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  • Lily: A Ladies Journal Devoted to Temperance and Literature, The (American newspaper)

    Amelia Bloomer: …edited entirely by a woman—The Lily: A Ladies Journal Devoted to Temperance and Literature—and opened its pages to women’s rights advocates as well as temperance reformers.

  • Lilybaeum (Italy)

    Marsala, town, western Sicily, Italy. It is situated on the Boeo Cape, also called Lilibeo, south of Trapani. It originated as Lilybaeum, which was founded by the Carthaginians in 397–396 bc after the destruction of the offshore island of Motya (modern San Pantaleo) by Dionysius I, tyrant of

  • Lilye, William (English scholar)

    William Lily, English Renaissance scholar and classical grammarian, a pioneer of Greek learning in England and one of the authors of an extremely popular Latin grammar that, with corrections and revisions, was used as late as the 19th century. Lily entered the University of Oxford in 1486 and,

  • LIM (mechanical device)

    roller coaster: Later innovations: The linear induction motor (LIM) used high-powered magnets to launch coasters like a slingshot, enabling them, for example, to reach speeds of 70 miles (112.5 km) per hour in under four seconds. A similar innovation is the linear synchronous motor (LSM) by Intamin, originally on Superman…

  • Lim Fjord (fjord, Jutland, Denmark)

    Denmark: Relief: …northern Jutland, where the long Lim Fjord separates the northern tip (Vendsyssel-Thy) from the rest of the peninsula, there are numerous flat areas of sand and gravel, some of which became stagnant bogs. Burials and ritual deposits interred in these bogs in antiquity—especially during the Bronze Age and the Iron…

  • Lim Goh Tong (Chinese-born Malaysian entrepreneur)

    Lim Goh Tong, Chinese-born Malaysian entrepreneur (born April 16, 1917, Anxi, Fujian province, China—died Oct. 23, 2007, Subang Jaya, Selangor, Malay.), built the highly successful Genting Highlands casino and resort a short distance from Kuala Lumpur and diversified his holdings into a worldwide

  • Lim, Alfredo (Philippine politician)

    Alfredo Lim, Philippine politician who rose from poverty to become the most heavily decorated police officer in Manila’s history, the mayor of Manila (1992–98, 2007–13), and a senator (2004–07) in the Philippine government. Lim was an orphan from a Manila slum. He studied at the University of the

  • Lima (Ohio, United States)

    Lima, city, seat (1831) of Allen county, northwestern Ohio, U.S. The city is situated on the Ottawa River, about 90 miles (145 km) northwest of Columbus. It was laid out in 1831, and its name (from Lima, Peru) is said to have been chosen from among several possibilities that were drawn from a hat.

  • Lima (national capital, Peru)

    Lima, city, capital of Peru. It is the country’s commercial and industrial centre. Central Lima is located at an elevation of 512 feet (156 metres) on the south bank of the Rímac River, about 8 miles (13 km) inland from the Pacific Ocean port of Callao, and has an area of 27 square miles (70 square

  • Lima Barreto, Afonso Henriques de (Brazilian author)

    Afonso Henriques de Lima Barreto, Brazilian novelist, journalist, short-story writer, and an aggressive social critic, who re-created in caricatural fashion the city and society of Rio de Janeiro at the turn of the century. Lima Barreto was an active journalist throughout his adult life. His often

  • lima bean (plant, Phaseolus limensis)

    Lima bean, (Phaseolus lunatus), any of a variety of legumes(family Fabaceae) widely cultivated for their edible seeds. Of Central American origin, the lima bean is of commercial importance in few countries outside the Americas. There is a wide range of pod size and shape and of seed size, shape,

  • lima bean (vegetable)

    bean: Of Central American origin, the lima bean (P. lunatus), also known as the sieva bean, is of commercial importance in few countries outside the Americas. There is a wide range of pod size and shape and of seed size, shape, thickness, and colour in both bush and climbing forms. Pods…

  • Lima fundada; o, conquista del Perú (work by Peralta Barnuevo)

