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  • Pygocentrus nattereri (fish)

    piranha: The most infamous is the red-bellied piranha (Pygocentrus nattereri), with the strongest jaws and sharpest teeth of all. Especially during low water, this species, which can grow up to 50 cm (about 20 inches) in length, hunts in groups that can number more than 100. Several groups can converge in…

  • Pygocephalomorpha (crustacean)

    malacostracan: Annotated classification: †Order Pygocephalomorpha Carboniferous to Permian; carapace large, unridged, covering thorax; ventral plates of thorax widening behind; walking legs 6-segmented; abdomen 6-segmented; coastal marine; 4 families. Order Lophogastrida Late Carboniferous to Holocene; carapace large, ridged, covering thorax; ventral plates of thorax evenly widened; thoracic legs

  • Pygopodidae (reptile)

    Flap-footed lizard, (family Pygopodidae), any of approximately 40 species of lizards that make up the seven genera of the family Pygopodidae. Confined to Australia and southern New Guinea, these lizards have elongated bodies and tails, a transparent scale (or spectacle) over the eye similar to

  • Pygoscelis (penguin genus)

    penguin: Classification: Genus Pygoscelis 3 species: Adélie, chinstrap, and gentoo. Genus Aptenodytes 2 species: emperor and king. Genus Eudyptula

  • Pygoscelis adeliae (bird)

    Adélie penguin, (Pygoscelis adeliae), species of penguin (order Sphenisciformes) characterized by black and white plumage and a small ring of white feathers surrounding each eye. During the warmer months Adélie penguins are found primarily in several breeding colonies along rocky, ice-free coasts

  • Pygoscelis antarctica (bird)

    Chinstrap penguin, (Pygoscelis antarctica), species of penguin (order Sphenisciformes) characterized by a cap of black plumage on the top of the head, a white face, and a fine, continuous band of black feathers that extends from one side of the head to the other across each cheek and under the

  • Pygoscelis antarcticus (bird)

    Chinstrap penguin, (Pygoscelis antarctica), species of penguin (order Sphenisciformes) characterized by a cap of black plumage on the top of the head, a white face, and a fine, continuous band of black feathers that extends from one side of the head to the other across each cheek and under the

  • Pygoscelis papua (bird)

    Gentoo penguin, (Pygoscelis papua), species of penguin (order Sphenisciformes) characterized by a band of white feathers extending across the top of the head from just above each eye. Other distinguishing features include a black throat, a brush tail that is large in comparison with other penguin

  • pygostyle (anatomy)

    bird: Skeleton: …(caudal) vertebrae and finally the pygostyle, which consists of several fused caudal vertebrae and supports the tail feathers.

  • Pyin Oo Lwin (Myanmar)

    Maymyo, town, central Myanmar (Burma). It lies at the head of a shallow valley, at an elevation of about 3,450 feet (1,050 metres). The town, named for Colonel (later Major General) James May of the 5th Bengal Infantry stationed there in 1886, served as the summer capital during the British

  • Pyinmana (Myanmar)

    Myanmar: …first to the city of Pyinmana (some 200 miles [320 km] north of Yangon) and then to Nay Pyi Taw (Naypyidaw), a newly constructed city near Pyinmana. Nay Pyi Taw was proclaimed the capital of Myanmar in 2006.

  • Pyithu Hluttaw (legislative organization, Myanmar)

    Myanmar: Administrative framework: …power rested with the unicameral People’s Assembly (Pyithu Hluttaw), a 485-member popularly elected body that exercised legislative, executive, and judicial authority. The Council of State, which consisted of 29 members (one representative elected from each of the country’s 14 states and divisions, 14 members elected by the People’s Assembly as…

  • pyjamas (clothing)

    Pajamas, loose, lightweight trousers first worn in the East, or a loose two-piece suit consisting of trousers and a shirt, made of silk, cotton, or synthetic material and worn for sleeping or lounging. They were introduced in England as lounging attire in the 17th century but soon went out of

  • pyknic type (physique classification)

    Ernst Kretschmer: …athletic type, and the rotund pyknic type. He suggested that the lanky asthenics, and to a lesser degree the athletic types, were more prone to schizophrenia, while the pyknic types were more likely to develop manic-depressive disorders. His work was criticized because his thinner, schizophrenic patients were younger than his…

  • Pyle, Artimus (American musician)

    Lynyrd Skynyrd: …3, 2015, Cartersville, Georgia), and Artimus Pyle (b. July 15, 1948, Louisville, Kentucky).

