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  • Pacquiao, Manny (Filipino boxer and politician)

    Manny Pacquiao, professional boxer, media celebrity, and politician who became world-famous for winning boxing titles in more weight classes than any other boxer in history. His rise from abject poverty to the pinnacle of his sport was made even more remarkable by his life outside the ring. The

  • Pact for Mexico (Mexican history)

    Mexico: Peña Nieto and the return of PRI rule: …things done, announced a “Pact for Mexico” that joined the PRI, PAN, and PRD in support of a 95-point agenda of policy reform. The pact generated considerable discontent within the PAN and especially within the PRD, many of whose members expressed unhappiness with their leaders’ decision to collaborate with…

  • Pact government (South African history)

    South Africa: Afrikaner rebellion and nationalism: …Labour parties known as the Pact government.

  • Pact of Steel (Italy–Germany [1939])

    Pact of Steel, Alliance between Germany and Italy. Signed by Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini on May 22, 1939, it formalized the 1936 Rome-Berlin Axis agreement, linking the two countries politically and

  • pacta sunt servanda (law principle)

    international law: Treaties: …known by the Latin formula pacta sunt servanda (“agreements must be kept”) is arguably the oldest principle of international law. Without such a rule, no international agreement would be binding or enforceable. Pacta sunt servanda is directly referred to in many international agreements governing treaties, including the Vienna Convention on…

  • Pactianae coniurationis commentarium (work by Poliziano)

    Poliziano: …he wrote the dramatic report Pactianae coniurationis commentarium (1478). In May 1479, as a result of a quarrel with Lorenzo’s wife, Clarice Orsini, he was expelled from the Medici household. In December, instead of accompanying Lorenzo on a difficult diplomatic mission to Naples, he undertook a series of journeys in…

  • Pactum Hludowicianum (decree by Louis I)

    Louis I: The challenges of empire: The historic Pactum Hludowicianum, also issued in 817, replaced the ill-defined "friendship alliance" between the Carolingians and the popes with a carefully arranged imperial-papal relationship that the emperor dominated. Louis later described the pope as his helper (adiutor) in caring for God’s people. He was no less…

  • pactus (law history)

    Germanic law: …to as an “agreement,” or pactus. The Visigothic laws were an exception; they always appear to have been formulated by the king and chief landowners without popular participation. Gradually, first the Lombard and then the Frankish kings overcame their people’s aversion to central government and began to legislate unilaterally. The…

  • pacu (fish)

    South America: The Amazonian and Guianan forests: …invertebrates and fishes, such as pacu (Metynnis), a big brownish flat fish, the meat of which is highly valued; coumarou (Curimato), which is a toothless vegetarian fish resembling the marine mullet; electric eel (Electrophorus electricus); pirarucu (Arapaima gigas), which can attain a length of 15 feet (4.5 metres) and a…

  • Pacuvius, Marcus (Roman dramatist)

    Marcus Pacuvius, the greatest Roman tragic dramatist before Accius. The bearer of an Oscan name, Pacuvius was probably educated at Tarentum and must have been equally at home in Oscan, Latin, and Greek, as was his uncle and teacher, the poet Quintus Ennius. As a young man he followed Ennius to

  • Paczynski, Bohdan (American astrophysicist)

    Bohdan Paczynski, Polish-born American astrophysicist (born Feb. 8, 1940 , Wilno, Pol. [now Vilnius, Lith.]—died April 19, 2007 , Princeton, N.J.), pioneered a novel method for carrying out astronomical observations of distant objects that produce little or no light of their own. The technique

  • PAD (political party, Thailand)

    Thailand: Thaksin Shinawatra: …led by the urban-based opposition People’s Alliance for Democracy (PAD)—who came to be known as the “yellow shirts” for the colour they wore during demonstrations—and grew steadily in size. Because Thaksin had lost the loyalty of many ranking military officers, he was unable to order that force be used to…

  • pada (Indian music)

    South Asian arts: South India: Pada and javali are two kinds of love songs using the poetic imagery characteristic of the romantic-devotional movement mentioned earlier. Tillana has a text composed mostly of meaningless syllables, which may include the onomatopoeic syllables used to represent the different drum sounds. This is a…

  • Padalka, Gennady (Russian cosmonaut)

    Charles Simonyi: …lifted off with Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka and U.S. astronaut Michael Barratt aboard Soyuz TMA-14, a flight to the ISS that made Simonyi the first repeat space tourist. They returned to Earth on April 8, traveling on Soyuz TMA-13.

