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  • Pire, Dominique (Belgian clergyman and educator)

    Dominique Pire, Belgian cleric and educator who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1958 for his aid to displaced persons in Europe after World War II. Pire entered the Dominican monastery of La Sarte at Huy, Belgium, in 1928 and was ordained in 1934. From 1932 to 1936 he studied at the

  • Pire, Dominique Georges Henri (Belgian clergyman and educator)

    Dominique Pire, Belgian cleric and educator who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1958 for his aid to displaced persons in Europe after World War II. Pire entered the Dominican monastery of La Sarte at Huy, Belgium, in 1928 and was ordained in 1934. From 1932 to 1936 he studied at the

  • Pirelli Building (building, Milan, Italy)

    Pier Luigi Nervi: …first skyscraper in Italy, the Pirelli Building; it was the first office building to use a long-span structure—80 feet (25 m). Although architects and engineers in the United States had long experience in the design and construction of skyscrapers, they had invariably designed them around frameworks consisting of series of…

  • Pirelli family (Italian family)

    Pirelli Family, an Italian family of industrialists who contributed to the development of production and commerce in rubber goods, electric wire, and electric cable. Giovanni Battista Pirelli (b. Dec. 27, 1848, Varenna, Como, Austrian Empire [Italy]—d. Oct. 20, 1932, Milan, Italy) was educated in

  • Pirelli SpA (Italian company)

    Pirelli SpA, international holding company and major Italian manufacturer of tires and other rubber products. It is headquartered in Milan. Three generations of the Pirelli family have managed the company since it was founded in 1872 by Giovanni Battista Pirelli. He started a small rubber factory

  • Pirelli, Alberto (Italian industrialist)

    Pirelli Family: 7, 1956, Milan) and Alberto (b. April 28, 1882, Milan—d. Oct. 19, 1971, Casciano, Italy), joined the business in 1904. Factories were started—under the Société Internationale Pirelli of Basel, Switz.—in Great Britain, other European countries, Turkey, and the Americas; and eventually the Pirelli groups together employed more than 55,000…

  • Pirelli, Giovanni Battista (Italian industrialist)

    Pirelli Family: Giovanni Battista Pirelli (b. Dec. 27, 1848, Varenna, Como, Austrian Empire [Italy]—d. Oct. 20, 1932, Milan, Italy) was educated in Milan, and it was there in 1872 that he started a small rubber factory, the first in Italy and one of the first in all…

  • Pirelli, Piero (Italian industrialist)

    Pirelli Family: His two sons, Piero (b. Jan. 27, 1881, Milan—d. Aug. 7, 1956, Milan) and Alberto (b. April 28, 1882, Milan—d. Oct. 19, 1971, Casciano, Italy), joined the business in 1904. Factories were started—under the Société Internationale Pirelli of Basel, Switz.—in Great Britain, other European countries, Turkey, and the…

  • Pireneus (mountain range, Europe)

    Pyrenees, mountain chain of southwestern Europe that consists of flat-topped massifs and folded linear ranges. It stretches from the shores of the Mediterranean Sea on the east to the Bay of Biscay on the Atlantic Ocean on the west. The Pyrenees form a high wall between France and Spain that has

  • Pirenne, Henri (Belgian historian)

    Henri Pirenne, Belgian educator and scholar, one of the most eminent scholars of the Middle Ages and of Belgian national development. The son of a prosperous industrialist, Pirenne studied for his doctorate (1883) at the University of Liège under the medievalist Godefroid Kurth and the historian of

  • Pires, Diogo (Portuguese Jewish martyr)

    Solomon Molcho, martyr who announced the messiah, arousing the expectations of European Jews. The son of Marrano parents (Portuguese or Spanish Jews forced to become Christians), Pires attained the position of royal secretary in a Portuguese high court of justice. When an Arabian adventurer, David

  • Pires, José Augusto Neves Cardoso (Portuguese author)