  • Pyle, Cash and Carry (American sports promoter)

    tennis: Professional and open tennis: This changed in 1926 when Charles C. (“Cash and Carry”) Pyle, a successful sports promoter in the United States, offered Suzanne Lenglen $50,000 to go on a professional tour of America playing Mary K. Browne, who had been U.S. singles champion from 1912 to 1914. He also signed four male…

  • Pyle, Charles C. (American sports promoter)

    tennis: Professional and open tennis: This changed in 1926 when Charles C. (“Cash and Carry”) Pyle, a successful sports promoter in the United States, offered Suzanne Lenglen $50,000 to go on a professional tour of America playing Mary K. Browne, who had been U.S. singles champion from 1912 to 1914. He also signed four male…

  • Pyle, Denver (American actor)

    Bonnie and Clyde: Cast:

  • Pyle, Ernest Taylor (American journalist)

    Ernie Pyle, American journalist who was one of the most famous war correspondents of World War II. Pyle studied journalism at Indiana University and left school to become a reporter for a small-town newspaper. Later, after various editorial jobs, he acquired a roving assignment for the

  • Pyle, Ernie (American journalist)

    Ernie Pyle, American journalist who was one of the most famous war correspondents of World War II. Pyle studied journalism at Indiana University and left school to become a reporter for a small-town newspaper. Later, after various editorial jobs, he acquired a roving assignment for the

  • Pyle, Howard (American writer and illustrator)

    Howard Pyle, American illustrator, painter, and author, best known for the children’s books that he wrote and illustrated. Pyle studied at the Art Students’ League, New York City, and first attracted attention by his line drawings after the style of Albrecht Dürer. His magazine and book

  • Pyle, James T. (American aviator)

    James T. Pyle, American aviator who was considered the father of modern air traffic control systems (b. Nov. 8, 1913, New York, N.Y.--d. April 1, 1998, Oyster Bay,

  • Pyleva, Olga (Russian athlete)

    Olympic Games: Turin, Italy, 2006: Olga Pyleva, a Russian silver medalist in the biathlon, was disqualified after failing her drug test. Coach Walter Mayer, who had been banned for suspicion of blood doping, was discovered in the Austrian camp, resulting in an investigation of 10 athletes.

  • Pylocheles (genus of crustacean)

    hermit crab: Pylocheles, a deepwater crab of the Indian Ocean, lives in bamboo sections; Xylopargus, found in West Indian waters at depths of 180 to 360 metres (600 to 1,200 feet), lives in hollow cylinders of wood. Other species make homes in coral, sponge, or the empty…

  • pylon (architecture)

    Pylon, (Greek: “gateway”), in modern construction, any tower that gives support, such as the steel towers between which electrical wires are strung, the piers of a bridge, or the columns from which girders are hung in certain types of structural work. Originally, pylons were any monumental gateways

  • Pylon (novel by Faulkner)

    William Faulkner: The major novels: …much of the material for Pylon, the novel about racing and barnstorming pilots that he published in 1935. Having given the Waco to his youngest brother, Dean, and encouraged him to become a professional pilot, Faulkner was both grief- and guilt-stricken when Dean crashed and died in the plane later…

  • pyloric ceca (anatomy)

    protacanthopterygian: Digestive system: These appendages, called pyloric ceca, secrete enzymes and provide additional digestive areas to the intestine. Among closely related species of the family Salmonidae, there is a tendency for the more predacious species to have more numerous pyloric ceca. Generalizations relating pyloric caecal development to diet cannot be extended,…

  • pyloric gastric gland (anatomy)

    gastric gland: …central stomach areas; and the pyloric glands in the terminal stomach portion. Both the cardiac and pyloric glands secrete mucus, which coats the stomach and protects it from self-digestion by helping to dilute acids and enzymes.

