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  • puck (fairy)

    Puck, in medieval English folklore, a malicious fairy or demon. In Old and Middle English the word meant simply “demon.” In Elizabethan lore he was a mischievous, brownielike fairy also called Robin Goodfellow, or Hobgoblin. As one of the leading characters in William Shakespeare’s Midsummer

  • Puck (fictional character)

    Puck, the vivacious fairy, henchman for Oberon, and narrator in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Notorious for his mischievous deeds, Puck makes witty, fanciful asides that serve to guide the play and its outrageous action. Although belief in fairy creatures was strong in medieval England,

  • puck (ice hockey)

    ice hockey: …a vulcanized rubber disk, the puck, past a goal line and into a net guarded by a goaltender, or goalie. With its speed and its frequent physical contact, ice hockey has become one of the most popular of international sports. The game is an Olympic sport, and worldwide there are…

  • Puck (American periodical)

    caricature and cartoon: The United States: In 1876 Puck was founded. It was soon to develop new artists, notably Joseph Keppler and Bernhard Gillam. They worked in a lithographic style of considerable artistic competence, without the force of Nast or the effortless flow of Daumier, but with plenty of clever analogies and with…

  • Puck of Pook’s Hill (work by Kipling)

    Rudyard Kipling: Life: …of his later writing—especially in Puck of Pook’s Hill (1906) and Rewards and Fairies (1910), two volumes that, although devoted to simple dramatic presentations of English history, embodied some of his deepest intuitions. In 1907 he received the Nobel Prize for Literature, the first Englishman to be so honoured. In…

  • Puck, Wolfgang (Austrian chef)

    Campbell Soup Company: …allowed the company to sell Wolfgang Puck soup, stock, and broth products, thereby expanding Campbell’s organic soup offerings.

  • puckered conformation

    hydrocarbon: Cycloalkanes: …involving interconversion of nonplanar “puckered” conformations.

  • Puckett, Kirby (American baseball player)

    Kirby Puckett, American baseball player (born March 14, 1960, Chicago, Ill.—died March 6, 2006, Phoenix, Ariz.), was one of the game’s most popular figures, noted for his outstanding play—he helped the Minnesota Twins win two World Series titles (1987, 1991)—and his exuberance. Puckett—an e

  • Puckle, James (British inventor)

    machine gun: In 1718 James Puckle in London patented a machine gun that was actually produced; a model of it is in the Tower of London. Its chief feature, a revolving cylinder that fed rounds into the gun’s chamber, was a basic step toward the automatic weapon; what prevented…

  • Pucun (Chinese painter)

    Huang Binhong, painter and art theorist who, faced with the challenge of a new society in 20th-century China, incorporated fresh ideas into traditional Chinese painting. Huang’s father was a merchant and art enthusiast who encouraged his son’s interest in painting. In 1888 his business collapsed

  • Pudd’nhead Wilson (novel by Twain)

    Pudd’nhead Wilson, novel by Mark Twain, originally published as Pudd’nhead Wilson, a Tale (1894). A story about miscegenation in the antebellum South, the book is noted for its grim humour and its reflections on racism and responsibility. Also notable are the ironic epigraphs from a fictional

  • pudding (food)

    Pudding, any of several foods whose common characteristic is a relatively soft, spongy, and thick texture. In the United States, puddings are nearly always sweet desserts of milk or fruit juice variously flavoured and thickened with cornstarch, arrowroot, flour, tapioca, rice, bread, or eggs. The

  • puddling furnace (metallurgy)

    iron processing: History: …Henry Cort, who patented his puddling furnace in 1784. Cort used a coal-fired reverberatory furnace to melt a charge of pig iron to which iron oxide was added to make a slag. Agitating the resultant “puddle” of metal caused carbon to be removed by oxidation (together with silicon, phosphorus, and…

  • puddling process (metallurgy)

