• 0-9
  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g
  • h
  • i
  • j
  • k
  • l
  • m
  • n
  • o
  • p
  • q
  • r
  • s
  • t
  • u
  • v
  • w
  • x
  • y
  • z
  • PCF (political party, France)

    French Communist Party, French political party that espouses a communist ideology and has joined coalition governments with the French Socialist Party. Founded in 1920 by the left wing of the French Socialist Party and affiliated with the Soviet-run Communist International, the PCF did not gain

  • PCI (technology)

    AGP: …processing unit) and system memory—unlike PCI (peripheral component interconnect), an earlier graphics card standard on which AGP was based. In graphics-intense applications, this direct channel gives AGP a performance advantage over PCI, which had been used for graphics cards, network cards, and countless other devices.

  • PCI (political party, Italy)

    Democrats of the Left, former Italian political party and historically western Europe’s largest communist party. The party was originally founded in January 1921 as the Italian Communist Party (Partito Comunista Italiano; PCI) by dissidents of the extreme left wing of the Italian Socialist Party

  • PCI (political party, Vietnam)

    Truong Chinh: …career within the recently formed Indochinese Communist Party (PCI). While editing a Communist Party newspaper in Hanoi, he was arrested by the French in 1932 and spent the next four years in prison. Paroled in 1936, he was a well-qualified candidate for command in the PCI, most of whose earlier…

  • PCL (chemical compound)

    major industrial polymers: Degradable polyesters: … (PLA), poly-2-hydroxy butyrate (PHB), and polycaprolactone (PCL), as well as their copolymers:

  • PCM (machine tool technology)

    machine tool: Photochemical machining (PCM): PCM is an extension of CHM that uses a series of photographic and chemical etching techniques to produce components and devices in a wide range of metals, especially stainless steel.

  • PCM (electronics)

    modulation: Pulse-coded modulation.: In pulse-coded modulation (PCM), the intelligence signal converts the carrier into a series of constant-amplitude pulses spaced in such a manner that the desired intelligence is contained in coded form. Continuous signals, such as voice messages, television pictures, and computer data, are commonly…

  • PCN (political party, El Salvador)

    El Salvador: Military dictatorships: …dismantled and replaced by the National Conciliation Party (Partido de Conciliación Nacional; PCN), which would control the national government for the next 18 years. Under the banner of the Alliance for Progress, Rivera advanced programs aimed at economic growth and diversification, which enabled El Salvador to take advantage of the…

  • PCN (political party, Nicaragua)

    Nicaragua: Political process: … (Partido Liberal Constitucionalista; PLC), the Conservative Party of Nicaragua (Partido Conservador de Nicaragua; PCN), and the Sandinista National Liberation Front (Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional; FSLN). The FSLN was established in the early 1960s as a guerrilla group dedicated to the overthrow of the Somoza family. They governed Nicaragua from…

  • PCOS (medical disorder)

    Stein-Leventhal syndrome, disorder in women that is characterized by an elevated level of male hormones (androgens) and infrequent or absent ovulation (anovulation). About 5 percent of women are affected by Stein-Leventhal syndrome, which is responsible for a substantial proportion of cases of

  • PCP (chemical compound)

    full-cell process: …creosote, oil-based chemicals such as pentachlorophenol (PCP), and aqueous solutions of compounds such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA), ammoniacal copper zinc arsenate (ACZA), and copper azole (CA-B). Creosote, PCP, and CCA are used on heavy structural members such as railroad ties, utility poles, marine pilings, and bridge timbers; ACZA and…

  • PCP (drug)

    PCP, hallucinogenic drug with anesthetic properties, having the chemical name 1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine. PCP was first developed in 1956 by Parke Davis Laboratories of Detroit for use as an anesthetic in veterinary medicine, though it is no longer used in this capacity. Used for a brief time

  • PCP (technology)

    pipeline: Capsule pipelines: …gas, the technology is called pneumatic capsule pipeline (PCP), and, when water or another liquid is used, it is termed hydraulic capsule pipeline (HCP). Owing to the low density of air, capsules in PCP cannot be suspended by air at ordinary speeds. Instead, the capsules are wheeled vehicles rolling through…

  • PCR (biochemistry)