  • pyloric sphincter (anatomy)

    pylorus: …circular muscle tissue allows the pyloric sphincter to open or close, permitting food to pass or be retained. The sphincter remains in an open or relaxed state two-thirds of the time, permitting small quantities of food to pass into the duodenum, the upper portion of the small intestine. When the…

  • pyloric stenosis (congenital disorder)

    atresia and stenosis: Pyloric stenosis is a spasmodic narrowing of the opening between the stomach and the duodenum. It is a relatively common cause of illness in newborns, occurring four times more often in males than in females and more frequently in whites than in blacks. The defect…

  • pyloric stomach (zoology)

    malacostracan: Digestion and nutrition: …from the smaller, more ventral, pyloric stomach that lies in the posterior part of the thorax. Lining the inside of the greatly folded and muscular stomach walls, especially the pyloric portion, are groups or rows of stiff bristles, teeth, and filtering setae known as the gastric mill. The mill is…

  • pylorus (anatomy)

    Pylorus, cone-shaped constriction in the gastrointestinal tract that demarcates the end of the stomach and the beginning of the small intestine. The main functions of the pylorus are to prevent intestinal contents from reentering the stomach when the small intestine contracts and to limit the

  • Pylos (ancient site, Greece)

    Pylos, any of three sites in Greece. The most important of them is identified with the modern Pylos, the capital of the eparkhía (“eparchy”) of Pylia in the nomós (department) of Messenia (Modern Greek: Messinía), Greece, on the southern headland of the Órmos (bay) Navarínou, a deepwater shipping

  • Pýlos (ancient site, Greece)

    Pylos, any of three sites in Greece. The most important of them is identified with the modern Pylos, the capital of the eparkhía (“eparchy”) of Pylia in the nomós (department) of Messenia (Modern Greek: Messinía), Greece, on the southern headland of the Órmos (bay) Navarínou, a deepwater shipping

  • Pylos Bay (bay, Greece)

    Bay of Navarino, small, deep, and almost landlocked bay of the Ionian Sea (Modern Greek: Ióvio Pélagos) in the nomós (department) of Messenia (Messinía), in the southwestern Peloponnese (Pelopónnisos), Greece. Known also as Pylos (Pýlos) Bay after Homeric Pylos, which has been identified farther to

  • Pylos, Battle of (ancient Greek history [425 bce])

    Battle of Pylos, (July 425 bce). In the Peloponnesian War, Athens, Sparta, and their respective allies contested supremacy in Greece and the eastern Mediterranean. Sparta was usually stronger on land and Athens at sea. At Pylos, an Athenian naval success led to the surrender of a Spartan land

  • Pylstaert (island, Tonga)

    Tongatapu Group: ʿEua and ʿAta islands, both volcanic, were sighted in 1643 by the Dutch navigator Abel Janszoon Tasman, who called them Middleburg and Pylstaert, respectively. ʿEua (33.7 square miles [87.4 square km]) is hilly, and its economy is based on agriculture, tourism, and forestry. The island also produces…

  • Pym of Sandy, Baron (British politician)

    Baron Pym of Sandy, (Francis Leslie Pym), British politician (born Feb. 13, 1922, Penpergwm Lodge, near Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Wales—died March 7, 2008, Sandy, Bedfordshire, Eng.), had a distinguished career as a moderate Conservative public servant, highlighted by appointments as defense

  • Pym, Barbara Mary Crampton (English author)

