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  • Pour un nouveau roman (work by Robbe-Grillet)

    Alain Robbe-Grillet: …(Pour un nouveau roman, 1963; Toward a New Novel; Essays on Fiction). Robbe-Grillet’s world is neither meaningful nor absurd; it merely exists. Omnipresent is the object—hard, polished, with only the measurable characteristics of pounds, inches, and wavelengths of reflected light. It overshadows and eliminates plot and character. The story is…

  • pourpoint (clothing)

    Gipon, tunic worn under armour in the 14th century and later adapted for civilian use. At first a tight-fitting garment worn next to the shirt and buttoned down the front, it came down to the knees and was padded and waisted. Later in the century the gipon became shorter, and it was replaced by

  • Pourtalès family (Swiss family)

    Neuchâtel crisis: …members of the family of Pourtalès. When its leaders were arrested, Frederick William appealed to the Swiss Federal Council for their release and also asked the French emperor Napoleon III to intercede for them. The Swiss at first persisted in declaring that the rebels must be brought to trial. Prussia…

  • Poussaint, Alvin (American physician)

    Alvin Poussaint, American psychiatrist specializing in child psychiatry and in issues of racial identity and health among African Americans. Poussaint also served as a consultant to popular television programs that featured African American characters. The son of Haitian immigrants, Poussaint grew

  • Poussaint, Alvin Francis (American physician)

    Alvin Poussaint, American psychiatrist specializing in child psychiatry and in issues of racial identity and health among African Americans. Poussaint also served as a consultant to popular television programs that featured African American characters. The son of Haitian immigrants, Poussaint grew

  • Pousseur, Henri (Belgian composer)

    Henri Pousseur, Belgian composer whose works encompass a variety of 20th-century musical styles. He wrote music for many different combinations of performers as well as for electronic instruments, alone or with live performers. Pousseur studied at the Liège Conservatory from 1947 to 1952 and the

  • Poussin, Gaspard (French painter)

    Gaspard Dughet, landscape painter of the Baroque period known for his topographic views of the Roman Campagna. He worked chiefly in Rome and its vicinity throughout his life, but, because his father was French, it is usual to class him among the French school. Dughet’s sister married Nicolas

  • Poussin, Nicolas (French painter)

    Nicolas Poussin, French painter and draftsman who founded the French Classical tradition. He spent virtually all of his working life in Rome, where he specialized in history paintings—depicting scenes from the Bible, ancient history, and mythology—that are notable for their narrative clarity and

  • Poussinist (art)

    Poussinist, any of the supporters of the supremacy of disegno (“drawing”) over colour in the “quarrel” of colour versus drawing that erupted in the French Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture in Paris in 1671. The quarrel was over the preeminent importance of drawing (i.e., the use of line to

  • Poussiniste (art)

    Poussinist, any of the supporters of the supremacy of disegno (“drawing”) over colour in the “quarrel” of colour versus drawing that erupted in the French Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture in Paris in 1671. The quarrel was over the preeminent importance of drawing (i.e., the use of line to

  • pout (fish)

    Bib, common fish of the cod family, Gadidae, found in the sea along European coastlines. The bib is a rather deep-bodied fish with a chin barbel, three close-set dorsal fins, and two close-set anal fins. It usually grows no longer than about 30 cm (12 inches) and is copper red with darker bars.

  • Pouteria campechiana (tree and fruit)

    Canistel, (Pouteria campechiana), small tree of the sapodilla family (Sapotaceae), grown for its edible fruits. Canistel is native to Cental America and northern South America and cultivated in other tropical regions. The sweet fruits have orange flesh and are commonly eaten fresh or made into

  • Pouteria sapota (plant and fruit)

    Sapote, (Pouteria sapota), plant of the sapodilla family (Sapotaceae) and its edible fruit. Sapote is native to Central America but cultivated as far north as the southeastern United States. The fruit is commonly eaten fresh and is also made into smoothies, ice cream, and preserves. The large

  • Poŭthĭsăt (Cambodia)

    Chan I: …was crowned at Pursat (Poŭthĭsăt), south of the Tonle Sap (“Great Lake”), in 1516. Ruling from Pursat until 1528, he reorganized the Cambodian army and held the Thais in abeyance. When he gained control of the city of Lovek (between the present Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh, and the Tonle…

  • poutine (food)

    Poutine, a Canadian dish made of french fries topped with cheese curds and gravy. It first appeared in 1950s rural Québec snack bars and was widely popularized across Canada and beyond in the 1990s. Poutine may be found everywhere from fine dining menus at top restaurants to fast-food chains. It

  • Pouto (ancient city, Egypt)

    Wadjet: …form of the ancient Egyptian Per Wadjit (Coptic Pouto, “House of Wadjit”), the name of the capital of the 6th Lower Egyptian nome (province), present-day Tall al-Farāʿīn, of which the goddess was the local deity.