    Latin American literature: Poetry: Pedro de Peralta Barnuevo’s Lima fundada; o, conquista del Perú (1732; “Lima Founded; or, Conquest of Peru”) illustrates the promise and the pitfalls of the genre. While Peralta’s occasional poetry often confirms the staying power of Góngora, Lima fundada blends Alonso de Ercilla’s poetics with French Neoclassical prescriptions for…

  • Lima Locomotive Works (American company)

    Ephraim Shay: …the Lima Machine Works (afterward Lima Locomotive Works) eventually became one of the world’s most important constructors of conventional steam locomotives.

  • Lima Machine Works (American company)

    Ephraim Shay: …the Lima Machine Works (afterward Lima Locomotive Works) eventually became one of the world’s most important constructors of conventional steam locomotives.

  • Lima, Almeida (Portuguese physician)

    psychosurgery: …first performed by his colleague, Almeida Lima, in 1935. The procedure, called lobotomy or prefrontal leukotomy, was based on experimental studies demonstrating that certain mental symptoms induced in chimpanzees could be modified by cutting brain fibres. Moniz’s original procedure consisted of cutting two openings in the skull, one on each…

  • Lima, Attilio Corrêa (architect)

    Latin American architecture: Brazil: The Seaplane Station (1938), by Attilio Corrêa Lima, was one of the first radically modern buildings built in Rio. An elegant concrete spiral staircase connects the ticketing and luggage hall with the restaurant and viewing terrace on the second floor. The reinforced concrete structure and the side walls of the…

  • Lima, Declaration of (history of the Americas)

    20th-century international relations: The return of U.S. isolationism: The Declaration of Lima (1938) provided for pan-American consultation in case of a threat to the “peace, security, or territorial integrity” of any state.

  • Lima, Dom Rodrigo de (Portuguese traveler)

    Pêro da Covilhã: …ambassador died, and his successor, Dom Rodrigo de Lima, and his party left from India in 1517 and finally reached the emperor’s camp in December 1520. They found Pêro old but robust, and he served them as guide and interpreter. When they returned in 1524, Pêro and his wife and…

  • Lima, Jorge de (Brazilian author)

    Jorge de Lima, Brazilian poet and novelist who became one of the foremost representatives of regionalist poetry in Brazil in the 1920s. Raised on a sugar plantation in northeastern Brazil, Lima practiced as a medical doctor. His earliest verses show the marked influence of the French Parnassian

  • Lima, Manuel dos Santos (Angolan author)

    Manuel dos Santos Lima, Angolan poet, dramatist, and novelist whose writing is rooted in the struggle for liberation of Angola from Portuguese colonialism. Lima represented Angola in 1956 at the first International Congress of Black Writers and Artists in Paris and again at the Congress of

  • Lima, Vanderlei (Brazilian athlete)

    Athens 2004 Olympic Games: …Italy after the leader, Brazil’s Vanderlei Lima, was assaulted by a deranged spectator about 4 miles (6.4 km) from the finish line. Lima, who recovered to take the bronze, was awarded the Pierre de Coubertin medal for “his exceptional demonstration of fair play and Olympic values.”

  • Limacacea (gastropod superfamily)

    gastropod: Classification: Superfamily Limacacea Marginal teeth of radula with narrow, lengthened basal plates, usually unicuspid; zonitid snails with smooth shells and many sluglike species, common in wet, tropical areas and in temperate regions; about 12 families, including limacid and milacid slugs. Suborder Holopoda A group of 3 superfamilies.…

  • Limacidae (gastropod family)

    gastropod: Reproduction and life cycles: …the slugs from the family Limacidae) or structural differences in the penis (as in the land snails of the family Endodontidae) to distinguish members of their own species.

