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  • Piper, William Thomas (American manufacturer)

    William T. Piper, American manufacturer of small aircraft, best known for the Piper Cub, a two-seater that became the most popular family aircraft. He earned the sobriquet “the Henry Ford of Aviation” for his efforts to popularize air travel. Piper graduated from Harvard University in 1903 and

  • Piperaceae (plant family)

    Piperaceae, the pepper family in the order Piperales, commercially important because of Piper nigrum, the source of black and white pepper. The family comprises about 5 genera, of which 2—Piper (about 2,000 species) and Peperomia (about 1,600 species)—are the most important. The plants grow as

  • Piperales (plant order)

    Piperales, order of flowering plants comprising 3 families, 17 genera, and 4,170 species. Along with the orders Laurales, Magnoliales, and Canellales, Piperales forms the magnoliid clade, which is an early evolutionary branch in the angiosperm tree; the clade corresponds to part of the subclass

  • piperazine (drug)

    Piperazine, anthelmintic drug used in the treatment of intestinal roundworm infection in humans and domestic animals (including poultry) and against pinworm infection in humans. It is administered orally, in repeated doses, usually as the citrate salt. Its action causes worms to be paralyzed and

  • piperine (organic compound)

    Piperine, an organic compound classed either with the lipid family (a group consisting of fats and fatlike substances) or with the alkaloids, a family of nitrogenous compounds with marked physiological properties. It is one of the sharp-tasting constituents of the fruit of the pepper vine (Piper

  • pipestone (clay)

    Pipestone National Monument: …1937 to protect the local pipestone (catlinite) quarries, which were the source of the relatively soft red stone used by the Plains Indians to make pipes for smoking on ceremonial occasions. The monument occupies 282 acres (114 hectares).

  • Pipestone (Minnesota, United States)

    Pipestone, city, seat of Pipestone county, southwestern Minnesota, U.S. It lies on the Coteau des Prairies, near the South Dakota state line, about 40 miles (65 km) northeast of Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Settlers were attracted to the Pipestone area by Native American legends of a quarry where red

  • Pipestone National Monument (national monument, Minnesota, United States)

    Pipestone National Monument, quarry, southwestern Minnesota, U.S. The monument is located just northwest of the city of Pipestone, near the South Dakota border. It was created in 1937 to protect the local pipestone (catlinite) quarries, which were the source of the relatively soft red stone used by

  • pipevine swallowtail (butterfly)

    lepidopteran: Protection against danger: …it coexists with the distasteful pipevine swallowtail (Battus philenor), which is also black. However, where B. philenor does not occur, P. glaucus females tend to be all nonmimetic yellow forms like the males because, without the black models, black has no protective significance. Some very striking mimetic polymorphisms occur among…

  • Pipidae (amphibian family)

    Anura: Annotated classification: Family Pipidae (tongueless frogs) Cretaceous (145.5 million–65.5 million years ago) to present; 6 to 8 presacral vertebrae; ribs present and free in larvae, but fused to transverse processes of vertebrae in adults; coccyx fused to sacrum or free and monocondylar (i.e., with 1 articulation); tongue absent;…

  • Pipil (people)

    Central America: Pre-Columbian Central America: …coast, notable especially among the Pipil of El Salvador and the Chorotega and Nicarao of Nicaragua. In Panama and Costa Rica, South American Chibcha influence was prevalent, while Caribbean cultural patterns penetrated the coastal plain from Panama to Honduras. Fugitives from the European conquistadores in the Caribbean increased this influence…

  • Pipil language

    Mesoamerican Indian languages: The classification and status of Mesoamerican languages: In addition to these languages, there is a very long list of names identified in colonial and other early sources that are generally thought to represent extinct Uto-Aztecan groups, most in northern Mexico. No information has survived on most of these,…

  • Pipilo erythrophthalmus (bird)

    Chewink, bird species also known as the rufous-sided towhee. See

  • Pipilo fuscus (bird)

    towhee: …States is the canyon, or brown, towhee (P. fuscus). The green-tailed towhee (P. chlorurus), also western, is gray, white, and greenish, with a red-brown cap.

