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  • Lacan, Jacques Marie Émile (French psychologist)

    Jacques Lacan, French psychoanalyst who gained an international reputation as an original interpreter of Sigmund Freud’s work. Lacan earned a medical degree in 1932 and was a practicing psychiatrist and psychoanalyst in Paris for much of his career. He helped introduce Freudian theory into France

  • Lacandón (people)

    Lacandón, Mayan Indians living primarily near the Mexico-Guatemala border in the Mexican state of Chiapas, though some Lacandón may live in Belize, across the eastern border of Guatemala. The Lacandón are divisible into two major groups, the Northern Lacandón (who live in the villages of Najá and

  • Laccadive Islands (islands, India)

    Lakshadweep: >Laccadive, Minicoy, and Amindivi Islands, union territory of India. It is a group of some three dozen islands scattered over some 30,000 square miles (78,000 square km) of the Arabian Sea off the southwestern coast of India. The principal islands in the territory are Minicoy…

  • Laccadive, Minicoy, and Amindivi Islands (union territory, India)

    Lakshadweep, union territory of India. It is a group of some three dozen islands scattered over some 30,000 square miles (78,000 square km) of the Arabian Sea off the southwestern coast of India. The principal islands in the territory are Minicoy and those in the Amindivi group. The easternmost

  • Laccifer (insect)

    insect: Insects as a source of raw materials: …the lac insect Kerria lacca (Homoptera), which is cultured for this purpose, is the source of commercial shellac.

  • Laccifer lacca (insect)

    homopteran: Glandular secretions: The Indian lac insect Laccifer lacca is important commercially. It is found in tropical or subtropical regions on banyan and other plants. The females are globular in form and live on twigs in cells of resin created by exudations of lac. Sometimes twigs become coated to…

  • laccolith (geology)

    Laccolith, in geology, any of a type of igneous intrusion that has split apart two strata, resulting in a domelike structure; the floor of the structure is usually horizontal. A laccolith is often smaller than a stock, which is another type of igneous intrusion, and usually is less than 16 km (10

  • lace (textile)

    Lace, ornamental, openwork fabric formed by looping, interlacing, braiding (plaiting), or twisting threads. The dividing line between lace and embroidery, which is an ornamentation added to an already completed fabric, is not easy to draw; a number of laces, such as Limerick and filet lace, can be

  • lace bug (insect)

    Lace bug, (family Tingidae), any of about 800 species of insects (order Heteroptera) in which the adult, usually less than 5 mm (0.2 inch) long, has a lacelike pattern of ridges and membranous areas on its wings and upper body surface. The lace bug sucks the juices from foliage, causing a yellow

  • lace pattern book

    Lace pattern book, collection of decorative lace patterns produced in the 16th and 17th centuries. The earliest known printed pattern books, beginning with those published in 1527 by Matio Pagano in Venice and Pierre de Quinty in Cologne, were dedicated to and intended for royal and noble ladies.

  • lace-bark pine (tree)

    tree: Tree bark: of sycamores (Platanus) and the lacebark pine (Pinus bungeana); and the rough shinglelike outer covering of shagbark hickory (Carya ovata).

  • Lace-Maker, The (work by Netscher)

    Caspar Netscher: The Lace-Maker is an example of this style. The later biblical and mythological subjects and the small, glossy portraits that made his reputation in his lifetime tend to be superficial despite their elegance. Netscher’s sons Theodoor (1661–1728) and Constantijn (1668–1723) were among his many pupils…

  • lacebark pine (tree)

    tree: Tree bark: of sycamores (Platanus) and the lacebark pine (Pinus bungeana); and the rough shinglelike outer covering of shagbark hickory (Carya ovata).

