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  • Lepage, Robert (Canadian writer, director, designer, and actor)

    Robert Lepage, Canadian writer, director, designer, and actor known for his highly original stage and film productions, which often drew together disparate cultural references and unconventional media. Lepage was raised in a working-class family in Quebec City. He graduated in 1978 from the

  • Lepanto (poem by Chesterton)

    G.K. Chesterton: …shown in the stirring “Lepanto” (1911). When it was not uproariously comic, his verse was frankly partisan and didactic. His essays developed his shrewd, paradoxical irreverence to its ultimate point of real seriousness. He is seen at his happiest in such essays as “On Running After One’s Hat” (1908)…

  • Lepanto, Battle of (1571)

    Battle of Lepanto, (October 7, 1571), naval engagement in the waters off southwestern Greece between the allied Christian forces of the Holy League and the Ottoman Turks during an Ottoman campaign to acquire the Venetian island of Cyprus. The battle marked the first significant victory for a

  • Lepas (crustacean genus)

    cirripede: Diversity and distribution: …plates, as in Pollicipes and Lepas, respectively. Goose barnacles are probably the most commonly observed pedunculate cirripedes.

  • Lepas anatifera (crustacean)

    cirripede: Importance to humans: …for he named the genus Lepas (“Shellfish”) and the local species L. anatifera and L. anserifera (“duck-bearing” and “goose-bearing,” respectively), and these pedunculate barnacles continue to be called goose barnacles.

  • Lepas anserifera (crustacean)

    cirripede: Importance to humans: anatifera and L. anserifera (“duck-bearing” and “goose-bearing,” respectively), and these pedunculate barnacles continue to be called goose barnacles.

  • Lepautre, Antoine (French architect)

    Antoine Le Pautre, French Baroque architect. Born into a family of architects and decorators, Le Pautre was appointed architect to the king’s buildings in 1644. He then designed the Chapelle de Port-Royal (begun 1646), an austere building that suited Jansenist sobriety. He was commissioned in 1654

  • Lepautre, Pierre (French architect)

    Western architecture: France: Pierre Lepautre, working under Hardouin-Mansart on the interiors of the Château de Marly (1679), invented new decorative ideas that became the Rococo. Lepautre changed the typical late 17th-century flat arabesque, which filled a geometrically constructed panel, to a linear pattern in relief, which was enclosed…

  • Lepchā (people)

    Lepchā, people of eastern Nepal, western Bhutan, Sikkim state, and the Darjeeling district of West Bengal in India. They number about 46,000 (11,000 in India; 25,000 in Sikkim; and 10,000 in Bhutan). They are thought to be the earliest inhabitants of Sikkim, but have adopted many elements of the

  • Lepcis Magna (ancient city, Libya)

    Leptis Magna, largest city of the ancient region of Tripolitania. It is located 62 miles (100 km) southeast of Tripoli on the Mediterranean coast of Libya. Lying 2 miles (3 km) east of what is now Al-Khums (Homs), Leptis contains some of the world’s finest remains of Roman architecture. It was

  • leper colony

    leprosy: History: …patient, frequently in large “leper colonies.” Perhaps the most famous colony was at Kalaupapa, on the island of Molokai, Hawaii, where the Belgian priest Father Damien served leprosy patients who had been forcibly relocated to the isolated community. In 1894 the Louisiana Leper Home was established near Carville, Louisiana,…

  • Leperditicopida (crustacean)

    crustacean: Annotated classification: †Order Leperditicopida Cambrian to Devonian. †Order Beyrichicopida Silurian to Carboniferous. Subclass Myodocopa Order Myodocopida Silurian to present; antennal notch in shell; 5 pairs of

  • Lepeshinskaya, Olga Vasiliyevna (Russian ballerina)

    Olga Vasiliyevna Lepeshinskaya, Russian ballerina (born Sept. 15 [Sept. 28, New Style], 1916, Kiev, Russia—died Dec. 20, 2008, Moscow, Russia), was one of the most popular stars of the Bolshoi Ballet for some 30 years (1933–63). Known for the virtuosity, dynamic technique, and humour and drama with

  • Lepethymnus, Mount (mountain, Lesbos, Greece)

    Lésbos: The principal peak, Mount Lepethymnus (Áyios Ilías), reaches 3,176 feet (968 metres). The original vegetation is well preserved west of the town of Kalloní. The major population centre is around Mytilene on the southeast coast.

