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  • Passfield White Paper (United Kingdom [1930])

    Palestine: The British mandate: …formed the basis of the Passfield White Paper, issued in October 1930, which accorded some priority to Britain’s obligations to the Arabs. Not only did it call for a halt to Jewish immigration, but it also recommended that land be sold only to landless Arabs and that the determination of…

  • Passiflora (plant)

    Passion-flower, any of about 400 species of tendril-bearing, herbaceous vines comprising the genus Passiflora (family Passifloraceae), with characteristic flowers. Some are important as ornamentals; others are grown for their edible fruits. The wild passion-flower, passion vine, or maypop (P.

  • Passiflora edulis (plant)

    passion-flower: The purple granadilla (P. edulis) and the yellow granadilla (P. laurifolia), as well as the wild passion-flower, are widely grown in tropical America for their fruit. Passiflora maliformis is the sweet calabash of the West Indies. The size of these fruits usually does not exceed that…

  • Passiflora incarnata (plant)

    passion-flower: The wild passion-flower, passion vine, or maypop (P. incarnata) climbs about 3 to 9 m (10 to 30 feet) high and has pink and white flowers about 4 to 7.5 cm (1.5 to 3 inches) across and a yellow, berrylike, edible fruit about 5 cm long.…

  • Passiflora laurifolia (plant)

    passion-flower: edulis) and the yellow granadilla (P. laurifolia), as well as the wild passion-flower, are widely grown in tropical America for their fruit. Passiflora maliformis is the sweet calabash of the West Indies. The size of these fruits usually does not exceed that of a hen’s egg, but that…

  • Passiflora lutea (plant)

    passion-flower: The yellow passion-flower (P. lutea) is a smaller plant with greenish yellow flowers and purple fruits.

  • Passiflora maliformis (plant)

    passion-flower: Passiflora maliformis is the sweet calabash of the West Indies. The size of these fruits usually does not exceed that of a hen’s egg, but that of the giant granadilla is like a gourd and may weigh up to seven or eight pounds.

  • Passiflora quadrangularis (plant)

    passion-flower: …delicate dessert fruits, as the giant granadilla (P. quadrangularis). The purple granadilla (P. edulis) and the yellow granadilla (P. laurifolia), as well as the wild passion-flower, are widely grown in tropical America for their fruit. Passiflora maliformis is the sweet calabash of the West Indies. The size of these fruits…

  • Passifloraceae (plant family)

    Passifloraceae, the passion-flower family, in the order Malpighiales, containing 16 genera and 705 species of herbaceous or woody vines, shrubs, and trees, mostly of warm regions. Passifloraceae is most highly developed in the Neotropics and in Africa. The largest genus in the family is Passiflora,

  • Passing (novel by Larsen)

    Nella Larsen: Her second novel, Passing (1929), centres on two light-skinned women, one of whom, Irene, marries a black man and lives in Harlem, while the other, Clare, marries a white man but cannot reject her black cultural ties. In 1930 Larsen became the first black woman to be awarded…

  • Passing of the Aborigine, The (work by Bates)

    Australian literature: Nationalism and expansion: …her experiences the standard phrase The Passing of the Aborigine (1938). Aboriginal people had become the subject of anthropological interest in the work of Sir Walter Baldwin Spencer and Francis James Gillen in Central Australia, and Aboriginal legends had been collected and rewritten by K. Langloh Parker, although there was…

  • Passing On (novel by Lively)

    Penelope Lively: …on her recollections of Egypt; Passing On (1989); City of the Mind (1991); and Cleopatra’s Sister (1993). Heat Wave (1996) is the story of the disintegration of a marriage, and a retired anthropologist reflects on her past in Spiderweb (1998). In The Photograph (2003) a man finds and investigates posthumous…

  • passing shot (tennis)

    tennis: Strategy and technique: …is always vulnerable to a passing shot—one angled cross-court or played down-the-line, beyond reach—but if the serve or approach shot puts the opponent under enough pressure, the server, now at the net, has the upper hand, since a volley is generally easier to put away (play for a point) than…

  • Passio Domini Nostri Ihesu Christi (Cornish drama)

