• 0-9
  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g
  • h
  • i
  • j
  • k
  • l
  • m
  • n
  • o
  • p
  • q
  • r
  • s
  • t
  • u
  • v
  • w
  • x
  • y
  • z
  • pedophilic disorder (psychosexual disorder)

    Pedophilia, in conventional usage, a psychosexual disorder, generally affecting adults, characterized by sexual interest in prepubescent children or attempts to engage in sexual acts with prepubescent children. The term was used with that meaning in the psychiatric diagnostic literature prior to

  • Pedra Furada (archaeological site, Brazil)

    Pedra Furada, Controversial archaeological site, northeastern Brazil. It was thought to contain hearths and stone artifacts as old as 48,000 years, about 35,000 years earlier than the commonly accepted dates for the first human settlement of the Americas. Experts have concluded that the early

  • Pedrarias (Spanish colonial administrator)

    Pedro Arias Dávila, Spanish soldier and colonial administrator who led the first Spanish expedition to found permanent colonies on the American mainland. A soldier in his youth, Arias Dávila served with distinction in wars against the Moors in Granada in the 1490s and in North Africa in 1508–11. It

  • Pedrell, Felipe (Spanish composer)

    Felipe Pedrell, Spanish composer and musical scholar who devoted his life to the development of a Spanish school of music founded on both national folk songs and Spanish masterpieces of the past. When Pedrell was a choirboy, his imagination was first fired by contact with early Spanish church

  • Pedrera, La (building, Barcelona, Spain)

    Antoni Gaudí: Life: …notably the facade; and the Casa Milá (1905–10), the several floors of which are structured like clusters of tile lily pads with steel-beam veins. As was so often his practice, he designed the two buildings, in their shapes and surfaces, as metaphors of the mountainous and maritime character of Catalonia.

  • pedrero (cannon)

    military technology: Terminology and classification: …category of ordnance was the pedreros, stone-throwing guns with barrels of as little as eight to 10 calibres that were used in siege and naval warfare.

  • pedro (card game)

    all fours: Cinch: Cinch, also known as pedro, is a variant of all fours that includes partnerships and bidding, two features that favour more-skillful players. This modern version of a 19th-century derivative of all fours is still popular in the southern United States.

  • Pedro Claver, San (Spanish missionary)

    St. Peter Claver, ; canonized 1888; feast day September 9), Jesuit missionary to South America who, in dedicating his life to the aid of African slaves, earned the title of “apostle of the Negroes.” Peter entered the Society of Jesus in 1602 and eight years later was sent to Cartagena, where he was

  • Pedro de Alcântara, Dom (emperor of Brazil)

    Pedro II, second and last emperor of Brazil (1831–89), whose benevolent and popular reign lasted nearly 50 years. On April 7, 1831, when he was five years old, his father, Pedro I (Pedro, or Peter, IV of Portugal), abdicated in his favour; and for nine years Brazil was governed by a turbulent

  • Pedro de Alcántara, San (Spanish mystic)

    Saint Peter of Alcántara, ; canonized 1669; feast day October 19), Franciscan mystic who founded an austere form of Franciscan life known as the Alcantarines or Discalced (i.e., barefooted) Friars Minor. He is the patron saint of Brazil. Of noble birth, he entered the Franciscan order at Alcántara

  • Pedro De Covilham (Portuguese explorer)

    Pêro da Covilhã, early Portuguese explorer of Africa, who established relations between Portugal and Ethiopia. As a boy, Pêro served the duke of Medina-Sidonia in Sevilla (Seville) for six or seven years, returning to Portugal with the duke’s brother late in 1474 or early in 1475, when he passed

  • Pedro de Toledo (Spanish viceroy)

    Italy: The Kingdom of Naples: Pedro de Toledo (viceroy 1532–53) reorganized the Kingdom of Naples and placed it firmly within the Spanish monarchical orbit dominated by Castile. Within the kingdom, he oversaw the eradication of the pro-French barons and attempted to install centralized, absolutist policies. Within the city, he developed…