    Puddling process, Method of converting pig iron into wrought iron by subjecting it to heat and frequent stirring in a furnace in the presence of oxidizing substances (see oxidation-reduction). Invented by Henry Cort in 1784 (superseding the finery process), it was the first method that allowed

  • pudendal artery (anatomy)

    human reproductive system: The penis: …blood supply from the internal pudendal artery, a branch of the internal iliac artery, which supplies blood to the pelvic structures and organs, the buttocks, and the inside of the thighs. Erection is brought about by distension of the cavernous spaces with blood, which is prevented from draining away by…

  • pudendal block (pathology)

    birth: Pudendal block: The pudendal block is a relatively simple and common procedure that numbs the birth canal and perineum for spontaneous delivery, forceps delivery, vacuum extraction, and episiotomy. The same anesthetic agents employed in epidural anesthesia are used and are injected through the vagina to…

  • pudendal cleft (anatomy)

    human reproductive system: External genitalia: …boundaries of the vulval or pudendal cleft, which receives the openings of the vagina and the urethra. The outer surface of each labium is pigmented and hairy; the inner surface is smooth but possesses sebaceous glands. The labia majora contain fat and loose connective tissue and sweat glands. They correspond…

  • pudgala (religious concept)

    Jainism: Jiva and ajiva: Matter (pudgala) has the characteristics of touch, taste, smell, and colour; however, its essential characteristic is lack of consciousness. The smallest unit of matter is the atom (paramanu). Heat, light, and shade are all forms of fine matter.

  • Pudgalavādin (Buddhist school)

    Pudgalavādin, ancient Buddhist school in India that affirmed the existence of an enduring person (pudgala) distinct from both the conditioned (saṃskṛta) and the unconditioned (asaṃskṛ-ta); the sole asaṃskṛta for them was nirvana. If consciousness exists, there must be a subject of consciousness,

  • pudiano (fish)

    hogfish: The spotfin hogfish and the Spanish hogfish belong to the genus Bodianus and occupy the same geographic range as L. maximus. The Spanish hogfish attains a length of 61 cm and, when young, are known to clean other fishes of external parasites.

  • Pudong (district, Shanghai, China)

    Expo Shanghai 2010: …was on the eastern (Pudong) side of the river and the remainder on the western (Puxi) side. Considerable effort was put into preparing the two sites, which included relocating out of the area thousands of residents, more than 200 factories, and a shipyard. In addition, Shanghai’s transportation infrastructure was…

  • Pudovkin, Vsevolod (Soviet director)

    Vsevolod Pudovkin, Soviet film director and theorist who was best known for visually interpreting the inner motivations and emotions of his characters. Wounded and imprisoned for three years in World War I, Pudovkin returned to the study of chemistry but was attracted to the theatre. After seeing

  • Pudovkin, Vsevolod Illarionovich (Soviet director)

    Vsevolod Pudovkin, Soviet film director and theorist who was best known for visually interpreting the inner motivations and emotions of his characters. Wounded and imprisoned for three years in World War I, Pudovkin returned to the study of chemistry but was attracted to the theatre. After seeing

  • pudu (mammal)

    deer: New World deer: …of the tiniest deer, the pudu (genus Pudu), standing only 30 cm (12 inches) at the shoulder, live far apart in the central Andes and southern Chile, as do two species of the larger, rock-climbing Andean deer (genus Hippocamelus). The small pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus) and the red deer-sized marsh…

  • Pudu-Kheba (Hittite queen)

    Arinnitti: The powerful Hittite queen Puduhepa adopted Arinnitti as her protectress; the queen’s seal showed her in the goddess’ embrace.