  • Limacodidae (insect)

    Slug caterpillar moth, (family Limacodidae), any of approximately 1,000 species of insects (order Lepidoptera) that are widely distributed throughout the world but are concentrated in the tropics. These moths are named after their short, fleshy, sluglike caterpillars. In the caterpillars, suckers

  • Limadou (Italian Jesuit missionary)

    Matteo Ricci, Italian Jesuit missionary who introduced Christian teaching to the Chinese empire in the 16th century. He lived there for nearly 30 years and was a pioneer in the attempt at mutual comprehension between China and the West. By adopting the language and culture of the country, he gained

  • Limaj, Fatmir (Kosovar politician)

    Kosovo Liberation Army: Disbanding of the KLA and postwar issues: These include Fatmir Limaj, a KLA commander who served as minister of transportation and telecommunications in Kosovo (2008–10), and Ramush Haradinaj, a KLA commander who became Kosovo’s prime minister in 2004 but stepped down the next year to stand trial. Others, such as Agim Çeku, a former…

  • liman (hydrology)

    Ukraine: Drainage: Known as limans, these bodies of water form at the mouths of rivers or ephemeral streams and are blocked off by sandbars from the sea. Some artificial lakes have been formed, the largest of which are reservoirs at hydroelectric dams—e.g., the reservoir on the Dnieper upstream from…

  • Liman von Sanders, Otto (German general)

    Otto Liman von Sanders, German general largely responsible for making the Ottoman army an effective fighting force in World War I and victor over the Allies at Gallipoli. Liman began his military career in 1874 and rose to the rank of lieutenant general. In 1913 he was appointed director of a

  • Liman, Arthur (American lawyer)

    Arthur Liman, American lawyer (born Nov. 5, 1932, New York, N.Y.—died July 17, 1997, New York), served as chief counsel on many high-profile cases, including the congressional investigation of the Iran-Contra arms-for-hostages scheme. Unglamorous and often disheveled in appearance, Liman was c

  • Liman, Mount (mountain, Indonesia)

    Kediri: …contains high mountains, such as Mount Liman (8,409 feet [2,563 metres]) and Mount Kelud (5,679 feet [1,731 metres]). Teak is obtained from its forests, and its fertile plains produce rice, sugarcane, cotton, cassava, corn (maize), peanuts, coconuts, soybeans, and—from estates—coffee, cocoa, quinine, tobacco, and indigo. The area’s chief city is…

  • Limanda (flatfish)

    Dab, any of the flatfishes of the genus Limanda, family Pleuronectidae, found in the North Atlantic and North Pacific. Dabs are right-eyed flatfish—i.e., the eyes are usually on the right side of the head. The dab of European waters is L. limanda, an abundant and valuable food fish. It is small,

  • Limanda aspera (fish)

    dab: …and a yellow tail; the yellowfin sole, or Alaska dab (L. aspera), a brownish northern Pacific flatfish; and the longhead dab (L. proboscidea), a light-spotted, brownish northern Pacific fish with yellow on the edges of its body.

  • Limanda ferruginea (fish)

    dab: Other species include the yellowtail flounder, or rusty dab (L. ferruginea), a reddish brown western Atlantic fish with rust-coloured spots and a yellow tail; the yellowfin sole, or Alaska dab (L. aspera), a brownish northern Pacific flatfish; and the longhead dab (L. proboscidea), a light-spotted, brownish northern Pacific fish…

  • Limanda proboscidea (fish)

    dab: …northern Pacific flatfish; and the longhead dab (L. proboscidea), a light-spotted, brownish northern Pacific fish with yellow on the edges of its body.