  • Pedro el Católico (king of Aragon)

    Peter II, king of Aragon from 1196 to 1213, the eldest son and successor of Alfonso II. Peter married (1204) Mary, lady of Montpellier, and thus greatly extended Aragonese power in southern France. Despite the violent objections of his subjects, he had himself crowned by Pope Innocent III in Rome a

  • Pedro el Ceremonioso (king of Aragon)

    Peter IV, king of Aragon from January 1336, son of Alfonso IV. Peter was the most cultivated of Spanish 14th-century kings but was also an inveterate political intriguer whose ability to dissemble was notorious. Through his voluminous correspondence, the workings of his mind are far better known

  • Pedro el Cruel (king of Aragon)

    Peter IV, king of Aragon from January 1336, son of Alfonso IV. Peter was the most cultivated of Spanish 14th-century kings but was also an inveterate political intriguer whose ability to dissemble was notorious. Through his voluminous correspondence, the workings of his mind are far better known

  • Pedro el Cruel (king of Castile and Leon)

    Peter, celebrated king of Castile and Leon from 1350 to 1369, charged by his contemporary enemies with monstrous cruelty but viewed by later writers as a strong executor of justice. He succeeded his father, Alfonso XI, at the age of 15, and John II of France saw the chance to force Castile into a

  • Pedro el del Puñal (king of Aragon)

    Peter IV, king of Aragon from January 1336, son of Alfonso IV. Peter was the most cultivated of Spanish 14th-century kings but was also an inveterate political intriguer whose ability to dissemble was notorious. Through his voluminous correspondence, the workings of his mind are far better known

  • Pedro el Grande (king of Aragon and Sicily)

    Peter III, king of Aragon from July 1276, on the death of his father, James I, and king of Sicily (as Peter I) from 1282. In 1262 he had married Constance, heiress of Manfred, the Hohenstaufen king of Sicily; and after the revolt of the Sicilians in 1282 he invaded the island and was proclaimed k

  • Pedro el Justiciero (king of Castile and Leon)

    Peter, celebrated king of Castile and Leon from 1350 to 1369, charged by his contemporary enemies with monstrous cruelty but viewed by later writers as a strong executor of justice. He succeeded his father, Alfonso XI, at the age of 15, and John II of France saw the chance to force Castile into a

  • Pedro Henríquez Ureña National University (university, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic)

    Dominican Republic: Education: The private Pedro Henríquez Ureña National University, located in Santo Domingo, was founded (1966) in part to counter the politicizing of the public university. It received support from the Roman Catholic church, prominent business leaders, and the national and U.S. governments. Apec University (1965) is also located…

  • Pedro Hispano (pope)

    John XXI, pope from 1276 to 1277, one of the most scholarly pontiffs in papal history. Educated at the University of Paris (c.. 1228–35), where he received his master’s degree c. 1240, John taught medicine at the new University of Siena, Italy. In 1272 Pope Gregory X, who made John his personal

  • Pedro I (emperor of Brazil)

    Pedro I, founder of the Brazilian empire and first emperor of Brazil, from Dec. 1, 1822, to April 7, 1831, also reckoned as King Pedro (Peter) IV of Portugal. Generally known as Dom Pedro, he was the son of King John VI of Portugal. When Napoleon conquered Portugal in 1807, Pedro accompanied the

  • Pedro II (emperor of Brazil)

    Pedro II, second and last emperor of Brazil (1831–89), whose benevolent and popular reign lasted nearly 50 years. On April 7, 1831, when he was five years old, his father, Pedro I (Pedro, or Peter, IV of Portugal), abdicated in his favour; and for nine years Brazil was governed by a turbulent

  • Pedro IV (emperor of Brazil)

