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  • Lieder (work by Günther)

    Johann Christian Günther: In his Leipzig Lieder he breaks away from Baroque mannerism and the learned traditions of humanism into classical lyricism. His true poetic quality, however, emerges when he writes of his personal sufferings in such poems as the Leonorenlieder and in the confessional poem in which he pleads to…

  • Lieder aus Beuern (medieval manuscript)

    Carmina Burana, 13th-century manuscript that contains songs (the Carmina Burana proper) and six religious plays. The contents of the manuscript are attributed to the goliards (q.v.), wandering scholars and students in western Europe during the 10th to the 13th century who were known for their songs

  • Lieder der Griechen (poetry by Müller)

    Wilhelm Müller: …emotion with complete simplicity, and Lieder der Griechen (1821–24; “Songs of the Greeks”), a collection that succeeded in evoking German sympathy for the Greek cause. His works as a translator include Neugriechische Volkslieder, 2 vol. (1825; “Modern Greek Folk Songs”), and an edition of Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus. He also…

  • Lieder des Mirza Schaffy, Die (work by Bodenstedt)

    Friedrich Martin von Bodenstedt: …Lieder des Mirza Schaffy (1851; The Songs of Mirza Schaffy), a collection of poems written in an Oriental style, was instantly successful. In 1854 he became professor of Slavic languages at the University of Munich. During this period he made numerous translations from Russian authors, notably Aleksandr Pushkin, Ivan Turgenev,…

  • Lieder eines Erwachenden (work by Strachwitz)

    Moritz, count von Strachwitz: His Lieder eines Erwachenden (1842; “Songs of Awakening”) especially showed his lyric genius and went through several editions. Neue Gedichte (1848) reveals a Romantic strain but also exhibits the influence of the German poet and dramatist August von Platen. Strachwitz’ political lyrics have aristocratic leanings lacking…

  • Lieder ohne Worte (work by Mendelssohn)

    Songs Without Words, collection of 48 songs written for solo piano rather than voice by German composer Felix Mendelssohn. Part of the collection—consisting of 36 songs—was published in six volumes during the composer’s lifetime. Two further volumes—with 12 more songs—were published after

  • Liederbuch dreier Freunde (book by Mommsen and Storm)

    Theodor Mommsen: The historian and his works: …to his abilities is the Liederbuch dreier Freunde (“Songbook of Three Friends”), which he published in 1843 together with his brother Tycho and the writer and poet Theodor Storm. Throughout his life Goethe was his ideal not only as a poet but also as “the wisest man of the century.”…

  • Liedtke, J. Hugh (American entrepreneur)

    J. Hugh Liedtke, American entrepreneur (born Feb. 10, 1922, Tulsa, Okla.—died March 28, 2003, Houston, Texas), as longtime CEO of the Pennzoil Co., became known as a takeover artist and won billions of dollars from Texaco Inc. in court. In 1953 Liedtke and his brother, William, in partnership w

  • Liedtke, John Hugh (American entrepreneur)

    J. Hugh Liedtke, American entrepreneur (born Feb. 10, 1922, Tulsa, Okla.—died March 28, 2003, Houston, Texas), as longtime CEO of the Pennzoil Co., became known as a takeover artist and won billions of dollars from Texaco Inc. in court. In 1953 Liedtke and his brother, William, in partnership w

  • Liefhebbers van de Schilderkonst (art)

    Rembrandt van Rijn: Growing fame: …public that was designated as Liefhebbers van de Schilderkonst (“Lovers of the Art of Painting”). The art lover’s main purpose was to understand paintings so as to be able to discuss them with other devotees and, preferably, with painters as well. Both the artist and the art lover of Rembrandt’s…

  • Liège (Belgium)

    Liège, city, Walloon Region, eastern Belgium, on the Meuse River at its confluence with the Ourthe. (The grave accent in Liège was officially approved over the acute in 1946.) The site was inhabited in prehistoric times and was known to the Romans as Leodium. A chapel was built there to honour St.

