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  • Pierrot Lunaire (work by Tetley)

    Glen Tetley: …his own company and created Pierrot Lunaire, a work focusing on the interaction of three commedia dell’arte characters and set to the atonal song cycle of the same name by the experimental composer Arnold Schoenberg. Its success gained Tetley a position as guest artist with the Netherlands Dance Theatre in…

  • Pierrot Lunaire (work by Schoenberg)

    harmony: Polytonality: …work as the chamber cantata Pierrot Lunaire (1912), tonality has been put aside. In this work it is no longer possible to discuss consonance and dissonance, for these concepts relate to the structure of a composition according to the harmonic principles of tonality.

  • Pierrot Players (British music ensemble)

    Sir Harrison Birtwistle: He cofounded the Pierrot Players with Peter Maxwell Davies (1967) but felt limited by the group’s size. He concentrated on exploring large-scale time structures; his music’s form is controlled by complex cyclical principles that he declined to discuss. His works include the theatre pieces Punch and Judy (1966–67),…

  • Piers Morgan Live (American television program)

    Piers Morgan: …show Piers Morgan Tonight (later Piers Morgan Live) on CNN (2011–14).

  • Piers Morgan Tonight (American television program)

    Piers Morgan: …show Piers Morgan Tonight (later Piers Morgan Live) on CNN (2011–14).

  • Piers Plowman (work by Langland)

    Piers Plowman, Middle English alliterative poem presumed to have been written by William Langland. Three versions of Piers Plowman are extant: A, the poem’s short early form, dating from the 1360s; B, a major revision and extension of A made in the late 1370s; and C, a less “literary” version of B

  • Piersall, Jimmy (American baseball player)

    baseball: Baseball and the arts: …is the biography of outfielder Jimmy Piersall, Fear Strikes Out (1957), which is an unsentimental account of Piersall’s struggle with mental illness. More in keeping with the period are entertaining comedies and musicals such as It Happens Every Spring (1949), Angels in the Outfield (1951), and Damn Yankees (1958), based…

  • Pierson, Frank (American writer, director, and producer)

    Frank Romer Pierson, American screenwriter, director, and producer (born May 12, 1925, Chappaqua, N.Y.—died July 22, 2012, Los Angeles, Calif.), garnered an Academy Award nomination for best screenplay based on material from another medium for his first film, Cat Ballou (1965), and another for his

  • Pierson, Frank Romer (American writer, director, and producer)

    Frank Romer Pierson, American screenwriter, director, and producer (born May 12, 1925, Chappaqua, N.Y.—died July 22, 2012, Los Angeles, Calif.), garnered an Academy Award nomination for best screenplay based on material from another medium for his first film, Cat Ballou (1965), and another for his

  • Pierson, Julia (American law-enforcement professional)

    Julia Pierson, American law-enforcement professional who became the highest-ranking woman in the U.S. Secret Service before serving as the 23rd—and first female—director of that agency in 2013–14. As a teenager in Orlando, Florida, Pierson worked at the Disney World theme park—as a parking-lot

  • Pierwszy dzień wolności (work by Kruczkowski)

    Leon Kruczkowski: In Pierwszy dzień wolności (1960; “The First Day of Freedom”; filmed 1965), he reflected on the conflict between human freedom and historical necessity. His last play, Śmierć gubernatora (1961; “Death of a Governor”), examined the ethics of the capitalist world, to which Kruczkowski compared the humanitarian…

  • Piesiewicz, Krzysztof (Polish writer)

    Krzysztof Kieślowski: …a longtime writing collaboration with Krzysztof Piesiewicz. Kieślowski’s mammoth Dekalog (1988–89; Decalogue), cowritten with Piesiewicz, is a series inspired by the Ten Commandments and made for Polish television. Each of the 10 hour-long episodes explores at least one commandment; as the commandments are not explicitly named, the audience is invited…