  • Lacedaemon (ancient city, Greece)

    Sparta, ancient capital of the Laconia district of the southeastern Peloponnese, southwestern Greece. Along with the surrounding area, it forms the perifereiakí enótita (regional unit) of Laconia (Modern Greek: Lakonía) within the Peloponnese (Pelopónnisos) periféreia (region). The city lies on the

  • Lacedelli, Lino (Italian mountaineer)

    Lino Lacedelli, Italian mountaineer (born Dec. 4, 1925, Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy—died Nov. 20, 2009, Cortina d’Ampezzo), was one of the first two men to successfully scale K2, the second highest peak in the world—widely considered to be a more challenging climb than Mt. Everest despite being some

  • Lacemaker Lekholm Has an Idea (work by Hellström)

    Gustaf Hellström: …Lekholm får en idé (1927; Lacemaker Lekholm Has an Idea), considered his masterpiece, is a family chronicle covering three generations of life in a provincial garrison town. He also wrote a fictionalized autobiography, Stellan Petreus: en man utan humor (1921–52; “Stellan Petreus: A Man Without Humour”).

  • Lacemaker, The (film by Goretta [1977])

    Isabelle Huppert: Early career and acclaim: In La Dentellière (The Lacemaker) her portrayal of Pomme, a young woman who suffers a nervous breakdown after being abandoned by her lover, earned Huppert the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Award as most promising newcomer. The following year she was named best actress at the…

  • lacemaking

    Lacemaking, Methods of producing lace. The popularity of handmade laces led to the invention of lacemaking machines in the 19th century (see John Heathcoat). Early models required intricate engineering mechanisms. Later improvements included Nottingham-lace machines, primarily for coarse lace, and

  • Lacépède, Bernard-Germain-Étienne de La Ville-sur-Illon, comte de (French naturalist and politician)

    Étienne de La Ville-sur-Illon, count de Lacépède, French naturalist and politician who made original contributions to the knowledge of fishes and reptiles. Lacépède’s Essai sur l’électricité naturelle et artificielle (1781; “Essay on Natural and Artificial Electricity”) and Physique générale et

  • Lacépède, Étienne de La Ville-sur-Illon, comte de (French naturalist and politician)

    Étienne de La Ville-sur-Illon, count de Lacépède, French naturalist and politician who made original contributions to the knowledge of fishes and reptiles. Lacépède’s Essai sur l’électricité naturelle et artificielle (1781; “Essay on Natural and Artificial Electricity”) and Physique générale et

  • laceration (injury)

    Laceration, tearing of the skin that results in an irregular wound. Lacerations may be caused by injury with a sharp object or by impact injury from a blunt object or force. They may occur anywhere on the body. In most cases, tissue injury is minimal, and infections are uncommon. However, severe

  • Lacerba (Italian periodical)

    Giovanni Papini: …he founded another Florentine periodical, Lacerba (1913), to further its aims. In 1921 Papini was reconverted to the Roman Catholicism in which he had been reared. A number of religious works followed, notably Storia di Cristo (1921; The Story of Christ), a vivid and realistic re-creation of the life of…

  • Lacerta (astronomy)

    Lacerta, (Latin: “Lizard”) constellation in the northern sky at about 22.5 hours right ascension and 45° north in declination. Its brightest star is Alpha Lacertae, with a magnitude of 3.8. BL Lacertae is the prototype of a class of quasars that are oriented such that their jets are aimed at Earth.

  • Lacerta (reptile genus)

    Lacerta, (family Lacertidae), genus of lizards of the family Lacertidae that includes among its nearly 50 species most European lizards and some Asian and northern African species. Lacerta and its allies, such as the Gallotia and Podarcis lizards, are commonly called wall or rock lizards. Lacerta

  • Lacerta vivipara (reptile)

    reptile: North temperate zone: The viviparous lizard (L. vivipara, or Z. vivipara) and the European viper (V. berus) are the most northerly distributed reptiles. A portion of each reptile’s geographic range occurs just north of the Arctic Circle, at least in Scandinavia. Other reptiles—the slowworm (Anguis fragilis), the sand lizard…

  • lacertid lizard (reptile genus)

    Lacerta, (family Lacertidae), genus of lizards of the family Lacertidae that includes among its nearly 50 species most European lizards and some Asian and northern African species. Lacerta and its allies, such as the Gallotia and Podarcis lizards, are commonly called wall or rock lizards. Lacerta

  • lacewing (insect)

