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  • Principles of Orchestration (work by Rimsky-Korsakov)

    wind instrument: The Romantic period: In his Principles of Orchestration (1913; written 1896–1908), the Russian composer Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov developed the theory that the four basic woodwinds had a vast range of expression. At each end of the entire range were areas useful for their individual colour, and the instruments of smaller and…

  • Principles of Philosophy (work by Descartes)

    René Descartes: Physics, physiology, and morals: In 1644 Descartes published Principles of Philosophy, a compilation of his physics and metaphysics. He dedicated this work to Princess Elizabeth (1618–79), daughter of Elizabeth Stuart, titular queen of Bohemia, in correspondence with whom he developed his moral philosophy. According to Descartes, a human being is a union of…

  • Principles of Physiological Psychology (work by Wundt)

    Wilhelm Wundt: …in the history of psychology, Grundzüge der physiologischen Psychologie, 2 vol. (1873–74; 3 vol., 6th ed., 1908–11; Principles of Physiological Psychology). The Grundzüge advanced a system of psychology that sought to investigate the immediate experiences of consciousness, including sensations, feelings, volitions, and ideas; it also contained the concept of apperception,…

  • Principles of Political Economy (work by Malthus)

    Thomas Malthus: Malthusian theory: In his summary Principles of Political Economy Considered with a View to Their Practical Application (1820), Malthus went so far as to propose public works and private luxury investment as possible solutions for economic distress through their ability to increase demand and prosperity. He criticized those who valued…

  • Principles of Political Economy (work by Mill)

    classical economics: …were restated by Mill in Principles of Political Economy (1848), a treatise that marked the culmination of classical economics. Mill’s work related abstract economic principles to real-world social conditions and thereby lent new authority to economic concepts.

  • Principles of Political Economy Considered with a View to Their Practical Application (work by Malthus)

    Thomas Malthus: Malthusian theory: In his summary Principles of Political Economy Considered with a View to Their Practical Application (1820), Malthus went so far as to propose public works and private luxury investment as possible solutions for economic distress through their ability to increase demand and prosperity. He criticized those who valued…

  • Principles of Practical Musick, The (work by Simpson)

    Christopher Simpson: …(variations on a ground); and The Principles of Practical Musick (1665; modern ed., 1970), praised for its excellence by Henry Purcell and other contemporary composers.

  • Principles of Psychology, The (work by Spencer)

    Herbert Spencer: Life and works: …published the first part of The Principles of Psychology in 1855. Between 1854 and 1859 he published a series of essays on education, which were collected in Education: Intellectual, Moral, and Physical (1861). Spencer rejected some traditional elements of the curriculum and emphasized the importance of self-development, sympathetic attention from…

  • Principles of Psychology, The (work by James)

    attention: 19th-century roots: In his major work, The Principles of Psychology (1890), he says:

  • Principles of Quantum Mechanics, The (work by Dirac)

    quantum mechanics: Axiomatic approach: …in a classic textbook entitled The Principles of Quantum Mechanics. (The book, published in 1930, is still in print.) An observable is anything that can be measured—energy, position, a component of angular momentum, and so forth. Every observable has a set of states, each state being represented by an algebraic…

  • Principles of Scientific Management, The (work by Taylor)

    Frederick W. Taylor: The Principles of Scientific Management was published commercially in 1911.

  • Principles of Sociology (work by Ross)

    Edward A. Ross: His Principles of Sociology (1920) was for years a standard introductory textbook.