  • Pouvanaa a Oopa (Polynesian leader)

    French Polynesia: History: In 1958 Pouvanaa a Oopa, vice president of the Council of Government, announced a plan to secede from France and form an independent Tahitian republic. He was subsequently arrested; the movement collapsed, and local powers were again curtailed. France issued new statutes granting more local autonomy in…

  • pouvoir-savoir (philosophy)

    continental philosophy: Foucault: …of his own devising, “power-knowledge” (pouvoir-savoir), by which he meant to indicate the myriad ways in which, in any age, structures of social power and governing epistemes reinforce and legitimate each other. (The integral relationship between psychiatry and mental asylums is one example of such mutual legitimation; the relationship…

  • povada (Indian literature)

    South Asian arts: Marathi: …Marathi is the tradition of povāḍās, heroic stories popular among a martial people. There is no way of dating the earliest of these; but the literary tradition is particularly vital at the time of Śivajī, the great military leader of Mahārāshtra (born 1630), who led his armies against the might…

  • Považská Bystrica (Slovakia)

    Považská Bystrica, town, Střední Slovensko kraj (region), northwestern Slovakia. It is situated 15 miles (24 km) southwest of Žilina on the Váh River. The town is a popular excursion centre because of its location near the picturesque Javorníky Mountains. Economic activities include the manufacture

  • Poveda Burbano, Alfredo (Ecuadorian military leader)

    Alfredo Poveda Burbano, head of the military junta that overthrew the regime of Ecuadorian President Guillermo Rodríguez Lara in a bloodless coup on Jan. 11, 1976, and held power until the return to civilian rule in 1979. Poveda was vice admiral of the navy at the time. Poveda was educated at the

  • Poverello (Italian saint)

    St. Francis of Assisi, ; canonized July 16, 1228; feast day October 4), founder of the Franciscan orders of the Friars Minor (Ordo Fratrum Minorum), the women’s Order of St. Clare (the Poor Clares), and the lay Third Order. He was also a leader of the movement of evangelical poverty in the early

  • poverty (sociology)

    Poverty, the state of one who lacks a usual or socially acceptable amount of money or material possessions. Poverty is said to exist when people lack the means to satisfy their basic needs. In this context, the identification of poor people first requires a determination of what constitutes basic

  • poverty

    The South Asian region, which comprises India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, and Maldives, in 1997 accounted for one-fifth of the world’s population, two-thirds of its absolute poor, and one-half of its illiterate adults. According to a well-researched study by Mahbub ul-Haq

  • Poverty and Famines: An Essay on Entitlement and Deprivation (work by Sen)

    Amartya Sen: In his book Poverty and Famines: An Essay on Entitlement and Deprivation (1981), Sen revealed that in many cases of famine, food supplies were not significantly reduced. Instead, a number of social and economic factors—such as declining wages, unemployment, rising food prices, and poor food-distribution systems—led to starvation…

  • Poverty Bay (inlet, Pacific Ocean)

    Poverty Bay, inlet of the southern Pacific Ocean, bounded by eastern North Island, New Zealand. The town of Gisborne is situated on its northern shore. Poverty Bay is 6 miles (10 km) long and 4 miles (6 km) wide. Named by Captain James Cook, it is the site of the explorer’s first landing (1769) in

  • Poverty in Britain and the Reform of Social Security (work by Atkinson)

    Tony Atkinson: …beginning with the influential work Poverty in Britain and the Reform of Social Security (1969). His paper “On the Measurement of Inequality,” published in 1970 in the Journal of Economic Theory, introduced the widely used Atkinson index of income inequality, which can be used to determine the largest contributor to…

  • poverty oat grass (plant)

    oat grass: Poverty oat grass (D. spicata) is a grayish green mat-forming species that grows on dry poor soil in many parts of North America.

