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  • phase polymorphism (biology)

    orthopteran: Hormones: …has both solitary and gregarious phases. Gregarious locusts outnumber solitary ones, migrate both as nymphs and adults, and travel in swarms. Swarming adults are tremendously destructive to crops. Typically, gregarious locusts have darker bodies and longer wings compared with solitary forms. Colour changes in adults are correlated with maturation of…

  • phase rule (physics)

    Phase rule, law relating variables of a system in thermodynamic equilibrium, deduced by the American physicist J. Willard Gibbs in his papers on thermodynamics (1875–78). Systems in thermodynamic equilibrium are generally considered to be isolated from their environment in some kind of closed c

  • phase separation (physics)

    industrial glass: Phase separation: On the scale of several atoms, the structure of multicomponent glasses usually is not as random as that shown in Figure 2. This is because the various components of a molten mixture may display liquid-liquid immiscibility during cooling; that is, the components may…

  • phase shift (physics)

    phase: …altered to another form, a phase change is said to have occurred.

  • phase speed (hydrology)

    wave: Physical characteristics of surface waves: …troughs and crests, called the phase speed, and the speed and direction of the transport of energy or information associated with the wave, termed the group velocity. For nondispersive long waves the two are equal, whereas for surface gravity waves in deep water the group velocity is only half the…

  • phase stability (nucleonics)

    particle accelerator: Linear proton accelerators: …device, but the principle of phase stability reduces to a manageable magnitude the need for precision in construction. It also makes possible an intense beam because protons can be accelerated in a stable manner even if they do not cross the gaps at exactly the intended times. The principle is…

  • phase transition (physics)

    phase: …altered to another form, a phase change is said to have occurred.

  • phase transition (physics)

    Kenneth Geddes Wilson: …did his prizewinning work on phase transitions while at Cornell. Second-order phase transitions of matter take place at characteristic temperatures (or pressures), but unlike first-order transitions they occur throughout the entire volume of a material as soon as that temperature (called the critical point) is reached. One example of such…

  • phase velocity (physics)

    radiation: Dispersion: …referred to, however, is the phase velocity or the velocity with which the sine-wave peaks are propagated. The propagation velocity of an actual signal or the group velocity is always less than the speed of light in vacuum. Therefore, relativity theory is not violated. An example is shown in Figure…

  • phase-contrast microscope

    microscope: Phase-contrast microscopes: Many biological objects of interest consist of cell structures such as nuclei that are almost transparent; they transmit as much light as the mounting medium that surrounds them does. Because there is no colour or transmission contrast in such an object, it is…

  • Phase—Mother Earth (work by Sekine Nobuo)

    Lee Ufan: …Japanese artist, Sekine Nobuo, created Phase—Mother Earth (1968) in a park in Kōbe. This conceptual work, consisting of a large hole dug in the ground with a cylinder of earth of corresponding size and shape next to it, would become known as a signature of the Mono-ha group. It drew…

  • phase-shift keying (communications)

    telecommunication: Phase-shift keying: When phase is the parameter altered by the information signal, the method is called phase-shift keying (PSK). In the simplest form of PSK a single radio frequency carrier is sent with a fixed phase to represent a 0 and with a 180° phase…

  • phased array (radar)

    radar: Antennas: ) This is called a phased-array antenna, the basic principle of which is shown in part C of the figure.

  • Phaseolus (bean plant)

    bean: The genera Phaseolus and Vigna have several species each of well-known beans, though a number of economically important species can be found in various genera throughout the family. Rich in protein and providing moderate amounts of iron, thiamin, and riboflavin, beans are used worldwide for cooking in…

  • Phaseolus aureus (vegetable)

    bean: The mung bean, or green gram (V. radiata), is native to India, where the small pods and seeds are eaten, as are the sprouts. Azuki (or adzuki) beans (V. angularis) are popular in Japan.