  • Piesmatidae (insect family)

    heteropteran: Annotated classification: Family Piesmatidae Juga (2 outer lobes of head) extend as a pair of horizontal, hornlike projections; prothorax with a deep pit below expanded sides; forewings, except apical part of membrane, with numerous coarse punctures; phytophagous, most frequently on plants of the goosefoot family (Chenopodiaceae); proven vectors…

  • Piešt’any (Slovakia)

    Piešt’any, town, southwestern Slovakia, on the Váh River, approximately 48 miles (77 km) northeast of Bratislava. Piešt’any is a Carpathian health resort, known since the Middle Ages for its warm sulfur springs and mud baths. It has specialized since the 16th century in treating rheumatic and

  • Pietà (iconography)

    Pietà, as a theme in Christian art, depiction of the Virgin Mary supporting the body of the dead Christ. Some representations of the Pietà include John the Apostle, Mary Magdalene, and sometimes other figures on either side of the Virgin, but the great majority show only Mary and her Son. The Pietà

  • Pietà (painting by Morales)

    Luis de Morales: …such as Ecce Homo and Pietà (1560–70), and the Virgin and Child. Perhaps the best known of these panels are 20 on the Life of Christ, painted for the Church of Arroyo del Puerco (1563–68). All of his paintings are marked by detailed execution and anguished asceticism. His work shows…

  • Pietà (sculpture by Michelangelo)

    art fraud: …credit for sculpting the famous Pietà (now in St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome), Michelangelo returned with his chisel and added his signature across the centre of the sculpture, on the prominent sash across Mary’s upper body (in Italian): “Michelangelo Buonarroti, Florentine, made this.”

  • Pieta (sculpture by Hernández)

    Western sculpture: Spain: … in sculptures like the “Pieta” (1617; Museo Nacional de Esculturas, Valladolid, Spain) revealed an emotional realism more Gothic than Baroque; but in the figures of Manuel Pereira there is a clear-cut monumentality and intense concentration comparable to that of Zurbarán. Both were active in Castile, though the main centre…

  • Pietà (painting by Bermejo)

    Bartolomé Bermejo: …of Renaissance techniques is the Pietà of 1490 in the Barcelona Cathedral. It is widely considered his finest work. The painting lacks gold in the background (present in earlier works). Instead, a landscape under a stormy sky is painted very much in the manner of the Flemish master Rogier van…

  • Pietà (painting by Botticelli)

    Sandro Botticelli: Late works: …Annunciation (1490) and the small Pietà (late 1490s) now in the Poldi-Pezzoli Museum. After the early 1490s his style changed markedly; the paintings are smaller in scale, the figures in them are now slender to the point of idiosyncrasy, and the painter, by accentuating their gestures and expressions, concentrates attention…

  • Pietà (painting by Perugino)

    Perugino: Mature work: …the Madonna and Saints, the Pietà, and the fresco of the Crucifixion for the Florentine convent of Sta. Maria Maddalena dei Pazzi. These works are characterized by ample sculptural figures gracefully posed in simple Renaissance architectural settings, which act as a frame to the images and the narrative. The harmonious…

  • Pietà (painting by Sebastiano del Piombo)

    Sebastiano del Piombo: …executed his best-known work, the Pietà (c. 1517), as well as Flagellation (1516–24) and The Raising of Lazarus (1519). Michelangelo’s opinion of him was so high that he thought by correcting his rather dull draftsmanship, he could make Sebastiano the best painter in Rome. In his Roman work Sebastiano combined…

  • Pietà (painting by Titian)

    Titian: Religious paintings: …and last testament is the Pietà, intended for his own burial chapel but left unfinished and completed by Palma il Giovane. The master and his son, Orazio, appear as tiny donors on the small plaque to the right. The monumentality of the composition is established by the great architectural niche…

  • Pietarsaari (Finland)

    Pietarsaari, town, western Finland, northeast of the city of Vaasa. Pietarsaari, which was formerly mainly Swedish-speaking, was founded in 1652; it became an important commercial centre because of its location on the Gulf of Bothnia. The poet Johan Ludvig Runeberg (who wrote in Swedish but is

