• 0-9
  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g
  • h
  • i
  • j
  • k
  • l
  • m
  • n
  • o
  • p
  • q
  • r
  • s
  • t
  • u
  • v
  • w
  • x
  • y
  • z
  • Panzerfaust 30 (weapon)

    Panzerfaust: The first model, the Panzerfaust 30, was developed in 1943 for use by infantry against Soviet tanks. The Panzerfaust consisted of a steel tube containing a propellant charge of gunpowder. The grenade, which consisted of a small bomb attached to a wooden stem and fins, was inserted into the…

  • Panzerkampfwagen (German tank)

    Panzer, series of battle tanks fielded by the German army in the 1930s and ’40s. The six tanks in the series constituted virtually all of Germany’s tank production from 1934 until the end of World War II in 1945. Panzers provided the striking power of Germany’s panzer (armoured) divisions

  • Panzerschreck (weapon)

    Panzerschreck, shoulder-type rocket launcher used as an antitank weapon by Germany in World War II. The Panzerschreck consisted of a lightweight steel tube about 1.5 metres (5 feet) long that weighed about 9 kg (20 pounds). The tube was open at both ends and was fitted with a hand grip, a trigger

  • Panzerwaffe (German military force)

    tactics: The armoured offensive: As a result, the Panzerwaffe was an elite force that grew out of the cavalry rather than the infantry, but it retained many elements of the latter’s mode of operations, including an emphasis on interarm cooperation, a decentralized system of command operating within an exceptionally disciplined framework, and a…

  • pao (clothing)

    Pao, wide-sleeved robe of a style worn by Chinese men and women from the Han dynasty (206 bc–ad 220) to the end of the Ming dynasty (1644). The pao was girdled about the waist and fell in voluminous folds around the feet. From the Tang period (618–907), certain designs, colours, and accessories

  • Pão de Açúcar (mountain, Brazil)

    Sugar Loaf, landmark peak overlooking Rio de Janeiro and the entrance of Guanabara Bay, in southeastern Brazil. Named for its shape, the conical, granitic peak (1,296 feet [395 metres]) lies at the end of a short range between Rio de Janeiro and the Atlantic Ocean. At its base is the fortress of

  • Pao River (river, Venezuela)

    Orinoco River: Physiography of the Orinoco: Manapire, Suatá (Zuata), Pao, and Caris rivers, which enter on the left bank, and the Cuchivero and Caura rivers, which join the main stream on the right. So much sediment is carried by these rivers that islands often form at the mouths. The Caroní River, one of the…

  • Pao-chi (China)

    Baoji, city, western Shaanxi sheng (province), north-central China. Situated on the north bank of the Wei River, it has been a strategic and transportation centre since early times, controlling the northern end of a pass across the Qin (Tsinling) Mountains, the only practicable route from the Wei

  • pao-chia (Chinese social system)

    Baojia, traditional Chinese system of collective neighbourhood organization, by means of which the government was able to maintain order and control through all levels of society, while employing relatively few officials. A collective neighbourhood guarantee system was first instituted during the

  • Pao-t’ou (China)

    Baotou, city, central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China. Baotou, a prefecture-level municipality, is situated on the north bank of the Huang He (Yellow River) on its great northern bend, about 100 miles (160 km) west of Hohhot, the capital of Inner Mongolia. Baotou is of

  • Pao-ting (China)

    Baoding, city, southwest-central Hebei sheng (province), China. It is situated in a well-watered area on the western edge of the North China Plain; the Taihang Mountains rise a short distance to the west. Situated on the main road from Beijing through western Hebei, it is southwest of the capital,

  • Paola (Malta)

    Paola, town, eastern Malta, just south of Valletta and adjacent to Tarxien to the southeast. It was founded in 1626 by the grand master of the Hospitallers (Knights of Malta), Antoine de Paule, and it remained a small village until the late 19th century, when it grew rapidly as a residential

  • Paolazzi, Leo (Italian poet)