  • Limann, Hilla (president of Ghana)

    Hilla Limann, Ghanaian politician who engaged in a seesaw battle with Lieut. Jerry Rawlings for the presidency of Ghana; Limann was elected president in 1979 when he defeated Rawlings, who had seized power in a coup; in 1981, however, Rawlings staged another coup and unseated Limann. When Limann

  • Limantour, José Yves (Mexican economist)

    científico: In 1895 José Yves Limantour, the son of a French immigrant and finance minister since 1893, became leader of the circle. He pressed government officials to concentrate on efficiency and did much himself to improve the financial footing of the country. The learned Justo Sierra became minister…

  • Limasawa (island, Philippines)

    Limasawa, small island of historic importance near the island of Leyte, east-central Philippines. Located about 4 miles (6 km) off the southern tip of the island of Leyte just outside the mouth of Sogod Bay, Limasawa rises to about 700 feet (200 m). On this island, Ferdinand Magellan first made

  • Limasol (Cyprus)

    Limassol, city and chief port of the Republic of Cyprus. The city lies on Akrotiri Bay, on the southern coast, southwest of Nicosia; it is the island’s second largest city and is also its chief tourist centre. Limassol’s rise from a humble market town between the ancient settlements of Amathus and

  • Limassol (Cyprus)

    Limassol, city and chief port of the Republic of Cyprus. The city lies on Akrotiri Bay, on the southern coast, southwest of Nicosia; it is the island’s second largest city and is also its chief tourist centre. Limassol’s rise from a humble market town between the ancient settlements of Amathus and

  • Limavady (former district, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Limavady: The former district of Limavady was south of Lough (inlet of the sea) Foyle and was bordered by the former districts of Londonderry to the west, Strabane and Magherafelt to the south, and Coleraine to the east. The glacially scoured Sperrin Mountains of southern Limavady descend to rolling hills…

  • Limavady (Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Limavady, town and former district (1973–2015) within the former County Londonderry, now part of the Causeway Coast and Glens district, northern Northern Ireland. Limavady town is on the River Roe 17 miles (27 km) east of the old city of Londonderry (Derry). Its name, meaning “the dog’s leap,” is

  • Limay (river, Argentina)

    Patagonia: Resource exploitation: …constructed on the Neuquén and Limay rivers in order to exploit the hydroelectric potential of the western portion of Patagonia. These projects also have created large reservoirs that have made extensive irrigated agriculture possible in the Negro River region. Among the major crops grown are peaches, plums, almonds, apples, pears,…

  • limb (anatomy)

    amputation: …part of or an entire limb, either upper or lower extremity. The reasons for surgical amputation in general are injury, infection, tumour, diabetes, or insufficient blood supply. Persons born without a limb or limbs are said to have suffered congenital amputation. Surgical amputation may be a lifesaving measure for injured…

  • limb bud (anatomy)

    animal development: The appendages: tail and limbs: …body conical protrusions called the limb buds, which, once formed, possess all the materials necessary for limb development. Limb buds may be transplanted into various positions on the body or on the head and there develop into clearly recognizable limbs, conforming to their origin, whether a forelimb or hindlimb, a…

  • limb darkening (astronomy)

    Limb darkening, in astrophysics, gradual decrease in brightness of the disk of the Sun or of another star as observed from its centre to its edge, or limb. This phenomenon is readily apparent in photographs of the Sun. The darkening is greatest for blue light, amounting to a drop of as much as 90

  • limb girdle (anatomy)

    skeleton: General features: …the basal supporting structure, the limb girdle. This portion of the appendage lies partly or wholly within the trunk and forms a stable base for the fin or limb. Each girdle consists of ventral and dorsal masses. In lower fishes these are composed of cartilage; in bony fishes and in…

  • limb-girdle dystrophy (pathology)

    muscular dystrophy: Limb-girdle dystrophy (dystrophy of the pelvic or shoulder muscles) affects both sexes. The first symptoms are manifest in the pelvic region, starting in late childhood. Muscular weakness eventually progresses to the arms and legs. Symptoms include frequent falling, difficulty in climbing, and a waddling gait.

  • limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (pathology)

    muscular dystrophy: Limb-girdle dystrophy (dystrophy of the pelvic or shoulder muscles) affects both sexes. The first symptoms are manifest in the pelvic region, starting in late childhood. Muscular weakness eventually progresses to the arms and legs. Symptoms include frequent falling, difficulty in climbing, and a waddling gait.