    Barbara Pym, English novelist, a recorder of post-World War II upper middle-class life, whose elegant and satiric comedies of manners are marked by poignant observation and psychological insight. Pym was educated at Huyton College, Liverpool, and at St. Hilda’s College, Oxford. She worked for the

  • Pym, Francis Leslie (British politician)

    Baron Pym of Sandy, (Francis Leslie Pym), British politician (born Feb. 13, 1922, Penpergwm Lodge, near Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Wales—died March 7, 2008, Sandy, Bedfordshire, Eng.), had a distinguished career as a moderate Conservative public servant, highlighted by appointments as defense

  • Pym, John (English statesman)

    John Pym, prominent member of the English Parliament (1621–43) and an architect of Parliament’s victory over King Charles I in the first phase (1642–46) of the English Civil Wars. Pym also was largely responsible for the system of taxation that survived in England until the 19th century and for the

  • Pym, Samuel (British admiral)
  • Pynchon, Thomas (American writer)

    Thomas Pynchon, American novelist and short-story writer whose works combine black humour and fantasy to depict human alienation in the chaos of modern society. After earning a B.A. in English from Cornell University in 1958, Pynchon spent a year in Greenwich Village writing short stories and

  • Pyne, Ganesh (Indian painter)

    Ganesh Pyne, Indian painter (born June 11, 1937, Calcutta, British India [now Kolkata, India]—died March 12, 2013, Kolkata), produced intense, often unsettling, art that featured dark colours and dreamlike imagery in watercolour, gouache, and, most memorably, tempera. Pyne claimed to have been

  • Pynson, Richard (English printer)

    Richard Pynson, printer in London, a native of Normandy who introduced roman type into English printing (1509). His chief rival in London was Wynkyn de Worde. About 1490 Pynson took over the business of William de Machlinia, leading London publisher of law books. In a 40-year career he produced

  • pyo (literature)

    Southeast Asian arts: The 15th century: …types of verse existed: (1) pyo (religious verse), which retold stories of Buddha’s birth and teaching and were taken from the Jatakas (a collection of folktales adapted to Buddhist purposes and incorporated into the Pali canon), to which were added imaginative details and a Burmese background; (2) linkar (shorter religious…

  • pyogenic osteomyelitis (pathology)

    bone disease: Infectious diseases of bone: Pyogenic osteomyelitis occurs both by direct routes and by hematogenous spread from an infection of the skin, urogenital tract, lung, or upper respiratory tract. Tuberculosis of the bone is almost always hematogenous in origin, usually disseminated from lesions in the lungs or the kidneys.

  • pyŏlgok (Korean verse form)

    Pyŏlgok, Korean poetic form that flourished during the Koryŏ period (935–1392). Of folk origin, the pyŏlgok was sung chiefly by women performers (kisaeng) and was intended for performance on festive occasions. The theme of most of these anonymous poems is love, and its joys and torments are

  • Pyongyang (photography by Gursky)

    Andreas Gursky: His series Pyongyang, shot in 2007 in North Korea, documented the Arirang Festival—a sporadically held weeks-long annual event, named for a Korean folk song, that in 2007 involved 80,000 participants in highly choreographed gymnastic performances honouring the late founder of North Korea, Kim Il-Sung. Gursky photographed the…

  • pyorrhea (dentistry)

    dentistry: Periodontics: disease is periodontitis, commonly called pyorrhea, an inflammatory condition usually produced by local irritants. Periodontitis, if untreated, destroys the periodontal tissues and is a major cause of the loss of teeth in adults.