    Italian literature: Experimentalism and the new avant-garde: …“We Want It All”); and Antonio Porta (pseudonym of Leo Paolazzi), whose untimely death at age 54 cut short the career of one of the less abstractly theoretical of these poets. At a subsequent meeting held near Palermo in 1963 this group was joined by, among others, aesthetic philosopher Luciano…

  • Paoli, Pasquale (Corsican statesman)

    Pasquale Paoli, Corsican statesman and patriot who was responsible for ending Genoese rule of Corsica and for establishing enlightened rule and reforms. The son of Giacinto Paoli, who led the Corsicans against Genoa from 1735, Pasquale followed his father into exile at Naples in 1739, studying at

  • Paolina Borghese as Venus Victrix (sculpture by Canova)

    Antonio Canova, marchese d'Ischia: …sister Princess Borghese reclining as Venus Victrix. He was created a marquis for his part in retrieving works of art from Paris after Napoleon’s defeat.

  • Paolo and Francesca (painting by Ingres)

    J.-A.-D. Ingres: Maturity: …category is the 1819 painting Paolo and Francesca. The work, which illustrates the tragic demise of two ill-fated lovers from Dante’s Inferno, features somewhat stiff, doll-like figures situated within a radically simplified, boxy interior reminiscent of those found in 14th-century Italian panel paintings. When exhibited at the Salon, such canvases…

  • Paolo da Venezia (Italian artist)

    Paolo Veneziano, a principal Venetian painter of the Byzantine style in 14th-century Venice. Paolo and his son Giovanni signed The Coronation of the Virgin in 1358; it is the last known work by him. Another The Coronation of the Virgin, which is dated 1324, is also attributed to Paolo. Other known

  • Paolo Di Venezia (Italian philosopher)

    Paul Of Venice, Italian Augustinian philosopher and theologian who gained recognition as an educator and author of works on logic. Paul studied at the universities of Oxford and Padua, where he also lectured (1408–15), and became Venetian ambassador to Poland (1413), but difficulties with the

  • Paolo Farinato (Italian artist)

    Paolo Farinati, Italian painter, engraver, and architect, one of the leading 16th-century painters at Verona. Farinati’s father, Giovanni Battista, was also a painter and may have been his first master; later he probably worked under Nicolò Giolfino. Farinati was active almost entirely in Verona.

  • Paolo Manuzio (Italian printer)

    Paulus Manutius, Renaissance printer, third son of the founder of the Aldine Press, Aldus Manutius the Elder. In 1533 Paulus assumed control of the Aldine Press from his uncles, the Asolani, who had managed the press after the death of Aldus in 1515. During their tenure, the Asolani had attempted

  • Paolo Veneto (Italian philosopher)

    Paul Of Venice, Italian Augustinian philosopher and theologian who gained recognition as an educator and author of works on logic. Paul studied at the universities of Oxford and Padua, where he also lectured (1408–15), and became Venetian ambassador to Poland (1413), but difficulties with the

  • Paolo Veneziano (Italian artist)

    Paolo Veneziano, a principal Venetian painter of the Byzantine style in 14th-century Venice. Paolo and his son Giovanni signed The Coronation of the Virgin in 1358; it is the last known work by him. Another The Coronation of the Virgin, which is dated 1324, is also attributed to Paolo. Other known

  • Paolozzi, Sir Eduardo Luigi (British artist)

    Sir Eduardo Luigi Paolozzi, British artist (born March 7, 1924, Leith, Scot.—died April 22, 2005, London, Eng.), helped launch the British Pop art movement with a series of collages based on mass-media images and later became one of England’s leading sculptors. Paolozzi studied art in Edinburgh a

  • PAP (biochemistry)

    cancer: Immunotherapy: …laboratory in the presence of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), an enzyme that is overproduced by prostate cancer cells. The cells, now “activated” (capable of provoking an immune response), are infused back into the patient, leading to the expansion of populations of PAP-specific T cells and a more effective immune response…