    José Augusto Neves Cardoso Pires, Portuguese writer whose moralistic allegorical works reflected the alienation of both the well-off and those on the margins of society; his large number of national literary awards included the most prestigious, the Fernando Pessoa (b. Oct. 2, 1925, São João do

  • Pires, Pedro (president of Cabo Verde)

    Cabo Verde: Independence: …Pereira, the PAIGC secretary-general, and Pedro Pires, a military commander, became the first president and prime minister, respectively. A military coup in Guinea-Bissau in 1980, deeply resented in Cabo Verde, broke the political unity between the two countries. The PAIGC subsequently split, with the Cabo Verdean branch thereafter known as…

  • Pires, Tomé (Portuguese writer)

    Indonesia: Muslim kingdoms of northern Sumatra: …mentioned by 16th-century Portuguese writer Tomé Pires in his Suma Oriental. These Javanese kingdoms existed to serve the commerce with the extensive Muslim world and especially with Malacca, an importer of Javanese rice. Similarly, the rulers of Malacca, though of prestigious Palembang origin, had accepted Islam precisely in order to…

  • piri (musical instrument)

    P’iri, Korean double-reed musical instrument, a type of cylindrical oboe. The large mouthpiece and the body are made of bamboo, and there are eight finger holes, seven on the front and one on the back. Three types of p’iri have been developed, each suited to particular uses. The largest is the

  • Piri (Ottoman ruler)

    Ramazan Dynasty: Mahmud’s successor Piri was appointed by the Ottomans; he assisted them in suppressing Turkmen revolts in central and southern Anatolia (1526) and enjoyed the favour of Sultan Süleyman I the Magnificent. Çukurova was incorporated into the Ottoman Empire (c. 1610), and thereafter members of the Ramazan dynasty…

  • piri (Sikhism)

    Sikhism: Guru Nanak: …however, the doctrine of miri/piri emerged. Like his predecessors, the Guru still engaged in piri, spiritual leadership, but to it he now added miri, the rule of a worldly leader. The Panth was thus no longer an exclusively religious community but was also a military one that was commonly…

  • Piriatin (Ukraine)

    Pyryatyn, city, east-central Ukraine, on the Uday River. Pyryatyn dates at least from 1155, when it is first documented, and was incorporated in 1781. Before the Russian Revolution of 1917, it was an administrative centre and later became a railway junction. Its varied industries have produced such

  • Pirie, Norman Wingate (British biochemist)

    Norman Wingate Pirie, British biochemist and virologist who, with his long-time collaborator, Frederick Bawden, demonstrated that the genetic material found in viruses is RNA. In later years Pirie championed the use of extracted leaf protein as a dietary supplement (b. July 1, 1907--d. March 29,

  • piriform sinus (anatomy)

    speech: Vocal cords: …the mucous lining of the piriform sinus of each side. These pear-shaped recesses mark the beginning of the entrance of the pharyngeal foodway into the esophagus.

  • piriformis syndrome (pathology)

    Piriformis syndrome, irritation of the sciatic nerve as it passes over, under, or through the piriformis muscle of the buttock. Pressure on the nerve can lead to pain in the low back, buttock, groin, or posterior thigh, and it can be a cause of sciatica, with pain, tingling, or numbness along the

  • Pirin Mountains (mountains, Bulgaria)

    Bulgaria: South Bulgaria: …the whole Balkan Peninsula; the Pirin Mountains, with Vikhren Peak reaching 9,560 feet; and a frontier range known as the Belasitsa Mountains. These majestic ranges discharge meltwater from montane snowfields throughout the summer, and their sharp outlines, pine-clad slopes, and, in the Rila and Pirin ranges, several hundred lakes of…

  • Pirineos (mountain range, Europe)

    Pyrenees, mountain chain of southwestern Europe that consists of flat-topped massifs and folded linear ranges. It stretches from the shores of the Mediterranean Sea on the east to the Bay of Biscay on the Atlantic Ocean on the west. The Pyrenees form a high wall between France and Spain that has

  • Pirithous (Greek mythology)

    Pirithous, in Greek mythology, the son of Ixion and the companion and helper of the hero Theseus in his many adventures, including the descent into Hades to carry off Persephone, the daughter of the goddess Demeter. They were detained in Hades until the Greek hero Heracles rescued Theseus but not

  • Pirkheimer, Willibald (German humanist)

    Albrecht Dürer: Second journey to Italy: …Venice (dated October 1506) to Willibald Pirkheimer, his long-time humanist friend, anticipating his imminent return to Germany: “O, how cold I will be away from the sun; here I am a gentleman, at home a parasite.”