    Polymerase chain reaction ( PCR), a technique used to make numerous copies of a specific segment of DNA quickly and accurately. The polymerase chain reaction enables investigators to obtain the large quantities of DNA that are required for various experiments and procedures in molecular biology,

  • PCRM (political party, Moldova)

    Vladimir Voronin: …Moldavian Communist Party as the Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova (PCRM), becoming its president a year later. In 2001 the PCRM won parliamentary elections with slightly more than 50 percent of the vote, ending a decade of rule by a reformist government. Elected president by parliament in…

  • PCS

    telephone: Personal communication systems: In a number of countries throughout the world, a wireless service called the personal communication system (PCS) is available. In the broadest sense, PCS includes all forms of wireless communication that are interconnected with the public switched telephone network, including mobile telephone…

  • PCT (political party, Republic of the Congo)

    Republic of the Congo: Political process: …the most active are the Congolese Labour Party (Parti Congolais du Travail; PCT), the Congolese Movement for Democracy and Integral Development (Mouvement Congolais pour la Démocratie et le Développement Intégral; MCDDI), the Pan-African Union for Social Development (Union Panafricaine pour la Démocratie Sociale; UPADS), Rally for Democracy and Social Progress…

  • PCTFE (chemical compound)

    Polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE), synthetic resin formed by the polymerization of chlorotrifluoroethylene. It is a moldable, temperature-resistant, and chemical-resistant plastic that finds specialty applications in the chemical, electrical, and aerospace industries. PCTFE can be prepared as a

  • Pd (chemical element)

    Palladium (Pd), chemical element, the least dense and lowest-melting of the platinum metals of Groups 8–10 (VIIIb), Periods 5 and 6, of the periodic table, used especially as a catalyst (a substance that speeds up chemical reactions without changing their products) and in alloys. A precious

  • PD (political party, Poland)

    Tadeusz Mazowiecki: …2005 he helped found the Democratic Party (Partia Demokratyczna [PD]; not to be confused with Poland’s other Democratic Party, Stronnictwo Demokratyczne [SD], founded in 1939). From 1992 to 1995 Mazowiecki represented the former Yugoslavia as a special reporter to the United Nations Human Rights Commission.

  • PD (political party, Romania)

    Romania: New constitution: …coalition of parties, including the Democratic Party (Partidul Democrat; PD), whose Traian Băsescu was elected president.

  • PD-1 (biology)

    immune system: Immunity against cancer: …immune regulatory protein known as programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), which occurs on the surface of T cells, led to the development of highly effective anti-PD-1 cancer immunotherapies.

  • PDA (handheld computer)

    PDA, a handheld organizer used to store contact information, manage calendars, communicate by e-mail, and handle documents and spreadsheets, usually in communication with the user’s personal computer. The first PDAs were developed in the early 1990s as digital improvements upon the traditional

  • PDC (political party, El Salvador)

    El Salvador: Military dictatorships: …from the rise of the Christian Democratic Party (Partido Demócrata Cristiano; PDC) and the victory of its candidate, José Napoleón Duarte, in the 1964 mayoral election in the city of San Salvador. At the same time, the Rivera government oversaw the formation of the Democratic Nationalist Organization (Organización Democrática Nacionalista;…

  • PDC (political party, Panama)

    Panama: Transitions to democracy and sovereignty: …of the largest party, the Christian Democrats (Partido Demócrata Cristiano; PDC), led by Vice President Ricardo Arias Calderón. This left the administration without a legislative majority and allowed the remnants of Noriega’s Democratic Revolutionary Party (Partido Revolucionario Democrático; PRD) to regain some political power. As a result, accomplishments were meagre…

  • PDC (political party, Switzerland)

    Christian Democratic People’s Party, Swiss centre-right political party that endorses Christian democratic principles. With FDP. The Liberals, the Social Democratic Party, and the Swiss People’s Party, the Christian Democratic People’s Party (CVP) has governed Switzerland as part of a grand

  • PDCI (political party, Côte d’Ivoire)

    Félix Houphouët-Boigny: …year he also founded the Democratic Party of Côte d’Ivoire (PDCI); this party was affiliated with the French Communist Party and was an important component of the interterritorial French West African Federation party, the African Democratic Rally, of which he was also president.