  • PAP (cosmology)

    anthropic principle: Forms of the anthropic principle: A participatory anthropic principle (PAP) was proposed by the American physicist John Archibald Wheeler. He suggested that if one takes the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics seriously, one may conclude that, because no phenomenon can be said to exist until it is observed, “observers” may be…

  • PAP (political party, Singapore)

    Singapore: The political process: …the People’s Action Party (PAP). The PAP’s ability to maintain its control largely has been attributable to Singapore’s rapid economic growth and improved social welfare. In addition, the PAP often has suppressed and co-opted domestic opposition—notably through internal-security laws that allow political dissidents to be held indefinitely without trial—and…

  • Pap (king of Armenia)

    Saint Nerses I the Great: He was a supporter of King Pap but broke with him over his fostering of religious ties with the court of Constantinople, which led Pap to instigate Nerses’ murder.

  • Pap smear (medicine)

    Pap smear, laboratory method of obtaining secretions from the cervix for the examination of cast-off epithelial cells to detect the presence of cancer. The Pap smear, named for Greek-born American physician George Papanicolaou, is notably reliable in detecting the early stages of cancer in the

  • Pap test (medicine)

    Pap smear: …now less common than the Pap test, in which the cells are first placed in a liquid medium before processing. The latter method has the advantage of allowing the laboratory technician to centrifuge the cells and to filter blood, mucus, and debris that can make slide interpretation difficult.

  • Pápa (Hungary)

    Pápa, city, Veszprém megye (county), northwest Hungary, on the northwest edge of the Bakony Mountains, alongside the Tapolca River, a tributary of the Rába. Its interesting and historic old houses, churches, museums, and libraries attract many visitors annually. The former Esterházy Castle,

  • Papa Bear (American sportsman)

    George Halas, founder, owner, and head coach of the Chicago Bears gridiron football team in the U.S. professional National Football League (NFL). Halas revolutionized American football strategy in the late 1930s when he, along with assistant coach Clark Shaughnessy, revived the T formation and

  • Papa Hamlet (work by Holz and Schlaf)

    German literature: Naturalism: …prose sketches under the title Papa Hamlet (1889), in which the characters’ actions are captured in minute, realistic detail. The technique was known as Sekundenstil (“second-by-second style”). The novella Bahnwärter Thiel (1888; Lineman Thiel), by Gerhart Hauptmann, explores the psychology of a railway-crossing guard who is driven to insanity and…

  • Papá Montero (Cuban baseball player and manager)

    Dolf Luque, Cuban professional baseball player and manager who was the first player from Latin America to become a star in the U.S. major leagues. Luque, a right-handed pitcher, made his major league debut in 1914 with the Boston Braves but spent most of his career in the United States with the

  • Papa Wemba (Congolese singer)

    Papa Wemba, (Jules Shungu Wembadio Pene Kikumba), Congolese singer (born June 14, 1949, Lubefu, Kasai region, Belgian Congo [now Democratic Republic of the Congo]—died April 24, 2016, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire), earned the sobriquet “king of rumba rock” for his expertise in Congolese rumba, a form of

  • Papa Wendo (Congolese musician)

    Papa Wendo, (Wendo Kolosoy; Antoine Kalosoyi), Congolese musician (born 1925, Mushie, Bandundu region, Belgian Congo [now Democratic Republic of the Congo]—died July 22, 2008, Kinshasa, Dem. Rep. of the Congo), helped lay the foundations of Congolese rumba, a form of lilting Afropop dance music

  • Papa’s Delicate Condition (film by Marshall)
  • papacy (Roman Catholicism)

    Papacy, the office and jurisdiction of the bishop of Rome, the pope (Latin papa, from Greek pappas, “father”), who presides over the central government of the Roman Catholic Church, the largest of the three major branches of Christianity. The term pope was originally applied to all the bishops in

  • Papadat-Bengescu, Hortensia (Romanian author)