  • Pietas (Roman religion)

    Pietas, in Roman religion, personification of a respectful and faithful attachment to gods, country, and relatives, especially parents. Pietas had a temple at Rome, dedicated in 181 bc, and was often represented on coins as a female figure carrying a palm branch and a sceptre or as a matron

  • Pietermaritzburg (South Africa)

    Pietermaritzburg, city, capital of KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. It lies in the Msunduzi River valley, at the base of a tree-covered escarpment inland from Durban. Boers from the Cape Colony founded it in 1838 after a victory over the Zulus at Blood River and named it to honour their dead

  • Pietersburg (South Africa)

    Polokwane, city, capital of Limpopo province, South Africa. It is located about midway between Pretoria and the Zimbabwe border, at an elevation of 4,199 feet (1,280 metres). It was founded by Voortrekkers (Afrikaans: “Pioneers”) in 1886 on land purchased in 1884 from a local farmer and named

  • Pieterszoon, Pieter (Dutch admiral)

    Piet Heyn, admiral and director of the Dutch West India Company who captured a Spanish treasure fleet (1628) with 4,000,000 ducats of gold and silver (12,000,000 gulden, or florins). That great naval and economic victory provided the Dutch Republic with money to continue its struggle against Spain

  • Pietism (religion)

    Pietism, influential religious reform movement that began among German Lutherans in the 17th century. It emphasized personal faith against the main Lutheran church’s perceived stress on doctrine and theology over Christian living. Pietism quickly spread and later became concerned with social and

  • Pietismus (religion)

    Pietism, influential religious reform movement that began among German Lutherans in the 17th century. It emphasized personal faith against the main Lutheran church’s perceived stress on doctrine and theology over Christian living. Pietism quickly spread and later became concerned with social and

  • Pietr-le-Letton (novel by Simenon)

    Georges Simenon: …own name was Pietr-le-Letton (1929; The Strange Case of Peter the Lett), in which he introduced the imperturbable, pipe-smoking Parisian police inspector Jules Maigret to fiction. Simenon went on to write 83 more detective novels featuring Inspector Maigret, as well as 136 psychological novels. His total literary output consisted of…

  • Pietra del paragone politico (work by Boccalini)

    Traiano Boccalini: …Earl of Monmouth, and called Advertisements from Parnassus; in Two Centuries with the Politick Touch-stone (1656). This and other European translations influenced Miguel de Cervantes, Joseph Addison, and Jonathan Swift.

  • pietra del paragone, La (opera by Rossini)

    Gioachino Rossini: Italian period: …La pietra del paragone (1812; The Touchstone), a touchstone of his budding genius. In its finale, Rossini—for the first time—made use of the crescendo effect that he was later to use and abuse indiscriminately.

  • pietra dura (stone)

    Pietra dura, (Italian: “hard stone”), in mosaic, any of several kinds of hard stone used in commesso mosaic work, an art that flourished in Florence particularly in the late 16th and 17th centuries and involved the fashioning of highly illusionistic pictures out of cut-to-shape pieces of coloured

  • pietra leccese (rock)

    Lecce: …are built of the characteristic pietra leccese, a light yellow, easily worked limestone. The cathedral, the Basilica of Santa Croce, and the Church of SS. Niccolo e Cataldo are notable, all rebuilt in the Baroque style. Other fine Baroque buildings include the bishop’s palace, the seminary, and the Palazzo della…

  • Pietrangeli, Carlo (Italian museum director)

    Carlo Pietrangeli, Italian director-general of the monuments, museums, and pontifical galleries of the Vatican, 1978-95 (b. Oct. 20, 1912--d. June 23,

  • Pietrasanta (Italy)

    Pietrasanta, town, centre of a district known as Versilia, Toscana (Tuscany) regione, central Italy, at the foot of the Alpi Apuane (mountains) just southeast of Carrara. Its piazza is surrounded by fine buildings including the Cathedral of San Martino and the Church of San Agostino (a baptistery

  • Pietri, Dorando (Italian athlete)