  • Principles of Sociology, The (work by Spencer)

    Herbert Spencer: Life and works: …when the third volume of The Principles of Sociology appeared, the task was completed. In order to prepare the ground for The Principles of Sociology, Spencer started in 1873 a series of works called Descriptive Sociology, in which information was provided about the social institutions of various societies, both “primitive”…

  • Principles of Teaching Based on Psychology, The (work by Thorndike)

    Edward L. Thorndike: …part of his career were The Principles of Teaching Based on Psychology (1906), Education: A First Book (1912), and Educational Psychology, 3 vol. (1913–14; 2nd ed., 1921). These books were responsible for many of the earliest applications of psychology to classroom instruction in arithmetic, algebra, reading, writing, and language and…

  • Prine, John (American singer-songwriter)

    singer-songwriters: …singer-songwriters of artistic note included John Prine, a homespun comic fabulist and storyteller from Illinois; Tom Waits, a Californian who acted the role of raspy-voiced hipster and latter-day beatnik saint; and Waits’s female counterpart, Rickie Lee Jones, whose pop-jazz suites echoed Nyro’s effusions. In England, Richard Thompson wrote scathingly despairing

  • Prinefosse, Josias de Soulas, sieur de (French actor)

    Floridor, French leading actor who headed the important troupe of the Théâtre de l’Hôtel de Bourgogne, in Paris, where he created many roles in plays by the French masters Pierre Corneille and Jean Racine. The son of a German father, he entered the French army and was promoted to ensign but later r

  • Prineville (Oregon, United States)

    Prineville, city, seat (1882) of Crook county, central Oregon, U.S., on the Crooked River near Ochoco Creek. Settled in 1868 and named for Barney Prine, the first settler, it was laid out in 1870. One of the few municipally owned railroads in the United States, the City of Prineville Railway, has

  • Pringle, John Cecil (American actor)

    John Gilbert, romantic leading man of the silent era, known as the “Great Lover.” In retrospect, his acting career has been overshadowed by his identification as the tragic star who failed to make the transition to sound. The son of a small-time acting family, Gilbert began his screen career in

  • Pringle, Sir John, 1st Baronet (English physician)

    Sir John Pringle, 1st Baronet, British physician, an early exponent of the importance of ordinary putrefactive processes in the production of disease. His application of this principle to the administration of hospitals and army camps has earned him distinction as a founder of modern military

  • Pringle, Thomas (Scottish-South African poet)

    Thomas Pringle, Scottish-South African poet, often called the father of South African poetry. Pringle was educated at the University of Edinburgh and befriended by Sir Walter Scott. He immigrated to South Africa in 1820. He published a newspaper and a magazine in Cape Town, but his reform views

  • Pringlea antiscorbutica (plant)

    Kerguelen cabbage, (Pringlea antiscorbutica), plant resembling the common cabbage and belonging to the same family (Brassicaceae), named for the Kerguelen Islands, where it was discovered. The sole member of its genus, Kerguelen cabbage inhabits only a few, remote islands near Antarctica at roughly

  • Pringsheim, Nathanael (German botanist)

    Nathanael Pringsheim, botanist whose contributions to the study of algae made him one of the founders of the science of algology. Pringsheim studied at various universities, including the University of Berlin, from which he received a Ph.D. in 1848. He then taught briefly at the Universities of

  • prinia (bird)

    Prinia, any bird of the large genus Prinia, belonging to the Old World warbler family, Sylviidae. Prinias are sometimes called longtail warblers or wren-warblers, from their long, graduated tails, which are carried, wrenlike, cocked up. Prinias, 10 to 15 centimetres (4 to 6 inches) long, are more

  • Prinias (ancient city, Crete)

    Western architecture: Minoan Crete: …this post-destruction period, and at Prinias a unique temple building may date from as late as 700 bc. The doorway of this temple has low reliefs on its architectural members. The opening above the lintel is flanked by seated figures, while the lintel itself is carved on its underside with…

  • Prinkipo (island, Turkey)

    Kızıl Adalar: …on the four larger islands, Büyükada (Prinkipo, ancient Pityoussa), Heybeli Ada (Halki, ancient Chalcitis), Burgaz Adası (Antigoni, ancient Panormos), and Kınalı Ada (Proti). Büyükada was Leon Trotsky’s home for a time after his exile from the Soviet Union in 1929. Heybeli Ada has a branch of the Turkish naval academy.