  • pyothorax (medicine)

    Pyothorax, presence of pus in the pleural cavity, between the membrane lining the thoracic cage and the membrane covering the lung. The most common cause is lung inflammation (pneumonia) resulting in the spread of infection from the lung to the bordering pleural membrane, but pyothorax may also

  • Pyotr Alekseyevich (emperor of Russia)

    Peter I, tsar of Russia who reigned jointly with his half-brother Ivan V (1682–96) and alone thereafter (1696–1725) and who in 1721 was proclaimed emperor (imperator). He was one of his country’s greatest statesmen, organizers, and reformers. Peter was the son of Tsar Alexis by his second wife,

  • Pyotr Alekseyevich (emperor of Russia)

    Peter II, emperor of Russia from 1727 to 1730. Grandson of Peter I the Great (ruled 1682–1725), Peter II was named heir to the Russian throne by Catherine I (ruled 1725–27) and was crowned at the age of 11 (May 18 [May 7, Old Style], 1727). Because Catherine had named the Supreme Privy Council to

  • Pyotr Fyodorovich (emperor of Russia)

    Peter III, emperor of Russia from January 5, 1762 (December 25, 1761, Old Style), to July 9 (June 28, Old Style), 1762. Son of Anna, one of Peter I the Great’s daughters, and Charles Frederick, Herzog (duke) von Holstein-Gottorp, the young duke was brought to Russia by his aunt Elizabeth shortly

  • Pyotr Veliky (emperor of Russia)

    Peter I, tsar of Russia who reigned jointly with his half-brother Ivan V (1682–96) and alone thereafter (1696–1725) and who in 1721 was proclaimed emperor (imperator). He was one of his country’s greatest statesmen, organizers, and reformers. Peter was the son of Tsar Alexis by his second wife,

  • Pyracantha (plant)

    Firethorn, (genus Pyracantha), genus of seven species of usually thorny evergreen shrubs in the rose family (Rosaceae), native to southeastern Europe and Asia. Firethorns are planted as ornamentals for their showy fruits; they are often used as hedges and can be espaliered (trained to grow flat

  • Pyracantha atalantioides (plant)

    firethorn: Common species: angustifolia), Gibb’s firethorn (P. atalantioides), and the Chinese firethorn (P. fortuneana), all of which are from China and bear clusters of scarlet fruits. The Formosa firethorn (P. koidzumii), from Taiwan, is densely branched, with red-purple young twigs and orange-scarlet fruit. The Himalayan, or Nepalese, firethorn (P. crenulata) grows…

  • Pyracantha coccinea (plant)

    firethorn: Common species: …European, or scarlet, firethorn (Pyracantha coccinea) can grow up to 4.5 metres (15 feet) tall and has provided many varieties of horticultural interest. Of similar height are the narrowleaf firethorn (P. angustifolia), Gibb’s firethorn (P. atalantioides), and the Chinese firethorn (P. fortuneana), all of which are from China and…

  • Pyracantha crenulata (plant)

    firethorn: Common species: The Himalayan, or Nepalese, firethorn (P. crenulata) grows up to 6 metres (19 feet) high and can be trained as a small tree.

  • Pyracantha fortuneana (plant)

    firethorn: Common species: atalantioides), and the Chinese firethorn (P. fortuneana), all of which are from China and bear clusters of scarlet fruits. The Formosa firethorn (P. koidzumii), from Taiwan, is densely branched, with red-purple young twigs and orange-scarlet fruit. The Himalayan, or Nepalese, firethorn (P. crenulata) grows up to 6 metres (19 feet)…

  • Pyracantha koidzumii (plant)

    firethorn: Common species: The Formosa firethorn (P. koidzumii), from Taiwan, is densely branched, with red-purple young twigs and orange-scarlet fruit. The Himalayan, or Nepalese, firethorn (P. crenulata) grows up to 6 metres (19 feet) high and can be trained as a small tree.