    Romanian literature: Between the wars: Hortensia Papadat-Bengescu’s trilogy of novels (Fecioarele despletite [1926; “Disheveled Virgins”], Concert din muzică de Bach [1927; “A Bach Concert”], and Drumul ascuns [1933; “The Hidden Way”]) is a document of changing lifestyles and urbanization, similar to the writings of novelist Ionel Teodoreanu. Victor Popa wrote…

  • Papademos, Lucas (prime minister of Greece)

    Lucas Papademos, Greek economist who served as vice president of the European Central Bank (ECB; 2002–10) and as prime minister of Greece (2011–12). After finishing his secondary education in Greece, Papademos studied in the United States at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he

  • Papadiamandis, Alexandros (Greek writer)

    Greek literature: Demoticism and folklorism, 1880–1922: …famous and prolific short-story writer, Aléxandros Papadiamándis, produced a wealth of evocations of his native island of Skiáthos imbued with a profound sense of Christian tradition and a compassion for country folk; his novel I fónissa (1903; The Murderess) is a fine study in psychological abnormality. The novel O zitiános…

  • Papadiamantópoulos, Yánnis (French poet)

    Jean Moréas, Greek-born poet who played a leading part in the French Symbolist movement. Early inspired by a French governess who instilled in him a passion for French poetry, Moréas moved to Paris in 1879, becoming a familiar figure in the literary circles frequenting the cafés and in the literary

  • Papadopoulos, Dimitrios (Greek patriarch)

    Dimitrios, 269th ecumenical patriarch of the Eastern Orthodox church. After studying at the French lycée in the Galata district of Istanbul, Dimitrios Papadopoulos entered the Holy Trinity School of Theology on the island of Heybeli in the Sea of Marmara. He was ordained a priest in 1942, served

  • Papadopoulos, George (American foreign policy advisor)

    Donald Trump: Russia investigation: …the FBI in May that George Papadopoulos, a foreign-policy adviser in the Trump campaign, had told an Australian diplomat in London that Russia had “dirt” on Clinton, an apparent reference to the stolen e-mails that were eventually released by Wikileaks in July. Speculation in the press regarding the existence of…

  • Papadopoulos, Giorgios (dictator of Greece)

    Giorgios Papadopoulos, Greek dictator (born May 5, 1919, Eleochorion, Greece—died June 27, 1999, Athens, Greece), led “the colonels,” the military junta that overthrew his country’s elected government on April 21, 1967, and vanquished King Constantine’s attempted counterrevolution the following D

  • Papadopoulos, Tassos (president of Cyprus)

    Tassos Papadopoulos, Greek Cypriot politician who was president of the Republic of Cyprus (2003–08). After studying law at King’s College London and Gray’s Inn, Papadopoulos returned to Cyprus to practice law. He was drawn to politics and participated in the island’s political life even before

  • papagallo (fish)

    Roosterfish, (Nematistius pectoralis), popular game fish of the family Nematistiidae, related to the jack (q.v.) family, Carangidae (order Perciformes). In the Gulf of California roosterfish commonly reach weights of 9 kilograms (20 pounds) and occasional specimens weigh as much as 32 kg. They are

  • Papago (people)

    Tohono O’odham, North American Indians who traditionally inhabited the desert regions of present-day Arizona, U.S., and northern Sonora, Mex. The Tohono O’odham speak a Uto-Aztecan language, a dialectal variant of Piman, and culturally they are similar to the Pima living to the north. There are,

  • Papagos, Alexandros (Greek statesman)

    Alexandros Papagos, soldier and statesman who late in life organized a political party and became premier (1952–55) of Greece. Papagos, commissioned in 1906, saw his first service in the Balkan Wars (1912–13). He took part in the Greek invasion of Turkey (1919–22), won promotion to the rank of

  • papain (enzyme)

    Papain, enzyme present in the leaves, latex, roots, and fruit of the papaya plant (Carica papaya) that catalyzes the breakdown of proteins by hydrolysis (addition of a water molecule). Papain is used in biochemical research involving the analysis of proteins, in tenderizing meat, in clarifying

  • Pāpak (Persian prince)