    João Carlos de Saldanha, duke de Saldanha: After the accession of Pedro IV in 1826, Saldanha was responsible for the proclamation in Portugal of Pedro’s constitutional charter. He was created Count de Saldanha in 1827, but he emigrated to London in October of that year, when Pedro’s brother, Dom Miguel, became regent. After the regent was…

  • Pedro IV Agua Rosada Nsamu a Mvemba of Kibangu (king of Kongo)

    Kongo: Pedro IV Agua Rosada Nsamu a Mvemba of Kibangu (reigned 1696–1718) engineered an agreement that recognized the integrity of the territorial bases while rotating kingship among them. During these negotiations, the abandoned capital of Mbanza Kongo (renamed São Salvador in the late 16th century) was…

  • Pedro Juan Caballero (Paraguay)

    Pedro Juan Caballero, town, northeastern Paraguay, founded in 1899. It lies in the Amambay Mountains at 2,296 feet (700 m) above sea level, opposite Ponta Pora, Braz. Pedro Juan Caballero is the region’s largest town and principal trade centre. The hinterland is utilized primarily for cattle

  • Pedro Mártir de Anghiera (Italian chaplain and historian of the Spanish court)

    Peter Martyr d’Anghiera, chaplain to the court of King Ferdinand II of Aragon and Queen Isabella I of Castile, and historian of Spanish explorations, who became a member of Emperor Charles V’s Council of the Indies (1518). He collected unidentified documents from the various discoverers, including

  • Pedro o Cruel (king of Portugal)

    Peter I, king of Portugal from 1357 to 1367. The son of Afonso IV and his consort Beatriz of Castile, Peter was married in 1336 to Constanza of Castile; but she died in 1345, and Peter is chiefly remembered for his tragic amour with Inês de Castro (q.v.), whose death he savagely avenged after his

  • Pedro o Justiceiro (king of Portugal)

    Peter I, king of Portugal from 1357 to 1367. The son of Afonso IV and his consort Beatriz of Castile, Peter was married in 1336 to Constanza of Castile; but she died in 1345, and Peter is chiefly remembered for his tragic amour with Inês de Castro (q.v.), whose death he savagely avenged after his

  • Pedro Páramo (work by Rulfo)

    Juan Rulfo: Pedro Páramo (1955; Eng. trans. Pedro Páramo) examines the physical and moral disintegration of a laconic cacique (boss) and is set in a mythical hell on earth inhabited by the dead, who are haunted by their past transgressions.

  • Pedro the Constable (Portuguese writer)

    Portuguese literature: Historical chronicles and poetry: Pedro the Constable (the son of Pedro, 1st duke of Coimbra) initiated the fashion of writing in Castilian. As one of the first to adopt the new Castilian trend toward allegory and the cult of Classical antiquity derived from Italy, his influence on his compatriots…

  • Pedro the Constable (king of Aragon)

    Pedro, 1o duque de Coimbra: His son Pedro the Constable, after a long exile in Castile, returned and was offered the crown of Aragon by a party in Barcelona, where he shortly died.

  • Pedro, Dom (prince and regent of Portugal)

    Pedro, 1o duque de Coimbra, second son of King John I of Portugal, younger brother of King Edward, and uncle of Edward’s son Afonso V, during whose minority he was regent. The second of the “illustrious generation,” comprising the sons of John I and Philippa of Lancaster, Pedro was present at the

  • Pedro, Dom (emperor of Brazil)

    Pedro I, founder of the Brazilian empire and first emperor of Brazil, from Dec. 1, 1822, to April 7, 1831, also reckoned as King Pedro (Peter) IV of Portugal. Generally known as Dom Pedro, he was the son of King John VI of Portugal. When Napoleon conquered Portugal in 1807, Pedro accompanied the

  • Pedro, Don (fictional character)

    Much Ado About Nothing: …for Claudio’s friend and mentor, Don Pedro. This malicious fiction is soon dispelled, but Claudio seems not to have learned his lesson; he believes Don John a second time, and on a much more serious charge—that Hero is actually sleeping with other men, even on the night before her impending…

  • Pedrocchi Café (building, Padua, Italy)

    Western architecture: Italy: …also the architect of the Pedrocchi Café, Padua (1816–42), which, with its Doric and Gothic exteriors and equally eclectic interiors is a remarkable extravaganza.