    Neuropteran, (order Neuroptera), any of a group of insects commonly called lacewings because of the complex vein patterns in the wings, giving them a lacy appearance. In a strict sense, the order Neuroptera includes only the lacewings. However, two other closely related insect groups are frequently

  • lacewing (insect)

    Lacewing, (order Neuroptera), any of a group of insects that are characterized by a complex network of wing veins that give them a lacy appearance. The most common lacewings are in the green lacewing family, Chrysopidae, and the brown lacewing family, Hemerobiidae. The green lacewing, sometimes

  • Lacework Nebula (astronomy)

    Cygnus Loop: …group of bright nebulae (Lacework Nebula, Veil Nebula, and the nebulae NGC 6960, 6979, 6992, and 6995) in the constellation Cygnus, thought to be remnants of a supernova—i.e., of the explosion of a star probably 10,000 years ago. The

  • Lach, Elmer (Canadian ice hockey player)

    Elmer James Lach, Canadian ice hockey player (born Jan. 22, 1918, Nokomis, Sask.—died April 4, 2015, Montreal, Que.), was the commanding centre (between Maurice [“the Rocket”] Richard and Hector [“Toe”] Blake) on the famed Punch Line of the 1940s Montreal Canadiens and helped the franchise win

  • Lach, Elmer James (Canadian ice hockey player)

    Elmer James Lach, Canadian ice hockey player (born Jan. 22, 1918, Nokomis, Sask.—died April 4, 2015, Montreal, Que.), was the commanding centre (between Maurice [“the Rocket”] Richard and Hector [“Toe”] Blake) on the famed Punch Line of the 1940s Montreal Canadiens and helped the franchise win

  • Lachaise, Gaston (French-American sculptor)

    Gaston Lachaise, French-born American sculptor known for his massively proportioned female nudes. Lachaise was the son of a cabinetmaker. At age 13 he entered a craft school, where he was trained in the decorative arts, and from 1898 to 1904 he studied sculpture at the École des Beaux-Arts. He

  • Lâche, Le (play by Lenormand)

    Henri-René Lenormand: Le Lâche (1925; “The Coward”) is a psychological study of fear in a man about to go to war as a soldier. Two of Lenormand’s plays, Le Mangeur de rêves (1922; “The Dream Eater”) and L’Homme et ses fantômes (1924; “Man and His Phantoms”), earned…

  • Lachen Bridge (bridge, Lachen, Switzerland)

    bridge: Maillart’s innovations: last bridges—at Vessy, Liesberg, and Lachen—illustrate his mature vision for the possibilities of structural art. Over the Arve River at Vessy in 1935, Maillart designed a three-hinged, hollow-box arch in which the thin cross-walls taper at mid-height, forming an X shape. This striking design, giving life to the structure, is…

  • Lachenbruch, Arthur Herold (American geologist)

    permafrost: Effects of climate: A.H. Lachenbruch of the U.S. Geological Survey reports an interesting example from northern Alaska. The mean annual air temperatures at Cape Simpson and Prudhoe Bay are similar, but permafrost thickness is 275 metres at Cape Simpson and about 650 metres at Prudhoe Bay because rocks…

  • Lachende Wahrheiten (work by Spitteler)

    Carl Spitteler: …stimulating essays, Lachende Wahrheiten (1898; Laughing Truths), and biographical works of charm, including Meine frühesten Erlebnisse (1914; “My Earliest Experiences”). In 1914 he published a politically influential tract, “Unser Schweizer Standpunkt,” directed against a one-sided pro-German view of World War I. An English translation of his Selected Poems appeared in…

  • Laches (work by Plato)

    Plato: Early dialogues: The interlocutors in the Laches are generals. One of them, the historical Laches, displayed less courage in the retreat from Delium (during the Peloponnesian War) than the humble foot soldier Socrates. Likewise, after the fictional date of the dialogue, another of the generals, Nicias, was responsible for the disastrous…

  • Laches (Greek general)

    Laches, a rich Athenian aristocrat who played a leading part in the first phase of the Peloponnesian War. Laches was an associate of Socrates and was a conservative. Elected general in 427 bc, he was replaced in 425 after he undertook an unsuccessful mission to support Athenian interests in Sicily