    Ardashīr I: Ardashīr was the son of Bābak, who was the son or descendant of Sāsān and was a vassal of the chief petty king in Persis, Gochihr. After Bābak got Ardashīr the military post of argabad in the town of Dārābgerd (near modern Darab, Iran), Ardashīr extended his control over several…

  • Pāpak (Iranian religious leader)

    Bābak, leader of the Iranian Khorram-dīnān, a religious sect that arose following the execution of Abū Muslim, who had rebelled against the ʿAbbāsid caliphate. Denying that Abū Muslim was dead, the sect predicted that he would return to spread justice throughout the world. Bābak led a new revolt

  • papakancha (Incan unit of measurement)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Inca technology and intellectual life: Units of land measurement, called papakancha, also differed: where the land was in continuous cultivation, as in corn country, one unit was used; another unit was in use for highland-tuber cultivation, where fallowing and rotation was the dominant crop pattern. As one “measurer” explained to the viceroy’s envoy, the papakancha…

  • papal brief (papal)

    diplomatics: The papal chancery: …of the 14th century, the brief (breve), used for the popes’ private or even secret correspondence. Written not in the chancery but, instead, by papal secretaries (an office dating from about 1338), the briefs were sealed on wax with the imprint of the papal signet ring.

  • papal bull (Roman Catholicism)

    Papal bull, in Roman Catholicism, an official papal letter or document. The name is derived from the lead seal (bulla) traditionally affixed to such documents. Since the 12th century it has designated a letter from the pope carrying a bulla that shows the heads of the apostles Peter and Paul on one

  • papal chancery (Roman Catholicism)

    diplomatics: The papal chancery: Knowledge about early papal documents is scant because no originals survive from before the 9th century, and extant copies of earlier documents are often much abridged. But it is clear that the popes at first imitated the form of the letters of the…

  • papal council (religion)

    Consistory, (from Latin consistorium, “assembly place”), a gathering of ecclesiastical persons for the purpose of administering justice or transacting business, particularly meetings of the Sacred College of Cardinals with the pope as president. From the 11th century, when the institution of the

  • papal diadem (papal dress)

    Tiara, in Roman Catholicism, a triple crown worn by the pope or carried in front of him, used at some nonliturgical functions such as processions. Beehive-shaped, it is about 15 inches (38 cm) high and is made of silver cloth and ornamented with three diadems, with two streamers, known as lappets,

  • papal document (Roman Catholicism)

    diplomatics: The papal chancery: Knowledge about early papal documents is scant because no originals survive from before the 9th century, and extant copies of earlier documents are often much abridged. But it is clear that the popes at first imitated the form of the letters of the Roman emperors. The papal protocol…

  • Papal Gendarmerie (Vatican City police)

    Pontifical Gendarmerie, former police force of Vatican City. The Pontifical, or Papal, Gendarmerie was created in the 19th century under the formal supervision of the pope. The gendarmes were responsible for maintaining the internal order and security of Vatican City. In the late 19th and early

  • papal infallibility (Roman Catholicism)

    Papal infallibility, in Roman Catholic theology, the doctrine that the pope, acting as supreme teacher and under certain conditions, cannot err when he teaches in matters of faith or morals. As an element of the broader understanding of the infallibility of the church, this doctrine is based on the

  • papal legate (Roman Catholicism)

    Legate, in the Roman Catholic Church, a cleric sent on a mission, ecclesiastical or diplomatic, by the pope as his personal representative. Three types of legates are recognized by canon law. A legatus a latere (a legate sent from the pope’s side, as it were) is a cardinal who represents the pope

  • Papal Palace (building, Avignon, France)

    Avignon: …and the interior of the Palais des Papes (Popes’ Palace) was wrecked. The palace, a formidable eight-towered fortress on a rock 190 feet (58 metres) above Avignon, was used as a barracks from 1822 to 1906.

  • papal primacy (Roman Catholicism)

    Council of Sardica: …development of the Roman bishop’s primacy as pope.