  • Phaseolus coccineus (vegetable)

    bean: The scarlet runner bean (P. coccineus) is native to tropical America. Naturally a perennial, it is grown to a small extent in temperate climates as an annual. It is a vigorous climbing plant with showy racemes of scarlet flowers, large, coarse pods, and large, coloured seeds.…

  • Phaseolus limensis (plant, Phaseolus limensis)

    Lima bean, (Phaseolus lunatus), any of a variety of legumes(family Fabaceae) widely cultivated for their edible seeds. Of Central American origin, the lima bean is of commercial importance in few countries outside the Americas. There is a wide range of pod size and shape and of seed size, shape,

  • Phaseolus lunatus (vegetable)

    bean: Of Central American origin, the lima bean (P. lunatus), also known as the sieva bean, is of commercial importance in few countries outside the Americas. There is a wide range of pod size and shape and of seed size, shape, thickness, and colour in both bush and climbing forms. Pods…

  • Phaseolus vulgaris (vegetable)

    Green bean, widely cultivated, edible-podded legume of the species Phaseolus vulgaris. See

  • Phasi, Isaac ben Jacob al- (Jewish scholar)

    Isaac ben Jacob Alfasi, Talmudic scholar who wrote a codification of the Talmud known as Sefer ha-Halakhot (“Book of Laws”), which ranks with the great codes of Maimonides and Karo. Alfasi lived most of his life in Fès (from which his surname was derived) and there wrote his digest of the Talmud,

  • Phasianellidae (gastropod family)

    gastropod: Classification: …(turban shells), and Phasianellidae (pheasant shells). Superfamily Neritacea Small, generally intertidal marine shells (Neritidae), with some freshwater dwellers, particularly in Indonesia and the Philippines (Neritidae), and 2 groups of land dwellers: 1 sparsely distributed in the Old World (Hydrocenidae) and 1 widely distributed in both Old and New

  • phasianid (bird family)

    Phasianidae, the pheasant family, a bird family (order Galliformes) that includes among its members the jungle fowl (from which the domestic chicken is descended), partridge, peacock, pheasant, and quail. Some classifications assign the turkey to Phasianidae, whereas several others place it in the

  • Phasianidae (bird family)

    Phasianidae, the pheasant family, a bird family (order Galliformes) that includes among its members the jungle fowl (from which the domestic chicken is descended), partridge, peacock, pheasant, and quail. Some classifications assign the turkey to Phasianidae, whereas several others place it in the

  • Phasianus colchicus (bird)

    pheasant: The common pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) has 20–30 races ranging across Asia. Birds naturalized elsewhere are mixtures of races, with the gray-rumped ringneck (or Chinese) strain usually dominating.

  • Phasianus versicolor (bird)

    pheasant: The green pheasant, or kiji (P. versicolor), of Japan, is mainly metallic green. It is sensitive to earth tremors not felt by humans and calls in concert when a quake impends.

  • phasic contraction (physiology)

    muscle: Twitch and tetanus responses: …by rapid, intense contractions called phasic contractions. If the ends of a frog sartorius muscle (at 0 °C) are fixed to prevent shortening, the tension increases for about 200 milliseconds and then begins to decrease, at first rather rapidly and then more slowly. More happens during this mechanical response to…

  • Phasis (ancient settlement, Georgia)

    Poti: …the ancient Greek colony of Phasis. The modern city developed in the 1880s, when an artificial harbour and a rail link were built. The city has a fishing fleet, a fish-processing works, and a dredger-building works. Manufactures include hydraulic and electrical equipment. Pop. (2014) 41,465; (2016 est.) 41,500.

  • Phasmatidae (insect)

    Walkingstick, (order Phasmida, or Phasmatodea), any of about 3,000 species of slow-moving insects that are green or brown in colour and bear a resemblance to twigs as a protective device. Some species also have sharp spines, an offensive odour, or the ability to force their blood, which contains

  • Phasmatodea (insect order)

    insect: Annotated classification: Order Phasmida (Phasmatoptera; stick and leaf insects) Often wingless; when winged, tegmina often shorter than wings; all legs similar, adapted for walking; mandibulate mouthparts; no tympanum; female ovipositor short, often concealed. Order Orthoptera (

  • Phasmatoptera (insect order)

    insect: Annotated classification: Order Phasmida (Phasmatoptera; stick and leaf insects) Often wingless; when winged, tegmina often shorter than wings; all legs similar, adapted for walking; mandibulate mouthparts; no tympanum; female ovipositor short, often concealed. Order Orthoptera (