    Cornish literature: …and the promise of salvation; Passio Domini (“Passion of the Lord”) describes Christ’s temptation and his Crucifixion; Resurrexio Domini (“Resurrection of the Lord”) covers the Resurrection and Ascension. The Ordinalia cannot be dated with certainty but may be from the late 14th or early 15th century. Unlike contemporary works in…

  • Passio Sanctarum Perpetuae et Felicitatis (Latin hagiography)

    Perpetua: …Tunisia]), Christian martyr who wrote The Passion of Saints Perpetua and Felicity, a journal recounting her trial and imprisonment that was continued by a contemporary who described Perpetua’s death in the arena. Both her martyrdom and its account have been highly revered by ancient and modern Christians. Her text is…

  • passion (human emotion)

    ethics: The Stoics: …above, Plato held that human passions and physical desires are in need of regulation by reason. The Stoics went farther: they rejected passions altogether as a basis for deciding what is good or bad. Although physical desires cannot simply be abolished, the wise person will appreciate the difference between wanting…

  • Passion (film by De Palma [2012])

    Brian De Palma: Later work: …soldiers, and the revenge thrillers Passion (2012), starring Rachel McAdams and Noomi Rapace, and Domino (2019).

  • Passion (Christianity)

    Jesus: Jesus’ last week: After supper, Jesus took his disciples to the Mount of Olives to pray. While he was there, Judas led armed men sent by the chief priests to arrest him (Mark 14:43–52). They took Jesus to Caiaphas, who had gathered some of his councillors (called collectively the Sanhedrin).…

  • Passion According to St. John (work by Bach)

    oratorio: The golden age of oratorio: 1600–c. 1750: …two great Passion oratorios, the Passion According to St. John (first performed 1724) and the Passion According to St. Matthew (1729), restored the balance attained by Schütz, though they are written on a greater scale and are enriched by the introduction of the later Italian aria. Bach, besides increasing the…

  • Passion According to St. Matthew (work by Bach)

    St. Matthew Passion, BWV 244, Passion music by Johann Sebastian Bach. Its earliest verified performance was April 11, 1727—Good Friday—at Thomaskirche in Leipzig. It is the longest and most elaborate of all works by this Baroque master and represents the culmination of his sacred music and, indeed,

  • Passion de Jeanne d’Arc, La (film by Dreyer [1928])

    La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc, (French: “The Passion of Joan of Arc”) French silent film, released in 1928, that was an acclaimed and historically accurate account of the trial and execution of Saint Joan of Arc in 1431. The inventive film is a sober, intelligent drama detailing the last weeks in the

  • Passion du Christ (French literature)

    French language: History: Two 10th-century texts (the Passion du Christ and the Vie de St. Léger) seem to mingle northern and southern dialect features, while another (the “Jonas fragment”) is obviously from the far north. In the 12th century the “gem” of the epic poems known as chansons de geste, La Chanson…

  • Passion du Palatinus (French literature)

    French literature: Religious drama: …early 14th century in the Passion du Palatinus (“Passion of Palatinus”). Of relatively modest proportions, this contains diversified dialogue with excellent dramatic potential and probably drew on earlier plays now lost.

  • Passion Fish (film by Sayles)

    John Sayles: …discrimination; City of Hope (1991); Passion Fish (1992), which earned Sayles an Academy Award nomination for a best original screenplay, as did the intricately crafted cross-cultural murder mystery Lone Star (1996); The Secret of Roan Inish (1994); Men with Guns (1997); Limbo (1999); Sunshine State (2002); Casa de Los Babys…

  • Passion Hymns of Iceland, The (work by Petursson)

    Jón Thorkelsson Vídalín: …worthy companion to Hallgrímur Pétursson’s Passion Hymns as well as the most popular devotional work in Iceland down to the 19th century.