  • Pirkka (Finnish magazine)

    history of publishing: Advertising in Britain and Europe: …worth noting that in Finland Pirkka, a giveaway distributed through grocery stores, achieved one of the largest magazine circulations.

  • Pirkkalaiset (Scandinavian traders)

    Birkarlar, group of Swedish and Finnish traders and trappers who, for approximately 300 years, explored, colonized, and governed the forest area extending from the eastern coast of the Gulf of Bothnia to the northern Norwegian hinterland. In 1277 the Swedish kings gave the Birkarlar the right to e

  • Pirmez, Octave (Belgian author)

    Octave Pirmez, one of the outstanding Belgian men of letters of the period immediately before the literary revival of the 1880s. His works consist primarily of collections of essays, letters, and literary discussions, e.g., Pensées et maximes (1862; “Thoughts and Maxims”) and Heures de philosophie

  • pirogue (boat)

    Pirogue, in its simplest form, a dugout made from one log, but also a number of more elaborately fashioned boats, including various native canoes, the structure and appearance of which generally resemble those of a dugout. The pirogue is widely distributed and may be found as a fishing vessel in

  • Piron, Alexis (French dramatist)

    Alexis Piron, French dramatist and wit who became famous for his epigrams and for his comedy La Métromanie (1738; “The Poetry Craze”). Piron was secretary to a banker and then studied law. In 1719 he moved to Paris, where he worked as a copyist, struggling meanwhile to enter the world of letters.

  • piroplasmosis (animal disease)

    Babesiosis, any of a group of tick-borne diseases of humans and other animals caused by species of Babesia, protozoans that destroy red blood cells and thereby cause anemia. The Babesia genus was named for Romanian pathologist Victor Babes, who discovered the organisms in the late 19th century in

  • Pirosh, Robert (American writer, producer, and director)
  • pirouette (dressage)

    dressage: …haute école movements include the pirouette, a turn on the haunches in four or five strides at a collected canter; the piaffe, a trot in place; the passage, a very collected, cadenced, high-stepping trot; the levade, in which the horse raises and draws in its forelegs, standing balanced on its…

  • pirouette (ballet)

    Pirouette, (French: “to whirl about”), ballet turn in place on one leg. The pirouette is often done in spectacular series, which women usually perform on toe (pointe) and men on the ball of the foot (demi-pointe). In a pirouette sur le cou-de-pied, the raised foot rests on the supporting ankle; in

  • pirouette à la seconde (ballet movement)

    pirouette: …the supporting ankle; in a pirouette à la seconde, or grande pirouette, it is extended in the second position at a 90° angle to the supporting leg. The leg may be held at the front (attitude), side (à la seconde, or grande pirouette), or back (arabesque and attitude). The body…

  • pirouette en dedans (ballet movement)

    pirouette: Four and five pirouettes are now commonly performed, and up to 14 have been executed by 20th-century dancers.

  • pirouette en dehors (ballet movement)

    pirouette: …(à la seconde, or grande pirouette), or back (arabesque and attitude). The body may turn toward the raised leg (en dehors: “outside,” or “backward”) or the supporting leg (en dedans: “inside,” or “forward”). Four and five pirouettes are now commonly performed, and up to 14 have been executed by 20th-century…

  • pirouette sur le cou-de-pied (ballet movement)

    pirouette: In a pirouette sur le cou-de-pied, the raised foot rests on the supporting ankle; in a pirouette à la seconde, or grande pirouette, it is extended in the second position at a 90° angle to the supporting leg. The leg may be held at the front (attitude),…

  • pirozhki (food)

    turnover: Russian pirozhki may be filled with meat, fish, cabbage, mushrooms, or cheese. Cornish pasties are large turnovers filled with beef, onions, and turnips; they are the traditional midday meal carried into the pits by miners. Turnovers may also be filled with sweet mixtures or fruit.