  • Limba (people)

    Sierra Leone: Ethnic groups: Other major groups include the Limba, Kuranko, Susu, Yalunka, and Loko in the north; the Kono and Kisi in the east; and the Sherbro in the southwest. Minor groups include the coastal Bullom, Vai, and Krim and

  • Limba Noastra (Moldovan national anthem)

    Moldova: Languages: …the country’s national anthem, “Limba Noastra” (“Our Language”), and the national motto, Limba Noastra-i o Comoara (“Our Language is a Treasure”).

  • Limbang (Malaysia)

    Brunei: Foreign relations: …but Brunei still claimed the Limbang region of Sarawak between the two portions of Brunei. In 2009 an agreement was reached by which Brunei would drop its claim on Limbang and Malaysia would forgo its claim to oil-rich areas in the South China Sea that the two countries had contested.…

  • Limbaugh, Rush (American radio personality and author)

    Rush Limbaugh, American radio personality and author known for his ultraconservative and often controversial views. Limbaugh was the older of two sons of a prominent Cape Girardeau family. At age 16 he began working at the local radio station before and after school. After graduation from high

  • Limbaugh, Rush Hudson, III (American radio personality and author)

    Rush Limbaugh, American radio personality and author known for his ultraconservative and often controversial views. Limbaugh was the older of two sons of a prominent Cape Girardeau family. At age 16 he began working at the local radio station before and after school. After graduation from high

  • Limbe (Malawi)

    Blantyre: …1956 Blantyre was united with Limbe, a town 7 miles (11 km) to the east that had been founded in 1909 and had grown around the headquarters of the Malawi (then Nyasaland) Railways. The amalgamated city is sometimes called Blantyre/Limbe. It has two cathedrals and the polytechnic and medical campuses…

  • Limbe (Cameroon)

    Limbe, town and port located in southwestern Cameroon. It lies along Ambas Bay in the Gulf of Guinea, at the southern foot of Mount Cameroon, just south of Buea. The town was founded in 1858 by Baptist missionaries, and several historical monuments dating from the colonial 1890s have been

  • limber pine (tree)

    tree: Tree lines: An example of this is limber pine (Pinus flexilis) and bristlecone pine (P. aristata), both of which are found in the Colorado Rocky Mountains in the United States. These species form erect trees where Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanni) and Alpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) can exist only as prostrate forms. One…

  • limbic lobe (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Emotion and behaviour: …parts that together constitute the limbic lobe, first considered as a unit and given its name in 1878 by the French anatomist Paul Broca. Together with related nuclei, it is usually called the limbic system, consisting of the cingulate and parahippocampal gyri, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the septal and preoptic…

  • limbic system (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Emotion and behaviour: …parts that together constitute the limbic lobe, first considered as a unit and given its name in 1878 by the French anatomist Paul Broca. Together with related nuclei, it is usually called the limbic system, consisting of the cingulate and parahippocampal gyri, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the septal and preoptic…

  • limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy (disease)

    dementia: …form of dementia known as limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy (LATE). Although LATE is also marked by the deterioration of memory and cognition and declines in social skills, patterns of neurocognitive change and the rate of decline in LATE differ from Alzheimer disease.

  • Limbo (film by Robson [1972])

    Mark Robson: Later films: The low-budget Limbo (1972) was notable for being among the first films about the Vietnam War to explore its impact on the home front.

  • limbo (Roman Catholic theology)

    Limbo, in Roman Catholic theology, the border place between heaven and hell where dwell those souls who, though not condemned to punishment, are deprived of the joy of eternal existence with God in heaven. The word is of Teutonic origin, meaning “border” or “anything joined on.” The concept of

  • Limbourg (province, Belgium)

    Belgium: Antwerp, and Limburg). Just north of the boundary between Walloon Brabant (Brabant Walloon) and Flemish (Vlaams) Brabant lies the officially bilingual but majority French-speaking Brussels-Capital Region, with approximately one-tenth of the total population. (See also Fleming and Walloon.)