  • padam (poetry)

    Padam, love poem in Karnatak (Carnatic) music. A padam is slow in tempo and grave in import, and it is usually treated as allegorical: the yearning of the nayika (heroine) is interpreted as the soul’s longing for the nayaka (hero). The best-regarded padams were written in Sanskrit and Telugu by

  • Padamo River (river, South America)

    Orinoco River: Physiography of the Orinoco: …bank and the Manaviche, Ocamo, Padamo, and Cunucunuma rivers on the right.

  • padān (Zoroastrianism and Parsiism)

    ceremonial object: Objects used in rites of passage: …shawl, a cotton veil (padan) to cover the nose and mouth, and a mace are added; the Brahmanic (Vedic) initiate also receives a tall staff and a black antelope skin. In Sikhism (an Indian religion founded by Guru Nanak in the 16th century), initiations of novices formerly included drinking…

  • Padang (Indonesia)

    Padang, kota (city), capital of West Sumatra (Sumatera Barat) propinsi (or provinsi; province), Indonesia. Padang is the chief port on Sumatra’s western coast and is the main city of the Minangkabau people of West Sumatra. It was the site of Dutch settlements early in the 17th century, and

  • Padang Highlands (region, Indonesia)

    Padang Highlands, region near the western coast of the island of Sumatra, Indonesia. It is part of the Barisan Mountains of Sumatera Barat provinsi (“province”). The highest among several volcanoes in the highlands is Mount Merapi (9,485 feet [2,891 m]). A favourite resort area because of its

  • Padang, Urang (people)

    Minangkabau, largest ethnic group on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia, whose traditional homeland is the west-central highlands. The Minangkabau have extensive terraced fields and garden plots in which they raise irrigated rice, tobacco, and cinnamon, as well as fruits and vegetables. Their crafts

  • Padarthatattvanirupana (work by Siromani)

    Indian philosophy: The new school: …Navya-Nyaya philosophers, Raghunatha Shiromani in Padarthatattvanirupana undertook a bold revision of the traditional categorical scheme by (1) identifying “time,” “space,” and “ether” with God, (2) eliminating the category of mind by reducing it to matter, (3) denying atoms (paramanu) and dyadic (paired) combinations of them (dvyanuka), (4) eliminating “number,” “separateness,”…

  • padauk (tree)

    Narra, (genus Pterocarpus), genus of timber trees of the pea family (Fabaceae), native to Asia and Africa. Narra wood is primarily used for cabinetwork; it is usually red or rose colour, often variegated with yellow. The wood is hard and heavy, and the pattern of the grain and the colouring are

  • Padaung (people)

    body modifications and mutilations: The torso: The Padaung women of Myanmar were famous for stretching their necks—by means of coiled brass neck rings—to a length of about 15 inches (38 cm), pushing down the collarbone, compressing the rib cage, and pulling up about four thoracic vertebrae into the neck.

  • padāvalī (Indian literature)

    South Asian arts: Bengali: The third genre, padāvalī (“string of verse”) songs, is also found elsewhere; inspired by the religious bhakti movement, the songs resemble the devotional poetry of the Nāyaṉārs and Āḻvārs in Tamil. It was such poetry that established Bengali as a significant literary language. The earliest work in what…

  • Padavona, Ronald James (American singer)

    Ronnie James Dio, (Ronald James Padavona), American rock singer (born July 10, 1942, Portsmouth, N.H.—died May 16, 2010, Los Angeles, Calif.), fronted the heavy metal bands Rainbow, Black Sabbath, and Dio with soaring, nearly operatic vocals and a theatrical stage persona. He was also credited with

  • Padda oryzivora (bird)

    Java sparrow, (Padda oryzivora), bird of the mannikin group in the family Estrildidae (order Passeriformes). One of the best-known cage birds, it is an attractive pet that chirps and trills. Native to Java and Bali, it has become established in the wild elsewhere in Asia as well as in Fiji, Mexico,

  • Paddington (area, London, United Kingdom)

    Paddington, area in the borough of Westminster, London. Formerly (until 1965) a metropolitan borough, it is located west of St. Marylebone and north of Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park. Its southern section includes the neighbourhood of Bayswater, and in its northern portion is Maida Vale. The area

  • Paddington (film by King [2014])

    Jim Broadbent: …as an antiques dealer in Paddington (2014), an adaptation of the classic children’s book series about a Peruvian bear exploring London. He later appeared in the sequel (2017). Roles in 2015 included the avuncular mentor of a young man who becomes entangled in a web of international espionage in the…

  • Paddington 2 (film by King [2017])

    Hugh Grant: …credits included the family movie Paddington 2 (2017) and the TV miniseries A Very English Scandal (2018), in which he portrayed Jeremy Thorpe, a British politician accused of trying to murder his former gay lover. He then played an unscrupulous private investigator in Guy Ritchie’s comedy-action movie The Gentlemen (2019).