  • piping (fluvial process)

    river: Variation of stream regime: …not characteristic of humid regions: piping, headcutting, and the formation of channel profiles that are discontinuous over short distances.

  • piping hare (mammal)

    Pika, (genus Ochotona), small short-legged and virtually tailless egg-shaped mammal found in the mountains of western North America and much of Asia. Despite their small size, body shape, and round ears, pikas are not rodents but the smallest representatives of the lagomorphs, a group otherwise

  • piping-crow (bird)

    Currawong, any of several songbirds of the Australian family Cracticidae (order Passeriformes). They are large, up to 50 centimetres (20 inches) long, with black, gray, or black-and-white plumage and yellow eyes. All have resounding, metallic voices. Found in woodlands and occasionally flocking

  • Pipiolo (Chilean history)

    Pipiolo and Pelucón, members of the two political partisan groups active in Chilean politics for about a century after national independence was achieved in the 1820s. The Pipiolos were liberals and the Pelucónes conservatives. Between 1830 and 1861 the Pelucónes were ascendant. Between 1861 and

  • pipistrelle (mammal)

    Pipistrelle, (genus Pipistrellus), any of about 68 species belonging to the vesper bat family (Vespertilionidae). Pipistrelles are found in almost all parts of the world. They are grayish, brown, reddish, or black bats that are about 3.5–10 cm (1.4–4 inches) long, not including the tail, which may

  • Pipistrellus (mammal)

    Pipistrelle, (genus Pipistrellus), any of about 68 species belonging to the vesper bat family (Vespertilionidae). Pipistrelles are found in almost all parts of the world. They are grayish, brown, reddish, or black bats that are about 3.5–10 cm (1.4–4 inches) long, not including the tail, which may

  • Pipistrellus hesperus (mammal)

    pipistrelle: subflavus) and western (P. hesperus) pipistrelles of North America.

  • Pipistrellus pipistrellus (mammal)

    migration: Flying mammals (bats): Others, such as the common pipistrelle (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) and the particoloured bat (Vespertilio murinus), withdraw to hibernating places at some distance from their summer range. In Germany the large mouse-eared bat (Myotis myotis) leaves its winter quarters in Brandenburg in March or April and travels as much as 260…

  • Pipistrellus subflavus (mammal)

    pipistrelle: pipistrellus of Eurasia and the eastern (P. subflavus) and western (P. hesperus) pipistrelles of North America.

  • pipit (bird)

    Pipit, any of about 50 species of small slender-bodied ground birds in the genera Anthus and Tmetothylacus in the family Motacillidae (order Passeriformes, suborder Passeri [songbirds]). They are found worldwide except in polar regions. Pipits range in size from 12.5 to 23 cm (5 to 9 inches) long.

  • Pipkov, Lyubomir (Bulgarian composer)

    Bulgaria: The arts: …created by such composers as Lyubomir Pipkov, Petko Stainov, and Pancho Vladigerov. Bulgarian composers in the second half of the 20th century experimented with new tonality in vocal and instrumental music. Recordings and concert tours abroad won much wider audiences for traditional Bulgarian vocal music.