  • Limbourg brothers (Flemish artists)

    Limbourg brothers, three Dutch brothers who are the best-known of all late Gothic manuscript illuminators. Herman (b. c. 1385, Nijmegen, duchy of Gelre [now in Gelderland, Netherlands]—d. February? 1416), Paul (Pol) (b. c. 1386/87, Nijmegen—d. February? 1416), and Jean (Johan) (b. c. 1388,

  • Limbourg, Herman de (Flemish artist)

    Limbourg brothers: Herman (b. c. 1385, Nijmegen, duchy of Gelre [now in Gelderland, Netherlands]—d. February? 1416), Paul (Pol) (b. c. 1386/87, Nijmegen—d. February? 1416), and Jean (Johan) (b. c. 1388, Nijmegen—d. February? 1416) were among the first illuminators to render specific landscape scenes (such as the environs…

  • Limbourg, Jean de (Flemish artist)

    Limbourg brothers: February? 1416), and Jean (Johan) (b. c. 1388, Nijmegen—d. February? 1416) were among the first illuminators to render specific landscape scenes (such as the environs and appearance of their patron’s castles) with great accuracy and sensitivity. Together they synthesized the innovations of other illuminators and developed a personal…

  • Limbourg, Paul de (Flemish artist)

    Limbourg brothers: February? 1416), Paul (Pol) (b. c. 1386/87, Nijmegen—d. February? 1416), and Jean (Johan) (b. c. 1388, Nijmegen—d. February? 1416) were among the first illuminators to render specific landscape scenes (such as the environs and appearance of their patron’s castles) with great accuracy and sensitivity. Together they synthesized…

  • Limbu (people)

    Limbu, the second most numerous tribe of the indigenous people called Kiranti, living in Nepal, on the easternmost section of the Himalayas east of the Arun River, and in northern India, mostly in the states of Sikkim, West Bengal, and Assam. Altogether, the Limbu numbered some 380,000 in the early

  • Limburg (province, Belgium)

    Belgium: Antwerp, and Limburg). Just north of the boundary between Walloon Brabant (Brabant Walloon) and Flemish (Vlaams) Brabant lies the officially bilingual but majority French-speaking Brussels-Capital Region, with approximately one-tenth of the total population. (See also Fleming and Walloon.)

  • Limburg (historical region, Europe)

    Limburg, historic region of the Low Countries that was one of many small states resulting from the division of the duchy of Lower Lorraine in the second half of the 11th century. The name Limburg was finally applied when the rival houses of Limburg (heirs of the first count, Walram of Arlon) and

  • Limburg (province, Netherlands)

    Limburg, provincie, southeastern Netherlands. It is bounded on the northwest by Noord-Brabant provincie, on the north by Gelderland provincie, on the east by Germany, and on the south and southwest by the Belgian provinces of Limburg and Liège. It is drained by the Geul, Gulp, Roer, and Maas

  • Limburg brothers (Flemish artists)

    Limbourg brothers, three Dutch brothers who are the best-known of all late Gothic manuscript illuminators. Herman (b. c. 1385, Nijmegen, duchy of Gelre [now in Gelderland, Netherlands]—d. February? 1416), Paul (Pol) (b. c. 1386/87, Nijmegen—d. February? 1416), and Jean (Johan) (b. c. 1388,

  • Limburg, Herman de (Flemish artist)

    Limbourg brothers: Herman (b. c. 1385, Nijmegen, duchy of Gelre [now in Gelderland, Netherlands]—d. February? 1416), Paul (Pol) (b. c. 1386/87, Nijmegen—d. February? 1416), and Jean (Johan) (b. c. 1388, Nijmegen—d. February? 1416) were among the first illuminators to render specific landscape scenes (such as the environs…

  • Limburg, Johan de (Flemish artist)

    Limbourg brothers: February? 1416), and Jean (Johan) (b. c. 1388, Nijmegen—d. February? 1416) were among the first illuminators to render specific landscape scenes (such as the environs and appearance of their patron’s castles) with great accuracy and sensitivity. Together they synthesized the innovations of other illuminators and developed a personal…