    Dorando Pietri: Falling at the Finish: “It would be no exaggeration,” declared The New York Times, to say that the finish of the marathon at the 1908 Olympics in London was “the most thrilling athletic event that has occurred since that Marathon race in ancient Greece, where the victor fell at…

  • Pietri, Pedro (Puerto Rican writer)

    Pedro Pietri, Puerto Rican poet and playwright (born March 21, 1944, Ponce, P.R.—died March 3, 2004, in flight from Mexico to New York, N.Y.), inspired young Puerto Ricans living in New York City, called Nuyoricans, by composing poetry that instilled pride in their culture and heritage. His poems o

  • Pietro Bembo (painting by Bellini)

    Giovanni Bellini: …head of state, and his Portrait of a Young Man (c. 1505; thought to be a likeness of the Venetian writer and humanist Pietro Bembo) in the British royal collection portrays all the sensitivity of a poet.

  • Pietro da Cortona (Italian artist)

    Pietro da Cortona, Italian architect, painter, and decorator, an outstanding exponent of Baroque style. Pietro studied in Rome from about 1612 under the minor Florentine painters Andrea Commodi and Baccio Ciarpi and was influenced by antique sculpture and the work of Raphael. The most important of

  • Pietro da Verona, San (Italian preacher)

    St. Peter Martyr, ; canonized 1253; feast day April 29), inquisitor, vigorous preacher, and religious founder who, for his militant reformation, was assassinated by a neo-Manichaean sect, the Cathari (heretical Christians who held unorthodox views on the nature of good and evil). Peter’s parents

  • Pietro della Gondola, Andrea di (Italian architect)

    Andrea Palladio, Italian architect, regarded as the greatest architect of 16th-century northern Italy. His designs for palaces (palazzi) and villas, notably the Villa Rotonda (1550–51) near Vicenza, and his treatise I quattro libri dell’architettura (1570; The Four Books of Architecture) made him

  • Pietro della Vigna (Italian minister)

    Pietro Della Vigna, chief minister of the Holy Roman emperor Frederick II, distinguished as jurist, poet, and man of letters whose sudden fall from power and tragic death captured the imagination of poets and chroniclers, including Dante. Born in the mainland part of the kingdom of Sicily to a p

  • Pietro di Candia (antipope)

    Alexander (V), antipope from 1409 to 1410. Alexander became a Franciscan theologian and then archbishop of Milan (1402). Pope Innocent VII appointed him cardinal (1405) and papal legate to Lombardy. Unanimously elected by the invalid Council of Pisa in 1409 when he was 70 years old, Alexander was p

  • Pietro Martire Vermigli (Italian religious reformer)

    Peter Martyr Vermigli, leading Italian religious reformer whose chief concern was eucharistic doctrine. The son of a prosperous shoemaker, Vermigli had by 1518 entered the Lateran Congregation of the Augustinian Canons Regular at Fiesole. After eight years of study at Padua, he served variously as

  • Pietro Martire, San (Italian preacher)

    St. Peter Martyr, ; canonized 1253; feast day April 29), inquisitor, vigorous preacher, and religious founder who, for his militant reformation, was assassinated by a neo-Manichaean sect, the Cathari (heretical Christians who held unorthodox views on the nature of good and evil). Peter’s parents

  • Pietrobuono, Gasparino di (Italian educator)

    Gasparino da Barzizza, early Italian humanist teacher noted for his ability to convey Classical civilization to the Italy of his day. Barzizza studied grammar and rhetoric at Pavia, remaining there from 1407 to 1421 to lecture in the university and direct a grammar school. He moved to Venice and

  • Pietrosu (mountain, Rodna Mountains, Europe)

    Carpathian Mountains: Physiography: …and reach a peak in Pietrosu (7,556 feet). To the south, extinct volcanoes in the Călimani and Harghita ranges have, to some extent, kept their original conical shape; the highest peaks of these ranges are 6,890 feet and 5,906 feet, respectively. Fringing the true Eastern Carpathians runs a narrow zone…