  • Pirqe avot (work by Maimonides)

    Samuel ben Judah ibn Tibbon: …resurrection and his commentary on Pirqe avot (“Sayings of the Fathers”), which appears in the Talmud; in addition, he translated the works of several Arabic commentators on the writings of Aristotle and Galen. Samuel ibn Tibbon was the father of the eminent translator Moses ben Samuel ibn Tibbon.

  • Pirqe Eliyahu (work by Levita)

    Elijah Bokher Levita: …various aspects of Hebrew grammar, Pirqe Eliyahu (“Chapters of Elijah”), appeared in 1520.

  • Pirquet’s reaction (pathology)

    Clemens, baron von Pirquet: …the site of application, called Pirquet’s reaction, indicates the presence of tuberculosis. In 1909 he published the results of a series of tuberculin tests of children of Vienna which showed that 70 percent of the children tested had been infected by tuberculosis by the age of 10 and more than…

  • Pirquet’s skin test (medicine)

    Clemens, baron von Pirquet: In Pirquet’s skin test for tuberculosis, a drop of tuberculin is scratched into the surface of a small area of skin. The development of a red, raised area at the site of application, called Pirquet’s reaction, indicates the presence of tuberculosis. In 1909 he published the…

  • Pirquet, Clemens, Freiherr von (Austrian physician)

    Clemens, baron von Pirquet, Austrian physician who originated a tuberculin skin test that bears his name. Pirquet attended the universities of Vienna, Königsberg, and Graz and graduated with a medical degree from Graz in 1900. He became a professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University in

  • Pirrie of Belfast, Baron (Canadian shipwright)

    William James Pirrie, Viscount Pirrie, Irish shipbuilder who controlled Harland and Wolff, the largest ship-construction firm in the world and the builder of the passenger liner Titanic. Pirrie was born in Canada to Irish parents, and after his father’s death in 1849 the family moved back to

  • Pirrie of Belfast, William James Pirrie, Viscount (Canadian shipwright)

    William James Pirrie, Viscount Pirrie, Irish shipbuilder who controlled Harland and Wolff, the largest ship-construction firm in the world and the builder of the passenger liner Titanic. Pirrie was born in Canada to Irish parents, and after his father’s death in 1849 the family moved back to

  • Pirrie, William James, Viscount Pirrie of Belfast (Canadian shipwright)

    William James Pirrie, Viscount Pirrie, Irish shipbuilder who controlled Harland and Wolff, the largest ship-construction firm in the world and the builder of the passenger liner Titanic. Pirrie was born in Canada to Irish parents, and after his father’s death in 1849 the family moved back to

  • Pirrip, Philip (fictional character)

    Pip, fictional character, the young orphan whose growth and development are the subject of Charles Dickens’s novel Great Expectations

  • Pirro, Ugo (Italian writer)
  • Pirsig, Robert M. (American author)

    American literature: Literary biography and the new journalism: Robert M. Pirsig’s Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974) defied all classification. Pirsig equated the emotional collapse of his central character with the disintegration of American workmanship and cultural values.

  • Pirsson, Louis Valentine (American geologist)

    Louis Valentine Pirsson, geologist whose studies of the igneous rocks of Montana revealed many previously unknown varieties. In 1889 he served as an assistant with a U.S. Geological Survey party in Yellowstone Park and later in Montana. He joined the faculty of Yale University in 1892 and became

  • Pirthudakeshwar (Hindu temples)

    Pehowa: …Hindu pilgrimage centre housing the Pirthudakeshwar (Pirthuveshwar) temples built by the Marathas in honour of the goddess Sarasvati. The name is derived from the Sanskrit name Prithudaka (“Pool of Prithu,” the son of the legendary Raja Vena). Excavations have revealed inscriptions dating to the 9th century ce. Until about the…