  • paddle

    canoe: …propelled by one or more paddles (not oars). Paddlers face the bow.

  • paddle shot (cricket)

    cricket: Technical development: …batting styles, such as the paddle shot (wherein the ball is hit behind the wicket because there are usually no fielders there) and the lofted shot (where the batsman tries to hit the ball past the fielders and over their heads). Twenty20 (T20), a style of one-day cricket consisting of…

  • paddle tennis (sport)

    Platform tennis, sport that is a combination of tennis and squash, devised in 1928 by American sports enthusiasts Fessenden Blanchard and James Cogswell at Scarsdale, N.Y. It is played on specially constructed platforms, 60 by 30 feet (18 by 9 m), surrounded by back and side walls of tightly

  • paddle tennis (sport)

    Paddle tennis, small-scale form of tennis similar to a British shipboard game of the 1890s. Frank P. Beal, a New York City official, introduced paddle tennis on New York playgrounds in the early 1920s. He had invented it as a child in Albion, Mich. It became popular, and national championship

  • paddle wheel (ship part)

    Paddle wheel, method of ship propulsion that was once widely employed but is now almost entirely superseded by the screw propeller. Early experiments with steam-driven paddles acting as oars led several inventors, including Robert Fulton, to mount the paddles in a wheel form, either at the stern

  • paddlefish (fish)

    Paddlefish, (Polyodon spathula), archaic freshwater fish with a paddlelike snout, a wide mouth, smooth skin, and a cartilaginous skeleton. A relative of the sturgeon, the paddlefish makes up the family Polyodontidae in the order Acipenseriformes. A paddlefish feeds with its mouth gaping open and

  • Paddleton (film by Lehmann [2019])

    Ray Romano: …was cast in the movie Paddleton, playing a bachelor whose similarly unmarried friend is diagnosed with a terminal illness, and he played an attorney in Martin Scorsese’s mob drama The Irishman.

  • paddock dredging (mining)

    placer mining: A later method known as paddock dredging allows placer deposits to be mined even when they are not adjacent to a river. In this method the dredge floats in its own pond, which is continuously extended by digging at one end while simultaneously being filled at the other end with…

  • Paddock, Charles William (American athlete)

    Charley Paddock, American sprinter, world record holder for the 100-metre dash (1921–30) and the 200-metre dash (1921–26). He also held the world record for the 100-yard dash (1921, 1924–26) and the 220-yard dash (1921–26). In addition, he was a member of a world record-holding 4 × 100-metre team

  • Paddock, Charley (American athlete)

    Charley Paddock, American sprinter, world record holder for the 100-metre dash (1921–30) and the 200-metre dash (1921–26). He also held the world record for the 100-yard dash (1921, 1924–26) and the 220-yard dash (1921–26). In addition, he was a member of a world record-holding 4 × 100-metre team

  • paddy (agriculture)

    Paddy, small, level, flooded field used to cultivate rice in southern and eastern Asia. Wet-rice cultivation is the most prevalent method of farming in the Far East, where it utilizes a small fraction of the total land yet feeds the majority of the rural population. Rice was domesticated as early

  • Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha (novel by Doyle)

    Roddy Doyle: Doyle’s fourth novel, Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha (1993), won the 1993 Booker Prize. Set in the 1960s in a fictional working-class area of northern Dublin, the book examines the cruelty inflicted upon children by other children. The protagonist, 10-year-old Paddy Clarke, fears his classmates’ ostracism, especially after…

  • Paddy’s Milestone (island, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Ailsa Craig, granite islet, South Ayrshire council area, Scotland, at the mouth of the Firth of Clyde and 10 miles (16 km) off the coast of South Ayrshire, to which it belongs. It is nicknamed “Paddy’s Milestone” for its location halfway between Glasgow and Belfast (Northern Ireland). The name