  • Pietrosul (mountain, Rodna Mountains, Europe)

    Carpathian Mountains: Physiography: …and reach a peak in Pietrosu (7,556 feet). To the south, extinct volcanoes in the Călimani and Harghita ranges have, to some extent, kept their original conical shape; the highest peaks of these ranges are 6,890 feet and 5,906 feet, respectively. Fringing the true Eastern Carpathians runs a narrow zone…

  • piezoelectric ceramics

    capacitor dielectric and piezoelectric ceramics: Piezoelectric ceramics: Many of the ferroelectric perovskite materials described above are also piezoelectric; that is, they generate a voltage when stressed or, conversely, develop a strain when under an applied electromagnetic field. These effects result from relative displacements of the ions, rotations of the dipoles,…

  • piezoelectric coefficient (physics)

    electricity: Piezoelectricity: The piezoelectric coefficient d (in metres per volt) is approximately 3 × 10−12 for quartz, 5 × −10−11 for ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, and 3 × 10−10 for lead zirconate titanate.

  • piezoelectric device (electronics)

    band-pass filter: …made up of freely vibrating piezoelectric crystals (crystals that vibrate mechanically at their resonant frequency when excited by an applied voltage of the same frequency), in which case the device is called a crystal band-pass filter or a monolithic filter.

  • piezoelectricity (physics)

    Piezoelectricity, appearance of positive electric charge on one side of certain nonconducting crystals and negative charge on the opposite side when the crystals are subjected to mechanical pressure. This effect is exploited in a variety of practical devices such as microphones, phonograph

  • piezophile (biology)

    extremophile: …below 0 °C [32 °F]); piezophilic, or barophilic (optimal growth at high hydrostatic pressure); oligotrophic (growth in nutritionally limited environments); endolithic (growth within rock or within pores of mineral grains); and xerophilic (growth in dry conditions, with low water availability). Some extremophiles are adapted simultaneously to multiple stresses (polyextremophile); common…

  • piezophilic organism (biology)

    extremophile: …below 0 °C [32 °F]); piezophilic, or barophilic (optimal growth at high hydrostatic pressure); oligotrophic (growth in nutritionally limited environments); endolithic (growth within rock or within pores of mineral grains); and xerophilic (growth in dry conditions, with low water availability). Some extremophiles are adapted simultaneously to multiple stresses (polyextremophile); common…

  • piezoremanent magnetization (physics)

    rock: Types of remanent magnetization: PRM (pressure remanent, or piezoremanent, magnetization) arises when a material undergoes mechanical deformation while in a magnetic field. The process of deformation may result from hydrostatic pressure, shock impact (as produced by a meteorite striking the Earth’s surface), or directed tectonic stress. There are magnetization changes with stress in…

  • pig (machine)

    iron processing: History: …shorter channels were known as pigs.

  • pig (domesticated animal)

    livestock farming: Pigs: Pigs are relatively easy to raise indoors or outdoors, and they can be slaughtered with a minimum of equipment because of their moderate size (see meat processing: Hogs). Pigs are monogastric, so, unlike ruminants, they are unable to utilize large quantities of forage and…

  • pig (mammal group)

    Pig, wild or domestic swine, a mammal of the Suidae family. In Britain the term pig refers to all domestic swine, while in the United States it refers to younger swine not yet ready for market and weighing usually less than 82 kg (180 pounds), others being called hogs. Pigs are stout-bodied,

  • pig flu (disease)

    Swine flu, a respiratory disease of pigs that is caused by an influenza virus. The first flu virus isolated from pigs was influenza A H1N1 in 1930. This virus is a subtype of influenza that is named for the composition of the proteins hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N) that form its viral

  • pig iron (metallurgy)

    Pig iron, crude iron obtained directly from the blast furnace and cast in molds. See cast

  • pig laurel (shrub)