  • Puducherry (union territory, India)

    Puducherry, union territory of India. It was formed in 1962 out of the four former colonies of French India: Pondicherry (now Puducherry) and Karaikal along India’s southeastern Coromandel Coast, surrounded by Tamil Nadu state; Yanam, farther north along the eastern coast in the delta region of the

  • Puducherry (India)

    Puducherry, city, capital of Puducherry union territory, southeastern India. The city constitutes an enclave surrounded by Tamil Nadu state, on the Coromandel Coast of the Bay of Bengal, 105 miles (170 km) south of Chennai (Madras). It originated as a French trade centre in 1674, when it was

  • Puduhepa (Hittite queen)

    Arinnitti: The powerful Hittite queen Puduhepa adopted Arinnitti as her protectress; the queen’s seal showed her in the goddess’ embrace.

  • Pudukkottai (India)

    Pudukkottai, city, southern Tamil Nadu state, southern India. It is located on a level lowland plain just north of the Vellar River, about 30 miles (48 km) south-southeast of Tiruchchirappalli and 35 miles (55 km) southwest of Thanjavur. Pudukkottai was founded by Raghunath, raja of Tondaimandalam

  • Puebla (Mexico)

    Puebla, city, capital of Puebla estado (state), central Mexico. Founded as Puebla de los Angeles in 1532, the city lies on a broad plain 7,093 feet (2,162 metres) above sea level, about 80 miles (130 km) southeast of Mexico City. It is spread across foothills where the Sierra Madre Oriental

  • Puebla (state, Mexico)

    Puebla, estado (state), east-central Mexico. It is bounded by the states of Veracruz to the north and east, Oaxaca to the south, Guerrero to the southwest, Morelos and México to the west, and Tlaxcala and Hidalgo to the northwest. Nearly half of its population is concentrated in the city of Puebla

  • Puebla de Zaragoza (Mexico)

    Puebla, city, capital of Puebla estado (state), central Mexico. Founded as Puebla de los Angeles in 1532, the city lies on a broad plain 7,093 feet (2,162 metres) above sea level, about 80 miles (130 km) southeast of Mexico City. It is spread across foothills where the Sierra Madre Oriental

  • Puebla, Anniversary of the Battle of (Mexican history)

    Cinco de Mayo, (Spanish: “Fifth of May”) holiday celebrated in parts of Mexico and the United States in honour of a military victory in 1862 over the French forces of Napoleon III. When in 1861 Mexico declared a temporary moratorium on the repayment of foreign debts, English, Spanish, and French

  • Puebla, Battle of (Mexican-French history [1862])

    Battle of Puebla, (May 5, 1862), battle fought at Puebla, Mexico, between the army of the liberal government headed by Benito Juárez and the French forces sent by Napoleon III to establish a French satellite state in Mexico. The battle, which ended in a Mexican victory, is celebrated in the

  • Pueblo (Colorado, United States)

    Pueblo, city, seat (1861) of Pueblo county, south-central Colorado, U.S., situated on the Arkansas River, near its confluence with Fountain Creek, at an elevation of 4,690 feet (1,430 metres). Jim Beckwourth, a trader and onetime war chief of the Crow Indians, established a trading post, Fort

  • pueblo

    Pueblo architecture, traditional architecture of the Pueblo Indians of the southwestern United States. The multistoried, permanent, attached homes typical of this tradition are modeled after the cliff dwellings built by the Ancestral Pueblo (Anasazi) culture beginning in approximately ad 1150. This

  • pueblo architecture

    Pueblo architecture, traditional architecture of the Pueblo Indians of the southwestern United States. The multistoried, permanent, attached homes typical of this tradition are modeled after the cliff dwellings built by the Ancestral Pueblo (Anasazi) culture beginning in approximately ad 1150. This

  • Pueblo Bonito (ruin, New Mexico, United States)

    Native American art: Southwest: …remarkable multistoried structures, some—such as Pueblo Bonito in New Mexico—sheltering hundreds of families in more than 400 rooms.