  • Prinoxystus robiniae (insect)

    carpenter moth: The carpenterworm moth (Prinoxystus robiniae) has a wingspan of about 5 cm (2 inches) and is the most familiar North American cossid. The mahogany-coloured larvae of the goat moth (Cossus cossus) attack deciduous trees and exude a strong, goatlike odour. The members of this family are…

  • Prins Karl’s Forland National Park (national park, Norway)

    Forlandet National Park, national park and bird sanctuary established in 1973 by Norway’s Environment Ministry for Svalbard. The Forlandet National Park has the greatest number of bird sanctuaries in the Svalbard archipelago: six in number, located throughout the southern and southeastern regions

  • Prinsengracht (canal, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

    Amsterdam: City development: …(Emperor’s Canal), and Prinsengracht (Prince’s Canal). These concentric canals, together with the smaller radial canals, form a characteristic spiderweb pattern, which was extended east along the harbour and west into the district known as the Jordaan during the prosperous Golden Age (the 17th and early 18th centuries).

  • Prinsenhof (building, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

    Amsterdam: Administration: …the council moved to the Prinsenhof, a onetime convent that later became the Admiralty Court. In the mid-1980s a new city hall and opera house were constructed on the north bank of the Amstel River, at Waterloo Square. In 1926 Herengracht 502, which was built for a director of the…

  • Prinsep’s Ghat (archway, Calcutta, india)

    James Prinsep: …measures while at Calcutta, where Prinsep’s Ghat, an archway on the bank of the Hugli (Hooghly) River, was erected to his memory.

  • Prinsep, James (English antiquarian)

    James Prinsep, antiquary and colonial administrator in India, the first European scholar to decipher the edicts of the ancient Indian emperor Ashoka. Prinsep was appointed to the Calcutta (Kolkata) mint in 1819 but left to become assay master (1820–30) at the Benares (Varanasi) mint. He returned to

  • Prinsep, Val (painter)

    William Morris: Education and early career: …the memoirs of the painter Val Prinsep, as “a short square man with spectacles and a vast mop of dark hair.” It was observed “how decisive he was: how accurate, without any effort or formality: what an extraordinary power of observation lay at the base of many of his casual…

  • Prinstein, Meyer (American track and field athlete)

    Meyer Prinstein, American jumper who won three gold medals in Olympic competition in the early 20th century. As a student at Syracuse University, Prinstein set a world record in the long jump, 7.24 metres (23 feet 8.875 inches), in 1898. He finished second in the long jump to his great rival, Alvin

  • Prinsztejn, Mejer (American track and field athlete)

    Meyer Prinstein, American jumper who won three gold medals in Olympic competition in the early 20th century. As a student at Syracuse University, Prinstein set a world record in the long jump, 7.24 metres (23 feet 8.875 inches), in 1898. He finished second in the long jump to his great rival, Alvin

  • print (photography)

    history of photography: General considerations: In printing the negative, the photographer has a wide choice in the physical surface of the paper, the tonal contrast, and the image colour. The photographer also may set up a completely artificial scene to photograph.

  • print

    Printmaking, an art form consisting of the production of images, usually on paper but occasionally on fabric, parchment, plastic, or other support, by various techniques of multiplication, under the direct supervision of or by the hand of the artist. Such fine prints, as they are known

  • printed circuit (electronics)

    Printed circuit, electrical device in which the wiring and certain components consist of a thin coat of electrically conductive material applied in a pattern on an insulating substrate by any of several graphic arts procedures. After World War II, printed circuits replaced conventional wiring in

  • printed felt base (floor covering)

    floor covering: Printed felt base: Printed felt base is formed by applying a heavy film of paint to felt saturated with asphalt; the felt is sealed at both the top and bottom with one or more layers of coating before application of paint, preventing discoloration from the paint and leveling…

  • Printemps (poems by Aubigné)

    Théodore-Agrippa d' Aubigné: …love poetry, collected in the Printemps (1570–73, unpublished). It remained in manuscript until 1874. In these poems the stock characters and phraseology, modelled on Petrarch, are transmuted into a highly personal style, full of tragic resonances, by Aubigné’s characteristic vehemence of passion and force of imagination.

