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  • porphyry (geological feature)

    dike: They commonly have a porphyritic texture, i.e., larger crystals within a finer-grained groundmass, indicating two periods of crystallization.

  • Porphyry (Syrian philosopher)

    Porphyry, Neoplatonist Greek philosopher, important both as an editor and as a biographer of the philosopher Plotinus and for his commentary on Aristotle’s Categories, which set the stage for medieval developments of logic and the problem of universals. Boethius’ Latin translation of the i

  • porphyry copper deposit (mineralogy)

    Porphyry copper deposit, large body of rock, typically a porphyry of granitic to dioritic composition, that has been fractured on a fine scale and through which chalcopyrite and other copper minerals are disseminated. Porphyry copper deposits commonly contain hundreds of millions of metric tons of

  • porphyry molybdenum deposit (mineralogy)

    mineral deposit: Porphyry deposits: …deposits (and their close relatives, porphyry molybdenum deposits) contain disseminated mineralization, meaning that a large volume of shattered rock contains a ramifying network of tiny quartz veins, spaced only a few centimetres apart, in which grains of the copper ore minerals chalcopyrite and bornite (or the molybdenum ore mineral molybdenite)…

  • Porpita porpita (plankton)

    marine ecosystem: Plankton: …and the small blue disk-shaped Porpita porpita are propelled along the surface by the wind, and after strong onshore winds they may be found strewn on the beach. Beneath the surface, comb jellies often abound, as do siphonophores, salps, and scyphomedusae.

  • porpoise (mammal)

    Porpoise, (family Phocoenidae), specifically, any of seven species of toothed whales distinguishable from dolphins by their more compact build, generally smaller size (maximum length about 2 metres, or 6.6 feet), and curved blunt snout with spatulate rather than conical teeth. In North America the

  • Porpora, Nicola (Italian vocal teacher)

    Nicola Porpora, leading Italian teacher of singing of the 18th century and noted composer between 1708 and 1747 of more than 60 operas in the elegant, lyrical Neapolitan style. He taught singing in Venice and Naples; among his pupils were the poet and librettist Pietro Metastasio, the composer

  • Porpora, Nicola Antonio Giacinto (Italian vocal teacher)

    Nicola Porpora, leading Italian teacher of singing of the 18th century and noted composer between 1708 and 1747 of more than 60 operas in the elegant, lyrical Neapolitan style. He taught singing in Venice and Naples; among his pupils were the poet and librettist Pietro Metastasio, the composer

  • Porrée, Gilbert de La (French bishop)

    St. Bernard of Clairvaux: Pillar of the church: …participated in the condemnation of Gilbert de La Porrée—a scholarly dialectician and bishop of Poitiers who held that Christ’s divine nature was only a human concept. He exhorted Pope Eugenius to stress his role as spiritual leader of the church over his role as leader of a great temporal power,…

  • Porres Velázquez, Juan Martín de (Christian saint)

    St. Martín de Porres, ; canonized 1962; feast day November 3), Peruvian friar noted for his kindness, his nursing of the sick, his obedience, and his charity. He is the patron saint of social justice, racial harmony, and mixed-race people. Born of a liaison between a Spanish grandee and a free

  • Porres, St. Martín de (Christian saint)

    St. Martín de Porres, ; canonized 1962; feast day November 3), Peruvian friar noted for his kindness, his nursing of the sick, his obedience, and his charity. He is the patron saint of social justice, racial harmony, and mixed-race people. Born of a liaison between a Spanish grandee and a free

  • porridge (foodstuff)

    cereal processing: Types of breakfast cereal: …and rolled oatmeal, eaten as porridge, requires brief boiling. Cooking time of these processed cereals has been greatly reduced, and various “instant” forms are available.

  • porridge pot (geological feature)

    mud volcano: Variations are the porridge pot (a basin of boiling mud that erodes chunks of the surrounding rock) and the paint pot (a basin of boiling mud that is tinted yellow, green, or blue by minerals from the surrounding rocks).