  • Papal Secretariat (Roman Catholic official)

    Roman Curia: …the Secretariat of State (or Papal Secretariat) and the Council for the Public Affairs of the Church (the latter previously known as the Sacred Congregation for Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs). The various sacred congregations of the Curia are concerned with administrative matters. The Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith…

  • Papal Secretariat of State (Roman Catholic official)

    Roman Curia: …the Secretariat of State (or Papal Secretariat) and the Council for the Public Affairs of the Church (the latter previously known as the Sacred Congregation for Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs). The various sacred congregations of the Curia are concerned with administrative matters. The Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith…

  • Papal States (historical region, Italy)

    Papal States, territories of central Italy over which the pope had sovereignty from 756 to 1870. Included were the modern Italian regions of Lazio (Latium), Umbria, and Marche and part of Emilia-Romagna, though the extent of the territory, along with the degree of papal control, varied over the

  • papalagi (people)

    Albert Wendt: …traditions and mores of the papalagi (people descended from Europeans) and depicts their effect on Samoan culture. An early example of this theme appears in Sons for the Return Home (1973; film 1979), his first novel, a roman à clef about a romance between a Samoan man and a white…

  • Papaleo, Anthony (American actor)

    Tony Franciosa, (Anthony Papaleo), American actor (born Oct. 25, 1928, New York, N.Y.—died Jan. 19, 2006, Los Angeles, Calif.), won critical acclaim for his stage and film work in the 1950s and early 1960s. He made his Broadway debut in 1953 in End as a Man and won a Tony nomination in 1955 for h

  • Papaleo, Guglielmo (American boxer)

    Willie Pep, American professional boxer, world featherweight (126 pounds) champion during the 1940s. Pep specialized in finesse rather than slugging prowess and competed successfully in the 1940s, ’50s, and ’60s. His rivalry with American Sandy Saddler is considered one of the greatest of

  • Papaloapan River (river, Mexico)

    Papaloapan River, river in Veracruz state, southeastern Mexico. It is formed by the junction of several rivers in Oaxaca state near the Veracruz–Oaxaca border and meanders generally northeastward for 76 miles (122 km) to Alvarado Lagoon, just south of Alvarado. Its chief headstreams include the

  • Papandreou, Andreas (prime minister of Greece)

    Andreas Papandreou, politician and educator who was prime minister of Greece from 1981 to 1989 and from 1993 to 1996. The son of Georgios Papandreou, he attended the American College in Athens (Modern Greek: Athína) and studied law at the University of Athens. A Trotskyite, he was imprisoned

  • Papandreou, Andreas Georgios (prime minister of Greece)

    Andreas Papandreou, politician and educator who was prime minister of Greece from 1981 to 1989 and from 1993 to 1996. The son of Georgios Papandreou, he attended the American College in Athens (Modern Greek: Athína) and studied law at the University of Athens. A Trotskyite, he was imprisoned

  • Papandreou, George (prime minister of Greece)

    George Papandreou, American-born Greek politician who served as prime minister of Greece (2009–11). Papandreou was the son of Andreas Papandreou and the grandson of Georgios Papandreou, both of whom served multiple terms as prime minister of Greece. During the dictatorship of Ioannis Metaxas,

  • Papandreou, George (archbishop of Athens)

    Damaskinos, archbishop of Athens and regent of Greece during the civil war of 1944–46, under whose regency came a period of political reconstruction. He was a private in the army during the Balkan Wars (1912) and was ordained priest in 1917. In 1922 Damaskinos became bishop of Corinth, and in 1

  • Papandreou, Georgios (prime minister of Greece)

    Georgios Papandreou, Greek liberal politician who served three terms as prime minister of his country and who established a political dynasty that spanned three generations. Papandreou studied at the University of Athens (L.L.D., 1911) and in Germany. He began his political career in 1915, served

  • Papandreou, Georgios Andreas (prime minister of Greece)