  • Passion music (vocal music)

    Passion music, musical setting of the suffering and Crucifixion of Christ, based either on biblical texts or poetic elaborations. Dating from the 4th century onward, they range from unaccompanied plainsong to compositions for soloists, chorus, and orchestra. In the medieval Passion the deacon sang

  • Passion of Anna, The (film by Bergman [1969])

    Ingmar Bergman: Life: …passion (1969; A Passion, or The Passion of Anna), all dramas of inner conflicts involving a small, closely knit group of characters. With The Touch (1971; Beröringen), his first English-language film, Bergman returned to an urban setting and more romantic subject matter, though fundamentally the characters in the film’s marital…

  • Passion of Ayn Rand, The (work by Branden)

    Ayn Rand: Legacy and influence: …Barbara Branden published a memoir, The Passion of Ayn Rand, that disclosed Rand’s affair with Nathan and revealed unflattering details of her relations with members of the Collective and others. Despite the resulting damage to her reputation, her novels continued to enjoy large sales, and she retained a loyal following…

  • Passion of Joan of Arc, The (film by Dreyer [1928])

    La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc, (French: “The Passion of Joan of Arc”) French silent film, released in 1928, that was an acclaimed and historically accurate account of the trial and execution of Saint Joan of Arc in 1431. The inventive film is a sober, intelligent drama detailing the last weeks in the

  • Passion of Josef D., The (work of Chayefsky)

    Paddy Chayefsky: …and attacked contemporary cynicism, while The Passion of Josef D. (1964) was a treatment of Joseph Stalin and the Russian Revolution. The Latent Heterosexual (published 1967; performed 1968) tells of a successful homosexual author who marries for tax purposes and enjoys it. Chayefsky also wrote film scripts and scenarios; he…

  • Passion of Sacco and Vanzetti, The (painting by Shahn)

    Social Realism: Shahn’s painting The Passion of Sacco and Vanzetti (1931–32) is a bitter comment on the outcome of the famous case in which two Italian anarchists were condemned to death in a politically motivated trial. A good example of Gropper’s powerfully simplified caricatures of American public life is…

  • Passion of Saints Perpetua and Felicity, The (Latin hagiography)

    Perpetua: …Tunisia]), Christian martyr who wrote The Passion of Saints Perpetua and Felicity, a journal recounting her trial and imprisonment that was continued by a contemporary who described Perpetua’s death in the arena. Both her martyrdom and its account have been highly revered by ancient and modern Christians. Her text is…

  • Passion of the Christ, The (film by Gibson [2004])

    Christology: Film: Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ (2004) avoids some of the problems attending a film on Jesus by concentrating on the last 12 hours of Jesus’ life, from his arrest to his Crucifixion. The film was criticized, however, for alleged anti-Semitism, excessive gore and violence, and…

  • Passion oratorio (music)

    oratorio: The golden age of oratorio: 1600–c. 1750: Passion oratorio texts (dealing with the death of Jesus) of this period often abandon biblical words for a mixture of rhymed paraphrase and lyrical commentary of a more or less sentimental nature.

  • Passion play (dramatic genre)

    Passion play, religious drama of medieval origin dealing with the suffering, death, and Resurrection of Christ. Early Passion plays (in Latin) consisted of readings from the Gospel with interpolated poetical sections on the events of Christ’s Passion and related subjects, such as Mary Magdalene’s

  • Passion Play (film by Glazer [2010])

    Bill Murray: …a mobster in the thriller Passion Play (2010). In 2012 he starred as U.S. Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt in Hyde Park on Hudson, which focused on the president’s private life during a weekend in 1939 when he entertained British royalty. Murray later played a member of the Monuments, Fine Arts,…

  • Passion Play, The (play by Morse)

    James O'Neill: …a San Francisco production of The Passion Play by Salmi Morse. The role, which caused local authorities to arrest him under ordinances forbidding impersonation of the Deity, drew nationwide attention. In 1882 O’Neill opened as Edmond Dantes in The Count of Monte Cristo in a stage version by Charles Fechter.…

  • Passion selon Pier Paolo Pasolini, La (work by Kalisky)

    René Kalisky: …complex in ideas and staging: La Passion selon Pier Paolo Pasolini (1977; “The Passion According to Pier Paolo Pasolini”) is a reconstitution of the Italian writer and film director’s murder, incorporating the reenactment of scenes from Pasolini’s films; Dave au bord de la mer (1978; “Dave on the Beach”) is…

  • Passion Sunday (Christianity)

    Palm Sunday, in the Christian tradition, the first day of Holy Week and the Sunday before Easter, commemorating Jesus Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem. It is associated in many churches with the blessing and procession of palms (leaves of the date palm or twigs from locally available trees).

  • Passion Triptych (painting by Memling)

    Hans Memling: …a Crucifixion panel from the Passion triptych (1491).