  • pademelon (marsupial)

    wallaby: Often called pademelons, the three species of scrub wallabies (Thylogale) of New Guinea, the Bismarck Archipelago, and Tasmania are small and stocky, with short hind limbs and pointy noses. They are hunted for meat and fur. A similar species is the short-tailed scrub wallaby, or quokka (Setonix…

  • Paderborn (Germany)

    Paderborn, city, North Rhine–Westphalia Land (state), central Germany. It lies on the Pader River, a small affluent of the Lippe formed from rain seepage on the slope of the Egge Mountains (Eggegebirge) and emerging from below the cathedral in about 200 springs, about 60 miles (100 km)

  • Paderewski, Ignacy Jan (composer and prime minister of Poland)

    Ignacy Jan Paderewski, Polish pianist, composer, and statesman, who was prime minister of Poland in 1919. Paderewski was the son of a steward of a Polish landowner. He studied music from 1872 at the Warsaw Conservatory and from 1878 taught piano there, and in 1880 he married one of his pupils,

  • Padilla, Heberto (Cuban poet)

    Heberto Padilla, controversial poet who came to international attention for a political scandal in revolutionary Cuba that is known as the “Padilla affair.” After elementary and secondary education in his native province of Pinar del Río, Padilla studied law at the University of Havana but did not

  • Padilla, José (New Granada general)

    history of Latin America: Mobility and hierarchy: …Manuel Piar in Venezuela and José Padilla in New Granada rose to the rank of general and admiral, respectively, in Bolívar’s forces. In practice, however, the old hierarchies did not fall so easily and continued on informally. Those nonwhites who managed to achieve the status of elites were clearly exceptions…

  • Padilla, Juan (Spanish missionary)

    Juan Padilla, first Christian missionary martyred within the territory of the present United States. After serving as a soldier, Padilla joined the Franciscans in Andalusia. He went to Spanish Mexico in 1528 and in the following year accompanied an expedition to Nueva Galicia (northwestern Mexico).

  • Padilla, Juan de (Spanish military leader)

    Juan de Padilla, aristocratic Spanish military leader of the Castilian Comunidades (Comuneros) in their unsuccessful revolt (1520–21) against the government of the Habsburg emperor Charles V (King Charles I of Spain). Padilla was a member of an ancient noble family of Toledo. Charles, who came to

  • Padjelanta National Park (national park, Sweden)

    Padjelanta National Park, park in Norrbotten län (county), northwestern Sweden, adjoining Norway (west) and Sarek National Park (east). It is the largest of the Swedish national parks and one of the largest parks in Europe, with an area of 776 square miles (2,010 square km). It was established in

  • padlock (lock)

    lock: Development of modern types.: …locks were used only for padlocks and trick boxes. In the last half of the 19th century, as developed for safes and strong-room doors, they proved to be the most secure form of closure. The number of possible combinations of letters or numbers is almost infinite and they have no…

  • Padlock Law (Spanish history)

    José Canalejas: …prime minister whose anticlerical “Padlock Law” forbade the establishment of new religious orders and introduced obligatory military service.

  • Padma (Hindu mythology)

    Lakshmi: …lotus and was known as Padma, or Kamala, both of which mean “Lotus”; when he was the ax-wielding Parashurama, the destroyer of the warrior class, she was his wife Dharani; when he was King Rama, she was his queen Sita. In the most widely received account of Lakshmi’s birth, she…

  • Padma ’Byung-Gnas (Buddhist mystic)

    Padmasambhava, legendary Indian Buddhist mystic who introduced Tantric Buddhism to Tibet and who is credited with establishing the first Buddhist monastery there. According to tradition, he was a native of Udyāna (now Swat, Pak.), an area famed for its magicians. Padmasambhava was a Tantrist and a

  • Padma River (river, Asia)

    Padma River, main channel of the greater Ganges (Ganga) River in Bangladesh. For some 90 miles (145 km) the Ganges River forms the western boundary between India and Bangladesh before it enters Bangladesh at the northern edge of the Kushtia district as the upper segment of the Padma River. The

  • Padmanabhapuram Palace (palace, India)

    Nagercoil: …is the tourist centre of Padmanabhapuram Palace, which was formerly the residence of the Travancore raja. Pop. (2001) 208,179; (2011) 224,849.