    George Papandreou, American-born Greek politician who served as prime minister of Greece (2009–11). Papandreou was the son of Andreas Papandreou and the grandson of Georgios Papandreou, both of whom served multiple terms as prime minister of Greece. During the dictatorship of Ioannis Metaxas,

  • Papanicolaou smear (medicine)

    Pap smear, laboratory method of obtaining secretions from the cervix for the examination of cast-off epithelial cells to detect the presence of cancer. The Pap smear, named for Greek-born American physician George Papanicolaou, is notably reliable in detecting the early stages of cancer in the

  • Papanicolaou, George (American mathematician)

    S.R. Srinivasa Varadhan: …with the Greek-born American mathematician George Papanicolaou and Chinese mathematician Maozheng Guo, Varadhan obtained important new results in hydrodynamics, which he later extended to give new methods for the theory of random walks, the basic approach to diffusion theory, and many other processes that can be modelled probabilistically.

  • Papantla (Mexico)

    Papantla, city, north-central Veracruz estado (state), east-central Mexico, situated in the hills dividing the Cazones and Tecolutla river basins. Corn (maize), beans, tobacco, and fruits flourish in the hot, humid climate. The city is the centre of Mexico’s most important vanilla-producing region;

  • Papantla de Hidalgo (Mexico)

    Papantla, city, north-central Veracruz estado (state), east-central Mexico, situated in the hills dividing the Cazones and Tecolutla river basins. Corn (maize), beans, tobacco, and fruits flourish in the hot, humid climate. The city is the centre of Mexico’s most important vanilla-producing region;

  • Papantla de Olarte (Mexico)

    Papantla, city, north-central Veracruz estado (state), east-central Mexico, situated in the hills dividing the Cazones and Tecolutla river basins. Corn (maize), beans, tobacco, and fruits flourish in the hot, humid climate. The city is the centre of Mexico’s most important vanilla-producing region;

  • Papapetrou, Petros (Greek cleric)

    Petros VII, (Petros Papapetrou), Greek Orthodox cleric (born Sept. 3, 1949, Sichari, British Cyprus—died Sept. 11, 2004, while flying over the Aegean Sea), viewed his position as the Greek Orthodox patriarch of Africa as an opportunity to strengthen and spread the message of Greek Orthodoxy t

  • paparazzi (photography)

    La Dolce Vita: …credited with contributing the word paparazzi to the English language (it derives from the name of the photographer in the film, Paparazzo) and adding the adjective “Felliniesque,” referring in part to the director’s embrace of the surreal, to the movie critic’s lexicon.

  • paparazzo (photography)

    La Dolce Vita: …credited with contributing the word paparazzi to the English language (it derives from the name of the photographer in the film, Paparazzo) and adding the adjective “Felliniesque,” referring in part to the director’s embrace of the surreal, to the movie critic’s lexicon.

  • Paparemborde, Robert (French rugby player)

    Robert Paparemborde, French rugby player (born July 5, 1948, Laruns, France—died April 19, 2001, Paris, France), was a powerful prop forward and a mainstay of the national Rugby Union team that won the Five Nations championship in 1977, 1981 (both grand slams), and 1983. Known as the “bear of the P

  • Papareschi, Gregorio (pope)

    Innocent II, pope from 1130 to 1143. A cardinal by 1116, Innocent was appointed in 1122 by Pope Calixtus II as one of the ambassadors who drafted the Concordat of Worms, an agreement ending disputes between the pope and the Holy Roman emperor Henry V over the right of investiture; i.e., whether the

  • Papaver (plant genus)

    poppy: …especially species of the genus Papaver. Most poppies are found in the Northern Hemisphere, and several species of poppies are cultivated as garden ornamentals.