  • Pedrolino (stock theatrical character)

    Pedrolino, stock character of the Italian commedia dell’arte, a simpleminded and honest servant, usually a young and personable valet. One of the comic servants, or zanni, Pedrolino functioned in the commedia as an unsuccessful lover and a victim of the pranks of his fellow comedians. His costume c

  • Pedroza, Eusebio (Panamanian boxer)

    Eusebio Pedroza, Panamanian professional boxer, world featherweight (126 pounds [57 kg]) champion from 1978 to 1985. At 5 feet 9 inches (1.75 metres), Pedroza was tall for a featherweight. He excelled in late rounds and at times was accused of being a dirty fighter. Pedroza began boxing

  • peduncle (botany)

    angiosperm: The receptacle: The peduncle is the stalk of a flower or an inflorescence. When a flower is borne singly, the internode between the receptacle and the bract (the last leaf, often modified and usually smaller than the other leaves) is the peduncle. When the flowers are borne in…

  • peduncle (zoology)

    cnidarian: Locomotion: …by action of their inflatable peduncle (a stalk that attaches to the strata in the lower end and to the polyp body on the higher end). Sea anemones that are attached to firm substrata can creep slowly on their pedal disks or detach altogether, often in response to unfavourable physical…

  • Pedunculata (crustacean)

    cirripede: Diversity and distribution: Pedunculate barnacles are similar to the sessile barnacles in having the principal part of the body contained within a protective covering, or wall. They differ from acorn barnacles in that the plates do not form a separate wall and operculum and in having the wall…

  • pedunculate barnacle (crustacean)

    cirripede: Diversity and distribution: Pedunculate barnacles are similar to the sessile barnacles in having the principal part of the body contained within a protective covering, or wall. They differ from acorn barnacles in that the plates do not form a separate wall and operculum and in having the wall…

  • Pee Dee River (river, United States)

    Pee Dee River, river rising as the Yadkin River in the Blue Ridge Mountains in northwestern North Carolina, U.S. Flowing northeast past Wilkesboro and Elkin, then southeast past Badin, it becomes the Pee Dee (named for the Pedee Indians) after a course of about 200 miles (320 km). As the Pee Dee,

  • Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (film by Burton)

    Tim Burton: …directed his first feature film, Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, in 1985. A box-office success, the family movie centred on a man-child (played by Paul Reubens) looking for his stolen bicycle. With the dark comedy Beetlejuice (1988), Burton established himself as an unconventional filmmaker. He turned to more mainstream fare with the…

  • Peebles (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Peebles, royal burgh (town), Scottish Borders council area, historic county of Peeblesshire, Scotland, at the junction of Eddleston Water with the River Tweed. Peebles, which gained royal burgh status in 1367, grew up under the shelter of the royal castle, which was a favourite residence of the

  • Peebles (former county, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Peeblesshire, historic county of southeastern Scotland that forms a triangle between the historic counties of Midlothian (north and northeast), Selkirkshire (east and southeast), Dumfriesshire (south), and Lanarkshire (west). It lies entirely within the Scottish Borders council area. The remains of

  • Peebles, James (American physicist)

    James Peebles, Canadian-born American physicist who was awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize for Physics for his work on physical cosmology. He received one half of the prize; the other half was awarded to Swiss astronomers Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz. Peebles received a bachelor’s degree in 1958 from

  • Peebles, Jim (American physicist)

    James Peebles, Canadian-born American physicist who was awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize for Physics for his work on physical cosmology. He received one half of the prize; the other half was awarded to Swiss astronomers Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz. Peebles received a bachelor’s degree in 1958 from

  • Peebles, Melvin (American author and filmmaker)