  • porringer (bowl)

    Porringer, a shallow, round bowl with one or two flat, horizontal handles set on opposite sides of the rim and, usually, a shallow lid. In recent usage, the word has also been used to refer to late 16th- and early 17th-century English silver vessels of cylindrical form with two vertical scroll

  • Porris, Georg Joachim De (Austrian astronomer)

    Georg Joachim Rheticus, Austrian-born astronomer and mathematician who was among the first to adopt and spread the heliocentric theory of Nicolaus Copernicus. In 1536 Rheticus was appointed to a chair of mathematics and astronomy at the University of Wittenberg. Intrigued by the news of the

  • Porritt, Arthur Espie Porritt, Baron (New Zealand physician and statesman)

    Arthur Espie Porritt Porritt, BARON, New Zealand-born physician and statesman (born Aug. 10, 1900, Wanganui, N.Z.—died Jan. 1, 1994, London, England), after a long career with the British monarchy as surgeon to King George VI (1946-52) and sergeant surgeon to Queen Elizabeth II (1952-67), served a

  • Porro prism (optics)

    prism: The Porro prism, for example, consists of two prisms arranged both to invert and to reverse an image and are used in many optical viewing instruments, such as periscopes, binoculars, and monoculars. The Nicol prism consists of two specially cut calcite prisms bonded together with an…

  • Porsangen (fjord, Norway)

    Porsangen, fjord, indenting the coast of extreme northern Norway on the Arctic Ocean. An inlet of the Barents Sea, the fjord is approximately 80 miles (130 km) long and lies well north of the Arctic Circle. Adjacent to the mouth of the fjord is a largely uninhabited area, Sværholtklubben, which

  • Porsche, Ferdinand (Austrian engineer)

    Ferdinand Porsche, Austrian automotive engineer who designed the popular Volkswagen car. Porsche became general director of the Austro-Daimler Company in 1916 and moved to the Daimler Company in Stuttgart in 1923. He left in 1931 and formed his own firm to design sports cars and racing cars.

  • Porsche, Ferdinand Alexander (German automobile designer)

    Ferdinand Alexander Porsche, (“Butzi”), German automobile designer (born Dec. 11, 1935, Stuttgart, Ger.—died April 5, 2012, Salzburg, Austria), was the grandson of automobile pioneer Ferdinand Porsche, the son of Ferdinand Anton Ernst (“Ferry”) Porsche, and the creator of the original model and

  • Porsche, Ferdinand Anton Ernst (Austrian car designer)

    Ferdinand Anton Ernst Porsche, Austrian car designer and businessman who worked with his father on the design of the Volkswagen Beetle and later, after having taken over the vehicle-design firm that his father had founded and given the family’s name, transformed the company into a renowned sports

  • Porsche, Ferry (Austrian car designer)

    Ferdinand Anton Ernst Porsche, Austrian car designer and businessman who worked with his father on the design of the Volkswagen Beetle and later, after having taken over the vehicle-design firm that his father had founded and given the family’s name, transformed the company into a renowned sports

  • Porsenna (Etruscan ruler)

    Roman Republic: The early historical record: Porsenna, the Etruscan king of Clusium, defeated the Romans and expelled Tarquinius Superbus. Yet before Porsenna could establish himself as monarch, he was forced to withdraw, leaving Rome without a king. Rather than restoring their king, the Romans replaced the kingship with two annually elected…

  • Porsgrunn (Norway)

    Porsgrunn, town, southern Norway, at the mouth of the Skienselva (river) on Frierfjorden. Established as a customs post in 1652 with the name Porsgrund, it received its town charter in 1842. An export and industrial centre, it contains the huge Norsk Hydro chemical factories. It is known for

  • Porshnev, Boris (Soviet scientist)

    Sasquatch: A Soviet scientist, Boris Porshnev, suggested that Sasquatch and his Siberian counterpart, the Almas, could be a remnant of Neanderthals, but most scientists do not recognize the creature’s existence.