  • printer, computer

    Computer printer, Electronic device that accepts text files or images from a computer and transfers them to a medium such as paper or film. It can be connected directly to the computer or indirectly via a network. Printers are classified as impact printers (in which the print medium is physically

  • printing (photography)

    technology of photography: Printing: The simplest printing equipment is the contact printing frame in which the negative and printing paper are held together behind a glass plate during exposure to a suitable lamp. A printing box is essentially a printing frame with a built-in light source. Contact printing…

  • printing (publishing)

    Printing, traditionally, a technique for applying under pressure a certain quantity of colouring agent onto a specified surface to form a body of text or an illustration. Certain modern processes for reproducing texts and illustrations, however, are no longer dependent on the mechanical concept of

  • printing plate (printing)

    embossing: …means of engraved dies or plates. Crests, monograms, and addresses may be embossed on paper and envelopes from dies set either in small handscrew presses or in ordinary letterpresses. Blocked ornaments on book covers or imitation tooling on leatherwork can be effected by means of powerful embossing presses. For impressing…

  • printing press (printing)

    Printing press, machine by which text and images are transferred to paper or other media by means of ink. Although movable type, as well as paper, first appeared in China, it was in Europe that printing first became mechanized. The earliest mention of a printing press is in a lawsuit in Strasbourg

  • printing telegraphy (communications)

    telegraph: Printing telegraphs: In 1903 the British inventor Donald Murray, following the ideas of Baudot, devised a time-division multiplex system for the British Post Office. The transmitter used a typewriter keyboard that punched tape, and the receiver printed text. He modified the Baudot Code by assigning…

  • printing-out paper (photography)

    history of photography: Development of the wet collodion process: …albumen paper is a slow printing-out paper (i.e., paper that produces a visible image on direct exposure, without chemical development) that had been coated with egg white before being sensitized. The egg white gave the paper a glossy surface that improved the definition of the image.

  • printmaking

    Printmaking, an art form consisting of the production of images, usually on paper but occasionally on fabric, parchment, plastic, or other support, by various techniques of multiplication, under the direct supervision of or by the hand of the artist. Such fine prints, as they are known

  • Printz v. United States (law case)

    Brady Law: …by the Supreme Court in Printz v. United States (1997). The NCIS was created by by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and became operational on November 30, 1998.

  • Printz, Johan Björnsson (Swedish military officer)

    Johan Björnsson Printz, Swedish military officer and colonial governor of New Sweden on the Delaware River. Printz, the son of a Lutheran pastor, received his early education in Sweden before he departed in 1618 for theological studies at German universities. He was pressed into military service in

  • Prinz (lunar crater)

    Moon: Effects of impacts and volcanism: …flows inundated the older crater Prinz, whose rim is now only partly visible. At one point on the rim, an apparently volcanic event produced a crater; subsequently, a long, winding channel, called a sinuous rille, emerged to flow across the mare. Other sinuous rilles are found nearby, including the largest…

  • Prinz Eugen (German warship)

    World War II: The Atlantic and the Mediterranean, 1940–41: …and a new cruiser, the Prinz Eugen, put out to sea from Germany. The Bismarck and the Prinz Eugen, however, were located by British reconnaissance in the North Sea near Bergen, and an intensive hunt for them was immediately set in motion. Tracked from a point northwest of Iceland by…

  • Prinz Friedrich von Homburg (work by Kleist)

    Heinrich von Kleist: Kleist’s last drama, Prinz Friedrich von Homburg (published posthumously in 1821 by Ludwig Tieck), is a brilliant psychological drama. The play’s problematical hero is Kleist’s finest figure, reflecting Kleist’s own conflicts between heroism and cowardice, dreaming and action.