  • Lachesis (Greek mythology)

    Fate: Their names were Clotho (Spinner), Lachesis (Allotter), and Atropos (Inflexible). Clotho spun the “thread” of human fate, Lachesis dispensed it, and Atropos cut the thread (thus determining the individual’s moment of death). The Romans identified the Parcae, originally personifications of childbirth, with the three Greek Fates. The Roman goddesses were…

  • Lachey, Nick (American singer)

    Television in the United States: Reality TV: …ultimately failed marriage of singers Nick Lachey (formerly of the boy band 98 Degrees) and Jessica Simpson; and Surreal Life (WB/VH1, 2003–06), a sort of Real World populated by where-are-they-now? personalities. Most of these shows were created with a heavy sense of irony, inviting the viewer to watch with a…

  • Lachine (Quebec, Canada)

    Lachine, former city, Montréal region, southern Quebec province, Canada. Until 2002 it was a western suburb of Montreal city, at which time it was incorporated into Montreal as a borough of that city. Lachine lies on the south shore of Montreal Island facing Lake Saint-Louis, which is a widening

  • Lachine Canal (canal, Canada)

    La Salle: …the western terminus of the Lachine Canal—an 8.7-mile (14-km) waterway completed in the 1820s to bypass the Lachine Rapids. In the 1850s the Montreal Aqueduct was built through the town from Lac Saint-Louis to serve the growing metropolis to the north.

  • Lachish (Palestine)

    epigraphy: Other countries of the ancient Middle East: …significance are the ostraca of Lachish in southern Palestine, which probably immediately preceded the Chaldean onslaught of 589 bce. Phoenician texts are scattered around the Mediterranean, and bear witness to an extensive and protracted maritime supremacy.

  • Lachlan River (river, New South Wales, Australia)

    Lachlan River, chief tributary of the Murrumbidgee River, in New South Wales, Australia. Rising in the Great Dividing Range (Eastern Highlands), 8 miles (13 km) east of Gunning, it flows northwest, and, 30 miles (48 km) upstream from Cowra, it is dammed to form Wyangala Reservoir. Continuing past

  • Lachman Das (Sikh military leader)

    Banda Singh Bahadur, first Sikh military leader to wage an offensive war against the Mughal rulers of India, thereby temporarily extending Sikh territory. As a youth, he decided to be a samana (ascetic), and until 1708, when he became a disciple of Guru Gobind Singh, he was known as Madho Das.

  • Lachman Dev (Sikh military leader)

    Banda Singh Bahadur, first Sikh military leader to wage an offensive war against the Mughal rulers of India, thereby temporarily extending Sikh territory. As a youth, he decided to be a samana (ascetic), and until 1708, when he became a disciple of Guru Gobind Singh, he was known as Madho Das.

  • Lachman, Gary (American musician)

    Blondie: …1955, Bayonne, New Jersey), bassist Gary Valentine (byname of Gary Lachman; b. December 24, 1955), and keyboardist Jimmy Destri (byname of James Destri; b. April 13, 1954, Brooklyn). Later members included bassist Nigel Harrison (b. April 24, 1951, Stockport, England) and guitarist Frank Infante (b. November 15, 1951).

  • Lachmanjati (Indian folk legend)

    Madhya Pradesh: Oral tradition: …great Hindu epics), while the Lachmanjati legend is the Gond equivalent of the Ramayana (the other great Hindu epic). All tribes have myths and legends regarding their origin. Some songs are associated with the celebration of particular life events, such as birth and marriage, while other songs accompany various styles…

  • Lachmann, Karl Konrad Friedrich Wilhelm (German philologist)

    Karl Lachmann, German founder of modern textual criticism, or the methodology of determining the definitive text of a written work. His commentary (1850) on Lucretius’ De rerum natura (“On the Nature of Things”) was perhaps his greatest achievement and has been regarded as a major accomplishment of

  • Lachmina Singh (Nepalese leader)

    Kathmandu: …a single tree by Raja Lachmina Singh in 1596. A building, supposedly the original, still stands in the central square and is used for the accommodation of sadhus (holy men). Kathmandu served as the seat of the ruling Shah family of the Gurkha people from 1768 to 2008.