  • PDD

    Pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), any of a group of conditions characterized by early-childhood onset and by varying degrees of impairment of language acquisition, communication, social behaviour, and motor function. There are five types of PDDs. These include the three known autism spectrum

  • PDD-NOS (neurobiological disorder)

    Pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), a neurobiological disorder characterized by impairment in ability to interact with others and by abnormalities in either communication or behaviour patterns and interests. PDD-NOS is described as atypical autism, because

  • PDE-5 inhibitor (category of drugs)

    PDE-5 inhibitor, category of drugs that relieve erectile dysfunction (impotence) in men. Two common commercially produced PDE-5 inhibitors are sildenafil (sold as Viagra) and vardenafil (Levitra). PDE-5 inhibitors work by blocking, or inhibiting, the action of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5), an enzyme

  • PDF (mathematics)

    Probability density function (PDF), in statistics, a function whose integral is calculated to find probabilities associated with a continuous random variable (see continuity; probability theory). Its graph is a curve above the horizontal axis that defines a total area, between itself and the axis,

  • PDF (computer science)

    Adobe Inc.: Application software: …had been converted to Acrobat’s portable document format (PDF), regardless of its origins, users of any major computer operating system could read and print it, with formatting, typography, and graphics nearly intact, via the Acrobat Reader, an application the company offered for free. However, with the advent of the Internet…

  • PDFLP (Palestinian political organization)

    Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine (DFLP), one of several organizations associated with the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO); it engaged in acts of terrorism in the 1970s and ’80s and originally maintained a Marxist-Leninist orientation, believing the peasants and the working

  • PDG (political party, Guinea)

    Guinea: Constitutional framework: …one-party state ruled by the Democratic Party of Guinea (Parti Démocratique de Guinée; PDG). In April 1984, after Touré’s death, a military group led by Lansana Conté abolished the PDG and all associated revolutionary committees and replaced them with the Military Committee for National Recovery (Comité Militaire de Redressement National;…

  • PDG (political party, Gabon)

    Gabon: Constitutional framework: …was amended to give the Gabonese Democratic Party (Parti Démocratique Gabonais; PDG), the only legal party after 1968, roles in the executive and legislative processes. In May 1990, following a national conference that was called in response to the upheaval of the previous four months, the constitution was amended to…

  • PDGE (political party, Equatorial Guinea)

    Equatorial Guinea: Political process: …in Equatorial Guinea is the Democratic Party of Equatorial Guinea (Partido Democrático de Guinea Ecuatorial; PDGE), formed in 1987. It was the only political party until 1991, when a new constitution allowing opposition parties was adopted. Since then several other parties have formed, including the Convergence for Social Democracy (Convergencia…

  • PDI (political party, Indonesia)

    Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle: …and two opposition parties, the Indonesian Democratic Party (later the PDI-P) and the United Development Party. The Indonesian Democratic Party was created from three nationalist groups and two Christian-based parties: the Indonesian Nationalist Party, the Movement for the Defense of Indonesian Independence, the People’s Party, the Catholic Party, and the…

  • PDI-P (political party, Indonesia)

    Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P), political party in Indonesia formed in 1973 through the forced merger of five non-Islamic political parties. In the final three decades of the 20th century, it was one of two opposition parties officially recognized by the government. Although it

  • PDK (political party, Kosovo)

    Kosovo: Self-declared independence: …Minister Hashim Thaçi of the Democratic Party of Kosovo (Partia Demokratike e Kosovës; PDK), prompting the dissolution of the body and the scheduling of elections. The fall of the government followed the September resignation of Pres. Fatmir Sejdiu, who in October withdrew his Democratic League of Kosovo (Lidhja Demokratike e…

  • PDL (political party, Romania)

    Romania: New constitution: …the leftist PSD and the Democratic Liberal Party (Partidul Democrat-Liberal; PDL), Băsescu’s new centrist party; the two parties formed a centre-left coalition government that December. This government lasted only until October 2009, when the PSD left the coalition in protest over the dismissal of a PSD member from a ministerial…

  • PdL (political party, Italy)

    Italy: Shifting power: …new party known as the People of Freedom (Popolo della Libertà; PdL)—clinched a third term as prime minister.

