

    Socinian: …the 17th century as “Unitarians” or “Polish Brethren.” They accepted Jesus as God’s revelation but still a mere man, divine by office rather than by nature; Socinians thus rejected the doctrine of the Trinity. One of the Socinians’ doctrines was that the soul dies with the body but the…

  • Unitarian Church (church, Quincy, Massachusetts, United States)

    Alexander Parris: …works outside Boston is the Unitarian Church at Quincy, called the Stone Temple (1828), a severe and impressive building that shelters the burial vaults of Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams.

  • Unitarian Universalist Association (American religious organization)

    Unitarian Universalist Association, religious organization in the United States formed in May 1961 by merger of the Universalist Church of America and the American Unitarian Association. The American Unitarian Association was founded in 1825 as the result of a gradual development of Unitarianism

  • Unitarianism (religion)

    Unitarianism and Universalism, liberal religious movements that have merged in the United States. In previous centuries they appealed for their views to Scripture interpreted by reason, but most contemporary Unitarians and Universalists base their religious beliefs on reason and experience.

  • unitario (Argentine history)

    Unitario, in early 19th-century Argentina, an advocate of strong central government. The porteños (people of the port city of Buenos Aires) were the chief advocates of centralism, which in effect meant control of the country by Buenos Aires, where the chief source of revenue, the customhouse, was

  • unitary field theory (physics)

    Unified field theory, in particle physics, an attempt to describe all fundamental forces and the relationships between elementary particles in terms of a single theoretical framework. In physics, forces can be described by fields that mediate interactions between separate objects. In the mid-19th

  • Unitary General Confederation of Labour (French labour union)

    General Confederation of Labour: …unions responded by forming the Unitary General Confederation of Labour (Confédération Générale du Travail Unitaire; CGTU), whose politics came to be dominated by Moscow. The CGTU rejoined the CGT in 1936 when communist parties and unions formed popular fronts with socialist organizations in joint opposition of fascism. By supporting the…

  • Unitary Socialist Party (political party, Italy)

    Italian Democratic Socialist Party: …July 1969 and formed the Unitary Socialist Party (PSU), whose disagreement with the PSI constituted a major stumbling block to forming governments in the late 1960s. The PSU took the name of Social Democrat again in the spring of 1970. It thereafter continued to add support to the Christian Democratic…

  • unitary state (government)

    Unitary state, a system of political organization in which most or all of the governing power resides in a centralized government, in contrast to a federal state. A brief treatment of the unitary state follows. For additional discussion, see Political system: Unitary nation-states. In a unitary

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