  • Pipoidea (amphibian superfamily)

    Anura: Annotated classification: Mesobatrachia Superfamily Pipoidea Vertebrae opisthocoelous; pectoral girdle arciferal; ribs absent or fused to transverse processes of vertebrae; amplexus inguinal; larvae with paired spiracles and simple mouthparts or with direct development. Family Rhinophrynidae (burrowing toad) Oligocene (33.9 million–23.03 million years ago) to present; 8 presacral

  • Pipp, Wally (American baseball player)

    Dorothy Kamenshek: …impressed former New York Yankee Wally Pipp as being the most accomplished he had ever seen among men or women. He once predicted that Kamenshek would be the first woman selected for the men’s major leagues. In fact, a men’s team from the Florida International League did attempt to recruit…

  • Pippa Passes (verse drama by Browning)

    Pippa Passes, verse drama in four parts by Robert Browning, published in 1841. The poem’s sections—Morning, Noon, Evening, and Night—are linked by episodes that either comment on the preceding scene or presage the scene to follow. On New Year’s morning, her only holiday for the entire year, Pippa,

  • Pippen, Scottie (American basketball player)

    Scottie Pippen, American professional basketball player who won six National Basketball Association (NBA) titles (1991–93, 1996–98) as a member of the Chicago Bulls. Pippen played high school basketball but stood just 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 metres) upon graduation. However, he had grown 2 inches (5

  • Pippi Långstrump (novel by Lindgren)

    Pippi Longstocking, novel for children written by Astrid Lindgren and published in 1945 in Swedish as Pippi Långstrump. The first English-language edition appeared in 1950. The collection of stories about the supremely independent and self-sufficient little girl became immensely popular worldwide

  • Pippi Longstocking (novel by Lindgren)

    Pippi Longstocking, novel for children written by Astrid Lindgren and published in 1945 in Swedish as Pippi Långstrump. The first English-language edition appeared in 1950. The collection of stories about the supremely independent and self-sufficient little girl became immensely popular worldwide

  • Pippi, Giulio (Italian artist and architect)

    Giulio Romano, late Renaissance painter and architect, the principal heir of Raphael, and one of the initiators of the Mannerist style. Giulio was apprenticed to Raphael as a child and had become so important in the workshop that by Raphael’s death, in 1520, he was named with G. Penni as one of the

  • Pippig, Uta (German athlete)

    Berlin Marathon: …Renata Kokowska of Poland and Uta Pippig of Germany.

  • Pippin (king of Italy)

    Pippin, king of Italy (781–810) and second son of the Frankish emperor Charlemagne by Hildegard. Given the title of king of Italy in 781, Pippin (originally named Carloman) took part in campaigns against Duke Tassilo III of Bavaria from 787 and led an army against the Avars in 796. His Venetian

  • Pippin (work by Fosse)

    Bob Fosse: From Broadway to Cabaret: In addition, Pippin opened on Broadway in 1972, and the following year Fosse won Tonys for best director (musical) and choreographer for his work on the production, which centred on the young king of Italy and his quest to find meaning in his life. Fosse became the…

  • Pippin der Ältere (Carolingian mayor)

    Pippin I, councillor of the Merovingian king Chlotar II and mayor of the palace in Austrasia, whose lands lay in the part of the Frankish kingdom that forms part of present-day Belgium. The reference to Landen dates from the 13th century. Through the marriage of his daughter Begga with Ansegisel,

  • Pippin der Kurze (king of the Franks)

    Pippin III, the first king of the Frankish Carolingian dynasty and the father of Charlemagne. A son of Charles Martel, Pippin became sole de facto ruler of the Franks in 747 and then, on the deposition of Childeric III in 751, king of the Franks. He was the first Frankish king to be anointed—first

  • Pippin I (Carolingian mayor)

    Pippin I, councillor of the Merovingian king Chlotar II and mayor of the palace in Austrasia, whose lands lay in the part of the Frankish kingdom that forms part of present-day Belgium. The reference to Landen dates from the 13th century. Through the marriage of his daughter Begga with Ansegisel,

  • Pippin I (Carolingian king)

    Pippin I, Carolingian king of Aquitaine, the second son of the emperor Louis I the Pious. Pippin was granted Aquitaine in July 814 and was recognized as king in 817, though it was clear that he was to remain subordinate to his elder brother, Lothar, the heir to the imperial title. It was Pippin who

  • Pippin II (Carolingian mayor)