  • phasmid (insect order)

    insect: Annotated classification: Order Phasmida (Phasmatoptera; stick and leaf insects) Often wingless; when winged, tegmina often shorter than wings; all legs similar, adapted for walking; mandibulate mouthparts; no tympanum; female ovipositor short, often concealed. Order Orthoptera (

  • Phasmida (insect order)

    insect: Annotated classification: Order Phasmida (Phasmatoptera; stick and leaf insects) Often wingless; when winged, tegmina often shorter than wings; all legs similar, adapted for walking; mandibulate mouthparts; no tympanum; female ovipositor short, often concealed. Order Orthoptera (

  • Phasmidohelea wagneri (insect)

    Biting midge, (family Ceratopogonidae), any member of a family of small, bloodsucking insects in the fly order, Diptera, that are often serious pests along seashores, rivers, and lakes and may attack in great numbers and cause extreme discomfort. The nickname no-see-ums is descriptive, for,

  • phason (physics)

    quasicrystal: Elastic properties: Known as phasons, these elastic deformations correspond to rearrangements of the relative atomic positions. Removal of a phason requires adjusting positions of all atoms within a row of atoms in a quasicrystalline structure. At low temperatures motion of atoms within the solid is difficult, and phason strain…

  • phasotron (physics)

    Synchrocyclotron, improved form of cyclotron, a device that accelerates subatomic particles to high energies (see

  • Phat Giao Hoa Hao (Vietnamese Buddhist religious movement)

    Hoa Hao, Vietnamese Buddhist religious movement that was formed in 1939 by the Buddhist reformer Huynh Phu So. The Hoa Hao, along with the syncretic religious group Cao Dai, was one of the first groups to initiate armed hostilities against the French and later the Japanese colonialists. Based in

  • Phat Song (Vietnamese philosopher)

    Huynh Phu So, Vietnamese philosopher, Buddhist reformer, and founder (1939) of the religion Phat Giao Hoa Hao, more simply known as Hoa Hao (q.v.), and an anti-French, anticommunist military and political activist. Frail and sickly in his youth, he was educated by a Buddhist monk and at the age o

  • Phataginus tetradactyla (mammal)

    pangolin: African black-bellied pangolin (Manis longicaudata, also classified as Phataginus tetradactyla) and the Chinese pangolin (M. pentadactyla), are almost entirely arboreal; others, such as the giant ground pangolin (M. gigantea, also classified as Smutsia gigantea) of Africa, are terrestrial. All are nocturnal and able to swim…

  • Phatalung (Thailand)

    Phatthalung, town, southern Thailand, situated in a large fertile plain 45 miles (72 km) northeast of Songkhla. It lies on the Bangkok–Singapore rail line. The area is planted largely in rice and coconuts. Fishing is a major activity on Thale Lagoon. Pop. (2000)

  • Phatthalung (Thailand)

    Phatthalung, town, southern Thailand, situated in a large fertile plain 45 miles (72 km) northeast of Songkhla. It lies on the Bangkok–Singapore rail line. The area is planted largely in rice and coconuts. Fishing is a major activity on Thale Lagoon. Pop. (2000)

  • Phaulkon, Constantine (Greek adventurer)

    Constantine Phaulkon, Greek adventurer who became one of the most audacious and prominent figures in the history of 17th-century European relations with Southeast Asia. Phaulkon signed on an English merchant ship in Greece at 12 years of age and sailed to Thailand. He learned the Thai language

  • Phaulkon-Tachard conspiracy (Thai history)

    Phaulkon-Tachard conspiracy, (1685–88), in Thai history, an unsuccessful attempt to establish French control over Siam (Thailand). Two main conspirators in this attempt were Constantine Phaulkon, a high-level royal adviser to Siam’s King Narai, and Gui Tachard, a French Jesuit missionary. A Greek

  • Phayao (Thailand)

    Phayao, town, northern Thailand, lying in a mountainous region on the watershed between the Mekong and Chao Phraya river systems. Phayao is located on a scenic mountain lake that empties into the Ing River, a Mekong tributary. The town was the capital of a principality in the 13th and 14th