    Melvin Van Peebles, American filmmaker who wrote, directed, and starred in Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971), a groundbreaking film that spearheaded the rush of African American action films known as "blaxploitation" in the 1970s. He also served as the film’s composer and editor. After

  • Peebles, P. J. E. (American physicist)

    James Peebles, Canadian-born American physicist who was awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize for Physics for his work on physical cosmology. He received one half of the prize; the other half was awarded to Swiss astronomers Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz. Peebles received a bachelor’s degree in 1958 from

  • Peebles, Thomas Chalmers (American physician and virologist)

    Thomas Chalmers Peebles, American physician and virologist (born June 5, 1921, Newton, Mass.—died July 8, 2010, Port Charlotte, Fla.), isolated (1954) the measles virus while working in the laboratory of virologist and microbiologist John F. Enders at the Children’s Hospital in Boston (Enders

  • Peeblesshire (former county, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Peeblesshire, historic county of southeastern Scotland that forms a triangle between the historic counties of Midlothian (north and northeast), Selkirkshire (east and southeast), Dumfriesshire (south), and Lanarkshire (west). It lies entirely within the Scottish Borders council area. The remains of

  • Peed, William Bartlett (American animator and writer)

    Bill Peet, (William Bartlett Peed), American animator, screenwriter, and author-illustrator (born Jan. 29, 1915, Grandview, Ind.—died May 11, 2002, Studio City, Calif.), worked for Walt Disney for 27 years, during which he earned a reputation as a storyteller on a par with Disney himself. His w

  • Peegee hydrangea (plant)

    hydrangea: Peegee hydrangea (H. paniculata ‘Grandiflora’), growing to a height of 9 metres, is a common landscape hydrangea, with tapering flower clusters, opening white and fading to pink, then to bronze. Oakleaf hydrangea (H. quercifolia), up to 2 metres high, has white flower clusters and deep…

  • PEEK (chemical compound)

    major industrial polymers: Polyetherketone (PEK) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK): PEK and PEEK are high-strength, radiation-resistant engineering plastics whose structures combine both ether and ketone groups. Both are thermally stable and highly resistant to chemicals. Principal uses are in machine parts, nuclear power-plant equipment, automobile parts, aerospace components, cable insulation, and pump parts.

  • Peek, Dan (American musician)

    Dan Peek, (Daniel Milton Peek), American musician (born Nov. 1, 1950, Panama City, Fla.—died July 24, 2011, Farmington, Mo.), wrote, sang, and played several different instruments for the folk-rock band America, best known for its chart-topping hits “A Horse with No Name” (1971), “Ventura Highway”

  • Peek, Daniel Milton (American musician)

    Dan Peek, (Daniel Milton Peek), American musician (born Nov. 1, 1950, Panama City, Fla.—died July 24, 2011, Farmington, Mo.), wrote, sang, and played several different instruments for the folk-rock band America, best known for its chart-topping hits “A Horse with No Name” (1971), “Ventura Highway”

  • Peekskill (New York, United States)

    Peekskill, city, Westchester county, southeastern New York, U.S., on the east bank of the Hudson River, 41 miles (66 km) north of New York City. Its name derives from Jan Peek, a Dutchman who established a trading post in 1654 at the point where a kil (Dutch for “channel,” or “creek”) joins the

  • Peel (Isle of Man, British Isles)

    Peel, town on the west coast of the Isle of Man, one of the British Isles, on Peel Bay at the mouth of the River Neb, which forms the harbour. On the west side of the river mouth is Patrick’s Isle, connected with the main island by a causeway; it is occupied by the ruined keep and guardroom of an

  • Peel Commission (British history)

    Peel Commission, group headed by Lord Robert Peel, appointed in 1936 by the British government to investigate the causes of unrest among Palestinian Arabs and Jews. Discontent in Palestine intensified after 1920, when the Conference of San Remo awarded the British government a mandate to control

  • Peel Line (European history)

    World War II: The invasion of the Low Countries and France: …same day, the weakly held Peel Line, south of the westward-turning arc of the Maas, was penetrated by the German land forces; and on May 11 the Dutch defenders fell back westward past Tilburg to Breda, with the consequence that the French 7th Army, under General Henri Giraud, whose leading…

  • peel oven

    baking: Ovens: Other types include the peel oven, having a fixed hearth of stone or brick on which the loaves are placed with a wooden paddle or peel; the reel oven, with shelves rotating on a central axle in Ferris wheel fashion; the rotating hearth oven; and the draw plate oven.

