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  • Paliurus spina-christi (plant)

    Christ’s thorn, any of several prickly or thorny shrubs, particularly Paliurus spina-christi, of the buckthorn family (Rhamnaceae). P. spina-christi is native to southern Europe and western Asia. It grows about 6 m (20 feet) tall and is sometimes cultivated in hedges. The alternate leaves are oval

  • Palizada, Río (river, Mexico)

    Usumacinta River: …and the eastern arm, the Palizada, empties into the Términos Lagoon in Campeche state. The total length of the main channel, including the Chixoy, is approximately 600 miles (1,000 km). Navigable for about 250 miles (400 km) inland, the Usumacinta has had great economic significance as a means of communication…

  • Palk Strait (strait, Bay of Bengal)

    Palk Strait, inlet of the Bay of Bengal between southeastern India and northern Sri Lanka. It is bounded on the south by Pamban Island (India), Adam’s (Rama’s) Bridge (a chain of shoals), the Gulf of Mannar, and Mannar Island (Sri Lanka). The southwestern portion of the strait is also called Palk

  • Palkhivala, Nani Adeshir (Indian jurist and activist)

    Nani Adeshir Palkhivala, Indian jurist and civil rights activist (born Jan. 16, 1920, Bombay [now Mumbai], India—died Dec. 11, 2002, Mumbai), was revered in India as a top authority on constitutional law and government finance. In 1958 Palkhivala, a lawyer and private businessman, began an annual t

  • Palko v. Connecticut (law case)

    Bowers v. Hardwick: Majority opinion: …concept of ordered liberty” (Palko v. Connecticut [1937]) or “deeply rooted in this Nation’s history and tradition” (Moore v. East Cleveland [1977]). But neither of those formulations is applicable to a presumed right to engage in homosexual sodomy; indeed, to claim otherwise “is, at best, facetious.”

  • Palkonda Hills (hills, India)

    Palkonda Hills, series of ranges in southern Andhra Pradesh state, southern India. The hills trend northwest to southeast and form the central part of the Eastern Ghats. Geologically, they are relicts of ancient mountains formed during the Cambrian Period (about 540 to 490 million years ago) that

  • Palkovič, Jiři (Slovak translator)

    biblical literature: Slavic versions: …from the Latin Vulgate by Jiři Palkovic̆ was printed in the Gothic script (2 vol., Gran, 1829, 1832) and another, associated with Richard Osvald, appeared at Trnava in 1928. A Protestant New Testament version of Josef Rohac̆ek was published at Budapest in 1913 and his complete Bible at Prague in…

  • Pālkuriki Sōmanātha (Indian poet)

    South Asian arts: Period of the Tamil Cōḷa Empire (10th–13th century): …Telugu Śaiva poets such as Pālkuriki Sōmanātha, who composed the Basavapurāṇam employing popular metres and idiomatic Telugu. His Paṇḍitārādhya Caritra is a life of the Śaiva devotee Paṇḍitārādhya as well as a book of general knowledge including social customs, arts, crafts, and particularly music. His Vṛṣādhipa Śatakam consists of verses…

  • pall (heraldry)

    heraldry: Ordinaries: The pall, or shakefork, is the upper half of a saltire (St. Andrew’s cross) with the lower half of a pale, forming a Y-shape. The pile is a triangle pointing downward. The flaunch, or flanch, is a segment of a circle drawn from the top of…

  • pall (ecclesiastical vestment)

    Pallium, liturgical vestment worn over the chasuble by the pope, archbishops, and some bishops in the Roman Catholic church. It is bestowed by the pope on archbishops and bishops having metropolitan jurisdiction as a symbol of their participation in papal authority. It is made of a circular strip

  • Pall Mall (cigarette)

    American Tobacco Company: …of the first king-size cigarettes, Pall Mall (an old name reapplied to a new cigarette). The sales of these two brands made American Tobacco the most successful cigarette manufacturer of the 1940s. The company failed to establish equally strong brands of filter cigarettes in the 1950s, however, and by the…

  • Pall Mall Gazette (British newspaper)

    history of publishing: Great Britain: …Another contemporary evening paper, the Pall Mall Gazette, adopted American tactics for some of its crusades. In a series of articles entitled “The Maiden Tribute to Modern Babylon”, W.T. Stead exposed the prostitution of young girls in London by himself procuring one. (Indeed as a result he served a term…

  • pall-mall (game)

    Pall-mall, (from Italian pallamaglio: palla, “ball,” and maglio, “mallet”), obsolete game of French origin, resembling croquet. An English traveler in France mentions it early in the 17th century, and it was introduced into England in the second quarter of that century. Thomas Blount’s

  • palla (clothing)

    dress: Ancient Rome: The feminine cloak, the palla, resembled the Greek himation.