  • Porson, Richard (English scholar)

    Richard Porson, British master of classical scholarship during the 18th century, the most brilliant of the English school that devoted itself to the task of freeing Greek texts from corruption introduced through the centuries. His special critical talent lay in his insight into Greek metre and his

  • port (computer science)

    Compaq Computer Corporation: Setting PC standards: …computer, the PS/2, with a bus that was incompatible with the AT-bus design of earlier IBM PCs. (A computer bus is a set of conductors that enable information to be transmitted between computer components, such as printers, modems, and monitors.) Despite having made its fortune by being 100 percent IBM-compatible,…

  • port (wine)

    Port, specifically, a sweet, fortified, usually red wine of considerable renown from the Douro region of northern Portugal, named for the town of Oporto where it is aged and bottled; also, any of several similar fortified wines produced elsewhere. The region of true port production is strictly d

  • port (harbour town)

    harbours and sea works: Classical harbour works: …of the ancient world are Alexandria, which had on the island of Pharos the first lighthouse in the world; Piraeus, the port of Athens; Ostia, the port of Rome; Syracuse; Carthage, destroyed and rebuilt by the Romans; Rhodes; and Tyre and Sidon, ports of the earliest important navigators, the Phoenicians.

  • Port Adelaide Enfield (South Australia, Australia)

    Port Adelaide Enfield, chief port of South Australia, on an estuarine-tidal inlet of Gulf St. Vincent, just northwest of central Adelaide. The harbour, sheltered by a long sand spit to the west, was visited in 1831 by Captain Collet Barker and was made the port for Adelaide in 1840. Port Adelaide

  • Port Angeles (Washington, United States)

    Port Angeles, city, seat (1890) of Clallam county, northwestern Washington, U.S., on Juan de Fuca Strait, linked by ferry to Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, 18 miles (29 km) north across the strait. Located at the base of Ediz Hook (a 3.5-mile- [5.6-km-] long, curving sand bar), the site was

  • Port Antonio (Jamaica)

    Port Antonio, town, on the northeast coast of Jamaica, about 60 miles (100 km) northeast of Kingston. One of the island’s largest ports, it is a shipping point for bananas, coconuts, and cacao and is one of Jamaica’s oldest and least-commercialized tourist resorts. It lies on a bay divided by a

  • Port Apra (Guam)

    Apra Harbor, port on the west coast of Guam, one of the Mariana Islands, northern Pacific Ocean. It is the best anchorage on the island and is located just west of Hagåtña (Agana). It is the port of entry and site of a U.S. naval base. The Apra Harbor complex includes a naval station, naval supply

  • Port Arthur (Texas, United States)

    Port Arthur, city, Jefferson county, southeastern Texas, U.S., 90 miles (145 km) east of Houston. It is a major deepwater port on Sabine Lake and the Sabine-Neches and Gulf Intracoastal waterways, 9 miles (14 km) from the Gulf of Mexico. With Beaumont and Orange, it forms the “Golden Triangle,” an

  • Port Arthur (former city, Dalian, China)

    Lüshun, former city and naval port, southern Liaoning sheng (province), northeastern China. In 1950 it was amalgamated with nearby Dalian to form the city of Lüda. In 1981, when Lüda was renamed Dalian, it became a district (under the name Lüshunkou) of the newly named

  • Port Arthur (city, Ontario, Canada)

    Thunder Bay, city, seat of Thunder Bay district, west-central Ontario, Canada, on Lake Superior’s Thunder Bay, at the mouth of the Kaministiquia River. Probably first occupied by French fur traders as early as 1678, its site was permanently settled only after the birth of the towns Port Arthur and

  • Port Arthur (inlet, Tasmania, Australia)

    Port Arthur, inlet of the Tasman Sea on the south coast of the Tasman Peninsula, Tasmania, Australia. It is known for the settlement established there in 1830 by George Arthur as the major site for punishing transported convicts who had further transgressed. A model reformatory for boys also

  • Port Arthur Massacre (Australia [1996])

    Port Arthur Massacre, mass shooting in and around Port Arthur, Tasmania, Australia, on April 28–29, 1996, that left 35 people dead and some 18 wounded; the gunman, Martin Bryant, was later sentenced to 35 life terms. It was the country’s worst mass murder, and it led to stricter gun controls,