  • Lachmon, Jaggernath (Surinamese politician)

    Jaggernath Lachmon, Surinamese politician (born Sept. 21, 1916, Nieuw Nickerie, Dutch Guiana [now Suriname]—died Oct. 19, 2001, Amsterdam, Neth.), was a prominent figure in Surinamese politics for over half a century. He helped found two political parties, was an MP from 1949 (except during the 1

  • Lachnolaimus maximus (fish)

    hogfish: One hogfish, Lachnolaimus maximus, usually occurs in the warm subtropical marine waters from Florida to Bermuda to the South American coast. Most specimens are red to pinkish in colour, and many reach a length of 60 cm (2 feet). Characteristically three or four anterior spines of the…

  • Lachrimae (song by Dowland)

    John Dowland: His famous Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares Figured in Seaven Passionate Pavans (1604), became one of the most widely known compositions of the time. In his chromatic fantasies, the finest of which are “Forlorne Hope Fancye” and “Farewell,” he developed this form to a height of intensity unequaled…

  • lachrymal bone (anatomy)

    skull: …the vomer and the nasal, lachrymal, and turbinate bones. In infants the sutures (joints) between the various skull elements are loose, but with age they fuse together. Many mammals, such as the dog, have a sagittal crest down the centre of the skull; this provides an extra attachment site for…

  • lachrymal duct (anatomy)

    Tear duct and glands, structures that produce and distribute the watery component of the tear film. Tears consist of a complex and usually clear fluid that is diffused between the eye and the eyelid. Further components of the tear film include an inner mucous layer produced by specialized

  • lachrymal gland (anatomy)

    tear duct and glands: …lachrymal, or lacrimal, duct and glands, structures that produce and distribute the watery component of the tear film. Tears consist of a complex and usually clear fluid that is diffused between the eye and the eyelid. Further components of the tear film include an inner mucous layer produced by specialized…

  • lachrymal sac (anatomy)

    dacryocystitis: …inflammation and infection of the lacrimal sac, usually stemming from obstruction of the flow of tears into the nose. Tears leave the eye through small openings called puncta in the inner corner of the eye and flow into the lacrimal, or tear, sac, from which they drain through a duct—the…

  • Lachs, Manfred (Polish educator and jurist)

    Manfred Lachs, Polish writer, educator, diplomat, and jurist who profoundly influenced the postwar development of international law. Lachs was educated at Jagiellonian University of Kraków, where he earned his law degrees, and did graduate work at the Consular Academy of Vienna and the London

  • Lachung (India)

    Lachung, village, northeastern Sikkim state, northeastern India. It is located on the Lachung River, a tributary of the Tista River, in a deep valley at the base of the Himalayas near the border with Tibet (China). Lachung is a small trading centre (corn [maize] and pulses). It has a dispensary, a

  • lacis (lace)

    Filet lace, (from French filet, “network”), knotted netting, either square or diamond mesh, that has been stretched on a frame and embroidered, usually with cloth or darning stitch. Of ancient origin, it was called opus araneum in the 14th century, lacis in the 16th, and in the 19th filet guipure

  • Lacistemataceae (plant family)

    Malpighiales: Smaller families: Lacistemataceae is a small family of 2 genera and 14 species native to the tropical and subtropical Americas and the West Indies. Lacistema includes 11 species. The flowers are very reduced and are sometimes borne in almost catkinlike inflorescences.