  • Poverty of Philosophy, The (work by Marx)

    Pierre-Joseph Proudhon: Early life and education: …misère de la philosophie (1847; The Poverty of Philosophy, 1910). It was the beginning of a historic rift between libertarian and authoritarian Socialists and between anarchists and Marxists which, after Proudhon’s death, was to rend Socialism’s First International apart in the feud between Marx and Proudhon’s disciple Bakunin and which…

  • Poverty Point National Monument (archaeological site, Louisiana, United States)

    Poverty Point National Monument, site of a prehistoric Native American city, located in northeastern Louisiana, U.S., about 50 miles (80 km) east of Monroe. Designated a national historic landmark in 1962 and authorized as a national monument in 1988, it is managed by the state of Louisiana as

  • Poverty Row studio (American company)

    Detour: Although Detour was made by Producers Releasing Corporation, one of several studios that specialized in cheaply made B-films, and thus was a “poverty row” movie, it has the distinction of being the first such film to be preserved in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Shot in…

  • poverty-reduction and growth facility (economics)

    International Monetary Fund: Financing balance-of-payments deficits: …deficits; and, since 1987, a poverty-reduction and growth facility. Each facility has its own access limit, disbursement plan, maturity structure, and repayment schedule. The typical IMF loan, known as an upper-credit tranche arrangement, features an annual access limit of 100 percent of a member’s quota, quarterly disbursements, a one- to…

  • Povest nepogashennoy luny (work by Pilnyak)

    Boris Pilnyak: …his Povest nepogashennoy luny (The Tale of the Unextinguished Moon), a scarcely veiled account of the death of Mikhail Vasilyevich Frunze, the famous military commander, during an operation. The issue of the magazine in which the tale was published was withdrawn immediately, and a new issue omitting it was…

  • Povest o zhizni (work by Paustovsky)

    Konstantin Georgiyevich Paustovsky: …work, Povest o zhizni (1946–62; The Story of a Life), published in several volumes, is an autobiographical cycle of reminiscences.

  • Povest vremennykh let (Russian literature)

    The Russian Primary Chronicle, medieval Kievan Rus historical work that gives a detailed account of the early history of the eastern Slavs to the second decade of the 12th century. The chronicle, compiled in Kiev about 1113, was based on materials taken from Byzantine chronicles, west and south

  • Povětroň (work by Čapek)

    Karel Čapek: …the world’s incomprehension; Povětroň (1934; Meteor) illustrates the subjective causes of objective judgments; and Obyčejný život (1934; An Ordinary Life) explores the complex layers of personality underlying the “self” an “ordinary” man thinks himself to be.

  • Povich, Shirley (American sportswriter)

    Shirley Povich, American sportswriter whose standard-setting columns, more than 15,000 in all, had graced the Washington Post since 1924, not only reporting the news in sports but also agitating for such causes as the racial integration of teams (b. July 15, 1905, Bar Harbor, Maine--d. June 4,

  • Povídky z druhé kapsy (work by Čapek)

    Karel Čapek: … (both 1929; published together as Tales from Two Pockets).

  • Povídky z jedné kapsy (work by Čapek)

    Karel Čapek: … (both 1929; published together as Tales from Two Pockets).

  • POW (international law)

    Prisoner of war (POW), any person captured or interned by a belligerent power during war. In the strictest sense it is applied only to members of regularly organized armed forces, but by broader definition it has also included guerrillas, civilians who take up arms against an enemy openly, or

  • Powassan virus disease

    tick: Powassan virus disease, and a form of encephalitis. Soft ticks also are carriers of diseases.

  • powder (pharmacology)

    pharmaceutical industry: Other solid dosage forms: Powders are mixtures of active drug and excipients that usually are sold in the form of powder papers. The powder is contained inside a folded and sealed piece of special paper. Lozenges usually consist of a mixture of sugar and either gum or gelatin, which…

  • Powder A (explosive)

    explosive: History of black powder: …came to be known as A and B blasting powder respectively. The A powder continued in use for special purposes that required its higher quality, principally for firearms, military devices, and safety fuses.