  • Padmapada (Indian philosopher)

    Indian philosophy: Shankara’s theory of error and religious and ethical concerns: …the State of Nonaction”), and Padmapada, author of Panchapadika, a commentary on the first five padas, or sections, of the bhashya. These early pupils raised and settled issues that were not systematically discussed by Shankara himself—issues that later divided his followers into two large groups: those who followed the Vivarana…

  • Padmasambhava (Buddhist mystic)

    Padmasambhava, legendary Indian Buddhist mystic who introduced Tantric Buddhism to Tibet and who is credited with establishing the first Buddhist monastery there. According to tradition, he was a native of Udyāna (now Swat, Pak.), an area famed for its magicians. Padmasambhava was a Tantrist and a

  • padmasana (yoga practice)

    asana: …common is the padmasana (“lotus posture”).

  • Padmāvatī (work by Jāyasī)

    South Asian arts: Hindi: …also is the religious epic Padmāvatī by Jāyasī, a Muslim from former Oudh state. Written in Awadhi (c. 1540), the epic is composed according to the conventions of Sanskrit poetics.

  • Padmavati the Harlot (work by Das)

    Kamala Das: …Child Prostitute” (1977) and “Padmavati the Harlot” (1992). Notable among her many Malayalam works were the short-story collection Thanuppu (1967; “Cold”) and the memoir Balyakalasmaranakal (1987; “Memories of Childhood”). Perhaps her best-known work was an autobiography, which first appeared as a series of columns in the weekly Malayalanadu, then…

  • Padmini (Indian actress)

    Padmini, Indian film actress (born June 12, 1932, Poojappura, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala state, British India—died Sept. 24, 2006, Chennai [Madras], India), entranced audiences with her beauty and graceful dance moves in more than 250 films. The multilingual Padmini spoke her own dialogue in Hi

  • Padmore, George (Trinidadian author and Pan-Africanist)

    Pan-Africanism: History of Pan-Africanist intellectuals: James and George Padmore, both of whom came from Trinidad. From the 1930s until his death in 1959, Padmore was one of the leading theorists of Pan-African ideas. Also influential were Léopold Senghor and Aimé Césaire, who were natives of Senegal and Martinique, respectively. A disciple of…

  • Padova (Italy)

    Padua, city, Veneto region, northern Italy, on the River Bacchiglione, west of Venice. The Roman Patavium, founded, according to legend, by the Trojan hero Antenor, it was first mentioned in 302 bce, according to the Roman historian Livy, who was born there (59 bce). The town prospered greatly and,

  • Padova, Università Degli Studi di (university, Padua, Italy)

    University of Padua, autonomous coeducational state institution of higher learning in Padua, Italy. The university was founded in 1222 by a secession of about a thousand students from the University of Bologna, reinforced by additional migrations from Bologna in 1306 and 1322. Like Bologna, it was

  • Pádraic Henry Pearse (Irish poet and statesman)

    Patrick Pearse, Irish nationalist leader, poet, and educator. He was the first president of the provisional government of the Irish republic proclaimed in Dublin on April 24, 1916, and was commander in chief of the Irish forces in the anti-British Easter Rising that began on the same day. The son

  • padrao (Portuguese stone pillar)

    Vasco da Gama: The first voyage: The fleet also carried padrões (stone pillars) to set up as marks of discovery.

  • Padre Isla, El (Spanish author)

    José Francisco de Isla, Spanish satirist and preacher noted for his novel known as Fray Gerundio. Isla showed intellectual promise early and entered the Jesuit order as a novice in 1719, studying at the University of Salamanca. He was named professor of sacred literature in 1727 and taught this

  • Padre Island (island, Texas, United States)

    Padre Island, barrier island, 113 miles (182 km) long and up to 3 miles (5 km) wide, lying in the Gulf of Mexico along the southeastern coast of Texas, U.S. It extends south from Corpus Christi to Port Isabel, just north of the Mexican border, and is separated from the mainland by Laguna Madre

  • Padre Martini (Italian composer)

    Giovanni Battista Martini, Italian composer, music theorist, and music historian who was internationally renowned as a teacher. Martini was educated by his father, a violinist; by Luc’Antonio Predieri (harpsichord, singing, organ); and by Antonio Riccieri (counterpoint). He was ordained in 1729,

  • Padre Padrone (film by Taviani brothers [1977])