  • palla-palla (Bolivian dance)

    Bolivia: Traditional culture: …attitudes: the dance of the palla-palla caricatures the 16th-century Spanish invaders, the dance of the waka-tokoris satirizes bullfights, and the morenada mocks white men, who are depicted leading imported African slaves. Some highly embroidered and colourful costumes imitate pre-Columbian dress. Many costumes are accompanied by elaborate masks made of plaster,…

  • Palladas (Greek writer)

    Epicureanism: The Epicurean school: …5th centuries, was the epigrammatist Palladas.

  • Palladian window (architecture)

    Palladian window, in architecture, three-part window composed of a large, arched central section flanked by two narrower, shorter sections having square tops. This type of window, popular in 17th- and 18th-century English versions of Italian designs, was inspired by the so-called Palladian motif,

  • Palladianism (architectural style)

    Palladianism, style of architecture based on the writings and buildings of the humanist and theorist from Vicenza, Andrea Palladio (1508–80), perhaps the greatest architect of the latter 16th century and certainly the most influential. Palladio felt that architecture should be governed by reason

  • palladin (gene)

    pancreatic cancer: Symptoms and causes: Mutations in a gene designated PALLD (palladin, or cytoskeletal associated protein) have been linked to familial pancreatic cancer.

  • Palladio, Andrea (Italian architect)

    Andrea Palladio, Italian architect, regarded as the greatest architect of 16th-century northern Italy. His designs for palaces (palazzi) and villas, notably the Villa Rotonda (1550–51) near Vicenza, and his treatise I quattro libri dell’architettura (1570; The Four Books of Architecture) made him

  • Palladis Tamia; Wits Treasury (work by Meres)

    Francis Meres: …Wing, Rutland), English author of Palladis Tamia; Wits Treasury, a commonplace book valuable for information on Elizabethan poets.

  • Palladium (Greek religion)

    Palladium, in Greek religion, image of the goddess Pallas (Athena), especially the archaic wooden statue of the goddess that was preserved in the citadel of Troy as a pledge of the safety of the city. As long as the statue was kept safe within Troy, the city could not be conquered. It was said that

  • palladium (chemical element)

    Palladium (Pd), chemical element, the least dense and lowest-melting of the platinum metals of Groups 8–10 (VIIIb), Periods 5 and 6, of the periodic table, used especially as a catalyst (a substance that speeds up chemical reactions without changing their products) and in alloys. A precious

  • palladium hydride (chemical compound)

    Thomas Graham: …his final paper he described palladium hydride, the first known instance of a solid compound formed from a metal and a gas.

  • Palladius (Galatian monk, bishop, and chronicler)

    Palladius, Galatian monk, bishop, and chronicler whose Lausiac History, an account of early Egyptian and Middle Eastern Christian monasticism, provides the most valuable single source for the origins of Christian asceticism. Palladius took up the ascetical life himself, first at the Mount of

  • Palladius (bishop of Ireland)

    Saint Celestine I: Palladius at Rome in 431, Celestine sent him as the first bishop to Ireland. Archbishop St. Cyril of Alexandria was entrusted with Nestorius’ recantation at the Council of Ephesus in 431. Celestine approved the council’s decision to anathematize, depose, and banish Nestorius, which caused a…

  • Pallas (Greek mythology)

    Athena, in Greek religion, the city protectress, goddess of war, handicraft, and practical reason, identified by the Romans with Minerva. She was essentially urban and civilized, the antithesis in many respects of Artemis, goddess of the outdoors. Athena was probably a pre-Hellenic goddess and was

  • Pallas (asteroid)

    Pallas, third largest asteroid in the asteroid belt and the second such object to be discovered, by the German astronomer and physician Wilhelm Olbers on March 28, 1802, following the discovery of Ceres the year before. It is named after Pallas Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom. Pallas’s orbital

  • Pallas and the Centaur (painting by Botticelli)