  • PDM (electronics)

    modulation: Pulse-duration modulation.: Another kind of pulse modulation is pulse-duration modulation (PDM), in which intelligence is represented by the length and order of regularly recurring pulses. A familiar example of PDM is the International Morse Code, used in ship-to-shore communications, amateur radio, and certain other forms…

  • PDO (climatology)

    climate change: Decadal variation: One such variation is the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), also referred to as the Pacific Decadal Variability (PDV), which involves changing sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the North Pacific Ocean. The SSTs influence the strength and position of the Aleutian Low, which in turn strongly affects precipitation patterns along the…

  • PDP (computer line)

    Digital Equipment Corporation: Digital’s first computer, the Programmed Data Processor, or PDP-1, was sold in November 1960. Eventually 50 PDP-1s would be sold, nearly half to International Telephone and Telegraph for message switching systems.

  • PDP (political party, Nigeria)

    People’s Democratic Party (PDP), Nigerian political party founded in August 1998 by members of numerous groups and organizations, including the groups known as G-18 and G-34. The party, which has a broad political base, supports economic deregulation, human rights, and greater funding for health

  • PDP (electronics)

    television: Plasma display panels: Plasma display panels (PDPs) overcome some of the disadvantages of both CRTs and LCDs. They can be manufactured easily in large sizes (up to 125 cm, or 50 inches, in diagonal size), are less than 10 cm (4 inches) thick, and have…

  • PDPA (political party, Afghanistan)

    Afghanistan: Mohammad Zahir Shah (1933–73): …such group was the Marxist People’s Democratic Party of Afghanistan (PDPA), the major leftist organization in the country. Founded in 1965, the party soon split into two factions, known as the People’s (Khalq) and Banner (Parcham) parties. Another was a conservative religious organization known as the Islamic Society (Jamʿiyyat-e Eslāmī),…

  • PDS (political party, Germany)

    Germany: The reunification of Germany: …the SED, now renamed the Party of Democratic Socialism (PDS), suffered a crushing defeat. The eastern counterpart of Kohl’s CDU, which had pledged a speedy reunification of Germany, emerged as the largest political party in East Germany’s first democratically elected People’s Chamber. A new East German government headed by Lothar…

  • PDS (political party, Senegal)

    Abdoulaye Wade: In 1974 Wade founded the Senegalese Democratic Party (Parti Démocratique Sénégalais; PDS) as an opposition party to Pres. Léopold Senghor’s Senegalese Progressive Union (Union Progressiste Sénégalaise; UPS), which was known as the Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste; PS) after 1976. The PDS became the centre of a fledgling opposition movement in…

  • PDSh (political party, Macedonia)

    North Macedonia: Independence: …also made their mark: the Democratic Party of Albanians (PDSh), with almost 6 percent of the vote and 8 seats, and the newly formed National Democratic Revival (RK), with about 3 percent and 2 seats. This proved to be a period of extensive political turmoil, which included a prolonged boycott…

  • PDSR (political party, Romania)

    Romania: The revolution of 1989: …and Iliescu’s supporters formed the Democratic National Salvation Front (DNSF). The party maintained its political dominance, as evidenced by its successes in parliamentary and presidential elections held in September and October 1992, in which Iliescu was reelected and his party emerged as the largest in the parliament. A loose coalition…

  • PDT (medicine)

    therapeutics: Photodynamic therapy: Another form of nonionizing radiation therapy is photodynamic therapy (PDT). This technique involves administering a light-absorbing substance that is selectively retained by the tumour cells. The cells are killed by exposure to intense light, usually laser beams of appropriate wavelengths. Lesions amenable to…

  • PDV (climatology)

    climate change: Decadal variation: One such variation is the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), also referred to as the Pacific Decadal Variability (PDV), which involves changing sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the North Pacific Ocean. The SSTs influence the strength and position of the Aleutian Low, which in turn strongly affects precipitation patterns along the…

  • PDVSA (Venezuelan company)

    Petróleos de Venezuela, SA, state-owned Venezuelan company created through the nationalization of the petroleum industry on Jan. 1, 1976. It earns the largest share of Venezuela’s foreign exchange. Its headquarters are in Caracas. By 1971 Venezuela had begun to take steps to curb the influence of

  • PDW (American bowler)

    Pete Weber, American bowler who was one of the sport’s greatest players, though he arguably attracted more attention for his brash personality. He was the first bowler in the history of the Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) to complete the “triple crown” at least twice (1989 and 2013) in a