  • Powder B (explosive)

    explosive: History of black powder: …be known as A and B blasting powder respectively. The A powder continued in use for special purposes that required its higher quality, principally for firearms, military devices, and safety fuses.

  • powder coating (technology)

    surface coating: Coalescence-based film formation: …what is known as “powder coating,” a process in which an object is coated by a spray or fluidized bed of pigmented polymer particles and the particles are fused by heating to form a continuous film. Other reactions may occur during the melting and fusing processes, but the predominant…

  • powder down (feather)

    ciconiiform: Plumage and coloration: …(two or more pairs) of powder down feathers are especially characteristic of the herons. These feathers break down to produce a fine powder, which is distributed to the plumage with the bill in preening.

  • Powder Her Face (opera by Adès)

    Thomas Adès: His controversial opera Powder Her Face (1995), about a 20th-century divorce scandal, attracted international attention, as did his large symphonic work Asyla (1997). Adès’s subsequent works include The Tempest (2003), an opera inspired by the Shakespeare play, and In Seven Days (2008), an orchestral piece accompanied by video…

  • powder metallurgy

    Powder metallurgy, fabrication of metal objects from a powder rather than casting from molten metal or forging at softening temperatures. In some cases the powder method is more economical, as in fashioning small metal parts such as gears for small machines, in which casting would involve

  • Powder River (river, United States)

    Powder River, stream of the northwestern United States. It rises in several headstreams in foothills of the Bighorn Mountains in Wyoming and flows northward for 486 miles (782 km) to join the Yellowstone River near Terry, Mont. Tributaries include the Little Powder River and Crazy Woman

  • powder-pellet process (technology)

    nuclear ceramics: Nuclear fuel: …fuels traditionally follows a standard powder-pellet process. This involves comminution, granulation, pressing, and sintering at 1,700° C (3,100° F) in a reducing atmosphere. The resulting microstructure consists of large, equiaxed grains (that is, with dimensions similar along all axes), with uniformly distributed spherical pores on the order of 2 to…

  • powdered soft drink

    soft drink: Powdered soft drinks: These are made by blending the flavouring material with dry acids, gums, artificial colour, etc. If the sweetener has been included, the consumer need only add the proper amount of plain or carbonated water.

  • powdered sugar (food)

    sugar: Crystallization: Powdered icing sugar, or confectioners’ sugar, results when white granulated sugar is finely ground, sieved, and mixed with small quantities (3 percent) of starch or calcium phosphate to keep it dry. Brown sugars (light to dark) are either crystallized from a mixture of brown and yellow…

  • powderless etching (printing)

    photoengraving: Chemical etching—traditional and powderless processes: …introduction of a process of etching a magnesium plate without the use of powder. Experimenters found that by adding an oily material and a surfactant (wetting agent) to the nitric acid bath and controlling the conditions under which the plate was etched, they could produce characters in relief with adequate…

  • Powderly, Terence V. (American labour leader)

    Terence V. Powderly, American labour leader and politician who led the Knights of Labor (KOL) from 1879 to 1893. Powderly, the son of Irish immigrants to the United States, became a railroad worker at the age of 13 in Pennsylvania. At 17 he became a machinist’s apprentice, and he worked at that

  • Powderly, Terence Vincent (American labour leader)

    Terence V. Powderly, American labour leader and politician who led the Knights of Labor (KOL) from 1879 to 1893. Powderly, the son of Irish immigrants to the United States, became a railroad worker at the age of 13 in Pennsylvania. At 17 he became a machinist’s apprentice, and he worked at that

  • Powdermaker, Hortense (American cultural anthropologist)

    Hortense Powdermaker, U.S. cultural anthropologist who helped to initiate the anthropological study of contemporary American life. Her first monograph, Life in Lesu (1933), resulted from fieldwork in Melanesia. She studied a rural community in Mississippi about which she wrote in After Freedom: A

  • powderpost beetle (insect)

    Powderpost beetle, (subfamily Lyctinae), any of approximately 70 species of beetles (insect order Coleoptera) that range in colour from reddish brown to black and in size from 1 to 7 mm (up to 0.3 inch). The larvae bore through seasoned wood, reducing it to a dry powder. They do not enter

  • powderpuff (breed of dog)