  • liege (feudal law)

    Liege, (probably from German ledig, “empty” or “free”), in European feudal society, an unconditional bond between a man and his overlord. Thus, if a tenant held estates of various overlords, his obligations to his liege lord (usually the lord of his largest estate or of that he had held the

  • Liège (province, Belgium)

    history of the Low Countries: The spiritual principalities: …Countries were the bishoprics of Liège, Utrecht, and, to a lesser degree, Cambrai, which, though within the Holy Roman Empire, belonged to the French church province of Rheims. The secular powers enjoyed by these bishops were based on the right of immunity that their churches exercised over their properties, and…

  • Liège, Université de (university, Liège, Belgium)

    University of Liège, state-financed, partially autonomous, coeducational, French-language institution of higher learning in Liège, Belg., founded in 1817 under King William I of the Netherlands. Following Belgian independence (1831), the university was designated a state university in 1835. It has

  • Liège, University of (university, Liège, Belgium)

    University of Liège, state-financed, partially autonomous, coeducational, French-language institution of higher learning in Liège, Belg., founded in 1817 under King William I of the Netherlands. Following Belgian independence (1831), the university was designated a state university in 1835. It has

  • Liegnitz (Poland)

    Legnica, city, Dolnośląskie województwo (province), southwestern Poland. It lies along the Kaczawa River in the western lowlands of Silesia (Śląsk). A 12th-century Silesian stronghold, Legnica became the capital of an autonomous principality in 1248. At the Battle of Liegnitz, or Legnica, on April

  • Liegnitz, Battle of (Poland [1241])

    Battle of Legnica, (9 April 1241). Mongol raiders in Poland defeated a European army containing much-feted Christian knights from the military orders of the Teutonic Knights, the Hospitallers, and the Templars. The raiders had been sent to Poland as a diversion from the Mongolian invasion of Europe

  • Lieh-tzu (Daoist philosopher)

    Liezi, (Chinese: “Master Lie”) one of the three primary philosophers who developed the basic tenets of Daoist philosophy and the presumed author of the Daoist work Liezi (also known as Chongxu zhide zhenjing [“True Classic of the Perfect Virtue of Simplicity and Emptiness”]). Many of the writings

  • Liehm, Antonín J. (Czech author)

    Czechoslovak history: The growing reform movement: …for antistate propaganda; Ludvík Vaculík, Antonín J. Liehm, and Ivan Klíma were expelled from the party; and Jan Procházka was dismissed from the party’s Central Committee, of which he was a candidate member. This repression merely strengthened opposition to Novotný, however.

  • Lieknis, Edvarts (Latvian writer)

    Latvian literature: Edvarts Virza (pseudonym of Edvarts Lieknis) created lyrics in strict classical forms; his prose poem Straumēni (1933) praised the patriarchal farmstead. Lyrical emotionalism was disciplined in Jānis Jaunsudrabiņš, whose best novel was a trilogy, Aija, Atbalss, and Ziema. World War I provided many themes for…

  • lien (property law)

    Lien, in property law, claim or charge upon property securing the payment of some debt or the satisfaction of some obligation or duty. Although the term is of French derivation, the lien as a legal principle was a recognized property right in early Roman law. The English common law early

  • Lien Viet (Vietnamese political organization)

    Viet Minh: …by a new organization, the Lien Viet, or Vietnamese National Popular Front. In 1951 the majority of the Viet Minh leadership was absorbed into the Lao Dong, or Vietnamese Workers’ Party (later Vietnamese Communist Party), which remained the dominant force in North Vietnam.

  • Lien-yün-kang (China)

    Lianyungang, city and seaport, northern Jiangsu sheng (province), eastern China. It is situated near the mouth of the Qiangwei River and at the northern end of a network of canals centred on the Yunyan River that is associated with the innumerable salt pans of the coastal districts of northern

  • Lienert, Meinrad (Swiss author)

    Swiss literature: …und underm Rafe, 1891), and Meinrad Lienert wrote several poems in the dialect of Schwyz. Almost every canton has its Mundartdichter, or local poet. There are vigorous novels in the Bernese dialect by the 20th-century writers Rudolf von Tavel and Simon Gfeller. Schaffhausen is represented in the novels of Albert…