  • Lepiceridae (insect family)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Lepiceridae (toadlet beetles) A few Central American species. Family Sphaeriusidae (minute bog beetles) Less than 1 mm in length; 1 genus; a few widespread species. Family Torridincolidae (torrent beetles)

  • Lepidagathis (plant genus)

    Acanthaceae: (150), Blepharis (130), Lepidagathis (100), Hygrophila (100), Thunbergia (90), and Dyschoriste (80). The small genus Avicennia contains at least eight species of ecologically important mangroves.

  • Lepidina (work by Pontano)

    Giovanni Pontano: …which the most important are Lepidina, a charming account of the wedding between a river god and a nymph, with a distinctly Neapolitan flavour, and a collection called De amore coniugali, a warm and personal series of poems on the joys and sorrows of family life. Pontano wrote Latin as…

  • Lepidium (plant genus)

    Peppergrass, (genus Lepidium), genus of some 230 species of herbs of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Peppergrass species are distributed throughout the world, and many are common lawn and field weeds. Some, such as garden cress (Lepidium sativum), are cultivated as salad plants for their

  • Lepidium campestre (herb, Lepidium campestre)

    peppergrass: Pepperwort, or field pepper (L. campestre), is a widespread weed originally native to Europe. It has hairy arrowlike stem leaves and once was marketed as an antidote to poisons under the name of mithridate pepperwort. Maca, or Peruvian ginseng (L. meyenii), is native to the…

  • Lepidium intermedium (plant)

    peppergrass: Lentejilla, or little lentil (L. armoracia), is native to Europe but has naturalized in Mexico, where it is used as a folk medicine. Pepperwort, or field pepper (L. campestre), is a widespread weed originally native to Europe. It has hairy arrowlike stem leaves and once…

  • Lepidium meyenii (plant)
  • Lepidium sativum (plant)

    cress: Common garden cress, or peppergrass (Lepidium sativum), a fast-growing, often weedy native of western Asia, is widely grown, especially in its curl-leaved form, and the seedlings are used as a garnish.

  • Lepidium virginicum (plant)

    peppergrass: Virginia peppergrass (L. virginicum), spread throughout North America, sometimes is known as canary grass because its seed stalks are fed to cage birds. Its leaves are used in salads. Lentejilla, or little lentil (L. armoracia), is native to Europe but has naturalized in Mexico, where…

  • Lepidobotryaceae (plant family)

    Celastrales: Lepidobotryaceae: Lepidobotryaceae is a small family of two genera and two or three species of trees, Lepidobotrys staudtii being known from East Africa and Ruptiliocarpon caracolito growing in Central and South America. They have simple two-ranked leaves that are jointed at the base of the…

  • Lepidobotrys staudtii (tree)

    Celastrales: Lepidobotryaceae: …or three species of trees, Lepidobotrys staudtii being known from East Africa and Ruptiliocarpon caracolito growing in Central and South America. They have simple two-ranked leaves that are jointed at the base of the blade and have small paired leafy structures, or stipels, as well as ordinary stipules where the…

  • Lepidocaris rhyniensis (fossil crustacean)

    branchiopod: Evolution and paleontology: The Lipostraca contains only Lepidocaris rhyniensis, from the Rhynie cherts of Scotland. This minute branchiopod is preserved so well that fine details of its limbs can be seen. Its structure is better known than that of any other fossil crustacean. It is even possible to deduce its method of…

  • Lepidochelys kempii (reptile)

    Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Environmental costs: …2013 showed that the endangered Kemp’s ridley sea turtle was likely severely affected, as its preferred foraging territory was within the area damaged by the spill. It was estimated that up to 65,000 imperiled turtles had died during 2010 alone, mostly as a result of oil contamination. It was also…

  • Lepidochelys olivacea (turtle)

    sea turtle: Physical features and feeding habits: Adult and juvenile olive ridleys (Lepidochelys olivacea) are also largely pelagic, but they are known to frequent coastal regions such as bays and estuaries. The olive ridley and its relative, the Kemp’s ridley sea turtle (L. kempii), are small with wide rounded shells. As adults, both species have…

  • lepidocrocite (mineral)

    goethite: …name was originally applied to lepidocrocite [γ-FeO(OH)], a less common mineral with the same chemical composition as goethite but with a different crystal structure. In goethite, oxygen and hydroxyl anions are closely packed in hexagonal arrays, while in lepidocrocite they are arranged in cubic arrays; in both structures, however, iron…