  • Pirthuveshwar (Hindu temples)

    Pehowa: …Hindu pilgrimage centre housing the Pirthudakeshwar (Pirthuveshwar) temples built by the Marathas in honour of the goddess Sarasvati. The name is derived from the Sanskrit name Prithudaka (“Pool of Prithu,” the son of the legendary Raja Vena). Excavations have revealed inscriptions dating to the 9th century ce. Until about the…

  • pirtizas (Baltic religion)

    Baltic religion: Sacred times: One birth rite, called pirtīžas, was a special sacral meal in which only women took part. Marriage rites were quite extensive and corresponded closely to similar Old Indian ceremonies. Fire and bread had special importance and were taken along to the house of the newly married couple. These rites…

  • Piryatin (Ukraine)

    Pyryatyn, city, east-central Ukraine, on the Uday River. Pyryatyn dates at least from 1155, when it is first documented, and was incorporated in 1781. Before the Russian Revolution of 1917, it was an administrative centre and later became a railway junction. Its varied industries have produced such

  • PiS (political party, Poland)

    Poland: Poland in the 21st century: …fell to the centre-right party Law and Justice (Prawo i Sprawiedliwość; PiS), with its founders, identical twins Lech and Jarosław Kaczyński, attaining the posts of president (2005) and prime minister (2006), respectively. In 2007 the PiS abandoned its coalition partners—the scandal-plagued Self-Defense Party and the League of Polish Families—and called…

  • PISA (education)

    STEM: Development of STEM in the United States: …eighth graders, and PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment), a triennial assessment of knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds, reinforced concerns in the United States. PISA 2006 results indicated that the United States had a comparatively large proportion of underperforming students and that the country ranked 21st (in a panel…

  • Pisa (Italy)

    Pisa, city, central Italy, in the Toscana (Tuscany) regione. The city lies on the alluvial plain of the Arno River, about 6 miles (10 km) from the Ligurian Sea and 50 miles (80 km) west of Florence. Pisa lay by the sea until the 15th century, by which time accumulated silt deposited by the Arno

  • Pisa (crab genus)

    spider crab: Pisa, 1.3 to 6 cm (0.5 to 2.4 inches) long, is found in the Mediterranean Sea and in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Maja squinado, which attains lengths of 18 cm (7 inches), is found in the Mediterranean Sea and along the southwest coast of Europe.

  • Pisa, Council of (Roman Catholicism [1409])

    Council of Pisa, (1409), a council of the Roman Catholic Church convened with the intention of ending the Western (or Great) Schism, during which rival popes, each with his own Curia (bureaucracy), were set up in Rome and Avignon. This meeting, which was the result of concerted action by cardinals

  • Pisa, Council of (Roman Catholicism [1511])

    Leo X: Election to the papacy: …a council to meet at Pisa in order to revive the conciliar movement, which promoted the idea that a general church council had greater authority than the pope and could depose him. Although “Pisa II” collapsed when first the Holy Roman emperor Maximilian I and then the French king Louis…

  • Pisa, Leonardo of (Italian mathematician)

    Fibonacci, medieval Italian mathematician who wrote Liber abaci (1202; “Book of the Abacus”), the first European work on Indian and Arabian mathematics. Little is known about Fibonacci’s life beyond the few facts given in his mathematical writings. During Fibonacci’s boyhood his father, Guglielmo,

  • Pisaca languages

    Dardic languages, group of closely related Indo-Iranian languages spoken in Pakistan, Kashmir, and Afghanistan. They are often divided into three subgroups: Kafiri, or Western; Khowari, or Central (spoken in the Chitrāl district of northwestern Pakistan); and the Eastern group, which includes

  • Pisacane, Carlo (Italian revolutionary)