    Lambkill, (species Kalmia angustifolia), an open upright woody shrub of the heath family (Ericaceae). Lambkill is 0.3–1.2 m (1–4 feet) tall and has glossy, leathery, evergreen leaves and showy pink to rose flowers. It contains andromedotoxin, a poison also common to other Kalmia species (including

  • Pig War (European history [1906–1909])

    Pig War, tariff conflict from March 1906 to June 1909 between Serbia and Austria-Hungary, so named because during it the export of live Serbian pigs to Austria-Hungary was prohibited. In 1903 Serbia, regenerated with the accession of a new king that year, threatened Austria-Hungary in the Balkans,

  • Pig War (United States history [1859])

    San Juan Islands: Following the bloodless “Pig War” of 1859 (precipitated by a marauding British pig in an American potato patch and involving American forces commanded by Captain George E. Pickett, who would be better known as a Confederate general during the U.S. Civil War), San Juan Island was occupied by…

  • Pig’s Meat (British periodical)

    United Kingdom: Britain during the French Revolution: …example, issued a penny periodical, Pig’s Meat (a reference to Burke’s savage description of the British masses as “the swinish multitude”), calling for the forcible nationalization of land.

  • pig-footed bandicoot (marsupial)

    bandicoot: The 35-centimetre- (14-inch-) long, pig-footed bandicoot (Chaeropus ecaudatus) of interior Australia has feet that are almost hooflike, with two toes functional on the forefoot, one on the hind foot. This herbivorous creature, resembling a little deer, is an endangered species and may well be extinct; it was last observed…

  • pig-tailed langur (primate)

    Simakobu, (Simias concolor), leaf-eating monkey found only on the Mentawai Islands west of Sumatra. The body averages about half a metre (20 inches) in length, and it is unique among langurs in having a tail that is much shorter than the body (15 cm [6 inches]). Females weigh 7 kg (15.5 pounds) on

  • pig-tailed macaque (primate)

    macaque: Species: …related to liontails are the pigtail macaques (M. nemestrina), which carry their short tails curved over their backs. Inhabiting rainforests of Southeast Asia, they are sometimes trained to pick ripe coconuts. Another close relative is the bokkoi (M. pagensis), found only on the Mentawai Islands of Indonesia.

  • Pigádhia (Greece)

    Kárpathos: …the 116-square-mile (301-square-kilometre) island is Pigádhia in the south behind Pigádhia Bay. Closely tied to the island of Rhodes in antiquity and the Middle Ages, the island was under Venetian rule from 1306 to about 1540, when it fell to the Turks. In 1912 it passed to Italy; after World…

  • Pigafetta, Antonio (Italian chronicler)

    Austronesian languages: 16th–18th century: …two short vocabularies collected by Antonio Pigafetta, the Italian chronicler of the Magellan expedition of 1519–22. Dutch ships bound for insular Southeast Asia stopped to restock in Madagascar, and this contact resulted in an almost immediate recognition of the relationship of Malagasy to Malay soon after the first Dutch expedition…

  • Pigafetta, Filippo (Italian mathematician)

    Kongo language: …in 1591 when the Italian Filippo Pigafetta included several words in Kongo in a description of the Kongo area that he based on the work of an earlier Portuguese traveler. In 1650 a multilingual dictionary of Kongo that reportedly included explanations in Portuguese, Latin, and Italian was produced by Giacinto…

  • Pigalle, Jean-Baptiste (French sculptor)

    Jean-Baptiste Pigalle, French sculptor noted for his stylistically varied and original works. Born into a family of master carpenters, Pigalle began training as a sculptor at age 18 with Robert Le Lorrain and then studied with Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne. After failing to win the Prix de Rome in 1735, he

  • Pigem, Carme (Spanish architect)

    Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramon Vilalta: Aranda, Pigem, and Vilalta grew up in Olot, which is located in the Catalonian region of Spain, and met when studying at the Vallès School of Architecture (Escola Tècnica Superior d’Arquitectura del Vallès [ETSAV]). After graduating in 1987, they returned to Olot and established their firm…

  • pigeon (bird)

    Pigeon, any of several hundred species of birds constituting the family Columbidae (order Columbiformes). Smaller forms are usually called doves, larger forms pigeons. An exception is the white domestic pigeon, the symbol known as the “dove of peace.” Pigeons occur worldwide except in the coldest

  • pigeon berry (plant)

    Verbenaceae: … (Holmskioldia sanguinea) and species of pigeon berry, or golden dewdrop (Duranta), and glory-bower (Clerodendrum) are cultivated as ornamentals. The shrub lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) is notable for its fragrant oil. The family also includes teak (Tectona grandis), an important timber tree of Southeast Asia (see teak).