    Taviani brothers: Their first major success, Padre Padrone (1977; “Father Master”), is based on the life of an Italian linguist who in his youth was an illiterate shepherd. In the later La notte di San Lorenzo (1982; The Night of the Shooting Stars), a mother recounts for her child her wartime…

  • Padres (American baseball team)

    San Diego Padres, American professional baseball team based in San Diego that plays in the National League (NL). The Padres were founded in 1969 and have won two NL pennants (1984, 1998). The franchise came into existence alongside three other expansion teams in 1969. The Padres lost 110 games in

  • Padri (Islamic sect)

    Padri War: …between reformist Muslims, known as Padris, and local chieftains assisted by the Dutch. In the early 19th century the puritan Wahhābīyah sect of Islām spread to Sumatra, brought by pilgrims who entered the island through Pedir, a northern port. The Padris, as these Sumatran converts to Wahhābīyah came to be…

  • Padri War (Southeast Asian history)

    Padri War, (1821–37), armed conflict in Minangkabau (Sumatra) between reformist Muslims, known as Padris, and local chieftains assisted by the Dutch. In the early 19th century the puritan Wahhābīyah sect of Islām spread to Sumatra, brought by pilgrims who entered the island through Pedir, a

  • padrona, La (work by Betti)

    Ugo Betti: His first play, La padrona (first performed 1927; “The Landlady”), drew mixed reactions, but later successful plays include Frana allo scalo Nord (first performed 1933; Eng. trans., Landslide, 1964), the story of a natural disaster and collective guilt; Delitto all’Isola delle Capre (first performed 1950; Eng. trans., Crime…

  • Padua (Italy)

    Padua, city, Veneto region, northern Italy, on the River Bacchiglione, west of Venice. The Roman Patavium, founded, according to legend, by the Trojan hero Antenor, it was first mentioned in 302 bce, according to the Roman historian Livy, who was born there (59 bce). The town prospered greatly and,

  • Padua, University of (university, Padua, Italy)

    University of Padua, autonomous coeducational state institution of higher learning in Padua, Italy. The university was founded in 1222 by a secession of about a thousand students from the University of Bologna, reinforced by additional migrations from Bologna in 1306 and 1322. Like Bologna, it was

  • Paduan school (painting)

    Francesco Squarcione: …Renaissance painter who founded the Paduan school and is known for being the teacher of Andrea Mantegna and other noteworthy painters.

  • Paducah (Kentucky, United States)

    Paducah, city, seat of McCracken county, southwestern Kentucky, U.S., at the confluence of the Ohio (there bridged to Brookport, Illinois) and Tennessee rivers. The site, known as Pekin, was part of a grant to soldier and frontiersman George Rogers Clark. At his death his brother William, who was

  • Padukone, Prakash (Indian badminton player)

    Prakash Padukone, Indian badminton champion who dominated the national badminton scene for almost a decade (1971–80) and put India on the sport’s international map. Padukone won the national senior championship in 1971 at age 16, thereby becoming the youngest player to have achieved the feat. He

  • Padukone, Vasanth Kumar Shivsankar (Indian filmmaker and actor)

    Guru Dutt, Hindi motion-picture producer, director, writer, and actor, whose mastery of such elements as mood and lighting in a group of melodramas made him one of the best-known and most-accomplished stylists of Bollywood’s golden age. Educated in Calcutta (now Kolkata), Dutt trained at Uday

  • Pădurea spînzuraților (work by Rebreanu)

    Romanian literature: Between the wars: …best work, Pădurea spînzuraƫilor (1922; The Forest of the Hanged), was inspired by his brother’s fate during World War I. In it, he describes the tragedy of a Romanian soldier forced to turn against his own people as a member of the Austro-Hungarian army. He tries to flee but is…

  • Padus (river, Italy)

    Po River, longest river in Italy, rising in the Monte Viso group of the Cottian Alps on Italy’s western frontier and emptying into the Adriatic Sea in the east after a course of 405 miles (652 km). Its drainage basin covers 27,062 square miles (70,091 square km), forming Italy’s widest and most f

  • Padzi (people)

    Solorese: …groups, the Demon and the Padzi, who have different political and religious beliefs.