  • Port Arthur, Battle of (Russo-Japanese War [1904])

    Battle of Port Arthur, (8–9 February 1904), conflict marking the beginning of the Russo-Japanese War (1904–05). Rival ambitions in Korea and China led to war between Russia and Japan in 1904. The Russian Pacific Fleet was a threat to the movement of Japanese troops to mainland Asia; in response,

  • Port Askaig Tillite (geology)

    Precambrian: Glacial sediments: …other notable deposits include the Port Askaig tillite on the island of Islay off northwestern Scotland, which is only 750 metres (2,460 feet) thick but records 17 ice advances and retreats and 27 periglacial periods (which are indicated by infilled polygons that formed under ice-free permafrost conditions). There are two…

  • Port Augusta (South Australia, Australia)

    Port Augusta, city and former port, South Australia, at the head of Spencer Gulf. Founded in 1852 and named for the wife of Sir Henry Fox Young, an early colonial governor of South Australia, Port Augusta was incorporated as a town in 1875 and in 1878 was linked by rail to Adelaide, 191 miles (307

  • Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (United States government agency)

    Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, self-supporting corporate agency formed in 1921 by agreement between the states of New York and New Jersey for the purpose of developing and operating trade and transportation facilities in the northern New Jersey–New York City region. Twelve nonsalaried

  • Port Autonome de Marseille (French government agency)

    Marseille: Industry: It is administered by the Port Autonome de Marseille (“Autonomous Port of Marseille”), a financially autonomous state enterprise that is responsible for the construction, administration, and maintenance of the industrial zones at Fos and Lavéra and the port facilities at Marseille, Lavéra, Caronte, Fos, and Port-Saint-Louis-du-Rhône. In addition to administering…

  • Port aux Basques (Newfoundland, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Channel–Port aux Basques, town on the southwestern tip of Newfoundland, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. It is the terminal for car ferries across Cabot Strait from North Sydney, Nova Scotia, and is the connecting point for the 570-mile (917-km) semicircular final stage of the Trans-Canada

  • Port Blair (India)

    Port Blair, city, capital of Andaman and Nicobar Islands union territory, India, in the Bay of Bengal. It was occupied by the Japanese during World War II and was later returned to the British during the time when Lord Mountbatten was viceroy of India. Port Blair is about 778 miles (1,255 km) from

  • Port Books (Flanders shipping list)

    ship: Early oceanic navigation: By 1252 the Port Books of Damme in Flanders distinguished ships with rudders on the side from those with stern rudders.

  • Port Borden (Prince Edward Island, Canada)

    Borden, town, Prince county, southern Prince Edward Island, Canada, on Northumberland Strait. Named Carleton Point by the English surveyor Samuel Holland in 1765, it was renamed (1916) for Sir Robert Borden, then the Canadian prime minister. Although a fishing port, it is economically dependent

  • Port Brabant (Northwest Territories, Canada)

    Tuktoyaktuk, hamlet, Inuvik region, northwestern Northwest Territories, Canada, lying on the Beaufort Sea. It is situated 20 miles (32 km) east of the Mackenzie River delta and 100 miles (160 km) northeast of Inuvik town. Tuktoyaktuk (an Inuit word for “reindeer that looks like caribou”) was

  • Port Byron Junction (Illinois, United States)

    East Moline, city, Rock Island county, northwestern Illinois, U.S. It lies on the Mississippi River, some 160 miles (260 km) west of Chicago. With Moline and Rock Island, Illinois, and Davenport and Bettendorf, Iowa, it forms a complex known as the Quad Cities. The area was long inhabited by Sauk

  • Port Clarence (national capital, Equatorial Guinea)

    Malabo, capital of Equatorial Guinea. It lies on the northern edge of the island of Bioko (or Fernando Po) on the rim of a sunken volcano. With an average temperature of 77 °F (25 °C) and an annual rainfall of 75 inches (1,900 mm), it has one of the more onerous climates in the Bight of Biafra

  • Port Clinton (Illinois, United States)