    Chinese crested, breed of toy dog of ancient ancestry; it is one of the hairless breeds, its coat being confined to its head (crest), tail (plume), and lower legs (socks), although most litters also contain “powderpuff” pups with a full coat. The origin of the breed is uncertain; it may have

  • powderpuff tree (plant species)

    albizia: Silk tree, or powderpuff tree (Albizia julibrissin), native to Asia and the Middle East, grows to about 9 metres (30 feet) tall, has a broad spreading crown, and bears flat pods about 12 cm (5 inches) long. Indian albizia, or siris (A. lebbek), native to…

  • powdery mildew (plant pathology)

    Powdery mildew, plant disease of worldwide occurrence that causes a powdery growth on the surface of leaves, buds, young shoots, fruits, and flowers. Powdery mildew is caused by many specialized races of fungal species in the genera Erysiphe, Microsphaera, Phyllactinia, Podosphaera, Sphaerotheca,

  • powdery mildew of grape (fungus)

    Ascomycota: …such as those that cause powdery mildew of grape (Uncinula necator), Dutch elm disease (Ophiostoma ulmi), chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica), and apple scab (Venturia inequalis). Perhaps the most indispensable fungus of all

  • Powell (Wyoming, United States)

    Powell, city, Park county, northwestern Wyoming, U.S., on the Shoshone River. Founded as a ranching centre in the Powder River basin, a predominantly agricultural district, Powell was named in honour of the 19th-century explorer John Wesley Powell. It developed a substantial oil industry when

  • Powell Jobs, Laurene (American businesswoman)

    The Atlantic: …was founded and headed by Laurene Powell Jobs, a noted philanthropist and the widow of Steve Jobs.

  • Powell River (British Columbia, Canada)

    Powell River, district municipality, southwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is located on the east side of the Strait of Georgia, 80 miles (130 km) northwest of Vancouver. Named for Israel Wood Powell, who was Indian superintendent for British Columbia in the 1870s, the settlement developed at

  • Powell River (river, United States)

    Powell River, river rising in Wise county, southwestern Virginia, U.S., and flowing southwest through Big Stone Gap in the Cumberland Plateau into Tennessee to enter the Clinch River at Norris Dam, 20 miles (32 km) northwest of Knoxville, Tenn. Approximately half of its total length of about 150

  • Powell v. Alabama (law case)

    Gideon v. Wainwright: In Powell v. Alabama (1932)—which involved the “Scottsboro Boys,” nine black youths who had been found guilty of raping two white women—the Court had ruled that state courts must provide legal counsel to indigent defendants charged with capital crimes. In Betts v. Brady, however, (1942), the…

  • Powell, Adam Clayton, Jr. (American legislator)

    Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., black American public official and pastor who became a prominent liberal legislator and civil-rights leader. Powell was the son of the pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem, New York City. Brought up in a middle-class home, he received his B.A. from Colgate

  • Powell, Anthony (British author)

    Anthony Powell, English novelist, best known for his autobiographical and satiric 12-volume series of novels, A Dance to the Music of Time. As a child, Powell lived wherever his father, a regular officer in the Welsh Regiment, was stationed. He attended Eton College from 1919 to 1923 and Balliol

  • Powell, Anthony Dymoke (British author)

    Anthony Powell, English novelist, best known for his autobiographical and satiric 12-volume series of novels, A Dance to the Music of Time. As a child, Powell lived wherever his father, a regular officer in the Welsh Regiment, was stationed. He attended Eton College from 1919 to 1923 and Balliol

  • Powell, Billy (American musician)

    Billy Powell, (William Norris Powell), American rock musician (born June 3, 1952, Corpus Christi, Texas—died Jan. 28, 2009, Orange Park, Fla.), played keyboards for the Southern-rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd. Powell’s initial association with the band was as a roadie. He became its keyboardist in 1972

  • Powell, Bud (American musician)

    Bud Powell, American jazz pianist who emerged in the mid-1940s as one of the first pianists to play lines originally conceived by bebop horn players. Powell played with the Cootie Williams band (1943–44) and sat in on the jam sessions at Minton’s Playhouse in Harlem. Crafting a style from pianists

  • Powell, Cecil Frank (British physicist)

    Cecil Frank Powell, British physicist and winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1950 for his development of the photographic method of studying nuclear processes and for the resulting discovery of the pion (pi-meson), a heavy subatomic particle. The pion proved to be the hypothetical particle