  • lack (resinous secretion)

    Lac, sticky, resinous secretion of the tiny lac insect, Laccifer lacca, which is a species of scale insect. This insect deposits lac on the twigs and young branches of several varieties of soapberry and acacia trees and particularly on the sacred fig, Ficus religiosa, in India, Thailand, Myanmar (

  • Lack, David Lambert (British author and ornithologist)

    David Lambert Lack, British ornithologist, best known as the author of The Life of the Robin (1943) and other works that popularized natural science. Lack was educated at Magdalene College, Cambridge (M.A., 1936), and taught zoology in Devon from 1933 to 1938, when he joined an expedition to the

  • Lack, Pearl (American dancer and choreographer)

    Pearl Lang, (Pearl Lack), American dancer and choreographer (born May 29, 1921, Chicago, Ill.—died Feb. 24, 2009, New York, N.Y.), was a sterling member of the Martha Graham Dance Company and the first dancer whom Graham allowed to perform some of her own roles. Lang displayed her dancing talent at

  • Lackawanna (New York, United States)

    Lackawanna, city, Erie county, western New York, U.S., on Lake Erie, adjoining Buffalo (north). Originally part of an Indian reservation, it was settled in the 1850s as part of West Seneca and was known as Limestone Hill. It was primarily a nursery and truck-farm area until 1899, when it was chosen

  • Lackawanna (county, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Lackawanna, county, northeastern Pennsylvania, U.S., bordered by Choke Creek to the southwest and the Lehigh River to the southeast. Its terrain is topographically complex. The Lackawanna River, bordered on the southeast by the Moosic Mountains, bisects the county northeast-southwest. Recreational

  • Lackawanna and Western Railroad (American railway)

    Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Company, American railroad built to carry coal from the anthracite fields of northeastern Pennsylvania. Originally known as Ligget’s Gap Railroad, it was chartered in 1851 as the Lackawanna and Western. Eventually it ran from the Lackawanna Valley in

  • Lackawanna River (river, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Susquehanna River: …tributaries (which include the Chemung, Lackawanna, West Branch of the Susquehanna, and Juniata rivers) drain an area of 27,570 square miles (71,410 square km). Though the river itself never served as an important waterway because of rapids and other obstructions, its valley was significant as a land route to the…

  • Lackawanna Valley, The (painting by Inness)

    George Inness: His early works such as The Lackawanna Valley (1855) reflect the influence of Asher B. Durand and Thomas Cole, painters of the Hudson River school. From about 1855 to 1874 Inness ascended to the height of his powers with works such as the Delaware Water Gap (1861) and the Delaware…

  • Lackland, John (king of England)

    John, king of England from 1199 to 1216. In a war with the French king Philip II, he lost Normandy and almost all his other possessions in France. In England, after a revolt of the barons, he was forced to seal the Magna Carta (1215). John was the youngest son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine.

  • Lackritz, Steven Norman (American musician and composer)

    Steve Lacy, (Steven Norman Lackritz), American musician and composer (born July 23, 1934, New York, N.Y.—died June 4, 2004, Boston, Mass.), helped introduce a neglected instrument, the soprano saxophone, into modern jazz in the mid-1950s, creating simple, lyric melodies with an individualistic c

  • Lacks, Henrietta (American medical patient)

    Henrietta Lacks, American woman whose cervical cancer cells were the source of the HeLa cell line, research on which contributed to numerous important scientific advances. After her mother died in childbirth in 1924, her father moved with his 10 children to Clover, Virginia, where he divided them

  • Laclau, Ernesto (Argentine political theorist)

    Slavoj Žižek: The Sublime Object of Ideology: …by the Argentine political theorist Ernesto Laclau, who suggested that the nonlinear structure of the text is faithful to the “retroactive” effect in Lacanian psychoanalysis, in which later events reframe and transform one’s understanding of what went before. The book’s title is indebted to Lacan’s objet petit a (literally, “object…

  • Laclède Liguest, Pierre (French explorer and fur trader)

    Auguste Chouteau: …she formed a liaison with Pierre Laclède Liguest, who took Auguste and the rest of the family to the Illinois country in 1763. The following year 14-year-old Auguste commanded a group of 30 men who built a village on the west bank of the Mississippi at the junction of the…

  • Laclede, Pierre (French explorer and fur trader)

    Auguste Chouteau: …she formed a liaison with Pierre Laclède Liguest, who took Auguste and the rest of the family to the Illinois country in 1763. The following year 14-year-old Auguste commanded a group of 30 men who built a village on the west bank of the Mississippi at the junction of the…