  • Prinz, Birgit (German football player)

    Birgit Prinz, German football (soccer) player who was considered by many to be Europe’s finest female footballer of the 1990s and 2000s. Prinz was an all-around sports enthusiast as a young girl, with swimming, trampoline, and athletics among her varied outdoor pursuits. Her football-playing father

  • Prinzapolka River (river, Nicaragua)

    Nicaragua: Drainage: …include the 158-mile- (254-km-) long Prinzapolka River, the 55-mile- (89-km-) long Escondido River, the 60-mile- (97-km-) long Indio River, and the 37-mile- (60-km-) long Maíz River.

  • Prinze, Freddie (American comedian)

    stand-up comedy: Countercultural comedy: …City-based comedians—among them Richard Lewis, Freddie Prinze, Elayne Boosler (one of the few women in a largely male-dominated crowd), and later Jerry Seinfeld—developed an intimate “observational” style, less interested in sociopolitical commentary than in chronicling the trials of everyday urban life, dealing with relationships, and surviving in the ethnic melting…

  • Prinzenraub (German history)

    Albert III: …incident is known as the Prinzenraub, and it became a popular subject for legend and literature, particularly for 16th-century German dramatists. On the death of their father, the brothers ruled their Saxon territories jointly until the Leipzig partition of 1485, when the lands were split between them.

  • Prío Socarrás, Carlos (president of Cuba)

    Carlos Prío Socarrás, president of Cuba (1948–52). Prío became politically active while a law student at the University of Havana, spending two years in prison for his anti-government activities. He took part in the coup that deposed Gerardo Machado’s dictatorship in 1933 and helped organize the

  • Priodontes giganteus (mammal)

    armadillo: Natural history: In contrast, the endangered giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus) can be 1.5 metres (5 feet) long and weigh 30 kg (66 pounds). It lives in the Amazon basin and adjacent grasslands.

  • prion (bird)

    Prion, any of several species of small Antarctic seabirds of the genus Pachyptila, in the family Procellariidae (order Procellariiformes). All are blue-gray above and whitish below. Among the broad-billed species, the bill, unique among petrels, is flattened, with the upper mandible fringed with s

  • prion (infectious particle)

    Prion, an abnormal form of a normally harmless protein found in the brain that is responsible for a variety of fatal neurodegenerative diseases of animals, including humans, called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In the early 1980s American neurologist Stanley B. Prusiner and colleagues

  • Prionace glauca (fish)

    Blue shark, (Prionace glauca), abundant shark of the family Carcharhinidae found in all oceans, from warm temperate to tropical waters. Also known as the blue whaler, the blue shark is noted for its attractive, deep-blue colouring contrasting with a pure-white belly. It is a slim shark, with a

  • Prionailurus bengalensis (mammal)

    Leopard cat, (Prionailurus bengalensis), forest-dwelling cat, of the family Felidae, found across India, Southeast Asia, and nearby islands. The leopard cat is noted for its leopard-like colouring. The species is generally divided into one mainland subspecies, P. bengalensis bengalensis, and

  • Prionailurus bengalensis bengalensis (mammal)

    leopard cat: …divided into one mainland subspecies, P. bengalensis bengalensis, and several island subspecies—including P. bengalensis borneoensis in Borneo, P. bengalensis heaneyi on Palawan, P. bengalensis rabori on the Philippine islands of Cebu, Negros, and

  • Prionailurus bengalensis borneoensis (mammal)

    leopard cat: …bengalensis, and several island subspecies—including P. bengalensis borneoensis in Borneo, P. bengalensis heaneyi on Palawan, P. bengalensis rabori on the Philippine islands of Cebu, Negros, and Panay, P. bengalensis javenensis on

  • Prionailurus bengalensis heaneyi (mammal)

    leopard cat: bengalensis borneoensis in Borneo, P. bengalensis heaneyi on Palawan, P. bengalensis rabori on the Philippine islands of Cebu, Negros, and Panay, P. bengalensis javenensis on Bali and Java, and P. bengalensis

  • Prionailurus bengalensis javenensis (mammal)

    leopard cat: Negros, and Panay, P. bengalensis javenensis on Bali and Java, and P. bengalensis sumatranus on Sumatra and Tebingtinggi.