  • Lienhard und Gertrud (novel by Pestalozzi)

    Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi: …novel Lienhard und Gertrud (1781–87; Leonard and Gertrude, 1801), written for “the people,” was a literary success as the first realistic representation of rural life in German. It describes how an ideal woman exposes corrupt practices and, by her well-ordered homelife, sets a model for the village school and the…

  • Lienz (Austria)

    Lienz, town, southern Austria, on the Drava (Drau) and Isel rivers at the northern end of the rugged Lienzer Dolomiten. The ruined Aguntum, which is situated immediately to the east, was the site of an Illyrian settlement (1100–500 bc) and subsequently of a Roman town. Lienz was chartered in 1252.

  • Liepa, Maris-Rudolf Eduardovich (Soviet dancer)

    Maris-Rudolf Eduardovich Liepa, Soviet ballet dancer who performed with the Bolshoi Ballet for more than 20 years. Liepa studied in Riga and at the Bolshoi ballet school (in 1961 renamed the Moscow Academic Choreographic School). He performed with the Riga Ballet (1955–56) and the Stanislavsky and

  • Liepāja (Latvia)

    Liepāja, city and port, Latvia, on the west (Baltic Sea) coast at the northern end of Lake Liepāja. First recorded in 1253, when it was a small Kurish settlement, Liepāja was the site of a fortress built by the knights of the Teutonic Order in 1263. It was created a town in 1625, and in 1697–1703 a

  • Lier (Belgium)

    Lier, commune, Flanders Region, northern Belgium, located at the junction of the Great and Little Nete rivers, southeast of Antwerp. Probably settled in the 8th century, it developed around the Chapel of St. Peter (1225) on the site of an earlier wooden chapel. An important textile centre by the

  • Lierre (Belgium)

    Lier, commune, Flanders Region, northern Belgium, located at the junction of the Great and Little Nete rivers, southeast of Antwerp. Probably settled in the 8th century, it developed around the Chapel of St. Peter (1225) on the site of an earlier wooden chapel. An important textile centre by the

  • Lies (poetry by Williams)

    C.K. Williams: …critical acclaim with the collection Lies (1969), which contains lyrical yet vituperative poems railing against human callousness and dishonesty. I Am the Bitter Name (1972) is an overtly political collection that addresses issues surrounding the Vietnam War, including the American military-industrial complex. His mature style first appeared in With Ignorance…

  • Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me (book by Handler)

    Chelsea Handler: …Chelsea Bang Bang (2010) and Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me (2011), a collection of anecdotes written by her friends and family; both books also hit number one. Handler related her travel mishaps in Uganda Be Kidding Me (2014), also an immediate best seller. Are You There, Chelsea?, an NBC…

  • Liesberg Bridge (bridge, Liesberg, Switzerland)

    bridge: Maillart’s innovations: …of his last bridges—at Vessy, Liesberg, and Lachen—illustrate his mature vision for the possibilities of structural art. Over the Arve River at Vessy in 1935, Maillart designed a three-hinged, hollow-box arch in which the thin cross-walls taper at mid-height, forming an X shape. This striking design, giving life to the…

  • Liesegang ring (chemistry)

    Liesegang ring, in physical chemistry, any of a series of usually concentric bands of a precipitate (an insoluble substance formed from a solution) appearing in gels (coagulated colloid solutions). The bands strikingly resemble those occurring in many minerals, such as agate, and are believed to

  • Liesegang, Raphael Eduard (German chemist)

    Liesegang ring: …discoverer, the 20th-century German chemist Raphael Eduard Liesegang.

  • Liestal (Switzerland)

    Liestal, capital (since 1833) of the Halbkanton (demicanton) of Basel-Landschaft, northern Switzerland. It lies along the Ergolz River, southeast of Basel. First mentioned as a village in 1189, it passed to the bishop of Basel in 1305 and to the city of Basel in 1400. Notable landmarks are the

  • Liesveldt, Jacob van (Dutch publisher)

    biblical literature: The Christian canon: …was a Dutch version by Jacob van Liesveldt (Antwerp, 1526). Martin Luther’s German edition of 1534 did the same thing and entitled them “Apocrypha” for the first time, noting that, while they were not in equal esteem with sacred Scriptures, they were edifying.