  • passion vine (plant)

    passion-flower: The wild passion-flower, passion vine, or maypop (P. incarnata) climbs about 3 to 9 m (10 to 30 feet) high and has pink and white flowers about 4 to 7.5 cm (1.5 to 3 inches) across and a yellow, berrylike, edible fruit about 5 cm long.…

  • Passion, Congregation of the (religious order)

    Passionist, a religious order of men in the Roman Catholic church, founded by Paolo Francesco Danei (now known as St. Paul of the Cross) in Italy in 1720 to spread devotion to the sufferings and death on the Cross of Jesus Christ. The Passionists fulfill their mission by preaching about Jesus

  • passion, En (film by Bergman [1969])

    Ingmar Bergman: Life: …passion (1969; A Passion, or The Passion of Anna), all dramas of inner conflicts involving a small, closely knit group of characters. With The Touch (1971; Beröringen), his first English-language film, Bergman returned to an urban setting and more romantic subject matter, though fundamentally the characters in the film’s marital…

  • Passion, Era of the (chronology)

    chronology: Christian: The Era of the Passion, commencing 33 years after that of the Incarnation, enjoyed a short vogue, mainly in 11th-century France.

  • Passion, The (novel by Winterson)

    Jeanette Winterson: The Passion (1987), her second work, is a picaresque historical novel that chronicles the adventures of Villanelle, an enslaved Venetian woman who is rescued by Henri, a cook from Napoleon’s army. Attempting to reach Venice, the two travel through Russia in winter.

  • Passion, The (film by Bergman [1969])

    Ingmar Bergman: Life: …passion (1969; A Passion, or The Passion of Anna), all dramas of inner conflicts involving a small, closely knit group of characters. With The Touch (1971; Beröringen), his first English-language film, Bergman returned to an urban setting and more romantic subject matter, though fundamentally the characters in the film’s marital…

  • passion-flower (plant)

    Passion-flower, any of about 400 species of tendril-bearing, herbaceous vines comprising the genus Passiflora (family Passifloraceae), with characteristic flowers. Some are important as ornamentals; others are grown for their edible fruits. The wild passion-flower, passion vine, or maypop (P.

  • passion-flower family (plant family)

    Passifloraceae, the passion-flower family, in the order Malpighiales, containing 16 genera and 705 species of herbaceous or woody vines, shrubs, and trees, mostly of warm regions. Passifloraceae is most highly developed in the Neotropics and in Africa. The largest genus in the family is Passiflora,

  • Passionate Kisses (song by Williams)

    Lucinda Williams: …Chapin Carpenter covered Williams’s “Passionate Kisses,” a single from her self-titled album. Carpenter’s version earned Williams a Grammy Award for country song of the year.

  • Passionate Life of Edith Piaf, The (film by Dahan [2007])

    Marion Cotillard: …Môme (2007; also released as La Vie en rose) propelled her to international fame.

  • Passionella (work by Feiffer)

    Jules Feiffer: …Sick (1958), was followed by Passionella, and Other Stories (1959). Passionella contains the character Munro, a four-year-old boy who was drafted into the army by mistake. Munro became the basis of an animated cartoon that received an Academy Award in 1961. Later cartoon collections included Boy, Girl, Boy, Girl (1961);…

  • Passionerna (work by Thorild)

    Thomas Thorild: …held in Stockholm, he entered Passionerna (1781; “The Passions”), his first poem. Although it won only honourable mention, Passionerna, a philosophic expression of pantheistic feeling for nature, greatly startled literary Stockholm. Thorild became increasingly involved in writing on social reform and philosophy during his later years, but he continued to…

  • Passionist Nuns (religious order)

    Passionist: Paul also founded the Passionist Nuns (Nuns of the Cross and Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ), approved by Pope Clement XIV in 1771. Passionist Sisters were established in 1852 in England.