  • Prionailurus bengalensis rabori (mammal)

    leopard cat: bengalensis heaneyi on Palawan, P. bengalensis rabori on the Philippine islands of Cebu, Negros, and Panay, P. bengalensis javenensis on Bali and Java, and P. bengalensis sumatranus on Sumatra and Tebingtinggi.

  • Prionailurus bengalensis sumatranus (mammal)

    leopard cat: on Bali and Java, and P. bengalensis sumatranus on Sumatra and Tebingtinggi.

  • Prionailurus planiceps (mammal)

    Flat-headed cat, (Felis planiceps), extremely rare Asian cat found in the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, and Borneo. One of the smallest members of the cat family, Felidae, the adult is from 40 to 60 centimetres (16 to 24 inches) long without the 15–20-cm tail and weighs from 1.5 to 2.5 kilograms (3.3

  • Prionailurus viverrinus (mammal)

    Fishing cat, (species Felis viverrina), tropical cat of the family Felidae, found in India and Southeast Asia. The coat of the fishing cat is pale gray to deep brownish gray and marked with dark spots and streaks. The adult animal stands about 40 cm (16 inches) at the shoulder, weighs 8–11 kg

  • prionid beetle (insect)

    long-horned beetle: The prionids (subfamily Prioninae) have leathery, brownish wing covers (elytra), and the margins of the prothorax (region behind the head) are toothlike and expanded laterally. Included in this group is the pine-inhabiting genus Parandra and the broad-necked prionus (Prionus laticollis), whose larvae live in grape, apple, poplar, blueberry,…

  • Prioninae (insect)

    long-horned beetle: The prionids (subfamily Prioninae) have leathery, brownish wing covers (elytra), and the margins of the prothorax (region behind the head) are toothlike and expanded laterally. Included in this group is the pine-inhabiting genus Parandra and the broad-necked prionus (Prionus laticollis), whose larvae live in grape, apple, poplar, blueberry,…

  • Prionodon linsang (mammal)

    linsang: …African linsang (Poiana richardsoni), the banded linsang (Prionodon linsang), and the spotted linsang (Prionodon pardicolor) vary in colour, but all resemble elongated cats. They grow to a length of 33–43 cm (13–17 inches), excluding a banded tail almost as long, and have slender bodies, relatively narrow heads, elongated muzzles, retractile…

  • Prionodon pardicolor (mammal)

    viverrid: Viverrid diversity: …the viverrid family is the spotted linsang (Prionodon pardicolor), which weighs 0.6 kg (1.3 pounds). The two largest species are the African civet (Civettictis civetta) and the fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox) of Madagascar, both of which can reach 20 kg. The most common viverrid, however, is the European genet (Genetta genetta),…

  • Prionodura newtoniana (bird)

    bowerbird: The golden bowerbird (Prionodura newtoniana) makes a rooflike bridge from tower to tower. Male gardeners, any of the four species of the genus Amblyornis, plant a lawn of tree moss around the maypole and embellish it with flowers, berries, and other objects. The brown, or crestless,…

  • Prionopidae (bird)

    Helmet-shrike, (family Prionopidae), any of nine species of African songbirds (order Passeriformes) characterized by a forwardly directed crest on the forehead. Several Prionops species, often called red-billed shrikes, were formerly separated in the genus Sigmodus. They are about 20 cm (8 inches)

  • Prior Analytics (work by Aristotle)

    history of logic: Aristotle: Prior Analytics (two books), containing the theory of syllogistic (described below). Posterior Analytics (two books), presenting Aristotle’s theory of “scientific demonstration” in his special sense. This is Aristotle’s account of the philosophy of science or scientific methodology. Topics (eight books), an early work, which contains…

  • prior probability distribution (statistics)

    statistics: Bayesian methods: A prior probability distribution for a parameter of interest is specified first. Sample information is then obtained and combined through an application of Bayes’s theorem to provide a posterior probability distribution for the parameter. The posterior distribution provides the basis for statistical inferences concerning the parameter.