  • Pueblo de San José de Guadalupe (California, United States)

    San Jose, city, seat (1850) of Santa Clara county, west-central California, U.S. It lies in the Santa Clara Valley along Coyote Creek and the Guadalupe River, about 50 miles (80 km) southeast of San Francisco. The city, located just southeast of San Francisco Bay, sprawls over a broad floodplain

  • Pueblo I (Anasazi culture)

    Ancestral Pueblo culture: …(ad 100–500), Basketmaker III (500–750), Pueblo I (750–950), Pueblo II (950–1150), Pueblo III (1150–1300), and Pueblo IV (1300–1600). When the first cultural time lines of the American Southwest were created in the early 20th century, scientists included a Basketmaker I stage. They created this hypothetical period in anticipation of finding…

  • Pueblo II (North American culture)

    Ancestral Pueblo culture: …III (500–750), Pueblo I (750–950), Pueblo II (950–1150), Pueblo III (1150–1300), and Pueblo IV (1300–1600). When the first cultural time lines of the American Southwest were created in the early 20th century, scientists included a Basketmaker I stage. They created this hypothetical period in anticipation of finding evidence for the…

  • Pueblo III

    cliff dwelling: …Pueblo culture period known as Pueblo III (approximately 1150–1300 ce).

  • Pueblo Incident (United States history)

    Pueblo Incident, capture of the USS “Pueblo,” a Navy intelligence ship, and its 83 crewmen by North Korean patrol boats off the coast of North Korea on Jan. 23, 1968. The United States, maintaining that the “Pueblo” had been in international waters, began a military buildup in the area. It also

  • Pueblo Indian Religion (work by Parsons)

    Elsie Clews Parsons: …syntheses of knowledge, culminating in Pueblo Indian Religion, 2 vol. (1939). Her interest in all possible influences on Pueblo peoples led her to investigations among Native Americans of the Great Plains and of Mexico, Peru, Ecuador, and the Caribbean. The Zapotec Indians of the state of Oaxaca, in Mexico, are…

  • Pueblo Indians (people)

    Pueblo Indians, North American Indian peoples known for living in compact permanent settlements known as pueblos. Representative of the Southwest Indian culture area, most live in northeastern Arizona and northwestern New Mexico. Early 21st-century population estimates indicated approximately

  • Pueblo IV period

    Ancestral Pueblo culture: … (950–1150), Pueblo III (1150–1300), and Pueblo IV (1300–1600). When the first cultural time lines of the American Southwest were created in the early 20th century, scientists included a Basketmaker I stage. They created this hypothetical period in anticipation of finding evidence for the earliest stages of the transition from hunting…

  • Pueblo Libre (district, Peru)

    Pueblo Libre, distrito (district), in the southwestern Lima–Callao metropolitan area, Peru. Mainly a middle-income residential community, it is dotted with small parks. Although many of the homes are modern, some predate Peru’s independence from Spain (1824). The liberators Simón Bolívar and José

  • Pueblo pottery (American Indian art)

    Pueblo pottery, one of the most highly developed of the American Indian arts, still produced today in a manner almost identical to the method developed during the Classic Pueblo period about ad 1050–1300. During the five previous centuries when the Pueblo Indians became sedentary, they stopped

  • Pueblo Rebellion (history of North America)

    Pueblo Rebellion, (1680), carefully organized revolt of Pueblo Indians (in league with Apaches), who succeeded in overthrowing Spanish rule in New Mexico for 12 years. A traditionally peaceful people, the Pueblos had endured much after New Mexico’s colonization in 1598. Catholicism was forced on

  • Pueblo V

    Ancestral Pueblo culture: The history of the modern Pueblo tribes is usually dated from approximately 1600 onward, as Spanish colonial occupation of the North American Southwest began in 1598. The Spanish mandate was to Christianize the indigenous population and to extract tribute for the crown, and violence was often used in order…

  • Pueblo, El (Spanish journal)

    Vicente Blasco Ibáñez: He founded the republican journal El Pueblo in 1891 and was first elected to the Cortes (parliament) in 1901, to which he was returned seven times before he voluntarily exiled himself in 1923 and settled on the French Riviera. He did so because of his opposition to the military dictatorship…