  • Phayre, Sir Arthur Purves (British colonial official)

    Sir Arthur Purves Phayre, British commissioner in Burma (Myanmar), who made a novel attempt to spread European education through traditional Burmese institutions. Educated at the Shrewsbury School in England, Phayre joined the army in India in 1828. He was an army officer in Moulmein in the

  • Phazania (region, Libya)

    Fezzan, historic region of northern Africa and until 1963 one of the three provinces of the United Kingdom of Libya. It is part of the Sahara (desert) and now constitutes the southwestern sector of Libya. Fezzan’s climate is extreme, with very hot summers and cool winters. Rainfall is scarce and i

  • PHB (chemical compound)

    major industrial polymers: Degradable polyesters: acid (PGA), polylactic acid (PLA), poly-2-hydroxy butyrate (PHB), and polycaprolactone (PCL), as well as their copolymers:

  • pheasant (bird)

    Pheasant, any bird of the family Phasianidae (order Galliformes) that is larger than a quail or partridge. Most pheasants—some 50 species in about 16 genera of the subfamily Phasianinae—are long-tailed birds of open woodlands and fields, where they feed in small flocks. All have hoarse calls and a

  • pheasant coucal (bird)

    Swamp pheasant, bird species of the cuckoo family (Cuculidae). See

  • pheasant pigeon (bird)

    pigeon: …subfamily Columbinae include the chicken-sized pheasant pigeon (Otidiphaps nobilis) of New Guinea. In the New World the white-winged doves and the mourning dove (Zenaida) are popular game birds; Central and South America support the terrestrial ground doves (Metriopelia) and quail doves (Geotrygon). The New World passenger pigeon is extinct.

  • pheasant shell (gastropod family)

    gastropod: Classification: …(turban shells), and Phasianellidae (pheasant shells). Superfamily Neritacea Small, generally intertidal marine shells (Neritidae), with some freshwater dwellers, particularly in Indonesia and the Philippines (Neritidae), and 2 groups of land dwellers: 1 sparsely distributed in the Old World (Hydrocenidae) and 1 widely distributed in both Old and New

  • pheasant’s-eye (plant)

    Pheasant’s-eye, (species Adonis annua), annual herbaceous plant of the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae) native to Eurasia and grown in garden borders and for cut flowers. It is 20 to 40 cm (8 to 16 inches) tall and is noted for its small, red flowers with prominent dark

  • Pheasant, Feast of the (French festival)

    Philip III: …the more-elaborate banquets, notably the Feast of the Pheasant in 1454, at Lille, were open to the public, who could admire the endless array of model ships and towers, pies with people inside them, peacocks, swans, and eagles (mock or real), and other paraphernalia that accompanied the various dishes. Other…

  • pheasant-tailed jacana (bird)

    jacana: …eastern Australian coast; and the pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus), of India and the Philippines, a handsome black, yellow, and white bird that acquires long tail feathers in breeding season.

  • Phebus, Gaston (French count)

    Gaston III, count of Foix from 1343, who made Foix one of the most influential and powerful domains in France. A handsome man (hence the surname Phoebus), his court in southern France was famous for its luxury. His passion for hunting led him to write the treatise Livre de la chasse (“Book of the

  • Phèdre (play by Racine)

    Phèdre, classical tragedy in five acts by Jean Racine, performed and published in 1677. Racine’s work is based on the play Hippolytus by the Greek playwright Euripides and addresses the same story, but it changes the focus from Hippolytus (Hippolyte), the stepson, to Phaedra (Phèdre), the

  • Phèdre et Hippolyte (painting by Guérin)

    Pierre-Narcisse, Baron Guérin: Phèdre et Hippolyte (1802) and Andromaque et Pyrrhus (1810) are melodramatic, highly calculated pieces. His best painting, the only one to show feeling for colour and atmosphere, is Enée racontant à Didon les malheurs de la ville de Troie (1817). He was director of the…

  • Pheidias (Greek sculptor)

    Phidias, Athenian sculptor, the artistic director of the construction of the Parthenon, who created its most important religious images and supervised and probably designed its overall sculptural decoration. It is said of Phidias that he alone had seen the exact image of the gods and that he

  • Pheidippides (Greek soldier)

    Battle of Marathon: …relates that a trained runner, Pheidippides (also spelled Phidippides, or Philippides), was sent from Athens to Sparta before the battle in order to request assistance from the Spartans; he is said to have covered about 150 miles (240 km) in about two days.