  • prior restraint (censorship)

    censorship: The 17th and 18th centuries: The effort to eliminate “previous restraints” (also known as prior restraints) in Great Britain and in America had its roots in English constitutional experience. Previous restraint (or licensing) came to be regarded as an inheritance of Roman Catholic practices. And so, when the Anglican successor to the Roman Catholic…

  • Prior, Matthew (British poet)

    English literature: Thomson, Prior, and Gay: …with a special urbanity is Matthew Prior, a diplomat and politician of some distinction, who essayed graver themes in Solomon on the Vanity of the World (1718), a disquisition on the vanity of human knowledge, but who also wrote some of the most direct and coolly elegant love poetry of…

  • Prioress’s Tale, The (story by Chaucer)

    The Prioress’s Tale, one of the 24 stories in The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. The tale is based on an anti-Semitic legend of unknown origin that was popular among medieval Christians. The Prioress describes how a widow’s devout young son is abducted by Jews, who are supposedly prompted by

  • Priority Records (American record label)

    N.W.A: Released under Priority Records and Ruthless Records on August 8, 1988, Straight Outta Compton details the lives of its creators via a blend of drum-heavy production, samples, turntable scratches, and aggressive, often profane lyrics. This “reality rap,” as Ice Cube once called it, offers uncensored thoughts on…

  • Priory of St. Mary of Bethlehem (hospital, Beckenham, England, United Kingdom)

    Bedlam, the first asylum for the mentally ill in England. It is currently located in Beckenham, Kent. The word bedlam came to be used generically for all psychiatric hospitals and sometimes is used colloquially for an uproar. In 1247 the asylum was founded at Bishopsgate, just outside the London

  • Priotelus temnurus (bird)

    Cuba: Plant and animal life: The endemic forest-dwelling tocororo (Trogon temnurus, or Priotelus temnurus), which is similar in appearance to the Guatemalan quetzal, was designated the national bird of Cuba because its bright plumes of red, white, and blue correspond to the colours of the Cuban flag; the tocororo is reputed to survive…

  • Prioux, René (French general)

    World War II: The invasion of the Low Countries and France: …this Dyle Line, and General René Prioux’s two tank divisions went out from it to challenge the German advance. After a big battle on May 14, however, Prioux’s tanks had to retire to the consolidated Dyle Line; and on May 15, notwithstanding a successful defense against a German attack, Gamelin…

  • Pripet Marshes (region, Eastern Europe)

    Pripet Marshes, vast waterlogged region of eastern Europe, among the largest wetlands of the European continent. The Pripet Marshes occupy southern Belarus and northern Ukraine. They lie in the thickly forested basin of the Pripet River (a major tributary of the Dnieper) and are bounded on the

  • Pripet Polesye (region, Eastern Europe)

    Pripet Marshes, vast waterlogged region of eastern Europe, among the largest wetlands of the European continent. The Pripet Marshes occupy southern Belarus and northern Ukraine. They lie in the thickly forested basin of the Pripet River (a major tributary of the Dnieper) and are bounded on the

  • Pripet River (river, Europe)

    Pripet River, river in Ukraine and Belarus, a tributary of the Dnieper River. It is 480 miles (775 km) long and drains an area of 44,150 square miles (114,300 square km). It rises in northwestern Ukraine near the Polish border and flows eastward in Ukraine and then Belarus through a flat, forested,

  • Pripets River (river, Europe)