    Highland Park, city, Lake county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. Lying on Lake Michigan, it is a suburb of Chicago, located some 25 miles (40 km) north of downtown. Potawatomi Indians were recent inhabitants of the area when settlement of the site began in 1834. The community was called St. Johns and

  • Port Colborne (Ontario, Canada)

    Port Colborne, city, regional municipality of Niagara, southeastern Ontario, Canada. It lies a few miles south of Welland on the north shore of Lake Erie at the upper entrance of the Welland Ship Canal and opposite Humberstone Lock; at 1,381 feet (421 metres) long it is one of the world’s largest

  • Port Cooper (New Zealand)

    Lyttelton, town and port, eastern South Island, New Zealand. It is situated within the Christchurch urban area and on Lyttelton Harbour, an inlet of the southwestern Pacific Ocean extending 8 miles (13 km) into the north shore of Banks Peninsula. The harbour’s entrance is flanked by Godley Head on

  • Port Dalhousie (Ontario, Canada)

    Saint Catharines: …neighbouring towns of Merritton and Port Dalhousie, more than doubling its population and stretching its boundaries from the Niagara Escarpment (south) to Lake Ontario (north) and eastward to the canal. In the late 19th century it was famed for its mineral springs. St. Catharines is now known as the Garden…

  • Port Davey (Tasmania, Australia)

    Port Davey, inlet of the Indian Ocean, indenting southwestern Tasmania, Australia. It is a glacial fjord, its entrance flanked by Point St. Vincent (north) and Hillyard Island. The inlet comprises two main arms, the shorter extending north to form Payne Bay and the other stretching 20 miles (32

  • Port Davey Foreshore Preserve (national park, Tasmania, Australia)

    Southwest National Park, national park in southwestern Tasmania, Australia, covering more than 2,350 square miles (6,080 square km). Together with the adjacent Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park (established in 1981), Southwest forms the core of the Tasmanian Wilderness, a World Heritage

  • port de bras (ballet)

    Port de bras, (French: “carriage of the arms”), in classical ballet, both the general arm movements of a dancer and a designated set of exercises designed to improve the quality of these movements. The port de bras of classical ballet is meant to be a graceful and harmonious accent to the movements

  • Port Dickson (Malaysia)

    Port Dickson, town, south-central Peninsular (West) Malaysia, on the Strait of Malacca. The port, now in decline, was used extensively during the late 19th century to export the tin mined in the foothills of the state. Now chiefly a seaside resort with a fishing village, it is connected by rail

  • Port Edward (China)

    Weihai, port city, eastern Shandong sheng (province), eastern China. It lies on the north coast of the Shandong Peninsula. Until the 14th century Weihai was no more than a minor fishing village, but in 1398, as part of the coastal defense policy against the raids of Japanese pirates, it became a

  • Port Elizabeth (South Africa)

    Port Elizabeth, port city, Eastern Cape province, southern South Africa. It lies on Algoa Bay of the Indian Ocean, its deepwater harbour enclosed by a breakwater. Port Elizabeth was established in 1820 as a British settlement around Fort Frederick (1799; the oldest British building in southern

  • Port Elliot treaty (American Indian history)

    Seattle: In 1855 Seattle signed the Port Elliott treaty, ceding Indian land and establishing a reservation for his people. During the Indian uprising of 1855–58 against whites, he stayed loyal to the settlers. Grateful residents decided to name their growing town after the chief, but Seattle objected on the grounds that…

  • Port Essington (inlet, Northern Territory, Australia)

    Port Essington, inlet of the Arafura Sea, indenting the north shore of the Cobourg Peninsula, at the extreme north of the Northern Territory, Australia. About 19 miles (30 km) long and 7 miles (11 km) wide, it was surveyed in 1818 by Captain Phillip Parker King of the Royal Navy, who named it for

  • Port Everglades (harbour, Florida, United States)

    Fort Lauderdale: …Basin and the deepwater port, Port Everglades, which is the deepest harbour in Florida. Port Everglades is a port of entry and ranks with the ports at Jacksonville and Tampa in volume of cargo handled. Fort Lauderdale itself is interlaced with recreational waterways and has extensive boating facilities, which have…