  • Powell, Colin (United States general and statesman)

    Colin Powell, U.S. general and statesman. He was chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (1989–93) and secretary of state (2001–05), the first African American to hold either position. The son of Jamaican immigrants, Powell grew up in the Harlem and South Bronx sections of New York City and attended

  • Powell, Colin Luther (United States general and statesman)

    Colin Powell, U.S. general and statesman. He was chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (1989–93) and secretary of state (2001–05), the first African American to hold either position. The son of Jamaican immigrants, Powell grew up in the Harlem and South Bronx sections of New York City and attended

  • Powell, Cynthia Lilian (British personality)

    Cynthia Lennon, (Cynthia Lillian Powell), British personality (born Sept. 10, 1939, Blackpool, Lancashire, Eng.—died April 1, 2015, Mallorca, Spain), was married to singer-songwriter John Lennon during his rise to fame as a member of the Beatles; their marriage was initially kept a secret from the

  • Powell, Dawn (American author)

    Dawn Powell, American novelist, playwright, and short-story writer known for her biting social satires. Although she gained critical success in her lifetime, her work was not commercially successful until well after her death. Powell endured a difficult childhood. Her mother died in 1903 of what

  • Powell, Dick (American actor)

    Lloyd Bacon: Warner Brothers: …musical, it featured Ruby Keeler, Dick Powell, Ginger Rogers, and Warner Baxter. Even more critical to its success were the contributions of composers Al Dubin and Harry Warren and dance director Busby Berkeley. Picture Snatcher (1933) was not as big a hit, but it featured a notable performance by James…

  • Powell, Earl (American musician)

    Bud Powell, American jazz pianist who emerged in the mid-1940s as one of the first pianists to play lines originally conceived by bebop horn players. Powell played with the Cootie Williams band (1943–44) and sat in on the jam sessions at Minton’s Playhouse in Harlem. Crafting a style from pianists

  • Powell, Eleanor (American dancer and actress)

    Eleanor Powell, American film performer best known for her powerful and aggressive style of tap dancing. In 1965 the Dance Masters of America bestowed upon her the title of World’s Greatest Tap Dancer. Powell studied ballet at age six and began dancing at nightclubs in Atlantic City, New Jersey,

  • Powell, Eleanor Torrey (American dancer and actress)

    Eleanor Powell, American film performer best known for her powerful and aggressive style of tap dancing. In 1965 the Dance Masters of America bestowed upon her the title of World’s Greatest Tap Dancer. Powell studied ballet at age six and began dancing at nightclubs in Atlantic City, New Jersey,

  • Powell, Elizabeth Dilys (British critic)

    Dilys Powell, British motion-picture critic (born July 20, 1901—died June 3, 1995, London, England), as the outspoken film critic for The Sunday Times (1939-79) and Punch (1979-92) and then as The Sunday Times’s reviewer for movies shown on British television (1976-95), wielded enormous power o

  • Powell, Elkan Harrison (American publisher)

    Encyclopædia Britannica: Corporate change: …Cox resigned as publisher, and Elkan Harrison Powell, vice president of Sears—but with no publishing experience—was chosen to replace him, becoming president of the company. Powell organized the direct sales methods that gradually raised the sales of the encyclopaedia from their low watermark during the Depression, and he also initiated…

  • Powell, Enoch (British politician)

    Enoch Powell, British politician and member of Parliament, noted for his controversial rhetoric concerning Britain’s nonwhite population and for his opposition to the nation’s entry into the European Economic Community. Powell was the son of schoolteachers of Welsh ancestry. He attended Trinity

  • Powell, George (British mariner)

    South Orkney Islands: George Powell (British) and Nathaniel Palmer (American), both sealers, sighted and charted the islands in December 1821.

  • Powell, Israel Wood (Canadian government official)

    Powell River: Named for Israel Wood Powell, who was Indian superintendent for British Columbia in the 1870s, the settlement developed at the mouth of the Powell River as a pulp-and-paper-milling centre after 1910. In 1955 the town of Powell River and several surrounding communities amalgamated to form a district…

  • Powell, Jane (American actress and singer)

    Seven Brides for Seven Brothers: …marries boardinghouse cook Milly (Jane Powell). Once at the cabin, Milly begins civilizing the uncouth Pontipees. They go to town for a barn-raising dance and meet some local women but get into a brawl. The Pontipees miss the women they met at the dance, so Adam tells his brothers…

  • Powell, Jerome (American attorney)

    Janet Yellen: She was succeeded by Jerome H. Powell.