  • Lietuviu Kalba

    Lithuanian language, East Baltic language most closely related to Latvian; it is spoken primarily in Lithuania, where it has been the official language since 1918. It is the most archaic Indo-European language still spoken. A Lithuanian literary language has been in existence since the 16th

  • Lietuvių kalbos žodynas (work by Būga)

    Kazimieras Būga: …began to prepare his ambitious Lietuvių kalbos žodynas (“Dictionary of the Lithuanian Language”), which was to be a comprehensive thesaurus that would include definitions, etymologies, histories of words, and notes on their geographic distribution. From 1922, however, he was burdened with teaching responsibilities at the newly founded University of Kaunas.…

  • Lietuvos Demokratinė Darbo Partija (political party, Lithuania)

    Lithuania: Independence restored: …Party, which renamed itself the Lithuanian Democratic Labour Party (LDLP), won 73 of 141 seats. Despite its victory, the LDLP did not seek to reverse policies. Instead, the government liberalized the economy, joined the Council of Europe, became an associate member of the Western European Union, and pursued membership in…

  • Lietuvos Komunistu Partija (political party, Lithuania)

    Lithuania: Political process: During the Soviet period the Lithuanian Communist Party (Lietuvos Komunistu Partija; LKP) was the country’s only political party. Its members and candidates for membership were supported by the activities of the Komsomol youth movement. In 1989, however, the legislature ended the Communist Party’s monopoly on power by legalizing other political…

  • Lietuvos Respublika

    Lithuania, country of northeastern Europe, the southernmost and largest of the three Baltic states. Lithuania was a powerful empire that dominated much of eastern Europe in the 14th–16th centuries before becoming part of the Polish-Lithuanian confederation for the next two centuries. Aside from a

  • Lietz, Hermann (German educational reformer)

    Hermann Lietz, German educational reformer. In 1898 he taught at the progressive Abbotsholme school for boys, founded in Derbyshire, Eng., in 1889 by Cecil Reddie. Lietz was impressed by the Abbotsholme system of education, which combined comprehensive individual instruction with physical exercise

  • Lietzmann, Hans (German scholar)

    Hans Lietzmann, German scholar and Lutheran church historian noted for his investigations of Christian origins. While a professor of classical philology and church history at the University of Jena (1905–24) and the University of Berlin (1924–42), Lietzmann began and directed the Handbuch zum Neuen

  • lieutenant (military rank)

    Lieutenant, company grade officer, the lowest rank of commissioned officer in most armies of the world. The lieutenant normally commands a small tactical unit such as a platoon. In the British Army and in the United States Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, a second lieutenant is the lowest ranking

  • lieutenant (criminal)

    Mafia: Below the underboss were the caporegime, or lieutenants, who, acting as buffers between the lower echelon workers and the don himself, protected him from a too-direct association with the organization’s illicit operations. The lieutenants supervised squads of “soldiers,” who often had charge of one of the family’s legal operations (e.g.,…

  • lieutenant colonel (military rank)

    military unit: …and is commanded by a lieutenant colonel. The battalion is the smallest unit to have a staff of officers (in charge of personnel, operations, intelligence, and logistics) to assist the commander. Several battalions form a brigade, which has 2,000 to 8,000 troops and is commanded by a brigadier general or…

  • Lieutenant en Algérie (work by Servan-Schreiber)

    Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber: …book, Lieutenant en Algérie (1957; Lieutenant in Algeria), which exposed French atrocities in the Algerian War of Independence. The controversial book was later credited with helping turn French public opinion against the Algerian conflict. In Le Défi américain (1967; The American Challenge) he warned against Europe’s becoming merely an economic…

  • lieutenant general (military rank)

    military unit: …and is commanded by a lieutenant general. The army corps is the largest regular army formation, though in wartime two or more corps may be combined to form a field army (commanded by a general), and field armies in turn may be combined to form an army group.