  • paean (lyric)

    Paean, solemn choral lyric of invocation, joy, or triumph, originating in ancient Greece, where it was addressed to Apollo in his guise as Paean, physician to the gods. In the Mycenaean Linear B tablets from the late 2nd millennium bc, the word pa-ja-wo-ne is used as a name for a healer god. This

  • paecottah (irrigation device)

    Shaduf, hand-operated device for lifting water, invented in ancient times and still used in India, Egypt, and some other countries to irrigate land. Typically it consists of a long, tapering, nearly horizontal pole mounted like a seesaw. A skin or bucket is hung on a rope from the long end, and a

  • paedodontics (dentistry)

    Pedodontics, dental specialty that deals with the care of children’s teeth. The pedodontist is extensively concerned with prevention, which includes instruction in proper diet, use of fluoride, and practice of oral hygiene. The pedodontist’s routine practice deals basically with caries (tooth

  • paedogenesis (zoology)

    Paedogenesis, reproduction by sexually mature larvae, usually without fertilization. The young may be eggs, such as are produced by Miastor, a genus of gall midge flies, or other larval forms, as in the case of some flukes. This form of reproduction is distinct from neotenic reproduction in its p

  • paedomorphism (biology)

    Paedomorphosis, retention by an organism of juvenile or even larval traits into later life. There are two aspects of paedomorphosis: acceleration of sexual maturation relative to the rest of development (progenesis) and retardation of bodily development with respect to the onset of reproductive a

  • paedomorphosis (biology)

    Paedomorphosis, retention by an organism of juvenile or even larval traits into later life. There are two aspects of paedomorphosis: acceleration of sexual maturation relative to the rest of development (progenesis) and retardation of bodily development with respect to the onset of reproductive a

  • paedophilia (psychosexual disorder)

    Pedophilia, in conventional usage, a psychosexual disorder, generally affecting adults, characterized by sexual interest in prepubescent children or attempts to engage in sexual acts with prepubescent children. The term was used with that meaning in the psychiatric diagnostic literature prior to

  • Paekche (ancient kingdom, Korea)

    Paekche, one of three kingdoms into which ancient Korea was divided before 660. Occupying the southwestern tip of the Korean peninsula, Paekche is traditionally said to have been founded in 18 bc in the Kwangju area by a legendary leader named Onjo. By the 3rd century ad, during the reign of King

  • Paektu, Mount (mountain, Asia)

    China: The Changbai Mountains: …is the volcanic cone of Mount Baitou (9,003 feet [2,744 metres]), which has a beautiful crater lake at its snow-covered summit. As one of the major forest areas of China, the region is the source of many valuable furs and famous medicinal herbs. Cultivation is generally limited to the valley…

  • Paeligni (people)

    Paeligni, ancient people of central Italy, whose territory lay inland on the eastward slopes of the Apennines. Though akin to the Samnites, they formed a separate league with their neighbours the Marsi, Marrucini, and Vestini. This league appears to have broken up after the Second Samnite War (304

  • paella (food)

    Paella, in Spanish cuisine, a dish of saffron-flavoured rice cooked with meats, seafood, and vegetables. Originating in the rice-growing areas on Spain’s Mediterranean coast, the dish is especially associated with the region of Valencia. Paella takes its name from the paellera, the utensil in

  • paellera (utensil)

    paella: …takes its name from the paellera, the utensil in which it is cooked, a flat round pan with two handles; paella is traditionally eaten from the pan.

  • paenula (liturgical vestment)

    religious dress: Roman Catholic religious dress: …goes back to the Roman paenula. The paenula also was the Eastern Orthodox equivalent of the chasuble, the phelonion, and perhaps also the cope (a long mantlelike vestment). In its earliest form, the paenula was a cone-shaped dress with an opening at the apex to admit the head. Because ancient…

  • Paeonia (historical region)

    Paeonia, the land of the Paeonians, originally including the whole Axius (Vardar) River valley and the surrounding areas, in what is now northern Greece, Macedonia, and western Bulgaria. The Paeonians, who were probably of mixed Thraco-Illyrian origin, were weakened by the Persian invasion (490

  • Paeonia (plant)

    Peony, (genus Paeonia), genus of about 30 species of flowering plants (family Paeoniaceae) known for their large showy blossoms. All but two species are native to Europe and Asia, and several species are cultivated as ornamentals and for the floral industry. There are three distinct groups of

  • Paeonia lactiflora (plant)

    peony: The fragrant Chinese peony (P. lactiflora) and the European common peony (P. officinalis) have given rise to most of the familiar garden peonies. P. lactiflora has provided hundreds of cultivated varieties, including the Japanese types, with one or two rows of petals surrounding a cluster of partially…

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