  • Passionists (religious order)

    Passionist, a religious order of men in the Roman Catholic church, founded by Paolo Francesco Danei (now known as St. Paul of the Cross) in Italy in 1720 to spread devotion to the sufferings and death on the Cross of Jesus Christ. The Passionists fulfill their mission by preaching about Jesus

  • Passions of the Mind (essays by Byatt)

    A.S. Byatt: …of Fire and Ice (1998); Passions of the Mind (1991), a collection of essays; and Angels & Insects (1991; film 1995), a pair of novellas. Among her nonfiction works is Peacock & Vine (2016), about William Morris and Mariano Fortuny. Byatt was made Dame Commander of the Order of the…

  • Passions of the Mind, The (work by Stone)

    Irving Stone: …of the Renaissance artist Michelangelo; The Passions of the Mind (1971), about Sigmund Freud; and The Origin (1980), a life of Charles Darwin centred on the voyage of the Beagle and its aftermath.

  • Passions of the Soul, The (work by Descartes)

    René Descartes: Physics, physiology, and morals: Despite such arguments, in his Passions of the Soul (1649), which he dedicated to Queen Christina of Sweden (reigned 1644–54), Descartes holds that most bodily actions are determined by external material causes.

  • Passionsspiel (religious pageant)

    pageant: The Passionsspiel (a presentation of Christ’s last hours on earth) of the village of Oberammergau in Bavaria is perhaps the best-known religious pageant drama in the West.

  • Passiusálmar (work by Petursson)

    Jón Thorkelsson Vídalín: …worthy companion to Hallgrímur Pétursson’s Passion Hymns as well as the most popular devotional work in Iceland down to the 19th century.

  • passive detector (physics)

    radiation measurement: Applications of radiation interactions in detectors: These so-called passive detectors are widely applied in the routine monitoring of occupational exposures to ionizing radiation. In contrast, in active detectors a signal is produced in real time to indicate the presence of radiation. This distinction is indicated for the examples in the table. The normal…

  • passive dispersal (zoology)

    migration: Navigation and orientation: Passive drifting is an important factor in the movements of larvae and young fishes, such as those of the eel, cod, herring, and plaice, and even in adult fishes that are passive after spawning, such as herring and cod. As a result of drifting with…

  • passive force (physiology)

    muscle: Length-tension relationship: …of the muscle, however, a passive force begins to assert itself. The exact length at which this passive force occurs depends on the particular muscle. This force is characterized as passive because it is developed in noncontracting or inactive muscles by the elastic elements of the muscle.

  • passive heating (technology)

    solar heating: Passive heating relies on architectural design to heat buildings. The building’s site, structure, and materials can all be utilized to maximize the heating (and lighting) effect of the sunlight falling on it, thereby lowering or even eliminating its fuel requirement. A well-insulated building with a…

  • passive immunity (immunology)

    immunization: In passive immunization a person receives antibodies or lymphocytes that have been produced by another individual’s immune system; in active immunization the individual’s own immune system is stimulated to produce antibodies and lymphocytes.

  • passive immunization (immunology)

    immunization: In passive immunization a person receives antibodies or lymphocytes that have been produced by another individual’s immune system; in active immunization the individual’s own immune system is stimulated to produce antibodies and lymphocytes.

  • passive intellect (philosophy)

    epistemology: Aristotle: The first is the passive intellect, the second the active intellect, of which Aristotle speaks tersely. “Intellect in this sense is separable, impassible, unmixed, since it is in its essential nature activity.…When intellect is set free from its present conditions, it appears as just what it is and nothing…

  • Passive Obedience (work by Berkeley)

    George Berkeley: Period of his major works: …in three sermons, published as Passive Obedience (1712). Thus, with four major books in five years, the foundations of his fame were laid. When he first left Ireland in 1713 on a leave of absence, he was already a man of mark in the learned world; his books were reviewed…

  • passive personality principle (international law)

    international law: Jurisdiction: The passive personality principle allows states, in limited cases, to claim jurisdiction to try a foreign national for offenses committed abroad that affect its own citizens. This principle has been used by the United States to prosecute terrorists and even to arrest (in 1989–90) the de…

  • passive resistance

    Civil disobedience, the refusal to obey the demands or commands of a government or occupying power, without resorting to violence or active measures of opposition; its usual purpose is to force concessions from the government or occupying power. Civil disobedience has been a major tactic and

  • passive restoration (ecology)

    ecological restoration: Implementation: This process is called passive restoration because restoration specialists do not need to take much action. For example, halting agricultural tillage or stemming the overuse of riverbanks by livestock may be enough to bring a site back to a pre-disturbed state.