  • Lepidodendrales (fossil plant order)

    lycophyte: Annotated classification: †Order Lepidodendrales Extinct tree lycophytes, therefore capable of secondary growth; heterosporous, with some strobili (cones) forming seedlike structures; about 6 genera, including Lepidodendron and Sigillaria. Order Lycopodiales (club mosses) Living and

  • Lepidodendron (fossil plant genus)

    Lepidodendron, extinct genus of tree-sized lycopsid plants that lived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359 million to 299 million years ago). Lepidodendron and its relatives—Lepidophloios, Bothrodendron, and Paralycopodites—were related to modern club mosses. They grew up to 40 metres (130

  • Lepidoderma albohirtum (insect)

    sugarcane: Pests: …greatest crop losses is the grayback beetle in its larval stage. Effective grub control is obtained by applying the insecticide benzene hexachloride after the young cane plant has germinated and stooled, though this chemical has been banned in many countries. Sugarcane can be protected against wireworms by applying insecticides when…

  • lepidolite (mineral)

    Lepidolite, the most common lithium mineral, basic potassium and lithium aluminosilicate; a member of the common mica group. It is economically important as a major source of lithium. Because it is one of the few minerals containing appreciable amounts of rubidium, it is useful in determining

  • lepidophagy (animal behaviour)

    perciform: Feeding behaviour: …an African cichlid that practices lepidophagy, the eating of scales plucked from other fishes.

  • Lepidophloios (fossil plant genus)

    Lepidodendron: Lepidodendron and its relatives—Lepidophloios, Bothrodendron, and Paralycopodites—were related to modern club mosses. They grew up to 40 metres (130 feet) in height and 2 metres (about 7 feet) in diameter. During their juvenile stages, these plants grew as unbranched trunks with a shock of long, thin leaves that…

  • Lepidoptera (insect)

    Lepidopteran, (order Lepidoptera), any of about 180,000 species of butterflies, moths, and skippers. This order of insects is second in size only to Coleoptera, the beetles. Because of their day-flying habits and bright colours, the butterflies are more familiar than the chiefly night-flying and

  • lepidopteran (insect)

    Lepidopteran, (order Lepidoptera), any of about 180,000 species of butterflies, moths, and skippers. This order of insects is second in size only to Coleoptera, the beetles. Because of their day-flying habits and bright colours, the butterflies are more familiar than the chiefly night-flying and

  • Lepidosaphes ulmi (insect)

    Oystershell scale, (Lepidosaphes ulmi), a species of insect in the armoured scale family, Diaspididae (order Homoptera), that is found on woody plants and secretes a hard, tough protective covering that resembles a miniature oystershell. Despite its small size, the oystershell scale can inflict

  • Lepidosauria (reptile subclass)

    reptile: Annotated classification: Subclass Lepidosauria (lepidosaurians) Upper Jurassic to present. Two orders. No teeth on parasphenoid; teeth attached superficially to upper and lower jaws; parietal eye in parietal; transverse cloacal opening. Order Rhynchocephalia (Sphenodontida) (tuatara) Middle Triassic to present. Three families, about 20 genera, but

  • lepidosaurian (reptile subclass)

    reptile: Annotated classification: Subclass Lepidosauria (lepidosaurians) Upper Jurassic to present. Two orders. No teeth on parasphenoid; teeth attached superficially to upper and lower jaws; parietal eye in parietal; transverse cloacal opening. Order Rhynchocephalia (Sphenodontida) (tuatara) Middle Triassic to present. Three families, about 20 genera, but

  • Lepidosiren paradoxa (fish)

    lungfish: Size range and distribution: The South American species, Lepidosiren paradoxa, reaches a length of 1.25 metres (about 4 feet).

  • Lepidosirenidae (fish family)

    lungfish: Annotated classification: Family Lepidosirenidae 4 gill clefts; body length growing to about 1.25 metres (about 4 feet). 1 living species (Lepidosiren paradoxa). Family Protopteridae 5 gill clefts; body length to 1.8 metres (about 6 feet). 1 genus (Protopterus), 4 living species.