  • pigeon breeder’s lung (pathology)

    immune system disorder: Type III hypersensitivity: …fungal spores from moldy hay; pigeon fancier’s lung, resulting from proteins from powdery pigeon dung; and humidifier fever, caused by normally harmless protozoans that can grow in air-conditioning units and become dispersed in fine droplets in climate-controlled offices. In each case, the person will be sensitized to the antigen—i.e., will…

  • pigeon fancier’s lung (pathology)

    immune system disorder: Type III hypersensitivity: …fungal spores from moldy hay; pigeon fancier’s lung, resulting from proteins from powdery pigeon dung; and humidifier fever, caused by normally harmless protozoans that can grow in air-conditioning units and become dispersed in fine droplets in climate-controlled offices. In each case, the person will be sensitized to the antigen—i.e., will…

  • Pigeon Feathers (short fiction by Updike)

    Pigeon Feathers, collection of short fiction by John Updike, published in 1962 and comprising the stories “Pigeon Feathers,” “Flight,” and “Friends from Philadelphia.” In these early stories Updike attempted to capture overlooked or unexpected beauty inherent in the small details of life and in the

  • Pigeon Feathers and Other Stories (short fiction by Updike)

    Pigeon Feathers, collection of short fiction by John Updike, published in 1962 and comprising the stories “Pigeon Feathers,” “Flight,” and “Friends from Philadelphia.” In these early stories Updike attempted to capture overlooked or unexpected beauty inherent in the small details of life and in the

  • pigeon flying (sport)

    Pigeon racing, racing for sport the homing pigeon, a specialized variety developed through selective crossbreeding and training for maximum distance and speed in directed flight. The earliest record of the domestication of pigeons is from the fifth Egyptian dynasty (about 3000 bc). The sultan of

  • pigeon guillemot (seabird)

    charadriiform: Auks (suborder Alcae): The breeding behaviour of the pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba) is fairly typical of the family. This species breeds on islands and coasts of the North Pacific, south to central California. It nests between rocks or in holes in cliffs, uses burrows of other birds, or digs its own tunnels with…

  • pigeon hawk (bird)

    Merlin, (Falco columbarius), small falcon found at high latitudes throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Adult males have slate-blue backs with finely streaked underparts; females and immature birds have brown backs; all have a tail with narrow white bands. During most of the year merlins inhabit open

  • pigeon orchid (plant)

    Dendrobium: …of the genus include the pigeon orchid (Dendrobium crumenatum), a white-flowered species; the bull orchid (D. taurinum), a Philippine species with twisted, hornlike petals; and the cucumber orchid (D. cucumerinum), an Australian species with unusual, cucumber-like leaves.

  • Pigeon Post (work by Ransome)

    Arthur Ransome: …sixth book in the series, Pigeon Post (1936), won the first Carnegie Medal for excellence in children’s literature; however, its successor, We Didn’t Mean to Go to Sea (1937), is widely considered Ransome’s masterpiece.