  • Pheidole (ant genus)

    caste: The subcastes of Pheidole ants are among the best characterized. These ants are capable of producing minor and major subcastes; minors perform foraging duties, while majors, which have large bodies and heads, are involved primarily in defense. A reduction in the population of minors causes majors to take…

  • Pheidon (king of Argos)

    Pheidon, king of Argos, Argolis, who made his city an important power in the Peloponnese, Greece. The ancient Greek historian Herodotus implied that Pheidon flourished about 600 bc, but at this time Corinth and Sicyon, not the Argives, were in the ascendance. Although some later writers assigned

  • Phek (India)

    Phek, town, south-central Nagaland state, northeastern India. It lies in the Naga Hills, about 75 miles (121 km) by winding mountain roads east of Kohima. Phek is a remote rural town whose inhabitants practice shifting cultivation. Weaving is the important cottage industry. The people of the region

  • phellem (plant anatomy)

    Cork, the outer bark of an evergreen type of oak tree called the cork oak (species Quercus suber) that is native to the Mediterranean region. Cork consists of the irregularly shaped, thin-walled, wax-coated cells that make up the peeling bark of the birch and many other trees, but, in the r

  • Phellinaceae (plant family)

    Asterales: Other families: …in the single genus of Phellinaceae, all of which are endemic to New Caledonia.

  • Phellodendron (plant)

    Cork tree, (genus Phellodendron), genus of several eastern Asian trees in the rue family (Rutaceae) usually having corklike bark. The Amur, or Japanese, cork tree (Phellodendron amurense) is useful as a lawn and shade tree and is tolerant of a wide range of growing conditions. Cork trees are

  • Phellodendron amurense (plant)

    cork tree: …or Japanese, cork tree (Phellodendron amurense) is useful as a lawn and shade tree and is tolerant of a wide range of growing conditions.

  • phellogen (plant anatomy)

    tissue: Plants: …the vascular cambium and the cork cambium. They produce secondary tissues from a ring of vascular cambium in stems and roots. Secondary phloem forms along the outer edge of the cambium ring, and secondary xylem (i.e., wood) forms along the inner edge of the cambium ring. The cork cambium produces…

  • phelonion (ecclesiastical garb)

    chasuble: …the equivalent vestment is the phelonion (phenolion), worn exclusively by priests.

  • Phelps Dodge & Co. (American company)

    William E. Dodge: ), American merchant, cofounder of Phelps, Dodge & Company, which was one of the largest mining companies in the United States for more than a century.

  • Phelps, Almira Hart Lincoln (American educator)

    Almira Hart Lincoln Phelps, 19th-century American educator and writer who strove to raise the academic standards of education for girls. Almira Hart was a younger sister of Emma Hart Willard. She was educated at home, in district schools, for a time by Emma, and in 1812 at an academy in Pittsfield,

  • Phelps, Edmund S. (American economist)

    Edmund S. Phelps, American economist, who was awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize for Economics for his analysis of intertemporal trade-offs in macroeconomic policy, especially with regard to inflation, wages, and unemployment. In 1959 Phelps earned a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University. He later

  • Phelps, Elizabeth Stuart (American author)

    Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward, popular 19th-century American author and feminist. Mary Gray Phelps was the daughter of a clergyman and of a popular woman writer. After the death of her mother in 1852, Phelps incorporated her mother’s name, Stuart, into her own. For several years she kept house for

  • Phelps, Elizabeth Stuart (American author)

    Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward, popular 19th-century American author and feminist. Mary Gray Phelps was the daughter of a clergyman and of a popular woman writer. After the death of her mother in 1852, Phelps incorporated her mother’s name, Stuart, into her own. For several years she kept house for

  • Phelps, Fred (American church leader)