  • lieutenant general of police (French government official)

    police: The French police under the monarchy: …XIV proclaimed the office of lieutenant of police (the title later was changed to lieutenant general of police). Nicolas de La Reynie, a magistrate, was the first person to hold the post, from 1667 to 1697. Like most government offices, the police lieutenancy had to be bought from the French…

  • lieutenant governor (government official)

    United States: State and local government: Most states have a lieutenant governor, who is often elected independently of the governor and is sometimes not a member of the governor’s party. Lieutenant governors generally serve as the presiding officer of the state Senate. Other elected officials commonly include a secretary of state, state treasurer, state auditor,…

  • Lieutenant in Algeria (work by Servan-Schreiber)

    Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber: …book, Lieutenant en Algérie (1957; Lieutenant in Algeria), which exposed French atrocities in the Algerian War of Independence. The controversial book was later credited with helping turn French public opinion against the Algerian conflict. In Le Défi américain (1967; The American Challenge) he warned against Europe’s becoming merely an economic…

  • lieutenant of police (French government official)

    police: The French police under the monarchy: …XIV proclaimed the office of lieutenant of police (the title later was changed to lieutenant general of police). Nicolas de La Reynie, a magistrate, was the first person to hold the post, from 1667 to 1697. Like most government offices, the police lieutenancy had to be bought from the French…

  • Lieutenant, The (novel by Grenville)

    Kate Grenville: Grenville’s next novel, The Lieutenant (2008), is set in 18th-century New South Wales and centres on a member of the British fleet. Sarah Thornhill (2011), a sequel to The Secret River, follows the youngest child of William. Grenville also wrote such nonfiction books as Searching for the Secret…

  • Lievens, Jan (Dutch painter)

    Jan Lievens, versatile painter and printmaker whose style derived from both the Dutch and Flemish schools of Baroque art. A contemporary of Rembrandt, he was a pupil of Joris van Schooten (1616–18) and of Rembrandt’s teacher Pieter Lastman in Amsterdam (1618–20). After residing in Leiden for a

  • Lieverszoon, Jan (Dutch painter)

    Jan Lievens, versatile painter and printmaker whose style derived from both the Dutch and Flemish schools of Baroque art. A contemporary of Rembrandt, he was a pupil of Joris van Schooten (1616–18) and of Rembrandt’s teacher Pieter Lastman in Amsterdam (1618–20). After residing in Leiden for a

  • Liévin (France)

    Liévin, town, Pas-de-Calais département, Hauts-de-France région, northern France, near the source of the Deûle River, southwest of Lille. Mentioned as Laid-win (Laivin) in 1104, it developed as a coal-mining centre of the Lens area. Many of the former miners’ houses have been restored, and lighter

  • Liexuanzhuan (Chinese text)

    Daoism: Lives of the Immortals: …Lives of the Immortals (Liexuanzhuan) of the early 2nd century ce. Such collections were a genre of the time. Brief sketches were provided for 72 figures: the same symbolic number as was found in contemporary collections of the “Lives” of the disciples of Confucius, eminent scholar-officials, and famous women.…

  • Liezi (Daoist literature)

    Liezi: …author of the Daoist work Liezi (also known as Chongxu zhide zhenjing [“True Classic of the Perfect Virtue of Simplicity and Emptiness”]).

  • Liezi (Daoist philosopher)

    Liezi, (Chinese: “Master Lie”) one of the three primary philosophers who developed the basic tenets of Daoist philosophy and the presumed author of the Daoist work Liezi (also known as Chongxu zhide zhenjing [“True Classic of the Perfect Virtue of Simplicity and Emptiness”]). Many of the writings

  • LIF (biology)

    stem cell: Mouse embryonic stem cells: …indefinitely in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a glycoprotein cytokine. If cultured mouse embryonic stem cells are injected into an early mouse embryo at the blastocyst stage, they will become integrated into the embryo and produce cells that differentiate into most or all of the tissue types that…

  • Lif (Norse mythology)

    Ragnarök: …one poem two human beings, Lif and Lifthrasir (“Life” and “Vitality”), will emerge from the world tree (which was not destroyed) and repeople the earth. The title of Richard Wagner’s opera Götterdämmerung is a German equivalent of Ragnarök meaning “twilight of the gods.”