  • PE (chemical compound)

    Polyethylene (PE), light, versatile synthetic resin made from the polymerization of ethylene. Polyethylene is a member of the important family of polyolefin resins. It is the most widely used plastic in the world, being made into products ranging from clear food wrap and shopping bags to detergent

  • PE (explosive)

    explosive: Picric acid and ammonium picrate: A series of plastic demolition explosives with great shattering power, designated Composition C-1 to Composition C-4, has had considerable publicity. These contain about 80 percent RDX combined with a mixture of various oils, waxes, and plasticizers. The only significant difference is in the temperature range through which they…

  • Pe-har (Tibetan Buddhist divinity)

    Five Great Kings: …identified as the following: (1) Pe-har, chief of the Five Great Kings and described as “king of the karma,” who resides in the northern quarter, is white in colour and rides a white lion; (2) Brgya-byin, the “king of the mind,” who resides in the centre, is dark blue and…

  • pea (legume)

    Pea, (Pisum sativum), herbaceous annual plant in the family Fabaceae, grown virtually worldwide for its edible seeds. Peas can be bought fresh, canned, or frozen, and dried peas are commonly used in soups. Some varieties, including sugar peas and snow peas, produce pods that are edible and are

  • pea aphid (insect)

    aphid: Types of aphids: The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) has two colour morphs, pale green and pinkish red. It overwinters on clover and alfalfa, migrating to peas in spring. The yellow bean mosaic virus it transmits is often responsible for killing pea plants. Each female produces 50 to 100 young…

  • pea crab (crustacean)

    Pea crab, any member of a genus (Pinnotheres) of crabs (order Decapoda) living in the mantle cavity of certain bivalve mollusks, echinoderms, and polychaetes as a commensal (i.e., on or in another animal host but not deriving nourishment from it). Females of Pinnotheres ostreum, also known as the

  • pea family (plant family)

    Fabaceae, pea family of flowering plants (angiosperms), within the order Fabales. Fabaceae, which is the third largest family among the angiosperms after Orchidaceae (orchid family) and Asteraceae (aster family), consists of more than 700 genera and about 20,000 species of trees, shrubs, vines, and

  • pea order (plant order)

    Fabales, order of dicotyledonous flowering plants in the Rosid I group among the core eudicots. The order comprises 4 families (Fabaceae, Polygalaceae, Quillajaceae, and Surianaceae), 754 genera, and more than 20,000 species. However, more than 95 percent of the genera and species belong to

  • pea picker’s disease (pathology)

    Leptospirosis, acute systemic illness of animals, occasionally communicable to humans, that is characterized by extensive inflammation of the blood vessels. It is caused by a spirochete, or spiral-shaped bacterium, of the genus Leptospira. Leptospires infect most mammals, particularly rodents and

  • Pea Ridge, Battle of (American Civil War)

    Battle of Pea Ridge, (March 7–8, 1862), bitterly fought American Civil War clash in Arkansas, during which 11,000 Union troops under General Samuel Curtis defeated 16,000 attacking Confederate troops led by Generals Earl Van Dorn, Sterling Price, and Ben McCulloch. Following a fierce opening

  • pea soup fog

    Great Smog of London: Known as “pea-soupers” for their dense, yellow appearance, such all-encompassing fogs had became a hallmark of London by the 19th century. But polluted fog was an issue in London as early as the 13th century, due to the burning of coal, and the situation only worsened as…

  • pea weevil (insect)

    seed beetle: …cycle is typified by the pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum) and the bean weevil (Acanthoscelides obtectus), both of which occur throughout the world.

  • Peabody (Massachusetts, United States)

    Peabody, city, Essex county, northeastern Massachusetts, U.S. It lies 17 miles (27 km) northeast of Boston. Originally part of Salem, it became part of Danvers in 1752 and was separately incorporated as the town of South Danvers in 1855. In 1868 it was renamed to honour the philanthropist George

  • peabody (dance)

    fox-trot: …the dance’s inception and the peabody (with a quick leg cross).