    Pripet River, river in Ukraine and Belarus, a tributary of the Dnieper River. It is 480 miles (775 km) long and drains an area of 44,150 square miles (114,300 square km). It rises in northwestern Ukraine near the Polish border and flows eastward in Ukraine and then Belarus through a flat, forested,

  • Pripiat River (river, Europe)

    Pripet River, river in Ukraine and Belarus, a tributary of the Dnieper River. It is 480 miles (775 km) long and drains an area of 44,150 square miles (114,300 square km). It rises in northwestern Ukraine near the Polish border and flows eastward in Ukraine and then Belarus through a flat, forested,

  • Pripyat River (river, Europe)

    Pripet River, river in Ukraine and Belarus, a tributary of the Dnieper River. It is 480 miles (775 km) long and drains an area of 44,150 square miles (114,300 square km). It rises in northwestern Ukraine near the Polish border and flows eastward in Ukraine and then Belarus through a flat, forested,

  • Priroda (Soviet space module)

    Mir: …laboratory; and Spektr (1995) and Priroda (1996), two science modules containing remote-sensing instruments for ecological and environmental studies of Earth. With the exception of its first occupants, Mir’s cosmonaut crews traveled between the station and Earth in upgraded Soyuz TM spacecraft, and supplies were transported by robotic Progress cargo ferries.

  • Priscae Latinitatis Monumenta Epigraphica (work by Ritschl and Mommsen)

    F.W. Ritschl: …published, with Theodor Mommsen, the Priscae Latinitatis Monumenta Epigraphica (1862; “Epigraphical Records of Ancient Latin”), an edition of Latin inscriptions from the earliest times to the end of the Roman Republic and a work that established Ritschl as one of the founders of modern epigraphy. He was named chief librarian…

  • Priscian (Latin grammarian)

    Priscian, the best known of all the Latin grammarians, author of the Institutiones grammaticae, which had a profound influence on the teaching of Latin and indeed of grammar generally in Europe. Though born in Mauretania, Priscian taught in Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey). His minor works

  • Priscianus Caesariensis (Latin grammarian)

    Priscian, the best known of all the Latin grammarians, author of the Institutiones grammaticae, which had a profound influence on the teaching of Latin and indeed of grammar generally in Europe. Though born in Mauretania, Priscian taught in Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey). His minor works

  • Priscilla, Catacomb of (tomb, Rome, Italy)

    Magi: …being the fresco in the Priscilla Catacomb of Rome dating from the 2nd century. In the Middle Ages the Adoration of the Magi was often associated with two other major events of Jesus’ life: his baptism, during which the voice of God publicly declared Jesus to be his son, and…

  • Priscillian (Spanish bishop)

    Priscillian, early Christian bishop who was the first heretic to receive capital punishment. A rigorous ascetic, he founded Priscillianism, an unorthodox doctrine that persisted into the 6th century. Around the Spanish towns of Mérida and Córdoba, Priscillian began about the year 375 to teach a

  • Priscus of Panium (historian)

    Attila: Attacks on the Eastern Empire: …fragments of the History of Priscus of Panium, who visited Attila’s headquarters in Walachia in company with a Roman embassy in 449. The treaty by which the war was terminated was harsher than that of 443; the Eastern Romans had to evacuate a wide belt of territory south of the…

  • Priscus, Helvidius (Roman senator [died c. 70–79 CE])

    Helvidius Priscus, a Roman Stoic who forcefully upheld the principle that the emperor should act only with the consent of the Senate. Though the son of a centurion, he rose to the Senate in the reign of Nero and became praetor in 70 ce. Later his uncompromising freedom of speech brought him into

  • Prishtinë (national capital, Kosovo)

    Pristina, city, capital and administrative centre of Kosovo. It is linked to Skopje, North Macedonia, by road and rail and, via Kraljevo, Serbia, to the Serbian capital of Belgrade; it also has an airport. Near Pristina, lead, silver, and zinc are mined in the Kopaonik Mountains. Pristina was the

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