    Pippin II, ruler of the Franks (687–714), the first of the great Carolingian mayors of the palace. The son of Begga and Ansegisel, who were, respectively, the daughter of Pippin I and the son of Bishop Arnulf of Metz, Pippin established himself as mayor of the palace in Austrasia after the death of

  • Pippin II (Carolingian king)

    Pippin II, Carolingian king of Aquitaine. The son of Pippin I of Aquitaine (d. 838), he was forced to fight for his inheritance. He gained the throne about 845 after defeating King Charles II the Bald, who had received authority over Aquitaine from Louis the Pious. War soon broke out again,

  • Pippin III (king of the Franks)

    Pippin III, the first king of the Frankish Carolingian dynasty and the father of Charlemagne. A son of Charles Martel, Pippin became sole de facto ruler of the Franks in 747 and then, on the deposition of Childeric III in 751, king of the Franks. He was the first Frankish king to be anointed—first

  • Pippin of Herstal (Carolingian mayor)

    Pippin II, ruler of the Franks (687–714), the first of the great Carolingian mayors of the palace. The son of Begga and Ansegisel, who were, respectively, the daughter of Pippin I and the son of Bishop Arnulf of Metz, Pippin established himself as mayor of the palace in Austrasia after the death of

  • Pippin of Landen (Carolingian mayor)

    Pippin I, councillor of the Merovingian king Chlotar II and mayor of the palace in Austrasia, whose lands lay in the part of the Frankish kingdom that forms part of present-day Belgium. The reference to Landen dates from the 13th century. Through the marriage of his daughter Begga with Ansegisel,

  • Pippin the Elder (Carolingian mayor)

    Pippin I, councillor of the Merovingian king Chlotar II and mayor of the palace in Austrasia, whose lands lay in the part of the Frankish kingdom that forms part of present-day Belgium. The reference to Landen dates from the 13th century. Through the marriage of his daughter Begga with Ansegisel,

  • Pippin the Short (king of the Franks)

    Pippin III, the first king of the Frankish Carolingian dynasty and the father of Charlemagne. A son of Charles Martel, Pippin became sole de facto ruler of the Franks in 747 and then, on the deposition of Childeric III in 751, king of the Franks. He was the first Frankish king to be anointed—first

  • Pippin, Donation of (Italian history)

    Donation of Pippin, traditional name of the oral or written promise made by the Carolingian king Pippin III to Pope Stephen II (or III) granting the pope rights over large territories in central Italy. The Donation was an important step in the development of the Papal States and helped to solidify

  • Pippin, Horace (American artist)

    Horace Pippin, American folk painter known for his depictions of African American life and of the horrors of war. Pippin’s childhood was spent in Goshen, New York, a town that sometimes appears in his paintings. There he drew horses at the local racetrack and, according to his own account, painted

  • Pippinid (European dynasty)

    Carolingian dynasty, family of Frankish aristocrats and the dynasty (750–887 ce) that they established to rule western Europe. The dynasty’s name derives from the large number of family members who bore the name Charles, most notably Charlemagne. A brief treatment of the Carolingians follows. For

  • Piprinae (bird)

    Manakin, (subfamily Piprinae), common name given to about 60 species of small, stubby, generally short-tailed birds abundant in American tropical forests. Manakins are short-billed birds that range in size from 8.5 to 16 cm (3.5 to 6.5 inches) long and weigh a mere 10–40 grams (0.35–1.4 ounces).

  • pipsissewa (plant)

    Pipsissewa, any evergreen, herbaceous plant of the genus Chimaphila, of the heath family (Ericaceae). C. umbellata, sometimes also called prince’s pine, love-in-winter, and wintergreen, occurs in North America from Canada to Mexico and in Europe and Japan. C. maculata, sometimes called striped

  • Piptadenia peregrina (plant)

    cohoba: …a tropical American tree (Piptadenia peregrina) and used by Indians of the Caribbean and South America at the time of early Spanish explorations. DMT (N,N-dimethyltryptamine) and bufotenine (qq.v.) are thought to have been the active principles. Cohoba was inhaled deeply by means of special bilateral tubes.