  • Puebloan (people)

    Ancestral Pueblo culture: …their approximate dates are Late Basketmaker II (ad 100–500), Basketmaker III (500–750), Pueblo I (750–950), Pueblo II (950–1150), Pueblo III (1150–1300), and Pueblo IV (1300–1600). When the first cultural time lines of the American Southwest were created in the early 20th century, scientists included a Basketmaker I stage. They created…

  • Pueblonuevo (town, Spain)

    Peñarroya-Pueblonuevo, town, Córdoba provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Andalusia, southern Spain. A railway junction in the Sierra Morena, it lies about 50 miles (80 km) northwest of Córdoba city. Peñarroya was settled in the 13th century. Pueblonuevo was

  • Pueblos Libres, Liga de los (political organization, Argentina)

    Argentina: Efforts toward reconstruction, 1820–29: …in Buenos Aires and the League of Free Peoples, which had grown up along the Río de la Plata and its tributaries under the leadership of José Gervasio Artigas. But both organizations collapsed in that year, and Buenos Aires seemed to be losing its position as the seat of national…

  • Pueblos Mesas (volcanoes, Nicaragua)

    Nicaragua: Relief: … in the north and the Pueblos Mesas in the south. The highest volcanoes include San Cristóbal (5,840 feet [1,780 metres]), Concepción (5,282 feet [1,610 metres]), and Momotombo (4,199 feet [1,280 metres]).

  • Puelche (people)

    Puelche, extinct South American Indian tribe that inhabited the grassy Pampas in the vicinity of the Río Negro and Río Colorado and ranged north as far as the Río de la Plata. The Puelche had their own language but in social and economic characteristics resembled their Patagonian and Pampean n

  • puellam suam, In (poetry by Poliziano)

    Poliziano: …In Lalagen and the ode In puellam suam (“In Regard to One’s Daughters”). To the same period belong the strange and poetically experimental Sylva in scabiem (1475; “Trees with Mildew”), in which he describes realistically the symptoms of scabies.

  • Puente, El (aqueduct, Segovia, Spain)

    Segovia aqueduct, water-conveyance structure built under the Roman emperor Trajan (reigned 98–117 ce) and still in use; it carries water 10 miles (16 km) from the Frío River to the city of Segovia, Spain. One of the best-preserved Roman engineering works, it was built of some 24,000 dark-coloured

  • Puente, Tito (American musician)

    Tito Puente , American bandleader, composer, and musician who was one of the leading figures in Latin jazz. His bravura showmanship and string of mambo dance hits in the 1950s earned him the nickname “King of Mambo.” The son of Puerto Rican immigrants, Puente grew up in New York City’s Spanish

  • Puente-Genil (Spain)

    Puente-Genil, town, Córdoba provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Andalusia, southern Spain, located south of Córdoba city, on the Córdoba-Málaga railway. It takes its name from the bridge over the Genil River that connects the two sections of the town. An

  • Puenzo, Luis (Argentine director, producer, and writer)
  • Pueraria montana (plant)

    Kudzu, (Pueraria montana), twining perennial vine of the pea family (Fabaceae). Kudzu is native to China and Japan, where it has long been grown for its edible starchy roots and for a fibre made from its stems. Kudzu is a useful fodder crop for livestock as well as an attractive ornamental.

  • puerperal fever (infection)

    Puerperal fever, infection of some part of the female reproductive organs following childbirth or abortion. Cases of fever of 100.4 °F (38 °C) and higher during the first 10 days following delivery or miscarriage are notifiable to the civil authority in most developed countries, and the notifying

  • puerperium

    Puerperium, the period of adjustment after childbirth during which the mother’s reproductive system returns to its normal prepregnant state. It generally lasts six to eight weeks and ends with the first ovulation and the return of normal menstruation. Puerperal changes begin almost immediately

  • Puerta del Sol (plaza, Madrid, Spain)

    Puerta del Sol, main plaza of Madrid, Spain. It was reputedly named for a gate (puerta) that stood there until 1510 and had on its front a representation of the sun (sol). Throughout Madrid’s history the square has been the focal point of transportation and of intellectual and economic activity.