    Sandro Botticelli: Mythological paintings: 1477–82), Pallas and the Centaur (c. 1485), Venus and Mars (c. 1485), and The Birth of Venus (c. 1485). The Primavera, or Allegory of Spring, and The Birth of Venus were painted for the home of Lorenzo di Pierfrancesco de’ Medici. All four of these panel…

  • Pallas’s cat (mammal)

    Pallas’s cat, (Felis manul), small, long-haired cat (family Felidae) native to deserts and rocky, mountainous regions from Tibet to Siberia. It was named for the naturalist Peter Simon Pallas. The Pallas’s cat is a soft-furred animal about the size of a house cat and is pale silvery gray or light

  • Pallas, Peter Simon (German naturalist)

    Peter Simon Pallas, German naturalist who advanced a theory of mountain formation and, by the age of 15, had outlined new classifications of certain animal groups. In 1761 he went to England to study natural-history collections and to make geological observations. He was appointed professor of

  • pallasite (meteorite)

    stony iron meteorite: …of stony iron, known as pallasites (formerly called lithosiderites), the nickel-iron is a coherent mass enclosing separated stony parts. The material that makes up pallasites probably formed, after melting and differentiation of their parent asteroids, at the interface between the nickel-iron metal core and the surrounding silicate mantle. The other…

  • Pallava Dynasty (Indian history)

    Pallava dynasty, early 4th-century to late 9th-century ce line of rulers in southern India whose members originated as indigenous subordinates of the Satavahanas in the Deccan, moved into Andhra, and then to Kanci (Kanchipuram in modern Tamil Nadu state, India), where they became rulers. Their

  • pallavi (music)

    South Asian arts: South India: The final section, pallavi, is a composition of words and melody set in a particular tala, usually a long or complex one. The pallavi may have been composed by the performer himself and be unfamiliar to his accompanists, usually a violinist who echoes the singer’s phrases and a…

  • Pallavicini, Gian Luca (Genoese patrician)

    Italy: Milan: The Genoese patrician Gian Luca Pallavicini prepared them as a minister after 1743 and then implemented them as governor after 1750. The reforms reorganized government administration, ended the sale of offices, reordered state finances, founded a public bank, and, most important, in 1749 placed a new cadastral survey—begun…

  • Pallavicino, Oberto (Italian leader)

    Oberto Pelavicino, leader of the Ghibelline (imperial) party in northern Italy and powerful supporter of the Holy Roman emperor Frederick II and his sons. As a member of a great feudal family of Lombardy, Pelavicino fought at Frederick’s side in 1238 against Brescia, near Milan, and the following

  • Pallca (archaeological site, Peru)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Chavín monuments and temples: At Moxeke and Pallca in the Casma Valley to the south, there are terraced, stone-faced pyramids with stone stairways. The first has niches containing clay-plastered reliefs of mud, stone, and conical adobes showing felines, snakes, and human beings of Chavinoid character painted in polychrome. Also in Casma is…

  • PALLD (gene)

    pancreatic cancer: Symptoms and causes: Mutations in a gene designated PALLD (palladin, or cytoskeletal associated protein) have been linked to familial pancreatic cancer.

  • Pallenberg, Max (Austrian actor)

    Max Pallenberg, actor, an exponent of the Austrian tradition of extempore farce, whose talents contributed to the evolution of German theatrical practice. Pallenberg’s career started in Vienna (1909) with appearances in popular revues and operettas, but soon he was at Berlin’s Deutsches Theater

  • Pallene (ancient city, Greece)

    Peisistratus: Rise to power: At Pallene, near Mount Hymettus, he launched a surprise attack on the Athenian army in the heat of midday, while his enemies were gambling or sleeping. After a complete victory, Peisistratus became master of Athens for the third time and remained in power until his death…

  • pallet (materials handling)

    logistics: Packaging: …in turn are handled on pallets, wooden platforms about 6 inches high and 40 inches by 48 inches along the top. Pallets are loaded two or four boxes high and moved by mechanical devices known as forklift trucks, tractorlike vehicles with two lifting prongs in front that fit into slots…

  • pallet (pipe organ)

    organ: …keys via a set of pallets, or valves, and fed with a supply of air by electrically or mechanically activated bellows. Each rank is brought into action by a stop that is connected by levers, or electrically, to a slider. To bring a pipe into speech the player must first…