  • Piqua (Ohio, United States)

    Piqua, city, Miami county, western Ohio, U.S., on the Great Miami River, 27 miles (43 km) north of Dayton. The original Shawnee village of Piqua (the name, from a term meaning “man who arose from the ashes,” comes from a local Shawnee clan’s creation story), near present-day Springfield, was

  • piqué work (metalwork)

    Piqué work, decorative technique, usually employed on tortoiseshell, in which inlaid designs are created by means of small gold or silver pins. The art reached its highest point in 17th- and 18th-century France, particularly for the decoration of small tortoiseshell articles such as combs, patch

  • Pique-nique en campagne (work by Arrabal)

    Fernando Arrabal: …and the 1959 production of Pique-nique en campagne (Picnic on the Battlefield), an antiwar satire that contrasts the horrors of war with a cheerful family outing, brought him to the attention of the French avant-garde. Arrabal’s most important play of this early period is probably Le Cimetière des voitures (1st…

  • piquet (card game)

    Piquet, card game, known since the 15th century in France. For centuries piquet has been regarded as one of the greatest two-player card games. In 1534 François Rabelais listed it as a favorite pastime of his fictional hero Gargantua, and in 1892 the delegates to a card congress in Vienna voted it

  • PIR (political party, Bolivia)

    Bolivia: The rise of new political groups and the Bolivian National Revolution: …of the Revolutionary Left (Partido de la Izquierda Revolucionaria; PIR). Both groups established important factions in the national congress of 1940–44. In 1943 the civilian president General Enrique Peñaranda was overthrown by a secret military group, Reason for the Fatherland (Razón de Patria; RADEPA). RADEPA allied itself with the…

  • pīr (Islam)

    Islamic world: Cultural flowering in Iraq: Masters (called sheikhs or pīrs) were beginning to attract disciples (murīds) to their way. Like other Muslims who tried to go “beyond” the Sharīʿah to inner truth, the Sufis practiced concealment of inner awareness (taqiyyah). Al-Ḥallāj, one of al-Junayd’s disciples, began to travel and preach publicly, however. His success…

  • Pir Panjal Range (mountain system, Asia)

    Pir Panjal Range, mountain range in the northern Indian subcontinent. It is part of the western (Punjab) Himalayas, the western outlier of the vast Himalayas system. The Pir Panjal Range is situated principally in the disputed Kashmir region. It extends southeastward for more than 200 miles (320

  • Pīr Sarāi (ridge, Pakistan)

    Siege of Aornos: Aornos is evidently modern Pīr Sarāi, a steep ridge a few miles west of the Indus and north of the Buner rivers in modern Pakistan. Unable to storm the rock, Alexander seized the hill opposite and threatened the Indians’ encampment with his catapults. They retreated but were caught, and…

  • Pir Sultan Abdal (Turkish author)

    Islamic arts: Influence of Yunus Emre: In the 16th century Pir Sultan Abdal (executed c. 1560) is noted for a few poems of austere melancholy. He was executed for collaboration with the Ṣafavids, the archenemies of the Ottomans, and in this connection it is worth remembering that the founder of the Iranian Ṣafavid dynasty, Shāh…

  • Piracicaba (Brazil)

    Piracicaba, city, in the highlands of east-central São Paulo estado (state), southeastern Brazil. It lies at 1,772 feet (540 metres) above sea level on the Tietê River. Formerly called Santo Antônio de Piracicaba and Vila Nova da Constituição, the settlement was given town status in 1821 and made

  • piracy (international law)

    Piracy, any robbery or other violent action, for private ends and without authorization by public authority, committed on the seas or in the air outside the normal jurisdiction of any state. Because piracy has been regarded as an offense against the law of nations, the public vessels of any state