  • Lepidosireniformes (fish order)

    fish: Annotated classification: Order Lepidosireniformes (South American and African lungfishes) 2 families, 2 genera, and 5 species. Fish classification has undergone major revisions in recent years, and further modifications can be expected in the future. Ichthyologists frequently disagree on major as well as minor concepts of

  • Lepidothamnus laxifolius (plant)

    conifer: Diversity of size and structure: Other conifers, such as the pygmy pine (Lepidothamnus laxifolius) of New Zealand, the smallest conifer, are always shrubby and may mature as shorter plants (less than 8 centimetres [3.15 inches] in height) than the pygmy cypress, but with greater spread.

  • Lepidozamia (plant genus)

    Lepidozamia, genus of cycads in the family Zamiaceae. The two species in the genus are restricted to the eastern coast of Australia. They can form substantial trunks that are clothed by the persistent leaf bases. The rachis (central axis) of the pinnately compound leaves is strongly thickened on

  • Lepidurus arcticus (crustacean)

    branchiopod: Distribution and abundance: …Branchinecta paludosa and the notostracan Lepidurus arcticus are regularly found in small pools of the Arctic tundra regions. These pools are temporary in the sense that they freeze solid in winter. A few species in these groups are found in permanent lakes.

  • Lepidus, Marcus Aemilius (Roman senator [died circa 77 BC])

    Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, Roman senator who attempted unsuccessfully to overthrow the constitution imposed by the dictator Sulla. Although he had supported Sulla’s rise to power and became wealthy in the Sullan proscriptions, Lepidus was elected consul for 78 with the help of Pompey, despite Sulla’s

  • Lepidus, Marcus Aemilius (Roman statesman [died 152 BC])

    Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, Roman statesman who held the highest offices of the republic. As ambassador to Greece, Syria, and Egypt in 200, he delivered to Philip V at Abydos the Senate’s ultimatum warning Macedonia not to make war on any Greek state. Consul in 187 and 175, censor in 179, pontifex

  • Lepidus, Marcus Aemilius (Roman statesman [died 13/12 BCE])

    Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, Roman statesman, one of the triumvirs who ruled Rome after 43. He was the son of a prominent politician (d. c. 77 bc) of the same name. Lepidus joined the Caesarian side during the Civil War (49–45) between Caesar and the adherents of Pompey. He was praetor in 49, governor

  • Lépinay de Brusly, Adolphe Godin de (French engineer)

    Panama Canal: American intervention: …to the one proposed by Lépinay but rejected by Lesseps. Included in the proposal was an enormous earthen dam across the Chagres River at Gatún. The dam created what was then the largest artificial lake in the world (Gatún Lake), and at the same time, it brought a considerable part…

  • Lepiotaceae (fungus family)

    fungus: Parasitism in plants and insects: …with fungi in the family Lepiotaceae (phylum Basidiomycota). The ants cultivate the fungi in their nests as an ongoing food supply and secrete enzymes that stimulate or suppress the growth of the fungi.

  • Lepisma saccharina (insect)

    Silverfish, (Lepisma saccharina), species of quick-moving, slender, flat, wingless insect having three tail bristles and silvery scales. Silverfish normally live indoors and are found worldwide. They often are considered pests because they eat materials containing high percentages of starch, such

  • Lepisosteidae (fish family)

    holostean: Annotated classification: Family Lepisosteidae Body elongate; jaws essentially a long snout and equipped with needlelike teeth; dorsal and anal fins located posteriorly on the body close to the tail. 2 genera (Lepisosteus and Atractosteus), 7 species. †Order Pycnodontiformes Deep-bodied fishes with dorsal and anal fins elongated; scales often…

  • Lepisosteus (fish)

    Gar, any of seven species of large North American fishes of the genera Atractosteus and Lepisosteus, in the family Lepisosteidae. Gars, which are related to the bowfin in the infraclass Holostei, are confined chiefly to fresh water, though some of the species descend to brackish or even salt water.

  • Lepisosteus (fish genus)
  • Lepisosteus osseus (fish)

    gar: …long and forcepslike in the longnose gar, or billfish (Lepisosteus osseus), but broad and relatively short in the alligator gar (A. spatula) of the southern United States. The alligator gar, reaching a length of about 3 metres (10 feet), is one of the largest of all freshwater fishes. Gars are…

  • Lepisosteus spatula (fish)

    gar: …and relatively short in the alligator gar (A. spatula) of the southern United States. The alligator gar, reaching a length of about 3 metres (10 feet), is one of the largest of all freshwater fishes. Gars are edible but are almost never eaten in the central and northern United States.…

  • Lepofski, Manford (American author)