  • pallet load

    logistics: Packaging: …of warehouses, railcars, and trucks, Pallet loads are also called “unit loads” and are the most common way of handling packaged freight. Goods that are not packaged are often handled in bulk. Examples are iron ore, coal, and grains that move in trainload, truckload, and shipload lots. They are loaded,…

  • pallia (invertebrate anatomy)

    Mantle, in biology, soft covering, formed from the body wall, of brachiopods and mollusks; also, the fleshy outer covering, sometimes strengthened by calcified plates, of barnacles. The mantle of mollusks and brachiopods secretes the shell in species that possess shells. It also forms a mantle

  • pallia (ecclesiastical vestment)

    Pallium, liturgical vestment worn over the chasuble by the pope, archbishops, and some bishops in the Roman Catholic church. It is bestowed by the pope on archbishops and bishops having metropolitan jurisdiction as a symbol of their participation in papal authority. It is made of a circular strip

  • pallial cavity (anatomy)

    mollusk: External features: … (except in bivalves), and the mantle cavity. The mantle in caudofoveates and solenogasters is covered by cuticle that contains scales or minute, spinelike, hard bodies (spicules), or both (aplacophoran level). The chitons (class Polyplacophora) develop a series of eight articulating plates or valves often surrounded by a girdle of cuticle…

  • pallial line (mollusk anatomy)

    bivalve: The mantle and musculature: …the shell being called the pallial line.

  • pallial retractor muscle (mollusk anatomy)

    bivalve: The mantle and musculature: …between the shell valves by mantle retractor muscles; their point of attachment to the shell being called the pallial line.

  • palliative care (medicine)

    Palliative care, form of health care that seeks to improve the quality of life of patients with terminal disease through the prevention and relief of suffering. It is facilitated by the early identification of life-threatening disease and by the treatment of pain and disease-associated problems,

  • palliative surgery

    cancer: Surgery: This type of surgery, called palliative surgery, can remove an intestinal obstruction or remove masses that are causing pain or disfigurement.

  • pallid harrier (bird)

    harrier: The pallid harrier (C. macrourus) breeds from the Baltic to southeastern Europe and Central Asia. Allied species include the cinereous harrier (C. cinereus), found from Peru to the Straits of Magellan; the long-winged harrier (C. buffoni), ranging over all of South America, especially east of the…

  • pallidotomy (surgery)

    parkinsonism: Pallidotomy involves destroying a part of the brain structure called the globus pallidus that is involved in motor control. Pallidotomy may improve symptoms such as tremors, rigidity, and bradykinesia. Cryothalamotomy destroys the area of the brain that produces tremors by the inserting a probe into…

  • pallidum (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Basal ganglia: …(2) the putamen, (3) the globus pallidus, and (4) the amygdala. Phylogenetically, the amygdala is the oldest of the basal ganglia and is often referred to as the archistriatum; the globus pallidus is known as the paleostriatum, and the caudate nucleus and putamen are together known as the neostriatum, or…

  • Pallieter (novel by Timmermans)

    Felix Timmermans: …literary reputation with the novel Pallieter (1916). An “ode to life” written after a moral and physical crisis, the book was warmly received by his readers as an antidote to the misery of World War I in occupied Belgium. For the characters in his books he drew on the people…

  • Palliser family (fictional characters)

    Palliser family, fictional characters in the Palliser novels, a series of novels published in the late 19th century by Anthony Trollope. The novels trace the slow progress of the marriage between Plantagenet Palliser and Lady Glencora Palliser, formerly Glencora M’Cluskie. Plantagenet, who chooses

  • Palliser novels (novels by Trollope)

    Palliser novels, series of novels by Anthony Trollope. They are united by their concern with political and social issues and by the character Plantagenet Palliser, who appears in each, with other characters recurring periodically. The series consists of these works (in order of publication): Can

  • Palliser, John (British surveyor)

    Cypress Hills: Incorrectly named “cypress” (by Captain John Palliser, a British government surveyor, on a map he drew in 1857), for the jack pine trees that covered their slopes, the hills contain pre-Ice Age fossils, flowers, and rocks of subtropical variety found nowhere else in Canada.