  • piracy (copyright crime)

    Piracy, act of illegally reproducing or disseminating copyrighted material, such as computer programs, books, music, and films. Although any form of copyright infringement can and has been referred to as piracy, this article focuses on using computers to make digital copies of works for

  • Piracy on the High Seas

    To the astonishment of many, High-seas piracy, a crime thought long relegated to legend, made headlines in late 2005 when a luxury cruise ship was attacked off the Somali coast. The Seabourn Spirit, carrying 151 Western tourists, managed to evade capture but not without one of its security officers

  • Piraeus (Greece)

    Piraeus, city and dímos (municipality), Attica (Modern Greek: Attikí) periféreia (region), Greece. Piraeus is the port of Athens (Athína) and lies on Phaleron Bay, about 6 miles (10 km) southwest of Athens by highway. The main harbour, Kántharos (ancient Cantharus), is enclosed on the west by the

  • piragua (boat)

    Pirogue, in its simplest form, a dugout made from one log, but also a number of more elaborately fashioned boats, including various native canoes, the structure and appearance of which generally resemble those of a dugout. The pirogue is widely distributed and may be found as a fishing vessel in

  • Piraiévs (Greece)

    Piraeus, city and dímos (municipality), Attica (Modern Greek: Attikí) periféreia (region), Greece. Piraeus is the port of Athens (Athína) and lies on Phaleron Bay, about 6 miles (10 km) southwest of Athens by highway. The main harbour, Kántharos (ancient Cantharus), is enclosed on the west by the

  • Pirandello, Luigi (Italian author)

    Luigi Pirandello, Italian playwright, novelist, and short-story writer, winner of the 1934 Nobel Prize for Literature. With his invention of the “theatre within the theatre” in the play Sei personaggi in cerca d’autore (1921; Six Characters in Search of an Author), he became an important innovator

  • Piranesi, Giambattista (Italian artist)

    Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Italian draftsman, printmaker, architect, and art theorist. His large prints depicting the buildings of classical and postclassical Rome and its vicinity contributed considerably to Rome’s fame and to the growth of classical archaeology and to the Neoclassical movement

  • Piranesi, Giovanni Battista (Italian artist)

    Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Italian draftsman, printmaker, architect, and art theorist. His large prints depicting the buildings of classical and postclassical Rome and its vicinity contributed considerably to Rome’s fame and to the growth of classical archaeology and to the Neoclassical movement

  • Piranga flava (bird)

    tanager: A less showy bird, the hepatic tanager (P. flava), has a greater breeding range: from southern Arizona to central Argentina. The most striking tropical genus is Tangara: about 50 small species sometimes called callistes. An example is the paradise tanager (T. chilensis), called siete colores (Spanish) from its seven hues,…

  • Piranga ludoviciana (bird)

    tanager: rubra), and western tanager (P. ludoviciana). A less showy bird, the hepatic tanager (P. flava), has a greater breeding range: from southern Arizona to central Argentina. The most striking tropical genus is Tangara: about 50 small species sometimes called callistes. An example is the paradise tanager (T.…

  • Piranga olivacea (bird)

    tanager: …temperate North America are the scarlet tanager (Piranga olivacea), summer tanager (P. rubra), and western tanager (P. ludoviciana). A less showy bird, the hepatic tanager (P. flava), has a greater breeding range: from southern Arizona to central Argentina. The most striking tropical genus is Tangara: about 50 small species sometimes…

  • Piranga rubra (bird)

    tanager: …the scarlet tanager (Piranga olivacea), summer tanager (P. rubra), and western tanager (P. ludoviciana). A less showy bird, the hepatic tanager (P. flava), has a greater breeding range: from southern Arizona to central Argentina. The most striking tropical genus is Tangara: about 50 small species sometimes called callistes. An example…

  • piranha (fish)