  • pigeon racing (sport)

    Pigeon racing, racing for sport the homing pigeon, a specialized variety developed through selective crossbreeding and training for maximum distance and speed in directed flight. The earliest record of the domestication of pigeons is from the fifth Egyptian dynasty (about 3000 bc). The sultan of

  • Pigeon River (river, United States)

    Pigeon River, river that rises on the slopes of the Blue Ridge in Pisgah National Forest, western North Carolina, U.S., and flows over a course of 100 miles (160 km). It travels northward past Canton and Clyde and continues around the eastern side of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, where it is

  • pigeon shooting (sport)

    shooting: Shotguns: For many years live pigeons were used, their release at unexpected angles offering good hunting practice. Live-pigeon shooting remained popular in France, Spain, and Italy in the second half of the 20th century. The live birds were replaced first by glass balls and ultimately by “clay pigeons.” The term…

  • pigeon tremex (wasp)

    horntail: …North American species is the pigeon tremex (Tremex columba). The adult is about 3.75 cm (1.5 inches) long and has a black and brown body with yellow stripes and yellow legs. The most common British species is Urocerus gigas, which feeds on the wood of pine trees.

  • Pigeon Tunnel: Stories from My Life, The (memoir by Le Carré)

    John le Carré: Le Carré’s memoir, The Pigeon Tunnel: Stories from My Life, was published in 2016.

  • pigeon wheat (plant)

    Hair-cap moss, any of the plants of the genus Polytrichum (subclass Bryidae) with 39–100 species; it often forms large mats in peat bogs, old fields, and areas with high soil acidity. About 10 species are found in North America. The most widely distributed species is P. commune, which often attains

  • pigeon’s milk (nutritive substance)

    pigeon: …parents feed their young “pigeon’s milk,” the sloughed-off lining of the crop, the production of which is stimulated by the hormone prolactin. The nestling obtains this “milk” by poking its bill down the parent’s throat.

  • pigeonhole principle (logic)

    metalogic: Ultrafilters, ultraproducts, and ultrapowers: …in model theory include the pigeonhole principles, of which the basic principle is that, if a set of large cardinality is partitioned into a small number of classes, some one class will have large cardinality. Those elements of the set that lie in the same class cannot be distinguished by…

  • pigeonite (mineral)

    Pigeonite, silicate mineral in the pyroxene family that occurs only in quickly chilled rocks, such as those formed from lava. It is an iron magnesium silicate considered to be intermediate between clinoenstatite and diopside. Inverted pigeonite (pigeonite with orthorhombic instead of monoclinic

  • pigfish (fish)

    grunt: …of the western Atlantic; the pigfish (Orthopristis chrysoptera), a western Atlantic food fish, striped silvery and blue and about 38 cm (15 inches) long; the porkfish (Anisotremus virginicus), a western Atlantic reef fish that, when young, is marked with black and serves as a “cleaner,” picking parasites off larger fishes;…

  • Piggott, Lester (British jockey)

    Lester Piggott, one of the world’s leading jockeys in Thoroughbred flat racing. He was the British riding champion 11 times (1960, 1964–71, and 1981–82). Born to parents whose families had long been associated with the turf, Piggott rode in his first race at the age of 12. He won the Derby nine

  • Piggott, Lester Keith (British jockey)

    Lester Piggott, one of the world’s leading jockeys in Thoroughbred flat racing. He was the British riding champion 11 times (1960, 1964–71, and 1981–82). Born to parents whose families had long been associated with the turf, Piggott rode in his first race at the age of 12. He won the Derby nine

  • piggyback (freight car)

    freight car: …time, American railroads introduced the piggyback car, a flatcar modified to hold as many as two truck trailers in place. Later piggyback-car designs utilized double-stacked trailers on interconnected flatcars. The two-level and three-level rack cars widely used in the United States and Canada for conveying new automobiles are also examples…

  • piggyback car (freight car)

    freight car: …time, American railroads introduced the piggyback car, a flatcar modified to hold as many as two truck trailers in place. Later piggyback-car designs utilized double-stacked trailers on interconnected flatcars. The two-level and three-level rack cars widely used in the United States and Canada for conveying new automobiles are also examples…

  • piggyback plant

    Pickaback plant, (Tolmiea menziesii), hairy-leaved herbaceous plant, in the family Saxifragaceae, native to western North America. The pickaback is a popular houseplant, particularly notable for its curious reproductive abilities: the leaves of the parent plant arise from an underground stem and,

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