    Ellery Queen, American cousins who were coauthors of a series of more than 35 detective novels featuring a character named Ellery Queen. Dannay and Lee first collaborated on an impulsive entry for a detective-story contest; the success of the result, The Roman Hat Mystery (1929), started Ellery

  • Lepomis gibbosus (fish)

    Pumpkinseed, popular food and sport fish and a species of sunfish

  • Lepomis macrochirus (fish)

    Bluegill, (Lepomis macrochirus), popular game fish in the sunfish family, Centrarchidae (order Perciformes). It is one of the best-known sunfishes throughout its original range in the freshwater habitats of the central and southern United States. Bluegills have been introduced into numerous

  • Lepontine Alps (mountains, Europe)

    Lepontine Alps, segment of the Central Alps along the Italian–Swiss border, bounded by the Simplon Pass and Pennine Alps (west-southwest), the Upper Rhône and Vorderrhein river valleys (north), Splügen Pass (Italian Passo dello Spluga) and the Rhaetian Alps (east-northeast), and the Italian lake

  • Lepontinische Alpen (mountains, Europe)

    Lepontine Alps, segment of the Central Alps along the Italian–Swiss border, bounded by the Simplon Pass and Pennine Alps (west-southwest), the Upper Rhône and Vorderrhein river valleys (north), Splügen Pass (Italian Passo dello Spluga) and the Rhaetian Alps (east-northeast), and the Italian lake

  • Lepontische Alpen (mountains, Europe)

    Lepontine Alps, segment of the Central Alps along the Italian–Swiss border, bounded by the Simplon Pass and Pennine Alps (west-southwest), the Upper Rhône and Vorderrhein river valleys (north), Splügen Pass (Italian Passo dello Spluga) and the Rhaetian Alps (east-northeast), and the Italian lake

  • Lepoqo (African chief)

    Moshoeshoe, founder and first paramount chief of the Sotho (Basuto, Basotho) nation. One of the most successful Southern African leaders of the 19th century, Moshoeshoe combined aggressive military counteraction and adroit diplomacy against colonial invasions. He created a large African state in

  • LePorte, Annie (American reformer)

    Annie LePorte Diggs, Canadian-born American reformer and politician, an organizer and campaigner in the Populist Movement of the late 19th century. Annie LePorte moved with her family to New Jersey in 1855. In 1873, after completing school, she went to Kansas, where in September of that year she

  • lepospondyl (fossil amphibian)

    amphibian: Annotated classification: …extinct orders within the superorder Lepospondyli, and Temnospondylia and Lissamphibia are listed as separate subclasses. Groups indicated by a dagger (†) are known only from fossils.

  • Lepospondyli (fossil amphibian)

    amphibian: Annotated classification: …extinct orders within the superorder Lepospondyli, and Temnospondylia and Lissamphibia are listed as separate subclasses. Groups indicated by a dagger (†) are known only from fossils.

  • Leppert, Alice Jeanne (American singer and actress)

    Alice Faye, American singer and actress who from the mid-1930s to the mid-1940s made 32 films, among them In Old Chicago, Alexander’s Ragtime Band, and Hello, Frisco, Hello; she later starred on radio with her husband on "The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show" (b. May 5, 1915, New York, N.Y.--d. May 9,

  • leprechaun (Irish folklore)

    Leprechaun, in Irish folklore, fairy in the form of a tiny old man often with a cocked hat and leather apron. Solitary by nature, he is said to live in remote places and to make shoes and brogues. The sound of his hammering betrays his presence. He possesses a hidden crock of gold; if captured and

  • lepromatous leprosy (pathology)

    leprosy: Course of the disease: …rise to what is called lepromatous leprosy, there is very little cellular response, and the bacilli can multiply freely. The organisms are found in enormous numbers in the deep layers of the affected skin, and they spread widely through the skin’s lymphatic channels. The disease spreads via the nerves but…

  • leprosy (infectious disease)

    Leprosy, chronic infectious disease that affects the skin, the peripheral nerves (nerves outside the brain and spinal cord), and the mucous membranes of the nose, throat, and eyes. It is caused by the leprosy bacillus, Mycobacterium leprae. Destruction of the peripheral nerves by the bacillus leads

  • Lepsi River (river, Kazakhstan)

    Lake Balkhash: Aqsū, Ayaguz, and Lepsi feed the eastern part of the lake. With almost equal areas in both parts of the lake, this situation creates a continuous flow of water from the western to the eastern section. The water of the western part was almost fresh and suitable for…