    Piranha, any of more than 60 species of razor-toothed carnivorous fish of South American rivers and lakes, with a somewhat exaggerated reputation for ferocity. In movies such as Piranha (1978), the piranha has been depicted as a ravenous indiscriminate killer. Most species, however, are scavengers

  • Piranha Press (comic book imprint)

    DC Comics: The DC universe: …for mature readers with its Piranha Press imprint. Launched in 1989 with the ongoing title Beautiful Stories for Ugly Children, Piranha was a bold, if not entirely successful, experiment in creator-owned content. The imprint folded in 1993, but it was revived in 1995 as Paradox Press. Although Paradox lasted only…

  • Pirani gauge (instrument)

    vacuum technology: Thermal conductivity gauges: …of thermal conductivity gauges, the Pirani and the thermocouple, determine pressure by the rate at which heat is dissipated from a hot filament. The Pirani gauge basically is a Wheatstone bridge with one arm in the form of a heated filament placed in the vacuum system. The resistance of the…

  • pirarucu (fish)

    Pirarucu, (Arapaima gigas), ancient, air-breathing, giant fish of Amazonian rivers and lakes. One of the largest freshwater fishes in the world, the pirarucu attains a length of nearly 3 metres (10 feet) and a weight of 220 kg (485 pounds). The fish has a peculiar profile in that the front of the

  • Pirata (spider genus)

    wolf spider: Wolf spiders of the genus Pirata, often found near ponds or streams, have a V-shaped pale mark on the back. The abdomen often has chevronlike marks and paired yellow spots. Thin-legged wolf spiders (Pardosa), which have a lens-shaped, greenish or gray egg sac, have relatively long legs with long spines…

  • Piratāpamutaliyār Carittiram (novel by Pillai)

    South Asian arts: Tamil: …Tamil appeared in 1879, the Piratāpamutaliyār Carittiram, by Vetanayakam Pillai, who was inspired by English and French novels. In important respects Pillai’s work is typical of all early modern Tamil fiction: his subject matter is Tamil life as he observed it, the language is scholastic, and the inspiration comes from…

  • Piratbyrån (Swedish anti-copyright group)

    The Pirate Bay: …by the Swedish anti-copyright group Piratbyrån (“Bureau of Piracy”). The Pirate Bay is the most popular site in the world to use the BitTorrent protocol that allows the distribution of very large files such as those containing movies and electronic games. The site is an enthusiastic defender of information piracy…

  • pirate (international law)

    Piracy, any robbery or other violent action, for private ends and without authorization by public authority, committed on the seas or in the air outside the normal jurisdiction of any state. Because piracy has been regarded as an offense against the law of nations, the public vessels of any state

  • Pirate Bay, The (Web site)

    The Pirate Bay, file-sharing Web site founded in 2003 by the Swedish anti-copyright group Piratbyrån (“Bureau of Piracy”). The Pirate Bay is the most popular site in the world to use the BitTorrent protocol that allows the distribution of very large files such as those containing movies and

  • Pirate Latitudes (novel by Crichton)

    Michael Crichton: …two completed manuscripts were discovered: Pirate Latitudes, about 17th-century pirates, and Dragon Teeth, which centres on the rivalry between paleontologists in the American West in the 1800s; the novels were published in 2009 and 2017, respectively. Micro (2011), which imagines the sinister applications of miniaturization technology, derived from a partially…

  • Pirate Party (political party, Iceland)

    Iceland: Political developments: …by young people, the antiestablishment Pirate Party had a huge impact on the election, capturing 10 seats, as opposed to 3 in 2013, and increasing its percentage of the popular vote from 5 percent to about 14 percent. Founded in 2012 by a mixture of veterans from the Pots and…

  • Pirate Party (political party, Sweden)

    copyright: …a political footing after Sweden’s Pirate Party, which campaigned heavily on a platform of copyright and patent-law reform, secured a seat in the European Parliament. The party had grown by more than 50 percent in the aftermath of the Pirate Bay trial.