  • Papaver dubium (plant)

    poppy: The long-headed poppy (P. dubium) is an annual similar to the corn poppy but with narrower, tapering capsules and smaller, paler flowers. The Iceland poppy (P. nudicaule), from Arctic North America, is a short-lived perennial 30 cm tall with fragrant white, orange, reddish, or bicoloured 7.6-cm…

  • Papaver nudicaule (plant)

    poppy: The Iceland poppy (P. nudicaule), from Arctic North America, is a short-lived perennial 30 cm tall with fragrant white, orange, reddish, or bicoloured 7.6-cm flowers. The peacock poppy (P. pavoninum)—with scarlet petals bearing a dark spot at the base in 2.5-cm (1-inch) blooms on 30-cm- (1-foot-)…

  • Papaver orientale (plant)

    poppy: The Oriental poppy (P. orientale), native to the Middle East, has 15.2-cm (6-inch) scarlet, salmon, pink, white, or red blooms on 1.2-metre- (4-foot-) tall long-lived perennial plants. The white-and-red or white-and-pink Shirley poppy is an annual variety developed from the corn poppy (P. rhoeas). The long-headed…

  • Papaver pavoninum (plant)

    poppy: The peacock poppy (P. pavoninum)—with scarlet petals bearing a dark spot at the base in 2.5-cm (1-inch) blooms on 30-cm- (1-foot-) tall plants—is an annual from Central Asia.

  • Papaver rhoeas (plant)

    Corn poppy, (Papaver rhoeas), annual (rarely biennial) plant of the poppy family (Papaveraceae), native to Europe, North Africa, and Asia. The plant has been introduced into Australia, New Zealand, and North America and is one of the most commonly cultivated garden poppies. The corn poppy is also

  • Papaver somniferum (plant)

    Opium poppy, (Papaver somniferum), flowering plant of the family Papaveraceae, native to Turkey. Opium, morphine, codeine, and heroin are all derived from the milky latex found in its unripe seed capsule. It is also grown for its tiny nonnarcotic ripe seeds, which are kidney-shaped and grayish blue

  • Papaveraceae (plant family)

    Papaveraceae, the poppy family of flowering plants (order Ranunculales), with 44 genera and 825 species. Most of these are herbaceous plants, but the family also includes some woody shrubs and a genus of small tropical trees. The family is outstanding for its many garden ornamentals and

  • papaverine (drug)

    drug use: Opium, morphine, heroin, and related synthetics: …opium are morphine (10 percent), papaverine (1 percent), codeine (0.5 percent), and thebaine (0.2 percent). (Papaverine is pharmacologically distinct from the narcotic agents and is essentially devoid of effects on the central nervous system.) About 1804 a young German apothecary’s assistant named F.W.A. Sertürner isolated crystalline morphine as the active…

  • papaw (tree and fruit)

    Papaya, (Carica papaya), succulent fruit of a large plant of the family Caricaceae. Though its origin is rather obscure, the papaya may represent the fusion of two or more species of Carica native to Mexico and Central America. Today it is cultivated throughout the tropical world and into the

  • papaw (fruit and tree, Asimina species)

    Pawpaw, (Asimina triloba), deciduous tree or shrub of the custard-apple family, Annonaceae (order Magnoliales), native to the United States from the Atlantic coast north to New York state and west to Michigan and Kansas. It can grow 12 metres (40 feet) tall with pointed, broadly oblong, drooping

  • papaya (tree and fruit)

    Papaya, (Carica papaya), succulent fruit of a large plant of the family Caricaceae. Though its origin is rather obscure, the papaya may represent the fusion of two or more species of Carica native to Mexico and Central America. Today it is cultivated throughout the tropical world and into the

  • papaya family (plant family)

    Brassicales: Caricaceae and Moringaceae: Caricaceae and Moringaceae form a very distinctive group with many anatomical features in common. Their stems are stout; the venation of the leaves is palmate; and there are tiny glands at the base of the petiole or on the blade; the stipules…

  • papaya ringspot virus (infectious agent)

    papaya: Cultivation: The papaya ringspot virus nearly wiped out papaya crops around the world, first hitting Hawaiian plantations in the 1940s and soon spreading. A genetically modified (GMO) variety named the Rainbow papaya was developed in the early 2000s with resistance to the virus. It was one of…

  • Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
    Subscribe Today!