  • Puerto Aisén (Chile)

    Puerto Aisén, city, southern Chile. It is located on the Aisén River at the head of a deep fjord facing the Chonos Archipelago. Colonization of the surrounding area of rugged topography and rigorous climate began only in the 19th century. Puerto Aisén is a port and commercial centre for the

  • Puerto Armuelles (Panama)

    Puerto Armuelles, Pacific Ocean seaport, western Panama. It is located on Charco Azul bay, west-southwest of David, near the border with Costa Rica. It was long a centre of banana cultivation and the headquarters of the Chiriquí Land Company, a subsidiary of Chiquita Brands International, Inc.

  • Puerto Ayacucho (Venezuela)

    Puerto Ayacucho, city, capital of Amazonas estado (state), southern Venezuela. It is situated on the Orinoco River just below the Atures Rapids, which block navigation on the river. Founded in 1924, Puerto Ayacucho is the trading centre for the large but sparsely populated state, which historically

  • Puerto Ayora (Ecuador)

    Santa Cruz Island: Puerto Ayora, on the southern coast, originally a colony of Scandinavians and Germans, has a harbour that can accommodate boats. Subsistence farming, fruit and sugarcane cultivation, and cattle raising are the basic economic activities, and tourism is important. The Charles Darwin Research Station on the…

  • Puerto Aysén (Chile)

    Puerto Aisén, city, southern Chile. It is located on the Aisén River at the head of a deep fjord facing the Chonos Archipelago. Colonization of the surrounding area of rugged topography and rigorous climate began only in the 19th century. Puerto Aisén is a port and commercial centre for the

  • Puerto Baquerizo (Galápagos Islands, Ecuador)

    San Cristóbal Island: …capital of the Galapagos) and Puerto Baquerizo Moreno are located on Naufragio (Wreck) Bay. Charles Darwin, the English naturalist, landed at San Cristóbal in 1835 and compiled data that he later incorporated into his On the Origin of Species (1859). A monument to Darwin was erected in 1935. Formerly a…

  • Puerto Barrios (Guatemala)

    Puerto Barrios, town, northeastern Guatemala, on Amatique Bay, off the Gulf of Honduras. Until the 1970s it was the principal port of Guatemala, used primarily for shipping agricultural commodities. In the early 20th century the port facilities and the railway connecting the port to Guatemala City

  • Puerto Bello (Panama)

    Portobelo, village, east-central Panama. It is situated along the Caribbean Sea coast, about 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Colón. The name Portobelo, meaning “beautiful harbour,” was given by Christopher Columbus in 1502; the village was founded in 1597. Portobelo grew to become a strongly

  • Puerto Berrío (Colombia)

    Puerto Berrío, city, eastern Antioquia department, northwestern Colombia, situated on the Magdalena River. It has been an important transportation hub almost since its founding in 1875 and a commercial and manufacturing centre for the agricultural and forest products of its hinterland. A cement

  • Puerto Caballos (Honduras)

    Puerto Cortés, city, northwestern Honduras, situated on the Gulf of Honduras. It is backed by Alvarado Lagoon and extends for 2 miles (3 km) along the southern shore of Caballos Point. Puerto Cortés serves as the seaport for San Pedro Sula and the Sula Valley. The city was founded in 1524 as Puerto

  • Puerto Cabello (Venezuela)

    Puerto Cabello, port city, northern Carabobo estado (state), north-central Venezuela, situated on the Caribbean Sea. In colonial times the waters of its well-protected harbour were said to be so smooth that a single hair (Spanish cabello) could moor a vessel to the dock—hence the name. Puerto

  • Puerto Cabezas (Nicaragua)

    Nicaragua: Transportation and telecommunications: The Caribbean ports include Puerto Cabezas and Bluefields, the latter connected to the river landing of Port Esperanza by regular small craft service. The short rivers in the west are navigable for small craft. In the east the Coco River is navigable in its lower course for medium-sized vessels.