  • Peel River (river, Canada)

    Peel River, river in northern Yukon and northwestern Mackenzie District of the Northwest Territories, Canada, the northernmost tributary of the Mackenzie River. From its major headstream, the Ogilvie River, in the mountains of central Yukon, the river flows generally northeastward for 425 mi (684

  • Peel’s Act (United Kingdom [1844])

    Bank of England: A royal charter allowed the bank to operate as a joint-stock bank with limited liability. No other joint-stock banks were permitted in England and Wales until 1826. This special status and its position as the government’s banker gave the bank considerable competitive advantages.

  • Peel, John (British disc jockey)

    John Peel, popular British disc jockey who for nearly 40 years, beginning in mid-1960s, was one of the most influential tastemakers in rock music. Peel was renowned for discovering and championing emerging artists and for his connossieurship of groundbreaking offbeat music and performers. The son

  • Peel, Lady (actress and comedienne)

    Beatrice Lillie, sophisticated-comedy star of British and American revues, perhaps the foremost theatrical comedienne of the 20th century. Making her stage debut in London in 1914 as a sentimental-ballad singer, Lillie proved her comic genius in a series of revues produced by André Charlot during

  • Peel, Robert (prime minister of United Kingdom)

    Robert Peel, British prime minister (1834–35, 1841–46) and founder of the Conservative Party. Peel was responsible for the repeal (1846) of the Corn Laws that had restricted imports. He was the eldest son of a wealthy cotton manufacturer, Robert Peel (1750–1830), who was made a baronet by William

  • Peel, Sir Robert, 2nd Baronet (prime minister of United Kingdom)

    Robert Peel, British prime minister (1834–35, 1841–46) and founder of the Conservative Party. Peel was responsible for the repeal (1846) of the Corn Laws that had restricted imports. He was the eldest son of a wealthy cotton manufacturer, Robert Peel (1750–1830), who was made a baronet by William

  • Peel, Thomas (British investor)

    Australia: Settlement: …still the idea persisted, with Thomas Peel—kinsman of the future prime minister Sir Robert Peel—investing heavily. But colonization was grim work in a hot, dry land, with the government reluctant to expend resources. Western Australia’s story for decades was survival, not success.

  • Peele, George (English dramatist)

    George Peele, Elizabethan dramatist who experimented in many forms of theatrical art: pastoral, history, melodrama, tragedy, folk play, and pageant. Peele’s father was a London clerk who contributed to several city pageants. Peele was educated at Oxford, where he translated into English a play by

  • Peele, Jordan (American actor and director)

    Lupita Nyong'o: Her movies from 2019 included Jordan Peele’s horror film Us, in which she starred as the mother of a family whose home is invaded by violent doppelgängers, and the zombie comedy Little Monsters. Also that year she reprised her role as Maz Kanata in Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker.

  • peeler (British police officer)

    Bobby, slang term for a member of London’s Metropolitan Police derived from the name of Sir Robert Peel, who established the force in 1829. Police officers in London are also known as “peelers” for the same reason. After becoming home secretary in the British government, between 1825 and 1830 Peel

  • Peelian Principles (code of police ethics)

    bobby: …to be known as the Peelian Principles—though they may have been devised by Rowan and Mayne. These principles stated that the purpose of the force was crime prevention and that the police must behave in such a way as to win the respect and cooperation of the public. To that…

  • peeling (biology)

    scarlet fever: The course of the disease: …features of the rash is desquamation, or peeling, which occurs at the end of the first week. Desquamating skin comes off as fine flakes like bran. The hands and feet are usually the last to desquamate—not until the second or third week of the illness.