  • pyralid moth (insect)

    Pyralid moth, (family Pyralidae or Pyralididae), any of a group of moths in the order Lepidoptera, most members of which have long, narrow forewings, broader hindwings, and a wingspan of 18 to 35 mm (0.75 to 1.5 inches), although a few reach to 75 mm (3 inches). Coloration is dull except for bright

  • Pyralidae (insect)

    Pyralid moth, (family Pyralidae or Pyralididae), any of a group of moths in the order Lepidoptera, most members of which have long, narrow forewings, broader hindwings, and a wingspan of 18 to 35 mm (0.75 to 1.5 inches), although a few reach to 75 mm (3 inches). Coloration is dull except for bright

  • Pyralididae (insect)

    Pyralid moth, (family Pyralidae or Pyralididae), any of a group of moths in the order Lepidoptera, most members of which have long, narrow forewings, broader hindwings, and a wingspan of 18 to 35 mm (0.75 to 1.5 inches), although a few reach to 75 mm (3 inches). Coloration is dull except for bright

  • Pyralis farinalis (insect)

    pyralid moth: …include the larvae of the meal moth, Indian meal moth, and Mediterranean flour moth. Meal moth (Pyralis farinalis) caterpillars are white with black heads and live in silken tubes that they spin in such grains as cereals, meal, and flour stored while damp or in damp places. The Indian meal…

  • Pyraloidea (insect superfamily)

    lepidopteran: Annotated classification: Superfamily Pyraloidea Approximately 17,800 species in 2 families worldwide; most with a pair of tympanal organs on the first abdominal segment; adults usually slender-bodied with long legs; many with narrow forewings and broad, often folded, hind wings. Family Pyralidae (pyralid, or snout, moths) Approximately 6,130

  • Pyrame et Thisbé (work by Viau)

    Théophile de Viau: …Paris, writing one important tragedy, Pyrame et Thisbé (1623). This period of prosperity ended when he was charged with irreligious activities. He fled, was sentenced in absentia to death, was rearrested, and was finally released in 1625 under sentence of banishment. His health broken, he died soon afterward.

  • pyramid (architecture)

    Pyramid, in architecture, a monumental structure constructed of or faced with stone or brick and having a rectangular base and four sloping triangular (or sometimes trapezoidal) sides meeting at an apex (or truncated to form a platform). Pyramids have been built at various times in Egypt, Sudan,

  • Pyramid Lake (lake, Nevada, United States)

    Pyramid Lake, lake within Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation, western Nevada, U.S., between the Lake Range and the Virginia Mountains. A remnant of ancient Lake Lahontan, Pyramid Lake was formed during the Pleistocene Epoch (i.e., about 2,600,000 to 11,700 years ago). It is the largest natural lake in

  • Pyramid Lake War (United States history)

    Pony Express: Rough rides, dangerous stations: …in the middle of the Pyramid Lake War with the Paiute people in Nevada, a conflict that is believed to have begun at Williams Station about 30 miles (48 km) east of Carson City on the Carson River.

  • Pyramid of the Moon (pyramid, Teotihuacan, Mexico)

    pyramid: …of the Sun and the Pyramid of the Moon at Teotihuacán in central Mexico, the Castillo at Chichén Itzá, and various Inca and Chimú structures in Andean settlements. American pyramids were generally built of earth and then faced with stone, and they are typically of stepped form and topped by…

  • Pyramid of the Niches (pyramid, El Tajín, Mexico)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Late Classic non-Maya Mesoamerica (600–900): …most imposing structure is the Pyramid of the Niches, named for the approximately 365 recesses on its four sides. In this and other buildings at El Tajín, the dominant architectural motif is the step-and-fret. There are a number of other temple pyramids at the site, as well as palacelike buildings…

  • Pyramid of the Sun (pyramid, Teotihuacán, Mexico)

    Pyramid of the Sun, large pyramid in the ancient city of Teotihuacán, Mexico, that was built about 100 ce and is one of the largest structures of its type in the Western Hemisphere. The pyramid rises 216 feet (66 metres) above ground level, and it measures approximately 720 by 760 feet (220 by 230

  • pyramid piano (musical instrument)

    keyboard instrument: Other early forms: In the “pyramid piano” the strings slanted upward from left to right, and the case above the keyboard took the form of a tall isosceles triangle. Or a grand piano was essentially set on end with its pointed tail in the air, producing the asymmetrical “giraffe piano.”…

  • Pyramid Texts (Egyptian religion)

    Pyramid Texts, collection of Egyptian mortuary prayers, hymns, and spells intended to protect a dead king or queen and ensure life and sustenance in the hereafter. The texts, inscribed on the walls of the inner chambers of pyramids, are found at Ṣaqqārah in several 5th- and 6th-dynasty pyramids, of

  • pyramidal composition (art)
  • pyramidal dune (landform)

    sand mountain: …smaller versions they are called pyramidal or star dunes.