    Fred Waldron Phelps, American church leader (born Nov. 13, 1929, Meridian, Miss.—died March 19, 2014, Topeka, Kan.), preached a message of hatred against homosexuals in his position as the fiery founder (1955) of the independent Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka. Phelps was widely reviled for

  • Phelps, Fred Waldron (American church leader)

    Fred Waldron Phelps, American church leader (born Nov. 13, 1929, Meridian, Miss.—died March 19, 2014, Topeka, Kan.), preached a message of hatred against homosexuals in his position as the fiery founder (1955) of the independent Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka. Phelps was widely reviled for

  • Phelps, Mary Gray (American author)

    Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward, popular 19th-century American author and feminist. Mary Gray Phelps was the daughter of a clergyman and of a popular woman writer. After the death of her mother in 1852, Phelps incorporated her mother’s name, Stuart, into her own. For several years she kept house for

  • Phelps, Michael (American swimmer)

    Michael Phelps, American swimmer, who was the most-decorated athlete in Olympic history with 28 medals, which included a record 23 gold. At the 2008 Games in Beijing, he became the first athlete to win eight gold medals at a single Olympics. Phelps was raised in a family of swimmers and joined the

  • Phelps, Michael Fred, II (American swimmer)

    Michael Phelps, American swimmer, who was the most-decorated athlete in Olympic history with 28 medals, which included a record 23 gold. At the 2008 Games in Beijing, he became the first athlete to win eight gold medals at a single Olympics. Phelps was raised in a family of swimmers and joined the

  • Phelps, Samuel (British actor and manager)

    Samuel Phelps, British actor and manager, one of the most famous actors of the 19th century. Early in life he worked in various newspaper offices and then, shortly after marrying (1826), accepted a theatrical engagement in the York circuit. He afterward appeared in southern English towns in

  • Phelps, William Lyon (American scholar)

    William Lyon Phelps, American scholar and critic who did much to popularize the teaching of contemporary literature. Phelps attended Yale University (B.A., 1887; Ph.D., 1891) and Harvard University (M.A., 1891), taught at Harvard for a year, and then returned to Yale, where he was for 41 years a

  • Phelsuma (reptile)
  • Pheme (classical mythology)

    Fama, in Greco-Roman mythology, the personification of popular rumour. Pheme was more a poetic personification than a deified abstraction, although there was an altar in her honour at Athens. The Greek poet Hesiod portrayed her as an evildoer, easily stirred up but impossible to quell. The Athenian

  • Phemius (mythological character)

    Homer: Homer as an oral poet: …such poets in some detail: Phemius, the court singer in the palace of Odysseus in Ithaca, and Demodocus, who lived in the town of the semi-mythical Phaeacians and sang both for the nobles in Alcinous’ palace and for the assembled public at the games held for Odysseus. On this occasion…

  • phenacetin (drug)

    acetaminophen: …major metabolite of acetanilid and phenacetin, which were once commonly used drugs, and is responsible for their analgesic (pain-relieving) effects. Acetaminophen relieves pain by raising the body’s pain threshold, and it reduces fever by its action on the temperature-regulating centre of the brain. The drug inhibits prostaglandin synthesis in the…

  • phenacite (mineral)

    Phenakite, rare mineral, beryllium silicate, Be2SiO4, used as a gemstone. Phenakite has long been known from the emerald and chrysoberyl mine on the Takovaya River, near Yekaterinburg (formerly Sverdlovsk), in the Urals region of Russia, where large crystals occur in mica schist. It also occurs in

  • Phenacodus (fossil mammal genus)

    Phenacodus, extinct genus of mammals known from fossils of the late Paleocene and early Eocene epochs of North America and Europe. Phenacodus is representative of early ungulates, or hoofed mammals. It had five toes and a digitigrade stance like that of a dog, with many specializations for running.