  • Palliser, Plantagenet (fictional character)

    Duke of Omnium, fictional character in the Palliser novels by Anthony Trollope. The Duke figures most prominently in Can You Forgive Her? (1864–65), the first book of the series. A stuffy yet decent-minded man, he is politically ambitious and neglectful of his beautiful and spirited young wife,

  • Palliser, Sir Hugh (British admiral)

    Augustus Keppel, Viscount Keppel: Sir Hugh Palliser, a member of the Admiralty Board, went to sea with Keppel in a subordinate command, and Keppel believed that the indecisive outcome of his battle against the French (July 27, 1778) off Ushant (a small island near Brittany) was partly due to…

  • pallium (invertebrate anatomy)

    Mantle, in biology, soft covering, formed from the body wall, of brachiopods and mollusks; also, the fleshy outer covering, sometimes strengthened by calcified plates, of barnacles. The mantle of mollusks and brachiopods secretes the shell in species that possess shells. It also forms a mantle

  • pallium (ecclesiastical vestment)

    Pallium, liturgical vestment worn over the chasuble by the pope, archbishops, and some bishops in the Roman Catholic church. It is bestowed by the pope on archbishops and bishops having metropolitan jurisdiction as a symbol of their participation in papal authority. It is made of a circular strip

  • palliums (invertebrate anatomy)

    Mantle, in biology, soft covering, formed from the body wall, of brachiopods and mollusks; also, the fleshy outer covering, sometimes strengthened by calcified plates, of barnacles. The mantle of mollusks and brachiopods secretes the shell in species that possess shells. It also forms a mantle

  • Pallo, Jackie (British wrestler)

    Jackie Pallo, (Jack Ernest Gutteridge), British professional wrestler (born Jan. 12, 1926, London, Eng.—died Feb. 11, 2006, Ramsgate, Kent, Eng.), starred in the golden age of British professional wrestling and had a memorable rivalry with Mick McManus that peaked with a 1967 bout at London’s R

  • palm (ancient Egyptian unit of measurement)

    measurement system: The Egyptians: Four digits equaled a palm, five a hand. Twelve digits, or three palms, equaled a small span. Fourteen digits, or one-half a cubit, equaled a large span. Sixteen digits, or four palms, made one t’ser. Twenty-four digits, or six palms, were a small cubit.

  • palm (ancient Roman unit of measurement)

    measurement system: Greeks and Romans: 97 inch); and the palm (palmus), or 14 Roman foot, was 74 mm (2.91 inches).

  • palm (tree)

    Palm, any member of the Arecaceae, or Palmae, the single family of monocotyledonous flowering plants of the order Arecales. The great centres of palm distribution are in America and in Asia from India to Japan and south to Australia and the islands of the Pacific and Indian oceans, with Africa and

  • Palm Bay (Florida, United States)

    Palm Bay, city, Brevard county, east-central Florida, U.S. It lies along the Indian River, a lagoon (part of the Intracoastal Waterway) which at that point is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the long and narrow southern peninsula of Merritt Island, adjacent to Melbourne (north). The area was

  • Palm Beach (Florida, United States)

    Palm Beach, town, Palm Beach county, southeastern Florida, U.S., on a narrow barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean (east) and Lake Worth (west). The latter, actually a lagoon (part of the Intracoastal Waterway), is bridged to West Palm Beach. In 1878 a shipwrecked cargo of coconuts was washed

  • Palm Beach Story, The (film by Sturges [1942])

    Preston Sturges: Films of the early 1940s: …turned to McCrea again for The Palm Beach Story (1942), pairing him with Claudette Colbert as a husband and wife whose pursuit of their dreams and each other leads them into misadventures in Florida. Unlike Sullivan’s Travels, this zany romantic comedy never takes itself seriously.

  • palm borer (beetle)

    branch and twig borer: However, the palm borer (Dinapate wrighti) of western North America, is about 50 mm long. The apple twig, or grape cane, borer (Amphicerus bicaudatus) bores into living fruit-tree branches and grape vines but breeds in dead wood. The lead-cable borer, or short-circuit beetle (Scobicia declivis), bores into…

  • palm cabbage (food)

    coconut: Uses: Palm cabbage, the delicate young bud cut from the top of the tree, is, like the buds from other palms, eaten as a salad vegetable. Mature palm leaves are used in thatching and weaving baskets. The fibrous, decay-resistant tree trunk is incorporated into the construction…

  • palm chestnut (nut)

    Peach palm, (Bactris gasipaes), species of palm (family Arecaceae), that is grown extensively for its edible fruits. The peach palm is cultivated from Central America as far south as Ecuador. Known as palm chestnuts, the fruits are commonly stewed and flavoured with salt or honey. The somewhat dry