  • Peabody Award (American media award)

    Peabody Award, any of the awards administered annually by the University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication in recognition of outstanding public service and achievement in electronic media. Recipients are organizations and individuals involved in the production or

  • Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology (museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States)

    anthropology: Museum-based study: …entirely to anthropology was the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology (1866) at Harvard University, followed in 1901 by the Lowie Museum of Anthropology (now the Phoebe Apperson Hearst Museum of Anthropology) at the University of California. The Field Museum in Chicago (1893) was established (as the Columbian Museum of…

  • Peabody, Elizabeth Palmer (American educator)

    Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, American educator and participant in the Transcendentalist movement, who opened the first English-language kindergarten in the United States. Peabody was educated by her mother, who for a time operated an innovative girls’ school in the home, and from an early age she

  • Peabody, George (American merchant, financier, and philanthropist)

    George Peabody, American-born merchant and financier whose banking operations in England helped establish U.S. credit abroad. When his brother’s Newburyport, Mass., dry goods store burned down in 1811, Peabody went to Georgetown in Washington, D.C., to work in a wholesale dry-goods warehouse. By

  • Peabody, Josephine Preston (American writer)

    Josephine Preston Peabody, American writer of verse dramas and of poetry that ranged from precise, ethereal verse to works of social concern. Peabody grew up in Brooklyn until 1884, when the death of her father and the consequent poverty of her family forced them to move to the home of her maternal

  • Peabody, Lucy Whitehead McGill Waterbury (American missionary)

    Lucy Whitehead McGill Waterbury Peabody, American missionary who was an influential force in a number of Baptist foreign mission societies from the 1880s well into the 20th century. Lucy McGill graduated from Rochester (New York) Academy in 1878. Thereafter she taught for three years in the

  • Peace (play by Aristophanes)

    Peace, comedy by Aristophanes, performed at the Great Dionysia in 421 bce. The plot concerns the flight to heaven on a monstrous dung beetle by a war-weary farmer, Trygaeus (“Vintager”), who searches for the lost goddess Peace only to discover that the God of War has buried her in a pit. With the

  • peace

    ethics: War and peace: The Vietnam War ensured that discussions of the justness of war and the legitimacy of conscription and civil disobedience were prominent in early writings in applied ethics. There was considerable support for civil disobedience against unjust aggression and against unjust laws even in a democracy.

  • Peace After War (work by Gironella)

    Spanish literature: The novel: …Ha estallado la paz (1966; Peace After War).

  • Peace and Friendship and Cooperation, Treaty of (India-Soviet Union [1971])

    India: The Bangladesh war: The Treaty of Peace, Friendship, and Cooperation, signed in mid-1971 by India with the Soviet Union, gave India the arms it used in the war. With the birth of Bangladesh, India’s already dominant position in South Asia was enhanced, and its foreign policy, which remained officially…

  • Peace and Longevity, Palace of (building, Beijing, China)

    Palace Museum: …the palace, known as the Palace of Peace and Longevity. These include priceless objects of precious metals and jewels and some examples of the 3,000 pieces that formed the imperial tableware.

  • Peace and National Reconciliation, Charter for (legislation, Algeria)

    Algeria: End to the civil war and amnesty for peace: …year Bouteflika put forth the Charter for Peace and National Reconciliation, which was endorsed by referendum in late September. In February 2006 a presidential decree concerning its implementation was approved by the council of ministers. Among those measures were compensation for the families of the “disappeared,” an amnesty for state…

  • Peace and Noise (album by Smith)

    Patti Smith: …1996 and was followed by Peace and Noise (1997) and Gung Ho (2000). She continued releasing new records in the 21st century, among them Banga (2012). If anything, that late work showed her stronger than before, full of the old fire but purged of her more extreme excesses.

  • Peace and Reconciliation, Palace of (building, Nursultan, Kazakhstan)

    Nursultan: …Foster to design the new Palace of Peace and Reconciliation, a 203-foot- (62-metre-) high pyramid that includes, among other things, a library and an opera house. The city continued to develop rapidly throughout Nazarbayev’s presidency, and, on March 20, 2019, the day after he left office, the city was renamed…

  • Peace Breaks Out (novel by Knowles)

    John Knowles: Its sequel, Peace Breaks Out (1981), features student rivalry in the same setting but viewed from the perspective of a troubled young teacher who has recently returned from World War II.