  • phenakistoscope (optical toy)

    animation: Early history: …Plateau in 1832, was the phenakistoscope, a spinning cardboard disk that created the illusion of movement when viewed in a mirror. In 1834 William George Horner invented the zoetrope, a rotating drum lined by a band of pictures that could be changed. The Frenchman Émile Reynaud in 1876 adapted the…

  • phenakite (mineral)

    Phenakite, rare mineral, beryllium silicate, Be2SiO4, used as a gemstone. Phenakite has long been known from the emerald and chrysoberyl mine on the Takovaya River, near Yekaterinburg (formerly Sverdlovsk), in the Urals region of Russia, where large crystals occur in mica schist. It also occurs in

  • Phenakospermum (plant genus)

    Strelitziaceae: …family includes three genera (Ravenala, Phenakospermum, and Strelitzia) and seven species.

  • phenazine (chemical compound)

    heterocyclic compound: Five- and six-membered rings with two or more heteroatoms: , cinnoline, quinazoline, and phenazine.

  • phenbenzamine (drug)

    antihistamine: H1 receptor antagonists: …antihistamines (an aniline derivative called Antergan) was discovered. Subsequently, compounds that were more potent, more specific, and less toxic were prepared, including the H1 receptor antagonists diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine, promethazine, and loratidine.

  • phencyclidine (drug)

    PCP, hallucinogenic drug with anesthetic properties, having the chemical name 1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine. PCP was first developed in 1956 by Parke Davis Laboratories of Detroit for use as an anesthetic in veterinary medicine, though it is no longer used in this capacity. Used for a brief time

  • phenelzine (drug)

    antidepressant: For instance, the MAOIs—chiefly isocarboxazid, phenelzine, and tranylcypromine—in general are used only after treatment with tricyclic drugs has proved unsatisfactory, because these drugs’ side effects are unpredictable and their complex interactions are incompletely understood. Fluoxetine often relieves cases of depression that have failed to yield to tricyclics or MAOIs.

  • phenelzine sulfate (drug)

    antidepressant: For instance, the MAOIs—chiefly isocarboxazid, phenelzine, and tranylcypromine—in general are used only after treatment with tricyclic drugs has proved unsatisfactory, because these drugs’ side effects are unpredictable and their complex interactions are incompletely understood. Fluoxetine often relieves cases of depression that have failed to yield to tricyclics or MAOIs.

  • phenetic taxonomy (biological classification)

    taxonomy: Ranks: Some biologists believe that “numerical taxonomy,” a system of quantifying characteristics of taxa and subjecting the results to multivariate analysis, may eventually produce quantitative measures of overall differences among groups and that agreement can be achieved so as to establish the maximal difference allowed each taxonomic level. Although such…

  • phenetics (biological classification)

    taxonomy: Ranks: Some biologists believe that “numerical taxonomy,” a system of quantifying characteristics of taxa and subjecting the results to multivariate analysis, may eventually produce quantitative measures of overall differences among groups and that agreement can be achieved so as to establish the maximal difference allowed each taxonomic level. Although such…

  • Phengaris arion (insect)

    blue butterfly: The large blue (Maculinea arion, or Phengaris arion) spends its larval and pupal stages in an ant nest, emerging in the spring as an adult.

  • Phengodes (insect genus)

    glowworm: …certain beetles of the genera Phengodes (North America) and Phrixothrix (South America), and (4) larvae of certain gnats (e.g., the cave-dwelling Arachnocampa of New Zealand and Platyura of the central Appalachians).

  • Phengodidae (insect family)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Phengodidae About 50 species in America; produce light. Superfamily Histeroidea Antennae geniculate (elbow-shaped) with last 3 segments club-shaped; wing with medio-cubital loop reduced; elytron truncate leaving 1 or 2 segments of abdomen exposed. Family Histeridae

  • Phenix City (Alabama, United States)

    Phenix City, city, Lee and Russell counties, seat (1935) of Russell county, eastern Alabama, U.S., about 25 miles (40 km) southeast of Opelika. The city is a port on the Chattahoochee River, opposite Columbus, Georgia. Incorporated in 1883 as Brownville, it was renamed in 1889 for the old Phoenix

  • Phenix City Story, The (film by Karlson [1955])

    Phil Karlson: Film noirs: …finest year for films, with The Phenix City Story, a two-fisted exposé of corruption in an Alabama town that was inspired by true events. The movie, which was shot on location, featured Richard Kiley as a crusading lawyer who seeks justice following his father’s murder. The Brothers Rico (1957), based…

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