  • Palm City (Florida, United States)

    Palm Beach, town, Palm Beach county, southeastern Florida, U.S., on a narrow barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean (east) and Lake Worth (west). The latter, actually a lagoon (part of the Intracoastal Waterway), is bridged to West Palm Beach. In 1878 a shipwrecked cargo of coconuts was washed

  • palm civet (mammal)

    civet: Except for the arboreal palm civets, such as Paradoxurus (also known as toddy cat because of its fondness for palm juice, or “toddy”) and Nandinia, civets are mainly terrestrial. The Sunda otter civet (Cynogale bennetti), the African civet (Civettictis civetta), and the rare Congo water civet (Genetta piscivora) are…

  • palm cockatoo (bird)

    cockatoo: …among psittaciform birds is the palm, or great black, cockatoo (Probosciger aterrimus), 65 to 75 cm (about 25 to 30 inches) long. This solitary bird of northeastern Australia, New Guinea, and the Aru Islands has a threadlike erectile crest. It has a piercing whistlelike call, and the male grips a…

  • Palm Deira (engineering project, United Arab Emirates)

    Palm Jumeirah: …others, Palm Jebel Ali and Palm Deira, are both much larger than Palm Jumeirah but remain uncompleted because of economic uncertainty. Also incomplete is the World, a grouping of artificial islands that is intended, upon completion, to resemble a map of the world.

  • Palm Festival (football game)

    Orange Bowl, American college postseason gridiron football game played on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day in Miami. It is one of six bowls that take turns hosting the semifinals of the College Football Playoff that determines the national champion of Division I college football (the others are the

  • palm heart (food)

    acai: …palm hearts, also known as hearts of palm, which are eaten as a vegetable. Palm hearts are harvested by removing the growing top of the palm crown; each heart consists of a whitish cylinder of tender immature leaves. Given that acai palms are multistemmed, the harvest can be done without…

  • Palm Inc. (American company)

    Hewlett-Packard Company: Computer business: …end, in 2010 Hewlett-Packard acquired Palm, Inc., an American manufacturer of personal digital assistants (PDAs) and smartphones. Palm’s position in the highly competitive smartphone market was weak, but its multitasking operating system, known as webOS (a “next generation” successor to the original Palm OS), was considered by analysts to be…

  • Palm Jebel Ali (engineering project, United Arab Emirates)

    Palm Jumeirah: The others, Palm Jebel Ali and Palm Deira, are both much larger than Palm Jumeirah but remain uncompleted because of economic uncertainty. Also incomplete is the World, a grouping of artificial islands that is intended, upon completion, to resemble a map of the world.

  • Palm Jumeirah (island, United Arab Emirates)

    Palm Jumeirah, artificial offshore islands in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, the site of private residences and hotels. From the air, the archipelago resembles a stylized palm tree within a circle. Palm Jumeirah was built in the early 21st century and was largely financed from Dubai’s substantial

  • palm oil

    Benin: The kingdom of Dahomey: …Gezo promoted the export of palm oil, produced by slave labour on royal plantations, as a substitute for the declining slave trade.

  • palm order (plant order)

    Arecales, order of flowering plants that contains only one family, Arecaceae (also known as Palmae), which comprises the palms. Nearly 2,400 species in 189 genera are known. The order includes some of the most important plants in terms of economic value. The members of the Arecales are distinctive

  • Palm OS (operating system)

    Palm OS, a proprietary operating system for personal computing devices, including personal digital assistants (PDAs), “smart phones” (telephones with PDA-like features), handheld gaming systems, and Global Positioning System (GPS) devices. More than 17,000 applications have been created for the

  • palm PC (handheld computer)

    PDA, a handheld organizer used to store contact information, manage calendars, communicate by e-mail, and handle documents and spreadsheets, usually in communication with the user’s personal computer. The first PDAs were developed in the early 1990s as digital improvements upon the traditional

  • Palm Pilot (computer)

    PDA: , released the first Palm Pilot PDAs, which quickly became the model for other companies to follow. The Pilot did not try to replace the computer but made it possible to organize and carry information with an electronic calendar, a telephone number and address list, a memo pad, and…

  • palm print (anatomy)

    hand: …and covered by ridges called palm prints and fingerprints, which function to improve tactile sensitivity and grip. The friction ridges are arranged in general patterns that are peculiar to each species but that differ in detail. No two individuals are alike, and in humans the patterns are used for identification.…