  • passive safety system (nuclear industry)

    nuclear power: Safety: …and rely more on so-called passive safety designs (i.e., directing cooling water by gravity rather than moving it by pumps) in order to keep the plants safe in the event of a severe accident or station blackout. For instance, in the Westinghouse AP1000 design, residual heat would be removed from…

  • passive smoking

    lung cancer: Causes and symptoms: Passive inhalation of cigarette smoke (sometimes called secondhand smoke) is linked to lung cancer in nonsmokers. According to the American Cancer Society, about 3,400 deaths from lung cancer occur each year in nonsmokers in the United States. Other risk factors include exposure to radon gas…

  • passive solar energy

    construction: Heating and cooling: …use in residential buildings is passive solar radiation. On sunny winter days, south-facing windows let in substantial amounts of energy, often enough to heat the entire building. Wood-burning fireplaces with chimneys are still widely provided in residential buildings, but their use is mostly for aesthetic effect.

  • passive sonar (technique)

    sonar: Passive systems consist simply of receiving sensors that pick up the noise produced by the target (such as a ship, submarine, or torpedo). Waveforms thus detected may be analyzed for identifying characteristics as well as direction and distance. The third category of sonar devices is…

  • passive spread (biology)

    nervous system: Localized potential: …potential, through a process called passive spread, diffuses along the nerve fibre and back out through the membrane.

  • passive transducer (device)

    transducer: The passive transducer produces a change in some passive electrical quantity, such as capacitance, resistance, or inductance, as a result of stimulation. Passive transducers usually require additional electrical energy. A simple example of a passive transducer is a device containing a length of wire and a…

  • passive transport (biology)

    cell: Transport across the membrane: …them through the membrane by passive transport; that is, the changes that the proteins undergo in order to facilitate diffusion are powered by the diffusing solutes themselves. For the healthy functioning of the cell, certain solutes must remain at different concentrations on each side of the membrane; if through diffusion…

  • passive voice (grammar)

    voice: …languages are those of active, passive, and middle voice. These distinctions may be made by inflection, as in Latin, or by syntactic variation, as in English. The active-passive opposition can be illustrated by the following sentences:

  • passive-aggressive personality disorder (psychology)

    personality disorder: Persons with passive-aggressive personality disorder express their hostility through such indirect means as stubbornness, procrastination, inefficiency, and forgetfulness.

  • passive-guidance system (technology)

    rocket and missile system: Passive: Passive guidance systems neither emitted energy nor received commands from an external source; rather, they “locked” onto an electronic emission coming from the target itself. The earliest successful passive homing munitions were “heat-seeking” air-to-air missiles that homed onto the infrared emissions of jet engine…

  • passive-homing antiradiation missile

    rocket and missile system: Inertial: Passive-homing antiradiation missiles, designed to destroy radar installations, generally combined inertial guidance with memory-equipped autopilots to maintain their trajectory toward the target in case the radar stopped transmitting.

  • passive-matrix addressing (electronics)

    liquid crystal display: Supertwisted nematic displays: The display is activated using passive-matrix addressing, for which the pixels are arranged in rows and columns; selective application of a voltage to a particular row and column will activate the corresponding element at their intersection. The supertwist causes a larger relative change in optical transmission with applied voltage, compared…

  • passive-restraint device

    vehicular safety devices: Passive-restraint devices protect drivers and passengers without any action on their part. Among those tested was the air bag, an inflatable pillow-like cushion stored in the instrument panel and triggered to inflate in a fraction of a second by the force of impact, cushioning and…

  • påssjo (Sami religion)

    Påssjo, the sacred area in a Sami kota, or tent, found directly behind the central hearth. Strictly forbidden to women, the påssjo was furnished with its own entrance and sometimes set off with poles to separate it from the living space in the rest of the kota. The påssjo held all objects of value,

  • Passmore, George (British artist)

    Gilbert & George: 17, 1943, Dolomites, Italy) and George Passmore (b. Jan. 8, 1942, Plymouth, Devon, Eng.), whose dynamic and often humorous insertion of themselves into their art proved an important chapter in postwar British conceptual art.