    Giuseppe Mazzini: Triumvir of republican Rome.: …that was seriously attempted was Carlo Pisacane’s disastrous landing in Calabria in 1857. Even the apparently futile conspiracies of this period had the useful effect, however, of keeping Italian problems before the governments of Europe. For these plots Mazzini was reviled in Piedmont, where the new moderate party was working…

  • Pisacha languages

    Dardic languages, group of closely related Indo-Iranian languages spoken in Pakistan, Kashmir, and Afghanistan. They are often divided into three subgroups: Kafiri, or Western; Khowari, or Central (spoken in the Chitrāl district of northwestern Pakistan); and the Eastern group, which includes

  • Pisae (Italy)

    Pisa, city, central Italy, in the Toscana (Tuscany) regione. The city lies on the alluvial plain of the Arno River, about 6 miles (10 km) from the Ligurian Sea and 50 miles (80 km) west of Florence. Pisa lay by the sea until the 15th century, by which time accumulated silt deposited by the Arno

  • Pisan Cantos, The (poetry by Pound)

    Bollingen Prize: …first award was made for The Pisan Cantos to Ezra Pound, who was then under indictment for treason in World War II for his broadcasts from Italy, which were anti-Semitic and pro-Fascist. A bitter controversy ensued in the press, and the Library of Congress was requested by a congressional committee…

  • Pisanello, Il (Italian painter and medalist)

    Il Pisanello, Italian medalist and painter, a major exponent of the International Gothic style. His early work suggests that he was the pupil of Stefano da Zevio, a Veronese artist. (He was wrongly called Vittore by Giorgio Vasari, and only in 1907 was his personal name verified as Antonio.)

  • Pisani, Niccolò (Venetian admiral)

    Niccolò Pisani, Venetian admiral, renowned for his victories in the third war between the feuding republics of Venice and Genoa (1350–55). In 1350 Pisani led a squadron to Constantinople (now Istanbul) to conclude an alliance with the Byzantines. At the mouth of the Bosporus he engaged in a fierce

  • Pisani, Vettore (Venetian admiral)

    Vettore Pisani, Venetian admiral, victor in a decisive battle in the fourth war between the maritime republics of Venice and Genoa. Pisani joined his father Niccolò during the third war with Genoa (1350–55) and later distinguished himself in a war against Hungary. Named captain and senator, he led

  • Pisani, Villa (house, Montagnana, Italy)

    Andrea Palladio: Visits to Rome and work in Vicenza: …at Piombino Dese and the Villa Pisani (c. 1553–55) at Montagnana, the portico is two-storied, with principal rooms on two floors. Normally (as at the Villa Foscari at Mira, called Malcontenta [1560]; the Villa Emo at Fanzolo [late 1550s]; and the Villa Badoer), the porch covers one major story and…

  • Pisano, Andrea (Italian sculptor)

    Andrea Pisano, one of the most important Italian sculptors of the 14th century whose chief works were executed in Florence, where he came under the influence of Giotto. Andrea is recorded as the author of the earliest of three bronze doors for the baptistery of the cathedral of Florence, which,

  • Pisano, Antonio (Italian painter and medalist)

    Il Pisanello, Italian medalist and painter, a major exponent of the International Gothic style. His early work suggests that he was the pupil of Stefano da Zevio, a Veronese artist. (He was wrongly called Vittore by Giorgio Vasari, and only in 1907 was his personal name verified as Antonio.)

  • Pisano, Giovanni (Italian sculptor)

    Giovanni Pisano, sculptor, sometimes called the only true Gothic sculptor in Italy. He began his career under the classicist influence of his father, Nicola, and carried on this tradition after his father’s death, continuously reintegrating the antique style into more northerly and contemporary

  • Pisano, Nicola (Italian sculptor)

    Nicola Pisano, sculptor whose work, along with that of his son Giovanni and other artists employed in their workshops, created a new sculptural style for the late 13th and the 14th centuries in Italy. Pisano’s origins are unclear. He is first recorded in 1260 in Pisa (or perhaps 1259, if

  • Pisano, Nino (Italian sculptor)