  • Port Fairy (Victoria, Australia)

    Port Fairy, town, Victoria, Australia. It lies at the mouth of the Moyne River, on a headland east of Portland Bay (an inlet of the Indian Ocean). A settlement established there in 1835 was called Belfast for a time until it was renamed for a ship, the Fairy, that had sheltered in its harbour in

  • Port Folio, The (American periodical)

    Joseph Dennie: …1801 a politico-literary periodical called The Port Folio, which became the most distinguished literary weekly of its time in America. He contributed his own “Lay Preacher” essays and commissioned original manuscripts from Thomas Campbell, Leigh Hunt, and Thomas Moore, among other prominent writers and poets. As the founder of the…

  • Port Foster (harbour, Deception Island)

    Deception Island: The harbour, known as Port Foster, has been the central port of entry for British claims in the Antarctic since 1910. The island has also served as a whaling and seal-hunting station from 1906 to 1931 and, during World War II, as a British military base. Argentina, Chile, and…

  • Port Gibson (Mississippi, United States)

    Port Gibson, city, seat (1803) of Claiborne county, southwestern Mississippi, U.S., 28 miles (45 km) south of Vicksburg, near the Mississippi River on a curve of the Bayou Pierre. It was founded in 1788 by Samuel Gibson, whose cotton plantation became a meeting place for early river travelers. The

  • Port Gibson, Battle of (American history)

    Port Gibson: …a victory (known as the Battle of Port Gibson) on May 1, 1863, over the Confederates at nearby Magnolia Church. The ruins of Windsor (23 Corinthian columns) are all that remain of what was considered to be the state’s most extravagant Greek Revival mansion (1859–61; burned 1890). Grand Gulf State…

  • Port Gilbert (Wisconsin, United States)

    Racine, city, seat (1836) of Racine county, southeastern Wisconsin, U.S. It lies along Lake Michigan at the mouth of the Root River, about 25 miles (40 km) south of Milwaukee. Miami and Potawatomi Indians were early inhabitants of the region. Founded in 1834 as Port Gilbert by Gilbert Knapp, a lake

  • Port Harcourt (Nigeria)

    Port Harcourt, port town and capital of Rivers state, southern Nigeria. It lies along the Bonny River (an eastern distributary of the Niger River) 41 miles (66 km) upstream from the Gulf of Guinea. Founded in 1912 in an area traditionally inhabited by the Ijo and Ikwere (Ikwerre, Ikwerri) people,

  • Port Harcourt, University of (university, Port Harcourt, Nigeria)

    Port Harcourt: The University of Port Harcourt (1975) and Rivers State University of Science and Technology (1972, university status 1980) serve the town, and nearby Onne is the site of the Nigerian Naval College. Port Harcourt is the starting point of the eastern branch of the Nigerian Railways…

  • Port Hawkesbury (Nova Scotia, Canada)

    Port Hawkesbury, town, Inverness county, northeastern Nova Scotia, Canada. It lies along the Strait of Canso, at the southern end of Cape Breton Island, 36 miles (58 km) east of Antigonish. Originally called Ship Harbour, the town was renamed in 1860, possibly for Charles Jenkinson, Baron

  • Port Hedland (Western Australia, Australia)

    Port Hedland, town and port, northwestern Western Australia. It lies on the Indian Ocean on the North West Coastal Highway. The port is built on a tidal island (8 miles by 1 mile [13 km by 1.6 km]) from which three causeways lead to the mainland and one to a jetty installation for loading iron ore

  • Port Herald (Malawi)

    Nsanje, town, southern Malawi, along the west bank of the Shire River and north of the Ndindi Marsh. It is home to the Manganja and Sena peoples, and as the country’s southernmost town, it serves as a customs post on the Mozambique border. It is also a trade and transportation centre on the

  • Port Hueneme (California, United States)

    Port Hueneme, city and seaport terminal, Ventura county, southwestern California, U.S. Lying about 60 miles (100 km) northwest of Los Angeles and 40 miles (65 km) south of Santa Barbara, it is the only commercial deepwater port between San Francisco and Los Angeles. Founded in 1874 by Thomas R.