  • Peeling the Onion (memoir by Grass)

    Günter Grass: …Beim Häuten der Zwiebel (2006; Peeling the Onion), caused widespread controversy, with some arguing that it undercut his moral authority. He had previously claimed that he had been drafted into an air defense unit in 1944.

  • Peellaert, Guy (Belgian artist and illustrator)

    Guy Peellaert, Belgian Pop artist and illustrator (born April 6, 1934, Brussels, Belg.—died Nov. 17, 2008, Paris, France), shot to international cult status with the book Rock Dreams (1973), a surrealist compilation of sketches, photographs, paintings, and collages depicting iconic rock musicians

  • Peenemünde (Germany)

    Peenemünde, village, Mecklenburg-West Pomerania Land (state), northeastern Germany, at the northwestern end of Usedom Island in the estuarine mouth of the Peene River on the Baltic Sea coast. It was mentioned as a fishing village in 1282. During World War II it was the site of the chief German

  • peep (bird)

    Peep, any of about a dozen species of small sandpipers. Some are also called oxbirds or oxeyes. See

  • peep show (children’s toy)

    Peep show, children’s toy and scientific curiosity, usually consisting of a box with an eyehole through which the viewer sees a miniature scene or stage setting, painted or constructed in perspective. Peep shows of an earlier time are often the only accurate representation of the stage design and

  • Peep Show (film by Egoyan [1981])

    Atom Egoyan: …in later films such as Peep Show (1981) and Family Viewing (1987).

  • Peeper Island (island, Georgia, United States)

    Cockspur Island, island, Chatham county, southeastern Georgia, U.S., in the mouth of the Savannah River. Known during colonial times as Peeper Island, it was given the name Cockspur for the shape of its reef. Its strategic advantages were early recognized; in the 18th century the island held Fort

  • Peeping Tom (film by Powell [1960])

    Peeping Tom, British psychological thriller film, released in 1960, that initially caused outrage for its depiction of voyeurism, pornography, serial killing, and child abuse. However, it later came to be considered a classic. Assistant cameraman Mark Lewis (played by Carl Boehm) is a disturbed

  • Peeping Tom (English legendary figure)

    Lady Godiva: Peeping Tom, a citizen who looked out his window, apparently became a part of the legend in the 17th century. In most accounts he was struck blind or dead.

  • peepul (tree)

    Ficus: Major species: The Bo tree, or pipal (F. religiosa), is sacred in India because of its association with the Buddha. Another notable Ficus species is the sycamore fig (F. sycomorus), which has mulberry-like leaves, hard wood, and edible fruit.

  • peer group (sociology)

    bullying: Background factors: Over the course of adolescence, peer groups become increasingly important and in some cases eclipse parental influences. As within the family, exposure to aggression in the peer group is associated with bullying behaviour. There is a strong tendency for bullies to be friends with other bullies in their class or…

  • Peer Gynt (play by Ibsen)

    Peer Gynt, five-act verse play by Henrik Ibsen, published in Norwegian in 1867 and produced in 1876. The title character, based on a legendary Norwegian folk hero, is a rogue who will be destroyed unless he is saved by the love of a woman. Peer Gynt is a charming but lazy and arrogant peasant youth

  • Peer Gynt (work by Grieg)

    Peer Gynt, incidental music by Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg, written to accompany the verse drama of the same name by Norwegian writer Henrik Ibsen. The music debuted to great acclaim in 1876 when the play was first produced for the stage, and it remains among the most popular of Grieg’s

  • Peer Gynt (opera by Egk)

    Werner Egk: …conducted his highly successful opera, Peer Gynt (after Henrik Ibsen), one of his most popular stage works. His ballets, such as Abraxas (1948) and Casanova in London (1969), also attracted wide attention. Abraxas was banned, after five sold-out performances, on grounds of obscenity. Egk also wrote instrumental music.