  • pirate perch (fish)

    Pirate perch, (Aphredoderus sayanus), freshwater fish that is the sole member of the family Aphredoderidae. The pirate perch is found in weedy or muddy creeks, rivers, and lakes of eastern North America. Noteworthy is the peculiar position of its anus, which is located near the anal fin when the

  • pirate radio

    Pirate radio, unlicensed radio broadcast intended for general public reception. While many pirate radio stations have been short-lived low-power entities operated by amateur hobbyists, others have been elaborate professional undertakings that skirted government regulation by transmitting from

  • pirate spider (arachnid)

    Pirate spider, any member of the family Mimetidae (order Araneida), noted for its habit of eating other spiders. The approximately 100 species are distributed worldwide. They are characterized by a row of sharp bristles on the first pair of legs. Pirate spiders do not build nests or webs. They move

  • Pirate, The (film by Minnelli [1948])

    Vincente Minnelli: Films of the later 1940s: Meet Me in St. Louis, The Clock, and The Pirate: The Pirate starred Kelly as the dashing Serafin, a not-so-humble minstrel, and Garland as the wide-eyed Manuela, who believes Serafin to be Macoco, the scourge of the Caribbean and the lusty rogue of her dreams. After six months the film was finished but was far…

  • Pirates of Penzance, The (operetta by Gilbert and Sullivan)

    The Pirates of Penzance, operetta in two acts with music by Arthur Sullivan and an English libretto by W.S. Gilbert. To secure an American copyright—so as to avoid pirated American productions, the like of those that had followed English production of H.M.S. Pinafore—the work premiered with a

  • Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (film by Verbinski [2007])

    Jerry Bruckheimer: … (2003), Dead Man’s Chest (2006), At World’s End (2007), On Stranger Tides (2011), and Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017). The films, which starred Johnny Depp, were among the highest-grossing movies of all time.

  • Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest (film by Verbinski [2006])

    Jerry Bruckheimer: …of the Black Pearl (2003), Dead Man’s Chest (2006), At World’s End (2007), On Stranger Tides (2011), and Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017). The films, which starred Johnny Depp, were among the highest-grossing movies of all time.

  • Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (film by Rønning [2017])

    Javier Bardem: …the undead Captain Salazar in Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales and as a poet whose marriage is tested by the arrival of strangers at the couple’s secluded home in the psychological thriller Mother! He also costarred with Cruz in both Loving Pablo (2017), about the relationship…

  • Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (film by Marshall [2011])

    Jerry Bruckheimer: … (2006), At World’s End (2007), On Stranger Tides (2011), and Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017). The films, which starred Johnny Depp, were among the highest-grossing movies of all time.

  • Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (film by Verbinski [2003])

    Jerry Bruckheimer: …Pirates of the Caribbean series—The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003), Dead Man’s Chest (2006), At World’s End (2007), On Stranger Tides (2011), and Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017). The films, which starred Johnny Depp, were among the highest-grossing movies of all time.

  • Pirates! Band of Misfits, The (motion picture [2012])

    Hugh Grant: …of a pirate captain in The Pirates! Band of Misfits, a stop-motion animation film, and he disappeared into multiple roles in the epic Cloud Atlas, which wove together six stories that spanned centuries.

  • piraya (fish)

    Piranha, any of more than 60 species of razor-toothed carnivorous fish of South American rivers and lakes, with a somewhat exaggerated reputation for ferocity. In movies such as Piranha (1978), the piranha has been depicted as a ravenous indiscriminate killer. Most species, however, are scavengers

  • Pircas (mountain pass, South America)

    Andes Mountains: Physiography of the Central Andes: …of Anconcagua the passes include Pircas (16,960 feet), Bermejo (more than 10,000 feet), and Iglesia (13,400 feet). Farther north the passes are more numerous but higher. The peaks of Mounts Bonete, Ojos del Salado, and Pissis surpass 20,000 feet.

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