  • Limburg, Pol de (Flemish artist)

    Limbourg brothers: February? 1416), Paul (Pol) (b. c. 1386/87, Nijmegen—d. February? 1416), and Jean (Johan) (b. c. 1388, Nijmegen—d. February? 1416) were among the first illuminators to render specific landscape scenes (such as the environs and appearance of their patron’s castles) with great accuracy and sensitivity. Together they synthesized…

  • Limburger (cheese)

    Limburger, semisoft surface-ripened cow’s-milk cheese that has a rind of pungent odour and a creamy-textured body of strong flavour. Limburger originated in the Belgian province of Liège and was first sold at markets in Limbourg. By the late 20th century, most Limburger was produced in Germany and

  • limburgite (rock)

    Limburgite, dark-coloured volcanic rock that resembles basalt but normally contains no feldspar. It is associated principally with nepheline-basalts and leucite-basalts; it also occurs with monchiquite, from which it is not easily distinguished. Limburgite may occur as flows, sills, or dikes and

  • limbus (anatomy)

    human eye: General description: …areas join is called the limbus. Thus, on looking directly into the eye from in front one sees the white sclera surrounding the cornea; because the latter is transparent one sees, instead of the cornea, a ring of tissue lying within the eye, the iris. The iris is the structure…

  • limbus infantum (Roman Catholicism)

    limbo: …into hell,” and (2) the limbus infantum, or limbus puerorum (“children’s limbo”), which is the abode of those who have died without actual sin but whose original sin has not been washed away by baptism. Traditionally, this “children’s limbo” included not only dead unbaptized infants but also the mentally impaired.

  • limbus patrum (Roman Catholicism)

    limbo: …supposed to exist: (1) the limbus patrum (Latin: “fathers’ limbo”), which is the place where the Old Testament saints were thought to be confined until they were liberated by Christ in his “descent into hell,” and (2) the limbus infantum, or limbus puerorum (“children’s limbo”), which is the abode of…

  • limbus puerorum (Roman Catholicism)

    limbo: …into hell,” and (2) the limbus infantum, or limbus puerorum (“children’s limbo”), which is the abode of those who have died without actual sin but whose original sin has not been washed away by baptism. Traditionally, this “children’s limbo” included not only dead unbaptized infants but also the mentally impaired.

  • lime (chemical compound)

    calcium: Compounds: Calcium oxide, CaO, also known as lime or more specifically quicklime, is a white or grayish white solid produced in large quantities by roasting calcium carbonate so as to drive off carbon dioxide. At room temperature, CaO will spontaneously absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere,…

  • lime (tree and fruit, Citrus species)

    Lime, any of several species and hybrids of trees and shrubs in the rue family (Rutaceae), widely grown in tropical and subtropical areas for their edible acidic fruits. The Persian lime (Citrus ×latifolia) is one of the most common commercial varieties, though the smaller key lime, or Mexican lime

  • lime (plant)

    Linden, any of several trees of the genus Tilia of the hibiscus, or mallow, family (Malvaceae), native to the Northern Hemisphere. Of the approximately 30 species, a few are outstanding as ornamental and shade trees. They are among the most graceful of deciduous trees, with heart-shaped, coarsely

  • lime mortar (construction)

    John Smeaton: …to recognize what constitutes a hydraulic lime.

  • lime saltpetre (chemical compound)

    saltpetre: …lime saltpetre, wall saltpetre, or calcium nitrate, Ca(NO3)2. These three nitrates generally occur as efflorescences caused by the oxidation of nitrogenous matter in the presence of the alkalis and alkaline earths.