  • pyramidal number

    number game: Polygonal and other figurate numbers: …numbers; these sequences are called pyramidal numbers.

  • pyramidal tract (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Corticospinal tract: …the medulla, known as the medullary pyramids. In the lower medulla about 90 percent of the fibres of the corticospinal tract decussate and descend in the dorsolateral funiculus of the spinal cord. Of the fibres that do not cross in the medulla, approximately 8 percent cross in cervical spinal segments.…

  • Pyramidellacea (order of gastropod)

    gastropod: Classification: Order Pyramidellacea Spiral shell; operculum present; gill and radula absent; long proboscis with stylet; ectoparasitic; in warm oceanic areas; generally minute. Order Acochlidacea Three families with visceral mass longer than foot; 4 species in fresh water; a few with sexes in separate animals; size minute. Order…

  • Pyramidenflügel (musical instrument)

    keyboard instrument: Other early forms: In the “pyramid piano” the strings slanted upward from left to right, and the case above the keyboard took the form of a tall isosceles triangle. Or a grand piano was essentially set on end with its pointed tail in the air, producing the asymmetrical “giraffe piano.”…

  • pyramids (game)

    Pyramids, British pocket-billiards game in which 15 red balls are arranged in a pyramid formation to begin. Players use a white cue ball in attempting to pocket the reds, scoring one point for each; the player who scores the highest number of pocketed balls is the winner. Players lose a point and

  • Pyramids, Battle of the (Egyptian history)

    Battle of the Pyramids, (July 21, 1798), military engagement in which Napoleon Bonaparte and his French troops captured Cairo. His victory was attributed to the implementation of his one significant tactical innovation, the massive divisional square. Bonaparte, then a general and key military

  • Pyramus (Babylonian mythology)

    Pyramus and Thisbe, hero and heroine of a Babylonian love story, in which they were able to communicate only through a crack in the wall between their houses; the tale was related by Ovid in his Metamorphoses, Book IV. Though their parents refused to consent to their union, the lovers at last

  • Pyramus River (river, Turkey)

    Ceyhan River, river, southern Turkey, rising in the Nurhak Mountains of the Eastern Taurus range, northeast of Elbistan. It flows southeast past Elbistan, where it is fed by the Harman Deresi and numerous other small streams. It then turns south, is joined by the Aksu on the outskirts of

  • pyran (chemical compound)

    Pyran, any of a class of organic compounds of the heterocyclic series in which five carbon atoms and one oxygen atom are present in a ring structure. Of two possible simple pyran compounds, only one is known; it was prepared in 1962 and found to be very unstable. Among the stable members of this

  • pyrantel pamoate (drug)

    anthelmintic: Nematode anthelmintics: Pyrantel pamoate causes spastic paralysis of helminth muscle. Most of the drug is not absorbed from the intestinal tract, resulting in high levels in the intestinal lumen. It is a drug of choice in treating pinworm and is an alternative therapy for Ascaris infection, hookworm,…

  • pyrargyrite (mineral)

    Pyrargyrite, a sulfosalt mineral, a silver antimony sulfide (Ag3SbS3), that is an important source of silver, sometimes called ruby silver because of its deep red colour (see also proustite). The best crystallized specimens, of hexagonal symmetry, are from St. Andreasberg in the Harz Mountains and