  • Puerto Carreño (Colombia)

    Puerto Carreño, capital of Vichada departamento, eastern Colombia, situated at the junction of the Meta and Orinoco rivers, across from Puerto Páez, Venezuela. The easternmost of Colombia’s urban centres and a potentially important port on the Orinoco River, the city is a collection centre for the

  • Puerto Castilla (Honduras)

    Puerto Castilla, port, northern coast of Honduras. Located on the western side of a spit jutting out from the mainland north of Trujillo, the port is on an artificial island created by canals cut on its northern, eastern, and western sides. The site of Spanish fortifications in the colonial period,

  • Puerto Cortés (Honduras)

    Puerto Cortés, city, northwestern Honduras, situated on the Gulf of Honduras. It is backed by Alvarado Lagoon and extends for 2 miles (3 km) along the southern shore of Caballos Point. Puerto Cortés serves as the seaport for San Pedro Sula and the Sula Valley. The city was founded in 1524 as Puerto

  • Puerto de Maó (Spain)

    Maó, capital of Minorca Island, Balearic Islands provincia (province) and comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), Spain. It originated as the Mediterranean Portus Magonis, bearing the name of the Carthaginian general Mago. Under the Romans it was a municipium (privileged town). The Arab pirate

  • Puerto de San José (Guatemala)

    Puerto de San José, port town, south-central Guatemala, situated along the Pacific Ocean. Opened in 1853, it is a roadstead with a long wharf; passengers and cargo are transferred from ships anchored 1 mile (1.6 km) offshore. It served as Guatemala’s principal Pacific port until the early 1980s,

  • Puerto de Santa María (Spain)

    El Puerto de Santa María, port city, Cádiz provincia (province), in the Andalusia comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), southern Spain, at the mouth of Guadalete River on the Bay of Cádiz, southwest of Jerez de la Frontera. The Roman Portus Menesthei, it was once the site of naval arsenals and

  • Puerto Grande (bay, Puerto Rico)

    Culebra Island: The island’s deep bay, Puerto Grande, on the southeast, was used as a U.S. naval base until 1975. Culebra has sparse, thin soils and no permanent streams; tourism and fishing are the principal activities of its few inhabitants.

  • Puerto Hormiga (archaeological site, Colombia)

    Native American art: Colombia: …region about 10,000 bc, and Puerto Hormiga excavations reveal that a pottery-making culture existed as early as 3000 bc. The more definite cultural expressions, however, are not found in quantity until San Agustín, which came into existence with the advent of the Common, or Christian, Era. Little pottery has been…

  • Puerto La Cruz (Venezuela)

    Puerto La Cruz, city, northeastern Anzoátegui estado (state), northeastern Venezuela. It is situated along the Caribbean Sea. The city’s origins lie in a 17th-century settlement of Indian fishermen that was named for the nearby “Spring of the Sacred Cross.” The former fishing village has become a

  • Puerto Lempira (Honduras)

    Puerto Lempira, town, northeastern Honduras. The town lies on an islet that forms part of Tánsin Island, facing the main passage into the Caratasca Lagoon. Fishing is the major economic activity of the area, and the town has a shrimp-packing plant. The shallow, swampy nature of the lagoon and the

  • Puerto Limón (Costa Rica)

    Limón, city and port, eastern Costa Rica. It is located on an open roadstead of the Caribbean Sea near the landfall sighted by Christopher Columbus in 1503. The waters there are deep enough for large ships, and a sandbar offers some protection for the port. In the colonial era, the port was used by