  • Palm Springs (California, United States)

    Palm Springs, city, Riverside county, southern California, U.S. It lies in the Coachella Valley, at the foot of Mount San Jacinto, which rises to 10,804 feet (3,293 metres). The area originally was inhabited by Cahuilla Indians; it was known to the Spanish as Agua Caliente (“Hot Water”) for its hot

  • Palm Sunday (Christianity)

    Palm Sunday, in the Christian tradition, the first day of Holy Week and the Sunday before Easter, commemorating Jesus Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem. It is associated in many churches with the blessing and procession of palms (leaves of the date palm or twigs from locally available trees).

  • Palm Sunday Outbreak (tornado disaster, Midwest region, United States)

    Palm Sunday tornado outbreak of 1965, series of tornados that struck the Midwestern region of the United States on April 11, 1965. A six-state area of Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Iowa was severely damaged by the tornados. Indiana’s death toll was the heaviest, with 141 of the

  • Palm Sunday tornado outbreak of 1965 (tornado disaster, Midwest region, United States)

    Palm Sunday tornado outbreak of 1965, series of tornados that struck the Midwestern region of the United States on April 11, 1965. A six-state area of Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Iowa was severely damaged by the tornados. Indiana’s death toll was the heaviest, with 141 of the

  • palm swift (bird)

    swift: …extreme example being the tropical Asian palm swift (Cypsiurus parvus), which glues its eggs to a tiny, flat feather nest on the surface of a palm leaf, which may be hanging vertically or even upside down. Swifts lay from one to six white eggs (usually two or three). Both eggs…

  • palm-chat (bird)

    Palm-chat, (species Dulus dominicus), songbird of Hispaniola (Haiti and the Dominican Republic) and nearby Gonâve Island, which may belong in the waxwing family (Bombycillidae) but which is usually separated as the family Dulidae. This 19-centimetre (7.5-inch) bird has a stout bill, and its plumage

  • palm-kernel oil

    carboxylic acid: Saturated aliphatic acids: …coconut oil (45–50 percent) and palm kernel oil (45–55 percent). Nutmeg butter is rich in myristic acid (C14), which constitutes 60–75 percent of the fatty-acid content. Palmitic acid (C16) constitutes between 20 and 30 percent of most animal fats and is also an important constituent of most vegetable fats (35–45…

  • palm-nut vulture (bird)

    vulture: Old World vultures: The palm-nut vulture (Gypohierax angolensis) lives in western and central Africa. It is about 50 cm (20 inches) long and has a bare orange face and yellow beak. It is unusual in being primarily vegetarian, although it sometimes takes crustaceans and dead fish.

  • Palm-Wine Drinkard , The (novel by Tutuola)

    The Palm-Wine Drinkard, novel by Amos Tutuola, published in 1952 and since translated into many languages. Written in the English of the Yoruba oral tradition, the novel was the first Nigerian book to achieve international fame. The story is a classic quest tale in which the hero, a lazy boy who

  • Palm-Wine Drinkard and His Dead Palm-Wine Tapster in the Deads’ Town, The (novel by Tutuola)

    The Palm-Wine Drinkard, novel by Amos Tutuola, published in 1952 and since translated into many languages. Written in the English of the Yoruba oral tradition, the novel was the first Nigerian book to achieve international fame. The story is a classic quest tale in which the hero, a lazy boy who

  • palm-wine music

    juju: …principal progenitor of juju was palm-wine music, a syncretic genre that arose in the drinking establishments of the culturally diverse port cities of West Africa in the early decades of the 20th century. In Nigeria’s port of Lagos, palm-wine music was foremost a song tradition. Roughly, it was a coupling…

  • palma (Mesoamerican art)

    Native American art: Mexico and Middle America: One of the objects, the palma, or palmate stone (shaped like a hand with extended fingers), was first thought to have had some religious significance. Experts now consider the palma a ritual object or trophy representing an actual protective device—worn together with the yugo, or yoke, and the hacha, or…

  • Palma (Spain)

    Palma, city, capital of the Balearic Islands provincia (province) and comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), Spain, in the western Mediterranean Sea. The city lies on the southwestern coast of the island of Majorca in the centre of 10-mile- (16-km-) wide Palma Bay. Little is known of Palma

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