  • Powell, Jerome H. (American attorney)

    Janet Yellen: She was succeeded by Jerome H. Powell.

  • Powell, Jody (American presidential adviser)

    Jody Powell, (Joseph Lester Powell, Jr.), American presidential adviser (born Sept. 30, 1943, Cordele, Ga.—died Sept. 14, 2009, Cambridge, Md.), served (1977–81) as press secretary to U.S. Pres. Jimmy Carter and became known for his easy drawl and quick temper as well as his powerful loyalty to the

  • Powell, John Enoch (British politician)

    Enoch Powell, British politician and member of Parliament, noted for his controversial rhetoric concerning Britain’s nonwhite population and for his opposition to the nation’s entry into the European Economic Community. Powell was the son of schoolteachers of Welsh ancestry. He attended Trinity

  • Powell, John Wesley (American explorer, geologist, and ethnologist)

    John Wesley Powell, American explorer, geologist, and ethnologist, best known for his exploration of the upper portion of the Colorado River and the Grand Canyon. Powell was the fourth child of English immigrants Joseph Powell, a tailor, farmer, and itinerant Methodist preacher, and Mary Dean, a

  • Powell, Joseph Lester, Jr. (American presidential adviser)

    Jody Powell, (Joseph Lester Powell, Jr.), American presidential adviser (born Sept. 30, 1943, Cordele, Ga.—died Sept. 14, 2009, Cambridge, Md.), served (1977–81) as press secretary to U.S. Pres. Jimmy Carter and became known for his easy drawl and quick temper as well as his powerful loyalty to the

  • Powell, Lake (lake, Utah, United States)

    John Wesley Powell: Powell’s legacy: …in his honour, as is Lake Powell, the huge lake that formed on the Colorado River behind Glen Canyon Dam after its completion in 1963. Powell Mountain, in Kings Canyon National Park, California, also bears the explorer’s name.

  • Powell, Lewis (American Lincoln assassination conspirator)

    assassination of Abraham Lincoln: Booth tasked Lewis Powell, a tall and powerful former Confederate soldier, with the attack on Seward, to be aided by David Herold. George Atzerodt, a German immigrant who had acted as a boatman for Confederate spies, was to kill Johnson. Booth himself was to assassinate Lincoln. All…

  • Powell, Lewis F., Jr. (United States jurist)

    Lewis F. Powell, Jr., associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1972–87). Powell was the eldest child of Louis Powell, a businessman, and Mary Gwaltney Powell. Educated at McGuire’s University School, a private academy that prepared students for admission to the University of

  • Powell, Martin (English showman)

    Punch: …use of the name by Martin Powell, a marionette showman, in a scurrilous attack on Robert Harley entitled A Second Tale of a Tub (1715).

  • Powell, Mary (wife of Milton)

    John Milton: Divorce tracts: Having married Mary Powell in 1642, Milton was a few months afterward deserted by his wife, who returned to her family’s residence in Oxfordshire. The reason for their separation is unknown, though perhaps Mary adhered to the Royalist inclinations of her family whereas her husband was progressively…

  • Powell, Maud (American violinist)

    Maud Powell, American virtuoso violinist, recognized in Europe and the United States as one of the finest performers of her day. Powell early displayed musical talent and took up the violin. Encouraged especially by her mother, an amateur musician and composer, she studied under teachers in Aurora,

  • Powell, Michael (British director)

    Michael Powell, British director of innovative, visually vivid motion pictures. Powell attended Dulwich College, London (1918–21). He directed his first film, Two Crowded Hours, in 1931. During the 1930s he directed over 20 low-budget, quickly made films before producer Alexander Korda teamed him

  • Powell, Michael Latham (British director)

    Michael Powell, British director of innovative, visually vivid motion pictures. Powell attended Dulwich College, London (1918–21). He directed his first film, Two Crowded Hours, in 1931. During the 1930s he directed over 20 low-budget, quickly made films before producer Alexander Korda teamed him

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