  • peace building (international relations)
  • peace church (religion)

    Brethren: …one of the three historic “peace churches,” along with the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) and Mennonites, because of a continuing (but not unanimous) adherence to the principle of conscientious objection to all wars. They usually affirm rather than swear oaths. All branches of the Brethren have been active in…

  • Peace Commission of 1778

    Carlisle Commission, during U.S. War of Independence, group of British negotiators sent in 1778, to effect a reconciliation with the 13 insurgent colonies by a belated offer of self-rule within the empire. Shocked by the British defeat at Saratoga (concluded Oct. 17, 1777) and fearful of French r

  • peace conference

    diplomacy: Conference diplomacy and the impact of democratization: The peace conferences at The Hague (1899–1907), which resulted in conventions aimed at codifying the laws of war and encouraging disarmament, were harbingers of the future.

  • peace congress

    diplomacy: Conference diplomacy and the impact of democratization: The peace conferences at The Hague (1899–1907), which resulted in conventions aimed at codifying the laws of war and encouraging disarmament, were harbingers of the future.

  • Peace Corps (United States agency)

    Peace Corps, U.S. government agency of volunteers, established by executive order by Pres. John F. Kennedy on March 1, 1961, and authorized by the U.S. Congress through the Peace Corps Act of September 22, 1961. (From 1971 to 1981 it was a subagency of an independent agency called ACTION.) The

  • Peace Democrat (American political faction)

    Copperhead, during the American Civil War, pejoratively, any citizen in the North who opposed the war policy and advocated restoration of the Union through a negotiated settlement with the South. The word Copperhead was first so used by the New York Tribune on July 20, 1861, in reference to the

  • Peace Garden State (state, United States)

    North Dakota, constituent state of the United States of America. North Dakota was admitted to the union as the 39th state on November 2, 1889. A north-central state, it is bounded by the Canadian provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba to the north and by the U.S. states of Minnesota to the east,

  • Peace Jubilee festival (music festival)

    music festival: …bandmaster Patrick Gilmore organized two Peace Jubilee festivals, featuring choirs of 20,000 and orchestras of 1,000, plus artillery firing and bells. Annual chamber-music festivals, performing specially commissioned works, were established by Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge (Pittsfield, Mass., 1918), and more specialized ones followed in the 20th century. In 1937 the conductor…

  • Peace Kannon (statue, Utsunomiya, Japan)

    Utsunomiya: The Peace Kannon (a manifestation of the goddess of compassion) is an 88-foot (27-metre) statue that was carved on the wall of a quarry between 1948 and 1956. Pop. (2005) 457,673; (2010) 511,739.

  • peace lily (plant)

    houseplant: Foliage plants: The peace lilies (not a true lily), of the genus Spathiphylla, are easy-growing, vigorous tropical herbs forming clumps; they have green foliage and a succession of flowerlike leaves (spathes), usually white. Species of Anthurium, many of which, such as the flamingo flower, have colourful spathes, do…

  • peace line (barrier)

    the Troubles: Internment, peace walls, and Bloody Sunday: …into brick and steel “peace walls,” some of which stood 45 feet (14 metres) high, segregating loyalist and republican enclaves, most famously the Falls Road Catholic community and the Shankill Protestant community of Belfast.

  • Peace Memorial Park (park, Hiroshima, Japan)

    Hiroshima: Peace Memorial Park, located at the epicentre of the atomic blast, contains a museum and monuments dedicated to those killed by the explosion. The cenotaph for victims of the bombing is shaped like an enormous saddle, resembling the small clay saddles placed in ancient Japanese…

  • Peace Mission (American religious sect)

    Peace Mission, predominantly black 20th-century religious movement in the United States, founded and led by Father Divine (1878/80–1965), who was regarded, or worshiped, by his followers as God, Dean of the Universe, and Harnesser of Atomic Energy. According to most accounts, Father Divine was

  • peace movement

    international relations: Between the two world wars: …was an offshoot of the peace movement and was concerned primarily with understanding the causes and costs of war, as well as its political, sociological, economic, and psychological dimensions. Interest in the question “Why war?” also brought a host of social scientists, including economists, sociologists, psychologists, and even mathematicians—all of…

  • Peace Museum (museum, Caen, France)

    Caen: The Caen Memorial (opened 1988) is a museum dedicated to both war and peace.

  • Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
    Subscribe Today!