  • Port Huron (Michigan, United States)

    Port Huron, city, seat (1871) of St. Clair county, eastern Michigan, U.S. Situated at the lower end of Lake Huron, it lies on the St. Clair River, opposite Sarnia, Ontario, Canada. In 1814 Fort Gratiot was built on the site of the earlier French Fort St. Joseph (1686), and a village was

  • Port Jabal ʿAlī (United Arab Emirates)

    United Arab Emirates: Trade: The large free-trade zone of Port Jebel Ali was developed during the 1980s and has done much to attract foreign manufacturing industries interested in producing goods for export.

  • Port Jackson (harbour, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia)

    Port Jackson, inlet of the Pacific, 12 miles (19 km) long with a total area of 21 square miles (55 square km), which is one of the world’s finest natural harbours and the principal port of New South Wales, Australia. It has minimum and maximum depths of 30 feet (9 metres) and 155 feet at low water,

  • Port Jackson shark (shark)

    bullhead shark: The Port Jackson shark (H. philippi or portusjacksoni), found in Australian Pacific waters, reaches a length of 1.5 m (5 feet).

  • Port Kaituma (Guyana)

    Guyana: Transportation: …mines at Matthews Ridge with Port Kaituma on the Kaituma River, and another transports bauxite between Ituni and Linden. Privately owned minibuses play an important role in transporting passengers and goods to and from Georgetown.

  • Port Kelang (Malaysia)

    Port Kelang, the leading port of Malaysia, on the Strait of Malacca midway between the major ports of Pinang and Singapore. It is the port of Kuala Lumpur, the federal capital, 23 miles (37 km) east-northeast, with which it is connected by road and rail. At the mouth of the Sungai (River) Kelang,

  • Port Kembla (port, New South Wales, Australia)

    New South Wales: Transportation: Jackson), Botany Bay, Newcastle, and Port Kembla. Congestion led to Sydney’s port function having largely moved to Botany Bay, located to the south of the city. Both Newcastle and Sydney are among the country’s top ports in terms of both cargo weight and value. Newcastle and Port Kembla concentrate on…

  • Port Láirge (county, Ireland)

    Waterford, county in the province of Munster, southern Ireland. It is bounded by the Atlantic Ocean on the south and from west to east by Counties Cork, Tipperary, Kilkenny, and Wexford. The county’s northern boundary follows the River Suir through the city of Waterford. Dungarvan, on Dungarvan

  • Port Láirge (Ireland)

    Waterford, city and port, eastern County Waterford, and the major town of southeastern Ireland. It is Ireland’s oldest city. Waterford city, administratively independent of the county, is situated on the south bank of the River Suir, 4 miles (6 km) above its junction with the Barrow and at the head

  • Port Laoise (Laoighis, Ireland)

    Port Laoise, county town (seat) of County Laoighis, Ireland, on the River Triogue. Established as Fort Protector during the reign of Mary I (1533–58), it was granted a charter in 1570. The main industries of the town are flour milling and the manufacture of worsteds and sports equipment. The Rock

  • Port Lavaca (Texas, United States)

    Port Lavaca, city, seat (1886) of Calhoun county, on Lavaca Bay of the Gulf of Mexico, southern Texas, U.S., some 70 miles (115 km) northeast of Corpus Christi. The site was settled by Spaniards in 1815. Some refugees from a Comanche raid (1840) on nearby Linnville sought sanctuary there and helped

  • Port Lawrence (Ohio, United States)

    Toledo, city, seat (1835) of Lucas county, northwestern Ohio, U.S., at the mouth of the Maumee River (bridged). It lies along Maumee Bay (southwestern tip of Lake Erie), about 55 miles (89 km) southwest of Detroit, Mich., and is a principal Great Lakes port, being the hub of a metropolitan complex

  • Port Lincoln (South Australia, Australia)