  • peer review (evaluation process)

    Peer review, process whereby experts in a given field help judge the value of a relevant work or ideas that they were not part of creating. The primary function of peer review is gatekeeping—selecting the best from a pool of submissions. It also serves, however, as a source of constructive

  • peer-to-peer (computer network)

    P2P, type of computer network used primarily for the distribution of digital media files. In a peer-to-peer network each computer acts as both a server and a client—supplying and receiving files—with bandwidth and processing distributed among all members of the network. Such a decentralized network

  • peerage

    Peerage, Body of peers or titled nobility in Britain. The five ranks, in descending order, are duke, marquess, earl (see count), viscount, and baron. Until 1999, peers were entitled to sit in the House of Lords and exempted from jury duty. Titles may be hereditary or granted for

  • Peerage Act (United Kingdom [1963])

    Tony Benn: …struggle, and in 1963 the Peerage Act enabled peers to renounce their titles for their lifetimes. Benn not only renounced his viscountcy (July 31, 1963) but later shed the names with which he had been christened, Anthony Neil Wedgwood, to become simply Tony Benn.

  • Peerage Bill (Great Britain [1719])

    Robert Walpole, 1st earl of Orford: Education and early career: …about the rejection of the Peerage Bill (1719), which would have limited the royal prerogative in the creation of peers. During this time, too, he became friendly with Caroline of Ansbach, the princess of Wales, who was to help maintain him in power when her husband succeeded to the throne…

  • Peers, House of (Japanese government)

    Diet: The upper house, the House of Peers (Kizokuin), was almost wholly appointive. Initially, its membership was slightly less than 300, but it was subsequently increased to approximately 400. The peers were intended to represent the top rank and quality of the nation and to serve as a check upon…

  • Peerzada, Rafi (Pakistani actor and playwright)

    South Asian arts: Parsi theatre: The actor-playwright Rafi Peerzada, with his knowledge of Western theatre as a result of his training in Berlin in the 1930s, helped to develop Pakistani theatre. Professional in approach, he produced radio and stage plays and was a critical colleague of A.S. Bokhari and Imtiaz in the…

  • Peet, Bill (American animator and writer)

    Bill Peet, (William Bartlett Peed), American animator, screenwriter, and author-illustrator (born Jan. 29, 1915, Grandview, Ind.—died May 11, 2002, Studio City, Calif.), worked for Walt Disney for 27 years, during which he earned a reputation as a storyteller on a par with Disney himself. His w

  • Peete, Calvin (American golfer)

    Calvin Peete, American golfer (born July 18, 1943, Detroit, Mich.—died April 29, 2015, Atlanta, Ga.), was a top player on the PGA Tour and was one of the most-successful African American golfers in the history of the sport. Peete did not take up golf until friends took him to a golf course when he

  • Peeters, Clara (Flemish painter)

    Clara Peeters, Flemish still-life painter known for her meticulous brushwork, sophisticated arrangement of materials, low angle of perspective, and ability to capture precisely the textures of the varied objects she painted. She was a significant popularizer of so-called banquet (or breakfast)

  • peewee (bird)

    Pewee, any of eight species of birds of the genus Contopus (family Tyrannidae); it is named for its call, which is monotonously repeated from an open perch. In North America a sad, clear “pee-oo-wee” announces the presence of the eastern wood pewee (C. virens), while a blurry “peeurrr” is the call

  • PEG (chemical compound)

    polyether: Polyethylene glycols are water-soluble liquids or waxy solids used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical preparations and in the manufacture of emulsifying or wetting agents and lubricants. Polypropylene glycols are liquids, mostly insoluble in water, used to suppress foaming in industrial processes and for making polyurethane resins,…

  • Your preference has been recorded
    Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
    Subscribe Today!