  • LiF (chemical compound)

    lithium: Chemical properties: Lithium fluoride (LiF) is used chiefly as a fluxing agent in enamels and glasses.

  • Lifan Yuan (Chinese government bureau)

    Lifan Yuan, government bureau established in the 17th century by China’s Qing (Manchu) dynasty to handle relations with the peoples of Inner Asia. It signified the growing interest of China in Central Asia. The office appointed governors to supervise Chinese territory in Central Asia and Tibet,

  • Lifaqane (African history)

    Mfecane, (Zulu: “The Crushing”) series of Zulu and other Nguni wars and forced migrations of the second and third decades of the 19th century that changed the demographic, social, and political configuration of southern and central Africa and parts of eastern Africa. The Mfecane was set in motion

  • Lifar, Serge (Russian-French dancer and choreographer)

    Serge Lifar, Russian-born French dancer, choreographer, and ballet master (1929–45, 1947–58) of the Paris Opéra Ballet who enriched its repertoire, reestablished its reputation as a leading ballet company, and enhanced the position of male dancers in a company long dominated by ballerinas. Lifar

  • Life (magazine)

    Life, weekly picture magazine (1936–72) published in New York City. Life was a pioneer in photojournalism and one of the major forces in that field’s development. It was long one of the most popular and widely imitated of American magazines. It was founded by Henry Luce, publisher of Time, and

  • Life (work by Cavendish)

    George Cavendish: …through a single work, his Life of Cardinal Wolsey, a landmark in the development of English biography, an important document to the student of Tudor history, and a rare source of information on the character of the author himself. Cavendish applied to his subject methods of concrete observation in matters…

  • life (biology)

    Life, living matter and, as such, matter that shows certain attributes that include responsiveness, growth, metabolism, energy transformation, and reproduction. Although a noun, as with other defined entities, the word life might be better cast as a verb to reflect its essential status as a

  • Life & Times of Michael K (work by Coetzee)

    African literature: English: …for Literature in 2003, wrote Life and Times of Michael K (1983), a story with a blurred hero and an indistinct historical and geographical background. It describes a war that could be any war, a country that could be any country, a bureaucracy that could be any bureaucracy. Through it…

  • Life × 3 (play by Reza)

    Yasmina Reza: Reza’s next play, Trois versions de la vie, showed an awkward situation—a couple arriving a day early for a dinner party—working itself out in three different outcomes. After premiering in Vienna in October 2000, it opened the following month in Paris, with the author in the cast, and…

  • life adjustment movement (education)

    National Defense Education Act: Background: …in American schools was the life adjustment movement, which aimed to provide a curriculum that would teach “life skills” that would be particularly valuable for students who did not plan to continue on to college or other types of postsecondary training after high school. This movement, headed by the vocational…

  • life after death (religion)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Mythology of death and afterlife: The beliefs of the Aztec concerning the other world and life after death showed the same syncretism. The old paradise of the rain god Tlaloc, depicted in the Teotihuacán frescoes, opened its gardens to those who died by drowning, lightning, or as a result…

  • Life After Life (novel by Atkinson)

    Kate Atkinson: …later critically acclaimed works was Life After Life (2013), a novel in which the protagonist, Ursula Todd, repeatedly dies and is reborn in the year 1910. In each new life, Ursula is confronted by different choices and situations that have the potential to alter the course of history. The novel…

  • Life After War

    French runner Joseph Guillemot was not favoured to win the 5,000-metre race at the 1920 Olympics in Antwerp, Belgium. Given his personal history, it was amazing that he was even able to compete. A veteran of World War I, Guillemot had survived a poison gas attack while fighting on the front line

  • Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims (work by Winnemucca)

    Sarah Winnemucca: …best known for her book Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims (1883). Her writings, valuable for their description of Northern Paiute life and for their insights into the impact of white settlement, are among the few contemporary Native American works.

  • Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit, The (novel by Dickens)

    Martin Chuzzlewit, novel by Charles Dickens, published serially under the pseudonym “Boz” from 1843 to 1844 and in book form in 1844. The story’s protagonist, Martin Chuzzlewit, is an apprentice architect who is fired by Seth Pecksniff and is also disinherited by his own eccentric, wealthy

  • Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, The (novel by Dickens)

    Nicholas Nickleby, novel by Charles Dickens, originally published in 20 monthly installments under the pseudonym “Boz” from 1838 to 1839 and published in book form in 1839. An early novel, this melodramatic tale of young Nickleby’s adventures as he struggles to seek his fortune in Victorian England

  • Life and Art of Albrecht Dürer, The (work by Panofsky)

    Erwin Panofsky: (1943; later published as The Life and Art of Albrecht Dürer [1955]); Abbot Suger on the Abbey Church of St.-Denis and Its Art Treasures (1946); Gothic Architecture and Scholasticism (1951); Early Netherlandish Painting, 2 vol. (1953); Meaning in the Visual Arts (1955), a collection of nine of Panofsky’s most…

  • Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, The (film by Powell and Pressburger [1943])

    The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, British romantic drama, released in 1943, that is famous for its lush Technicolor cinematography. It was the first film produced by director Michael Powell and screenwriter Emeric Pressburger after they formed the partnership known as the Archers. The story

  • Life and Death of Habbie Simson, the Piper of Kilbarchan, The (work by Sempill)

    Robert Sempill: He wrote the elegy “The Life and Death of Habbie Simson, the Piper of Kilbarchan” (1640). This humorous poem in Scots was included by James Watson in his Choice Collection (1706), and its fame was assured when the poet Allan Ramsay called its metre “Standart Habbie” and used it…

  • Life and Death of Habbie Simson, the Piper of Kilbarchan, The (work by Sempill)

    Robert Sempill: He wrote the elegy “The Life and Death of Habbie Simson, the Piper of Kilbarchan” (1640). This humorous poem in Scots was included by James Watson in his Choice Collection (1706), and its fame was assured when the poet Allan Ramsay called its metre “Standart Habbie” and used it…

  • Life and Death of Harriett Frean (novel by Sinclair)

    English literature: The literature of World War I and the interwar period: …Olivier: A Life (1919) and Life and Death of Harriett Frean (1922), which explored the ways in which her female characters contributed to their own social and psychological repression. West, whose pen name was based on one of Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen’s female characters, was similarly interested in female self-negation.…

  • Life and Death of Jason, The (poem by Morris)

    William Morris: Iceland and socialism: …success with the romantic narrative The Life and Death of Jason (1867), which was soon followed by The Earthly Paradise (1868–70), a series of narrative poems based on classical and medieval sources. The best parts of The Earthly Paradise are the introductory poems on the months, in which Morris reveals…

  • Life and Death of King John, The (work by Shakespeare)

    King John, chronicle play in five acts by William Shakespeare, written perhaps in 1594–96 and published in the First Folio of 1623 from an authorial manuscript that may have been copied and supplied with some theatrical touches. The source of the play was a two-part drama generally known as The

  • Life and Death of Mr. Badman, The (work by Bunyan)

    John Bunyan: Later life and works: His The Life and Death of Mr. Badman (1680) is more like a realistic novel than an allegory in its portrait of the unrelievedly evil and unrepentant tradesman Mr. Badman. The book gives an insight into the problems of money and marriage when the Puritans were…

  • Life and Labour of the People in London (work by Booth)

    Sidney and Beatrice Webb: Early life of Beatrice Potter Webb.: …his monumental study of The Life and Labour of the People in London. In 1891 she published The Co-operative Movement in Great Britain, a small book based on her experiences in Lancashire, which later became a classic. It was not long before she realized that in order to find any…

  • Life and Letters of Lord Macaulay (work by Trevelyan)