  • Passmore, John Arthur (Australian philosopher)

    John Arthur Passmore, Australian philosopher (born Sept. 9, 1914, Manly, N.S.W., Australia—died July 25, 2004, Canberra, Australia), was a leading figure in the field of applied philosophy, in which philosophical research is applied to practical matters, such as medical ethics and the e

  • Passo di Resia (mountain pass, Europe)

    Resia Pass, pass south of the Austrian-Italian border and just east of the Swiss frontier. It is 4,934 feet (1,504 m) high and about 1 mile (1.6 km) long and separates the Unterengadin section of the Inn River valley, Austria, from the Venosta Valley or Adige River valley, Italy. The pass marks

  • Passo di San Bernardino (mountain pass, Switzerland)

    San Bernardino Pass, mountain pass (6,775 ft [2,065 m]), in the Lepontine Alps of Graubünden canton, southeastern Switzerland. Although the pass was not mentioned until 941, it is believed to have been in use since prehistoric times. The road over the pass connects the villages of Splügen and H

  • Passo Fundo (Brazil)

    Passo Fundo, city, northern Rio Grande do Sul estado (state), southern Brazil. The city lies near the headwaters of the Passo Fundo River at 2,326 feet (709 metres) above sea level. Passo Fundo was founded in 1857 and given city status in 1890. It is a service centre for an agricultural and

  • Passos (Brazil)

    Passos, city, southwestern Minas Gerais estado (state), Brazil. Passos lies along the Bocaina River near the Rio Grande, at 2,388 feet (728 metres) above sea level. It was made a seat of a municipality in 1848 and became a city 10 years later. Rice, corn (maize), sugarcane, cotton, coffee, and

  • Passos, John Roderigo Dos (American novelist)

    John Dos Passos, American writer, one of the major novelists of the post-World War I “lost generation,” whose reputation as a social historian and as a radical critic of the quality of American life rests primarily on his trilogy U.S.A. The son of a wealthy lawyer of Portuguese descent, Dos Passos

  • Passover (Judaism)

    Passover, in Judaism, holiday commemorating the Hebrews’ liberation from slavery in Egypt and the “passing over” of the forces of destruction, or the sparing of the firstborn of the Israelites, when the Lord “smote the land of Egypt” on the eve of the Exodus. The festival thus marks the first and

  • passport (document)

    Passport, a formal document or certification issued by a national government identifying a traveler as a citizen or national with a right to protection while abroad and a right to return to the country of citizenship. Passports, letters of transit, and similar documents were used for centuries to

  • Passport to the War (work by Kunitz)

    Stanley Kunitz: His collection Passport to the War (1944), like his first book, contains meticulously crafted, intellectual verse. Most of the poems from these first two works were reprinted with some 30 new poems in Selected Poems 1928–1958 (1958), which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1959.

  • Passport, The (novel by Müller)

    Herta Müller: …Fasan auf der Welt (The Passport), was published in Germany in 1986. Although her circumstances had changed, her work continued to present and examine the formative experiences of her life: themes such as totalitarianism and exile pervade her work. Her style was described by Romanian journalist Emil Hurezeanu as…

  • passus (ancient Roman unit of measurement)

    measurement system: Greeks and Romans: Five Roman feet made the pace (passus), equivalent to 1.48 metres or 4.86 feet.

  • password (computing)

    computer security: …done by assigning an individual password to each person who has access to a system. The computer system itself can then automatically track the use of these passwords, recording such data as which files were accessed under particular passwords and so on. Another security measure is to store a system’s…

  • Password (quiz show)

    Betty White: …Truth, What’s My Line?, and Password. The latter was hosted by Allen Ludden. White and Ludden married in 1963 and were together until his death in 1981.

  • Passy (section, Paris, France)

    Paris: The Buttes: Upon the heights of Passy, on the Right Bank between the western city limits and the Arc de Triomphe, perch the wealthy neighbourhoods of the 16th arrondissement. By contrast, the Butte-Montmartre (18th arrondissement) and the Buttes-Chaumont (19th arrondissement), which rise along the northern rim of the city, are historically…

  • Passy, Frédéric (French economist)

    Frédéric Passy, French economist and advocate of international arbitration who was cowinner (with Jean-Henri Dunant) of the first Nobel Prize for Peace in 1901. After serving as auditor for the French Council of State (1846–49), Passy devoted himself to writing, lecturing, and organizing on behalf

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