    Western sculpture: Italian Gothic: Andrea had a son, Nino Pisano, about whom little is known but from whose hand a group of Madonnas survives. They are interesting in that they veer strongly in the direction of daintiness and sweetness and, to this extent, look more northern than almost any other group of Italian…

  • Pisanosaurus (dinosaur genus)

    dinosaur: Ornithischia: …form is the incompletely known Pisanosaurus, from the Late Triassic of Argentina. Some teeth and footprints and some fragmentary skeletal material of ornithischians are known from Late Triassic sediments, but it is only in the Early Jurassic that they become well known. Basal Jurassic forms include Lesothosaurus and other fabrosaurids,…

  • Pisarev, Dmitry I. (Russian literary critic)

    Russia: Education and ideas: Its most extreme exponent was Dmitry I. Pisarev, who held that all art is useless and that the only aim of thinking people should be “to solve forever the unavoidable question of hungry and naked people.” In the last decades of the century the chief spokesman of social utilitarianism was…

  • Pisaster brevispinus (sea star)

    sea star: Pisaster brevispinus—at 65 cm (26 inches) one of the world’s largest sea stars—inhabits the western coast of North America; it preys on other echinoderms known as sand dollars, which burrow to escape it. Perhaps the most common sea star of the American Pacific coast is…

  • Pisaster ochraceus (sea star)

    sea star: …the American Pacific coast is P. ochraceus, a five-rayed species sometimes 35 cm (14 inches) across; it is usually reddish but has other colour phases. The many-rayed sunflower sea star (Pycnopodia helianthoides) of Alaska to California has 15 to 24 arms and is often 60 cm (24 inches) across. Heliaster,…

  • Pisatis (ancient district, Greece)

    Elis: …basin of the Peneus River; Pisatis, occupying the north bank of the Alpheus River; and Triphylia, a hilly area stretching south from the Alpheus to the northern border of Messenia. Comparatively high rainfall produced good pasture and arable land in low-lying areas, and the region became noted for its horses,…

  • Pisauridae (arachnid)

    Nursery-web spider, (family Pisauridae), any member of a family of spiders (order Araneida) noted for the female spider’s habit of making a protective nursery web for the young and standing guard over that web. Most species are medium to large in size, and many are found near the water. Members of

  • Pisaurum (Italy)

    Pesaro, city, Marche regione, northern Italy. Pesaro is a seaport lying along the Adriatic Sea at the mouth of the Foglia (Pisaurum) River. Destroyed by Witigis the Ostrogoth in 536, the town was rebuilt and fortified by the Byzantine general Belisarius and was one of the five cities of the

  • Piscaria (Italy)

    Pescara, city, Abruzzi regione, central Italy. Pescara lies along the Adriatic Sea at the mouth of the Pescara River, east-northeast of Rome. The Roman Aternum, the city was almost destroyed in the barbarian invasions and arose again in the early European Middle Ages as Piscaria (i.e., abounding

  • Piscataqua (New Hampshire, United States)

    Portsmouth, city, Rockingham county, southeastern New Hampshire, U.S., across the Piscataqua River from Kittery, Maine, on the Atlantic coast. It is New Hampshire’s oldest settlement, second oldest city, first capital, and only seaport. In 1623 a fishing settlement was built at the river’s mouth.

  • Piscataqua Plantation (Maine, United States)

    Kittery, town, York county, southwestern Maine, U.S., at the mouth of the Piscataqua River, on the Atlantic coast opposite Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The town includes the communities of Kittery and Kittery Point. Settled in 1623, it was incorporated (1647) as Piscataqua Plantation, Maine’s first

  • Piscataquis (county, Maine, United States)

    Piscataquis, county, central Maine, U.S. It comprises a largely mountainous region drained by the Piscataquis, Pleasant, and Penobscot (west branch) rivers. Moosehead Lake (120 square miles [310 square km]), one of the hundreds of lakes and ponds in the county, is the state’s largest lake. Others

  • Piscataway (people)