    Sir George Otto Trevelyan, 2nd Baronet: His Life and Letters of Lord Macaulay, 2 vol. (1876), regarded as one of the best biographies in English, presents Lord Macaulay, a historian and Whig politician, in the round and, though sympathetic, is never partisan. His historical works include the Early History of Charles James…

  • Life and Letters of Martin Luther, The (work by Smith)

    Preserved Smith: …published as a full biography, The Life and Letters of Martin Luther (1911), in which he saw the Reformation as the most significant period of change in modern thought and Luther as its leader. In 1920 he published his great work, The Age of the Reformation, a comprehensive survey of…

  • Life and Memorable Actions of George Washington, The (work by Weems)

    Mason Locke Weems: …edition (1806) of Weems’s book The Life and Memorable Actions of George Washington (1800).

  • Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, The (novel by Sterne)

    Tristram Shandy, experimental novel by Laurence Sterne, published in nine volumes from 1759 to 1767. Wildly experimental for its time, Tristram Shandy seems almost a modern avant-garde novel. Narrated by Shandy, the story begins at the moment of his conception and diverts into endless digressions,

  • Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner: Who Lived Eight and Twenty Years, All Alone in an Un-inhabited Island on the Coast of America, Near the Mouth of the Great River of Oroonoque; Having Been Cast on Shore by Shipwreck, Wherein All the Men Perished but Himself. With an Account how he was at last as Strangely Deliver’d by Pyrates. Written by Himself., The (novel by Defoe)

    Robinson Crusoe, novel by Daniel Defoe, first published in London in 1719. Defoe’s first long work of fiction, it introduced two of the most-enduring characters in English literature: Robinson Crusoe and Friday. Crusoe is the novel’s narrator. He describes how, as a headstrong young man, he ignored

  • Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (work by Douglass)

    African American literature: Slave narratives: The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself (1845) gained the most attention, establishing Frederick Douglass as the leading African American man of letters of his time. By predicating his struggle for freedom on his solitary pursuit of literacy, education,…

  • Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean, The (film by Huston [1972])

    John Huston: Last films: …follow-up was the revisionist western The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1973), a loose biography of the notorious self-appointed hanging judge Roy Bean, which featured Paul Newman in the title role, an irreverent screenplay by John Milius, and a supporting cast that included Anthony Perkins, Ava Gardner, and…

  • Life and Work Movement (religious organization)

    World Council of Churches: The Life and Work Movement concentrated on the practical activities of the churches, and the Faith and Order Movement focused on the beliefs and organization of the churches and the problems involved in their possible reunion. Before long, the two movements began to work toward establishing…

  • life annuity

    insurance: Group annuities: A life annuity, a subclass of annuities in general, is one in which the payments are guaranteed for the lifetime of one or more individuals. A group annuity differs from an individual annuity in that the annuity payments are based upon the assumed length of lives…

  • Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, The (film by Anderson [2004])

    Cate Blanchett: Films: Elizabeth and the Lord of the Rings series: …in Wes Anderson’s offbeat comedy The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, playing a pregnant reporter in a bizarre love triangle with the ship’s captain (played by Bill Murray) and someone who may be his son (played by Owen Wilson).

  • Life As We Know It (film by Berlanti [2010])

    Katherine Heigl: …The Ugly Truth (2009), and Life As We Know It (2010), about a mismatched couple entrusted with raising an orphaned infant. She also appeared in the action comedies Killers (2010), as a woman who unknowingly marries a former assassin, and One for the Money (2012), as a novice bounty hunter.…

  • Life Begins at Forty (book by Pitkin)

    Great Depression: Portrayals of hope: …the decade’s best-selling self-help books, Life Begins at Forty (1932) by Walter Pitkin, implied that a wise if chastened maturity was emotionally healthier and more realistic than adolescent self-confidence. At the same time, movies like Capra’s It Happened One Night (1934), You Can’t Take It with You (1938), and Meet…

  • Life Beyond Measure: Letters to My Great-Granddaughter (book by Poitier)

    Sidney Poitier: Return to acting: Life Beyond Measure: Letters to My Great-Granddaughter (2008) was a volume of advice and insights in epistolary form. He also released a suspense novel, Montaro Caine, in 2013.

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