    Port Lincoln, city, south-central South Australia. It lies on a protected embayment of Spencer Gulf on the east shore of Eyre Peninsula, about 150 miles (240 km) west of Adelaide. Visited in 1802 by the explorer Matthew Flinders, this fine natural harbour with deepwater anchorage was named by him

  • Port Louis (national capital, Mauritius)

    Port Louis, city, capital, and main port of the island of Mauritius in the western Indian Ocean. It lies between a well-sheltered, deepwater harbour, accessible to ships through a break in the coral reef, and a semicircle of mountains. Port Louis was founded about 1736 by the French as a calling

  • Port Macquarie (New South Wales, Australia)

    Port Macquarie, town and seaside resort of northeastern New South Wales, Australia. It lies on the Pacific Ocean coast, at the mouth of the Hastings River. The location of what is now the port was sighted by the explorer John Oxley and named by him for the colonial governor Lachlan Macquarie. A

  • Port Macquarie pine (plant)

    cypress pine: …pine, and scrub pine; the Port Macquarie pine, or stringybark (C. macleayana), of southeastern Australia; and the common cypress pine (C. preissii) of southern Australia, often shrubby near the seacoast, with one subspecies called slender pine and another known as turpentine pine. Most of these timber trees are about 25…

  • Port Marghera (district, Venice, Italy)

    Venice: The port of Venice: …of commercial shipping today is Port Marghera, developed next to the suburb of Mestre on the mainland shore west of Venice. Marco Polo International Airport (1960) was built on reclaimed land at Tessera, to the northwest of the city. Although these areas are incorporated into the administration of Venice, the…

  • Port Maria (Jamaica)

    Port Maria, town and Caribbean port, northern Jamaica, northwest of Kingston. Its harbour is well sheltered and has a small wooded island at its centre. Bananas are exported, and Port Maria serves as a market for surrounding areas producing logwood, coffee, coconuts, allspice (pimento), and

  • Port Morant (Jamaica)

    Port Morant, town and Caribbean port, southeastern Jamaica, situated approximately 10 miles (16 km) west of Morant Point on Jamaica’s eastern tip. The town is the trade centre for an area producing bananas, sugarcane, coconuts, vegetables, and livestock. Bananas are exported. Pop. (2011) urban

  • Port Moresby (national capital, Papua New Guinea)

    Port Moresby, city and capital of Papua New Guinea, southwestern Pacific Ocean. The city is situated on the eastern shore of Port Moresby Harbour of the Gulf of Papua. Before the arrival of Europeans, the area around the harbour was inhabited by the Motu and Koitabu people, fishermen and yam

  • Port Muhammad Bin Qāsim (Pakistan)

    Pakistan: Manufacturing: A new port, Port Qāsim (officially Port Muḥammad Bin Qāsim), was built to bring iron ore and coal for the mill.

  • Port Natal (South Africa)

    Durban, largest city of KwaZulu-Natal province and chief seaport of South Africa, located on Natal Bay of the Indian Ocean. European settlement began with a band of Cape Colony traders led by Francis G. Farewell, who charted the port in 1824 and named the site Port Natal. Land was ceded to the

  • Port Nicholson (inlet, New Zealand)

    Wellington Harbour, inlet of Cook Strait indenting southern North Island, New Zealand. The almost circular harbour measures 7 miles (11 km) by 6 miles and covers a total of some 31 square miles (80 square km). At least 60 feet (18 metres) deep over most of its extent, the bay is one of the world’s

  • Port Nolloth (South Africa)

    Port Nolloth, town and Atlantic port, Northern Cape province, South Africa, in the hot, arid Namaqualand south of the Namibia border. It was founded in 1855 to serve as a harbour for the copper mines in the vicinity, especially those at Okiep, to which it was connected first by rail and later by

  • Port of London Act (United Kingdom [1908])

    David Lloyd George: Early life: …of British inventions; and the Port of London Act (1908), setting up the Port of London Authority. He also earned a high reputation by his patient work in settling strikes. He suffered a cruel bereavement in November 1907, when his daughter Mair died of appendicitis at the age of 17.…

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