  • Lime Twig, The (novel by Hawkes)

    John Hawkes: With The Lime Twig (1961), a dark thriller set in postwar London, Hawkes attracted the critical attention that would place him in the front rank of avant-garde, postmodern American writers. His next novel, Second Skin (1964), is the first-person confessional of a retired naval officer. The…

  • lime-painting (painting)

    painting: Fresco secco: In the fresco secco, or lime-painting, method, the plastered surface of a wall is soaked with slaked lime. Lime-resistant pigments are applied swiftly before the plaster sets. Secco colours dry lighter than their tone at the time of application, producing the pale, matte,…

  • lime-soda method (chemistry)

    water supply system: Water softening: The lime-soda method of water softening must be followed by sedimentation and filtration in order to remove the precipitates. Ion exchange is accomplished by passing the water through columns of a natural or synthetic resin that trades sodium ions for calcium and magnesium ions. Ion-exchange columns…

  • Limehouse (neighbourhood, Tower Hamlets, London, United Kingdom)

    Limehouse, neighbourhood in the borough of Tower Hamlets in the East End of London. The name of the district derives from the limekilns that were on the riverbank at least as early as the 14th century. (The sometimes pejorative term Limey for Englishman, erroneously thought to derive from the

  • Limehouse Declaration (British history)

    Social Democratic Party: History: …in January 1981 with the Limehouse Declaration, a statement of intent by four former Labour Cabinet ministers—Roy Jenkins, David Owen, William Rodgers, and Shirley Williams—to quit the leftward path that had lately been taken by Labour. The party was formally founded on March 26, including in its ranks 14 members…

  • Limeira (Brazil)

    Limeira, city, east-central São Paulo estado (state), Brazil, on the headwaters of Tatu Stream, a tributary of the Piracicaba River. Known at various times as Tatuibi, Rancho de Limeira, and Nossa Senhora das Dores de Tatuibi, it was elevated to city status in 1863. Limeira processes local crops

  • Limelight (film by Chaplin [1952])

    Limelight, British sentimental drama film, released in 1952, that was written, directed, and produced by Charlie Chaplin, who was inspired by his experiences as a child and young man performing in music halls. The once-famous clown Calvero (played by Chaplin) is sunk in alcoholic despair. After he

  • limelight (theatre lighting)

    Limelight, first theatrical spotlight, also a popular term for the incandescent calcium oxide light invented by Thomas Drummond in 1816. Drummond’s light, which consisted of a block of calcium oxide heated to incandescence in jets of burning oxygen and hydrogen, provided a soft, very brilliant

  • limen (psychology)

    attention: Selective attention: …idea of the establishment of thresholds. Thus threshold sensitivity might be set quite low for certain priority classes of stimuli, which, even when basically unattended and hence attenuated, may nevertheless be capable of activating the perceptual systems. Examples would be the sensitivity displayed to hearing one’s own name spoken or…

  • Limenitis archippus (butterfly)

    brush-footed butterfly: The viceroy (Basilarchia archippus or Limenitis archippus) is known for its mimetic relationship with the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus). The two species resemble one another in their coloration, and both are distasteful to predators. Viceroy larvae feed on willow, aspen, and poplar foliage and retain in…

  • Limenitis arthemis (butterfly)

    admiral: The white admiral (L. arthemis), a species made up of a white form and a red-spotted purple form, was once thought to be two distinct species. The white admiral occurs in North America and from Great Britain across Eurasia to Japan, feeds on honeysuckle. The Indian…

  • Limentidinae (butterfly)

    Admiral, (subfamily Limentidinae), any of several butterfly species in the family Nymphalidae (order Lepidoptera) that are fast-flying and much prized by collectors for their coloration, which consists of black wings with white bands and reddish brown markings. The migratory red admiral (Vanessa

  • limerick (poetic form)

    Limerick, a popular form of short, humorous verse that is often nonsensical and frequently ribald. It consists of five lines, rhyming aabba, and the dominant metre is anapestic, with two metrical feet in the third and fourth lines and three feet in the others. The origin of the limerick is unknown,

  • Limerick (county, Ireland)

    Limerick, county, southwestern Ireland, in the province of Munster. The county seat is the administratively independent city of Limerick. The county’s northern boundary, with County Clare, is the River Shannon and its estuary. The River Maigue bisects County Limerick and flows north into the

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