  • Laclos, Pierre Choderlos de (French author)

    Pierre Choderlos de Laclos, French soldier and writer, author of the classic Les Liaisons dangereuses, one of the earliest examples of the psychological novel. Laclos chose a career in the army but soon left it to become a writer. His first novel, Les Liaisons dangereuses (1782), caused an

  • Laclos, Pierre-Ambroise-François Choderlos de (French author)

    Pierre Choderlos de Laclos, French soldier and writer, author of the classic Les Liaisons dangereuses, one of the earliest examples of the psychological novel. Laclos chose a career in the army but soon left it to become a writer. His first novel, Les Liaisons dangereuses (1782), caused an

  • LACMA (museum, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), museum campus in Los Angeles with distinguished collections of Asian (Indian, Tibetan, Nepalese), Islamic, medieval, Latin American, European, and modern art. In the early 21st century LACMA held more than 100,000 works of art. Established in 1910, the

  • Lacock (England, United Kingdom)

    Western architecture: From the 17th to the 19th century: His most significant work was Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, the symmetrical, flattened facade of which is thinly decorated with Gothic motifs. Walpole’s Gothic, though apparently as lighthearted, was more serious in intent. When in 1747 he decided to rebuild his house, Strawberry Hill, Twickenham, Middlesex, he proposed to reflect faithfully in…

  • LaCock, Joanne (American actress)

    Joanne Dru, (JOANNE LACOCK), U.S. film actress and captivating leading lady in the Westerns Red River, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, and Wagonmaster (b. Jan. 31, 1923--d. Sept. 10,

  • Lacombe, Friar François (French friar)

    Jeanne-Marie Bouvier de La Motte Guyon, Madame du Chesnoy: …personal religious developments by Barnabite Friar François Lacombe, she left her children and began travels with Lacombe to Geneva, Turin, and Grenoble (1681–86). In these cities she began to write on the suppression of individual desire and self-awareness. She also began to offer informal spiritual instruction to visitors in her…

  • Lacombe, Lucien (film by Malle [1974])

    Patrick Modiano: …wrote the screenplay for Malle’s Lacombe Lucien (1974), about a bored teenager who becomes an informer for the Gestapo during the German occupation of France. He likewise cowrote the screenplay for Egyptian director Moshé Mizrahi’s film version of Modiano’s novel Une Jeunesse (1981; film 1983) and was involved with several…

  • Laconia (New Hampshire, United States)

    Laconia, city, seat of Belknap county, central New Hampshire, U.S., on the Winnipesaukee River and bordering Winnisquam Lake and Opechee and Paugus bays of Lake Winnipesaukee. In a mountain setting, it is headquarters for the White Mountain National Forest. Nearby resorts include Lakeport and Weirs

  • Laconia (department, Greece)

    Laconia, perifereiakí enótita (regional unit) and historic region in the southeastern part of the Peloponnese (Modern Greek: Pelopónnisos) periféreia (region), southern Greece. The present regional unit of Laconia corresponds closely to the ancient province, which was bounded by Arcadia and Argolís

  • Laconia, Gulf of (gulf, Greece)

    Gulf of Laconia, large, deep gulf on the southern Ionian Sea (Modern Greek: Ióvio Pélagos) embraced by the two southernmost peninsulas of the Peloponnese (Pelopónnisos), Greece, 35 miles (56 km) north-south and 30 miles (48 km) wide. Cape Maléa, which divides the Gulf of Laconia from the Aegean

  • Lacordaire, Henri (French priest)

    Henri Lacordaire, leading ecclesiastic in the Roman Catholic revival in France following the Napoleonic period. Raised in a troubled time, Lacordaire renounced religion and studied jurisprudence at Dijon, France, following which he practiced law in Paris. After experiencing a religious awakening,

  • Lacordaire, Jean-Baptiste-Henri (French priest)

    Henri Lacordaire, leading ecclesiastic in the Roman Catholic revival in France following the Napoleonic period. Raised in a troubled time, Lacordaire renounced religion and studied jurisprudence at Dijon, France, following which he practiced law in Paris. After experiencing a religious awakening,