  • Puerto Madero (neighbourhood, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    Buenos Aires: City neighbourhoods: …Buenos Aires include Monserrat and Puerto Madero. Monserrat, wedged between San Telmo and the Plaza de Mayo, is home to many of the city’s oldest churches, modern government buildings, and distinctive Beaux Arts buildings. Puerto Madero, once an area of dilapidated buildings and abandoned warehouses, has been transformed into a…

  • Puerto Maldonado (Peru)

    Puerto Maldonado, port city, southeastern Peru. It lies at the confluence of the Tambopata and Madre de Dios rivers, at 840 feet (256 m) above sea level in the hot, humid rain forest known as the selva (jungle). It was named for Dom Pedro Maldonado, an 18th-century Spanish explorer, but was not

  • Puerto México (Mexico)

    Coatzacoalcos, city and port, southeastern Veracruz estado (state), south-central Mexico. Formerly known as Puerto México, it lies at the mouth of the Coatzacoalcos River on the Gulf of Campeche, at the narrowest segment of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. An important port and transportation centre,

  • Puerto Montt (Chile)

    Puerto Montt, port and city, southern Chile. It lies at the head of Reloncaví Bay (an inlet of the Pacific Ocean), adjacent to Tenglo Island. A settlement was founded there in 1853 and was named for Manuel Montt, then president of Chile. Early German settlers gave it a distinctive appearance.

  • Puerto Padre (Cuba)

    Puerto Padre, city and port, eastern Cuba. It lies on sheltered Puerto Padre Bay, of the Atlantic Ocean, about 30 miles (50 km) northwest of Holguín. The city is a commercial and manufacturing centre for a fertile irrigated hinterland. Sugarcane, tobacco, fruit, and livestock produced in the area

  • Puerto Plata (Dominican Republic)

    Puerto Plata, (Spanish: “Silver Port”) city and port, northern Dominican Republic. It lies at the foot of Isabel de Torres Peak, along the Atlantic Ocean. Puerto Plata was founded in 1503 by Christopher Columbus. Serving the fertile Cibao Valley, the port handles the produce of one of the country’s

  • Puerto Presidente Stroessner (Paraguay)

    Ciudad del Este, city, eastern Paraguay. It is situated directly on the right bank of the Paraná River at the border with Brazil, but it is considered part of the tri-border region that includes Argentina. Founded in 1957, the city was converted from a tropical forest into Paraguay’s second most

  • Puerto Princesa (Philippines)

    Puerto Princesa, city, east-central Palawan, Philippines. It is an important port on a sheltered inlet of the Sulu Sea, south of Honda Bay, and it has an airport. The city was formerly called Cuyo. The site of a penal colony during the Spanish regime, Puerto Princesa has become one of several

  • Puerto Príncipe (Cuba)

    Camagüey, city, capital of Camagüey provincia (province), east-central Cuba. It is situated on the San Pedro River, about 25 miles (40 km) southeast of Florida. The city was founded in 1514 as Santa María del Puerto del Príncipe (also called Puerto Príncipe), at the site of present-day Nuevitas,

  • Puerto Real (Spain)

    Puerto Real, town, Cádiz provincia (province), in the Andalusia comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), southern Spain. It is on the north shore of the inner arm of the Bay of Cádiz and lies 5 miles (8 km) east of Cádiz. Known to the Romans, it was probably the most ancient trading station on

  • Puerto Rican (people)

    United States: Hispanics: Puerto Ricans are the second largest group of Hispanics in the country. Their experience in the United States is markedly different from that of Mexican Americans. Most importantly, Puerto Ricans are American citizens by virtue of the island commonwealth’s association with the United States. As…

  • Puerto Rican (nationality)

    Hispanics in the United States: The U.S. Census of 2000: …a “person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin,” regardless of skin colour. From 1990 to 2000 the Hispanic population in the United States rose by nearly 60 percent, from 22.4 million in 1990 to 35.3 million in 2000, and some two…

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