  • Pyrausta nubilalis (insect)

    insect: Ecological factors: … (Icerya purchasi) of citrus, the European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilalis; also called Ostrinia nubilalis), and others. The Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), which caused appalling destruction to the cultivated potato in the United States beginning about 1840, was a native insect of semidesert country. The beetle, which fed on the

  • Pyraustinae (insect subfamily)

    lepidopteran: Annotated classification: …grasses, sedges, or rushes; subfamily Pyraustinae contains more than 7,400 species, feeding mainly on stems and fruits of various plants; many Pyraustinae species are considered pests, but some have been used in management of aquatic weeds. Superfamily Geometroidea Almost 22,000 species; adults with abdominal tympana; some authorities classify each of…

  • pyrazinamide (drug)

    antibiotic: Antituberculosis antibiotics: pyrazinamide, and ethionamide are synthetic chemicals used in treating tuberculosis. Isoniazid, ethionamide, and pyrazinamide are similar in structure to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a coenzyme essential for several physiological processes. Ethambutol prevents the synthesis of mycolic acid, a lipid found in

  • pyrazine (chemical compound)

    Pyrazine, any of a class of organic compounds of the heterocyclic series characterized by a ring structure containing four atoms of carbon and two of nitrogen. The pyrazine ring is part of many polycyclic compounds of biological or industrial significance. The simplest member of the pyrazine

  • pyrazole (chemical compound)

    Pyrazole, any of a class of organic compounds of the heterocyclic series characterized by a ring structure composed of three carbon atoms and two nitrogen atoms in adjacent positions. The simplest member of the pyrazole family is pyrazole itself, a compound with molecular formula C3H4N2. The

  • pyrazolone (drug)

    analgesic: Anti-inflammatory analgesics: …in the 19th century—salicylic acid, pyrazolone, and phenacetin (or acetophenetidin). Although chemically unrelated, the drugs in these families have the ability to relieve mild to moderate pain through actions that reduce inflammation at its source. Acetylsalicylic acid, or aspirin, which is derived from salicylic acid, is the most widely used…

  • Pyrenean chamois (mammal)

    chamois: The two species are the Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica), which is found in the Cantabrian Mountains, Pyrenees, and central Apennines, and the chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra), which is distributed from the western Alps and the Tatra Mountains to the Caucasus and northern Turkey.

  • Pyrenean desman (mammal)

    desman: The Pyrenean desman (Galemys pyrenaicus) of western Europe has similar scent glands. It has a cylindrical tail, flat near its tip and fringed with stiff hairs. The Russian desman resembles a muskrat, weighing 100–220 grams (3.5–7.8 ounces), with a body about 20 cm (8 inches) long…

  • Pyrenean ibex (extinct mammal)

    ibex: …ibex are now extinct (C. pyrenaica pyrenaica, which lived in the Pyrenees, and C. pyrenaica lusitanica, which was found in Portugal) and one is vulnerable (C. pyrenaica victoriae, which lives in the Sierra de Gredos), but another is fairly abundant, with a population of about 9,000 head (C. pyrenaica…

  • Pyrenean mountain dog (breed of dog)

    Great Pyrenees, large working dog, probably of Asian origin, that appeared in Europe between 1800 and 1000 bc. The court favourite of 17th-century France, the Great Pyrenees was originally used in the Pyrenees Mountains to guard flocks of sheep from wolves and bears. It is noted as a guard and

  • Pyrénées (mountain range, Europe)

    Pyrenees, mountain chain of southwestern Europe that consists of flat-topped massifs and folded linear ranges. It stretches from the shores of the Mediterranean Sea on the east to the Bay of Biscay on the Atlantic Ocean on the west. The Pyrenees form a high wall between France and Spain that has

  • Pyrenees (mountain range, Europe)

    Pyrenees, mountain chain of southwestern Europe that consists of flat-topped massifs and folded linear ranges. It stretches from the shores of the Mediterranean Sea on the east to the Bay of Biscay on the Atlantic Ocean on the west. The Pyrenees form a high wall between France and Spain that has

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