  • Laços de família (work by Lispector)

    Clarice Lispector: …as Laços de família (1960; Family Ties) and A legião estrangeira (1964; The Foreign Legion) focus on personal moments of revelation in the everyday lives of the protagonists and the lack of meaningful communication among individuals in a contemporary urban setting. English translations of her stories were collected as The…

  • Lacoste, Jean-René (French tennis player)

    René Lacoste, French tennis player who was a leading competitor in the late 1920s. As one of the powerful Four Musketeers (the others were Jean Borotra, Henri Cochet, and Jacques Brugnon), he helped France win its first Davis Cup in 1927, starting its six-year domination of the cup. Later on he was

  • Lacoste, René (French tennis player)

    René Lacoste, French tennis player who was a leading competitor in the late 1920s. As one of the powerful Four Musketeers (the others were Jean Borotra, Henri Cochet, and Jacques Brugnon), he helped France win its first Davis Cup in 1927, starting its six-year domination of the cup. Later on he was

  • Lacoste, Robert (French colonial minister)

    Algeria: The Algerian War of Independence: …his place the pugnacious socialist Robert Lacoste as resident minister. Lacoste’s policy was to rule Algeria through decree, and he gave the military exceptional powers. At the same time, he wanted to give the country a decentralized administrative structure that allowed some autonomy.

  • LaCour, P. (scientist)

    turbine: Development of wind turbines: …was built in 1890 by P. LaCour in Denmark, using patent sails and twin fantails on a steel tower.

  • Lacovara, Kenneth (American paleontologist)

    Kenneth Lacovara, In 2014 American paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara published a groundbreaking paper in the journal Scientific Reports on the first description of the fossilized remains of Dreadnoughtus schrani, a massive sauropod (or “lizard-hipped” dinosaur) that lived in Patagonia during the Late

  • Lacovara, Kenneth John (American paleontologist)

    Kenneth Lacovara, In 2014 American paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara published a groundbreaking paper in the journal Scientific Reports on the first description of the fossilized remains of Dreadnoughtus schrani, a massive sauropod (or “lizard-hipped” dinosaur) that lived in Patagonia during the Late

  • Lacplesis (epic by Pumpurs)

    Latvia: The arts: Andrejs Pumpurs’s literary epic Lacplesis (1888; Bearslayer) was inspired by the genre, as was the work of Rainis (pseudonym of Jānis Pliekšāns; 1865–1929), who is considered one of the great Latvian poets.

  • Lacq (France)

    Lacq, village, centre of an industrial complex in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département, Nouvelle Aquitaine région, southwestern France, northwest of Pau. The industrial complex was built after the discovery at Lacq of petroleum and, in 1951, of one of the greatest natural gas fields in the world.

  • lacquer (varnish)

    Lacquer, coloured and frequently opaque varnish applied to metal or wood, used in an important branch of decorative art, especially in Asia. Lac, a resinous secretion of certain scale insects, is the basis for some but not all lacquers. Lacquer in China and Japan is made from the sap of the Chinese

  • lacquer tree (tree group)

    Varnish tree, any of various trees whose milky juice is used to make a varnish or lacquer. The term is applied particularly to an Asian tree (Toxicodendron vernicifluum), related to poison ivy, that is highly irritating to the skin. On being tapped, the tree exudes a thick, milky emulsion that was

  • lacquer tree (plant, Toxicodendron vernicifluum)

    lacquer: …the Chinese lacquer tree (Toxicodendron vernicifluum, formerly Rhus vernicifera), which, cleaned of impurities, can be used in its natural state. One active constituent of the sap of the lacquer tree is urushiol (from urushi, the Japanese word for lacquer), a substance that can cause contact dermatitis if the lacquer…

  • lacquerwork (art)

    Lacquerwork, certain metallic and wood objects to which coloured and frequently opaque varnishes called lacquer are applied. The word lacquer is derived from lac, a sticky resinous substance that is the basis of some lacquers. But the lacquer of China, Japan, and Korea, which is made from the sap

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