  • Lepsius, Karl Richard (German Egyptologist)

    Richard Lepsius, German Egyptologist and a founder of modern, scientific archaeology who did much to catalog Egyptian archaeological remains and to establish a chronology for Egyptian history. Following studies in archaeological philology and comparative languages, Lepsius became a lecturer at the

  • Lepsius, Richard (German Egyptologist)

    Richard Lepsius, German Egyptologist and a founder of modern, scientific archaeology who did much to catalog Egyptian archaeological remains and to establish a chronology for Egyptian history. Following studies in archaeological philology and comparative languages, Lepsius became a lecturer at the

  • Leptaena (fossil brachiopod genus)

    Leptaena, genus of extinct brachiopods (lamp shells) commonly found as fossils in Ordovician to Lower Carboniferous sedimentary rocks (between 488 million and 318 million years old). The very distinctive shell of Leptaena is characterized by its wrinkled ornamentation and fine linear

  • Leptailurus serval (mammal)

    Serval, (Felis serval), long-limbed cat, family Felidae, found in Africa south of the Sahara, especially in grass- and bush-covered country near water. A swift, agile cat, the serval climbs and leaps very well. It is a nocturnal hunter preying on birds and small mammals such as rodents and hares.

  • Lepti Minus (ancient city, Tunisia)

    Leptis Minor, small Carthaginian city located 10 miles (16 km) from modern Al-Munastīr (Ruspinum), Tunisia. In Roman times it was the centre of a prosperous olive-growing district, and its exports included olive oil and pottery. It was Julius Caesar’s base before the Battle of Thapsus in 46 bc.

  • Leptiminus (ancient city, Tunisia)

    Leptis Minor, small Carthaginian city located 10 miles (16 km) from modern Al-Munastīr (Ruspinum), Tunisia. In Roman times it was the centre of a prosperous olive-growing district, and its exports included olive oil and pottery. It was Julius Caesar’s base before the Battle of Thapsus in 46 bc.

  • leptin (hormone)

    leptin receptor: …receives and transmits signals from leptin, a hormone released from fat cells that is involved primarily in the regulation of metabolism but also serves roles in bone metabolism, immunity, and reproductive function. The leptin receptor is located in the cell membrane in various tissues in the body but is most…

  • leptin receptor (physiology)

    Leptin receptor, molecule that receives and transmits signals from leptin, a hormone released from fat cells that is involved primarily in the regulation of metabolism but also serves roles in bone metabolism, immunity, and reproductive function. The leptin receptor is located in the cell membrane

  • Leptines, Law of (ancient Athens)

    Law of Leptines, (354 bc), ancient Athenian tax measure, subject of an early speech of the orator Demosthenes. The law, named for the man who proposed it, was backed by the Athenian statesman Aristophon; it sought to raise money for the state by eliminating hereditary tax exemptions granted to

  • Leptinotarsa decemlineata (insect)

    Colorado potato beetle, (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), insect pest that attacks the leaves of potato plants. This leaf beetle belongs to the subfamily Chrysomelinae of the family Chrysomelidae (order Coleoptera). It is native to western North America and originally fed on buffalo bur, a wild plant of

  • Leptis Magna (ancient city, Libya)

    Leptis Magna, largest city of the ancient region of Tripolitania. It is located 62 miles (100 km) southeast of Tripoli on the Mediterranean coast of Libya. Lying 2 miles (3 km) east of what is now Al-Khums (Homs), Leptis contains some of the world’s finest remains of Roman architecture. It was

  • Leptis Minor (ancient city, Tunisia)

    Leptis Minor, small Carthaginian city located 10 miles (16 km) from modern Al-Munastīr (Ruspinum), Tunisia. In Roman times it was the centre of a prosperous olive-growing district, and its exports included olive oil and pottery. It was Julius Caesar’s base before the Battle of Thapsus in 46 bc.