    Conoy, an Algonquian-speaking North American Indian tribe related to the Delaware and the Nanticoke; before colonization by the English, they lived between the Potomac River and the western shore of Chesapeake Bay in what is now Maryland. Early accounts suggest that their economy was based mainly

  • Piscator, Erwin (German dramatist)

    Erwin Piscator, theatrical producer and director famed for his ingenious Expressionistic staging techniques. He was the originator of the epic theatre style later developed by the German playwright Bertolt Brecht. Having studied at the König school of dramatic art and at the university, Piscator

  • Piscatorie Eclogs and other Poetical Miscellanies (work by Fletcher)

    Phineas Fletcher: …was published; it included his Piscatorie Eclogues, and Other Poetical Miscellanies. He died in 1650, his will being proved on December 13.

  • Pisces (constellation and astrological sign)

    Pisces, (Latin: “Fishes”) in astronomy, zodiacal constellation in the northern sky between Aries and Aquarius, at about 1 hour right ascension and 15° north declination. The vernal equinox, the point where the Sun’s annual apparent path takes it north of the celestial equator and from which

  • Pisces (superclass of fish)

    Bony fish, any member of the superclass Osteichthyes, a group made up of the classes Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes) and Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes) in the subphylum Vertebrata, including the great majority of living fishes and virtually all the world’s sport and commercial fishes. The

  • Piscicola (leech genus)

    annelid: Annotated classification: …cm; examples of genera: Glossisphonia, Piscicola, Pontobdella. Order Arhynchobdellida Pharynx with 3 toothed jaws or none, noneversible; terrestrial or freshwater; bloodsuckers or carnivorous; size, minute to 20 cm; examples of genera: Hirudo, Haemopis,

  • piscina (Roman and Medieval artificial pool)

    Piscina, in Roman times, an artificial reservoir used for swimming or as a fish pond. During the Middle Ages a piscina was a pool or tank in which fish were stored by monastic communities, for whose members fish was a staple item of diet. Although never a calculated feature of gardens, existing

  • Piscis Austrinus (constellation)

    Piscis Austrinus, (Latin: “Southern Fish”) constellation in the southern sky at about 22 hours right ascension and 30° south in declination. Its brightest star is Fomalhaut (from the Arabic for “the fish’s mouth”), the 17th brightest star in the sky, with a magnitude of 1.16. The connection of this

  • Pisco (Peru)

    Pisco, city and port, southwestern Peru, along the Pacific at the mouth of the Pisco River. Founded in 1640 by Pedro Toledo y Leiva, it was devastated by an earthquake in 1682 and by a tidal wave in 1686. It was incorporated as a city in 1898. Pisco (Quechua for “bird”) is noted for its brandy made

  • pisco (distilled liquor)

    brandy: Pisco, mainly produced in Peru, is distilled from muscat wines. Brandies distilled from grape pomace, or marc, the material remaining in the winepress after grape pressing, include the French eau-de-vie de marc, for which Burgundy is well known, and grappa, an unaged, sharp-tasting brandy produced…

  • pisé de terre (African architecture)

    African architecture: Forest dwellings: …often constructed of “swish,” or pisé de terre (earth rammed into a wooden formwork), raised in lifts. The pitched or hipped roof is covered in thatch or, more frequently, with corrugated iron. Though the materials have changed, the basic form remains in the village compounds: four independently constructed rectangular-plan structures…

  • Pisemsky, Aleksey Feofilaktovich (Russian author)

    Aleksey Feofilaktovich Pisemsky, novelist and playwright whom many critics rank with the great masters of Russian Realism, though his Realism borders on Naturalism and he lacks the philanthropic conscience that informs the work of his great contemporaries. Pisemsky came from an impoverished noble

  • Pisgah, Mount (mountain, Colorado, United States)

    Cripple Creek: , overlooked by Mount Pisgah (10,400 feet [3,170 metres]). It lies west of Colorado Springs in a granite pocket 9,600 feet (2,925 metres) above sea level, at the edge of Pike National Forest. In 1891 gold was discovered in nearby Poverty Gulch by Robert Womack, a cowboy (who…

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