  • Leptobramidae (fish)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Leptobramidae (beachsalmon) A slender carangid-like species with large mouth, rather long-based anal fin, and a single dorsal fin placed behind the beginning of the anal fin; resembles Pempheridae but apparently is not related to it; a single species reaching 43 cm (17 inches) and about 2…

  • leptocephali (eel larva)

    eel: General features: …eels probably pass through the leptocephalus stage, an extended larval phase, in the open ocean and undergo metamorphosis to a juvenile stage that is a smaller version of the adult. At maturity eels range in length from 10 cm (4 inches), in the deep-sea Cyema atrum, to 3.5 metres (11.5…

  • leptocephalus (eel larva)

    eel: General features: …eels probably pass through the leptocephalus stage, an extended larval phase, in the open ocean and undergo metamorphosis to a juvenile stage that is a smaller version of the adult. At maturity eels range in length from 10 cm (4 inches), in the deep-sea Cyema atrum, to 3.5 metres (11.5…

  • Leptoceratops (dinosaur genus)

    ceratopsian: including Protoceratops and Leptoceratops, were mostly quadrupedal and slightly larger and lived from the Early to Late Cretaceous; these dinosaurs had a somewhat larger frill but no horns.

  • leptochlorite (mineral)

    Leptochlorite, subgroup of chlorite minerals. See

  • Leptocoris trivittatus (insect)

    coreid bug: The box-elder bug (Boisea trivittatus) is dark brown with three longitudinal red lines on the thorax and red veins in the first pair of wings. These coreid bugs feed mostly on box-elder trees. They pass the winter in groups in some dry spot, such as under…

  • Leptodactylidae (amphibian family)

    Leptodactylidae, family of frogs (order Anura), including more than 900 species, most of which are found in South and Central America. Leptodactylid frogs live in water, on land, or in trees. More than 300 species, most of them West Indian or Central American, are of the genus Eleutherodactylus, or

  • Leptodactylinae (amphibian subfamily)

    Anura: Annotated classification: …Indies), Hylodinae (South America), and Leptodactylinae (South America and Central America). Family Myobatrachidae and Limnodynastidae Eocene to present; 8 presacral vertebrae; coccyx free, bicondylar; 21 genera, 110 species; adult length to about 10 cm (4 inches); 2 subfamilies: Limnodynastinae (New Guinea and Australia) and Myobatrachinae (New Guinea

  • Leptodactylus pentadactylus (amphibian)

    Leptodactylidae: The South American bullfrogs are of this genus. These animals resemble true frogs (Rana) but lack webbing on the feet. The edible L. pentadactylus of Panama and South America is a large form with a maximum length of more than 15 cm (6 inches).

  • Leptodeira (reptile, genus Leptodeira)

    cat snake: Often classified separately, cat-eyed snakes (Leptodeira) of the New World tropics are superficially similar to Old World cat snakes. Ten species of cat-eyed snakes occur in dry habitats from Mexico to Argentina. The most common species is the banded cat-eyed snake (L. annulata), which is found over the…

  • Leptodeira annulata (reptile)

    cat snake: …most common species is the banded cat-eyed snake (L. annulata), which is found over the entire range of the genus. These snakes are light brown in colour with dark brown spots or blotches on the back, and they typically grow to 0.5–0.8 metre (1.6–2.6 feet), though specimens of 1.1 metres…

  • Leptodesma (fossil clam genus)

    Leptodesma, extinct genus of pelecypods (clams) found as fossils in Silurian to Lower Carboniferous rocks (between about 444 million and 318 million years old). Its distinct shell, roughly oval except for a sharp outgrowth that extends posteriorly, makes Leptodesma easy to identify. A troughlike

  • Leptodora (crustacean)

    water flea: …exception is the predatory giant Leptodora, which grows as long as 18 mm and whose carapace is reduced to a small brood sac. Most species swim by means of powerful strokes of the antennae; in some species the successive strokes produce a characteristic hopping and sinking motion. Apart from a…

  • Leptodus (fossil brachiopod genus)

    Leptodus, extinct genus of articulate brachiopods, or lamp shells, of the Permian Period (299 million to 251 million years ago). Leptodus, a very specialized form characterized by an aberrant morphology, had an oysterlike pedicle valve, which anchored the shell to the substrate and was probably

  • Leptoglossus membranaceus (insect)

    coreid bug: …phyllopus of North America and L. membranaceus of Australia) have enlarged or flattened extensions on their legs, hence the common name leaf-footed bug. These insects suck plant juices from crops such as peas, beans, potatoes, and tomatoes. Leaf-footed bugs spend the winter in the adult stage. In warm climates there…

  • Leptoglossus phyllopus (insect)

    coreid bug: , Leptoglossus phyllopus of North America and L. membranaceus of Australia) have enlarged or flattened extensions on their legs, hence the common name leaf-footed bug. These insects suck plant juices from crops such as peas, beans, potatoes, and tomatoes. Leaf-footed bugs spend the winter in the…

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