• 0-9
  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g
  • h
  • i
  • j
  • k
  • l
  • m
  • n
  • o
  • p
  • q
  • r
  • s
  • t
  • u
  • v
  • w
  • x
  • y
  • z
  • Leo VI (Byzantine emperor)

    Leo VI, Byzantine coemperor from 870 and emperor from 886 to 912, whose imperial laws, written in Greek, became the legal code of the Byzantine Empire. Leo was the son of Basil I the Macedonian, who had begun the codification, and his second wife, Eudocia Ingerina. Made coemperor in 870, Leo

  • Leo VII (pope)

    Leo VII, pope from 936 to 939. Leo was probably a Benedictine monk when he succeeded John XI, who had been imprisoned by Duke Alberic II of Spoleto. In 936 he invited Abbot St. Odo of Cluny (then one of the most influential abbeys in western Europe) to help him settle the struggle between Hugh of

  • Leo VIII (pope)

    Leo VIII, pope, or antipope, from 963 to 965. The legitimacy of his election has long been debated. A Roman synod in December 963 deposed and expelled Pope John XII for dishonourable conduct and for instigating an armed conspiracy against the Holy Roman emperor Otto I the Great. Otto, who had

  • Leo X (pope)

    Leo X, one of the leading Renaissance popes (reigned 1513–21). He made Rome a cultural centre and a political power, but he depleted the papal treasury, and, by failing to take the developing Reformation seriously, he contributed to the dissolution of the Western church. Leo excommunicated Martin

  • Leo XI (pope)

    Leo XI, pope from April 1–27, 1605. Pope Gregory XIII made him bishop of Pistoia, Italy, in 1573, archbishop of Florence in 1574, and cardinal in 1583. Elected to succeed Clement VIII on April 1, 1605, he died within the

  • Leo XII (pope)

    Leo XII, pope from 1823 to 1829. Ordained in 1783, della Genga became private secretary to Pope Pius VI, who in 1793 sent him as ambassador to Lucerne, Switz. In 1794 he was appointed ambassador to Cologne, subsequently being entrusted with missions to several German courts. Pope Pius VII created

  • Leo XIII (pope)

    Leo XIII, head of the Roman Catholic Church (1878–1903) who brought a new spirit to the papacy, manifested in more conciliatory positions toward civil governments, by care taken that the church not be opposed to scientific progress and by an awareness of the pastoral and social needs of the times.

  • Leo, Heinrich (Prussian historian)

    Heinrich Leo, Prussian conservative historian. As a student at the universities of Breslau, Jena, and Göttingen, Leo joined the extreme revolutionary wing of the students’ association. But, after reading Edmund Burke and Albrecht Haller and after a friend of his murdered the reactionary dramatist

  • Leo, Leonardo Ortensio Salvatore de (Italian composer)

    Leonardo Leo, composer who was noted for his comic operas and who was instrumental in forming the Neapolitan style of opera composition. Leo entered the Conservatorio della Pietà dei Turchini at Naples in 1709, where his earliest known work, a sacred drama, L’infedeltà Abbattuta, was performed by

  • Leo, Melissa (American actress)

    Melissa Leo, American actress who was known for her naturalistic portrayals of tough, flinty women dealing with difficult situations. Leo became enamoured with acting when as a small child she was enrolled in the Peter Schumann Bread and Puppet Theater Workshop. She later studied at the Brattleboro

  • Leo, Melissa Chessington (American actress)

    Melissa Leo, American actress who was known for her naturalistic portrayals of tough, flinty women dealing with difficult situations. Leo became enamoured with acting when as a small child she was enrolled in the Peter Schumann Bread and Puppet Theater Workshop. She later studied at the Brattleboro

  • Leoben (Austria)

    Leoben, town, southeast-central Austria, on the Mur River, northwest of Graz. An ancient settlement, it was reestablished as a town by Ottokar II of Bohemia about 1263. Medieval buildings include the Maria am Waasen Church (12th century, rebuilt 15th century) with magnificent Gothic stained-glass

  • Leoben, Peace of (Europe [1797])

    Venice: End of the Venetian republic: The Peace of Leoben left Venice without an ally, and Ludovico Manin, the last doge, was deposed on May 12, 1797. A provisional democratic municipality was set up in place of the republican government, but later in the same year Venice was handed over to Austria.

  • Leochares (Greek sculptor)

    Leochares, Greek sculptor to whom the Apollo Belvedere (Roman copy, Vatican Museum) is often attributed. About 353–c. 350 bc Leochares worked with Scopas on the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, one of the Seven Wonders of the World. Most of his attributions are from ancient records. The base of a statue

  • Leodegar, Saint (French bishop)

    Ebroïn: Leodegar (or Léger), bishop of Autun, of complicity in Childeric’s murder; the bishop’s tongue and lips were cut off before he was finally executed.

  • Leodocia (California, United States)

    Red Bluff, city, seat (1857) of Tehama county, northern California, U.S. It lies along the Sacramento River, 115 miles (185 km) north-northwest of Sacramento. Settled in the 1840s, it was known as Leodocia until sometime before 1854, when it was renamed for the reddish sand and low bluffs on which

  • Leofric (earl of Mercia)

    Leofric, Anglo-Saxon earl of Mercia (from 1023 or soon thereafter), one of the three great earls of 11th-century England, who took a leading part in public affairs. On the death of King Canute in 1035, Leofric supported the claim of Canute’s son Harold to the throne against that of Hardecanute;

  • Léogâne (Haiti)

    Léogâne, city and port on the Gulf of Gonâve, southwestern Haiti, lying approximately 20 miles (32 km) west of Port-au-Prince on the north shore of the country’s southern peninsula. A former French colonial town, Léogâne has long been the centre of a predominantly agricultural region. The city was

  • Léogâne fault (fault, Caribbean)

    2010 Haiti earthquake: The earthquake: …by contractional deformation along the Léogâne fault, a small hidden thrust fault discovered underneath the city of Léogâne. The Léogâne fault, which cannot be observed at the surface, descends northward at an oblique angle away from the EPG fault system, and many geologists contend that the earthquake resulted from the…

  • Leominster (England, United Kingdom)

    Leominster, town (parish), unitary authority and historic county of Herefordshire, west-central England. It is situated on the River Lugg, a tributary of the Wye. A religious house was founded on the site in 660, and the parish church of Saints Peter and Paul was the former priory church. The town

  • Leominster (Massachusetts, United States)

    Leominster, city, Worcester county, north-central Massachusetts, U.S. It lies on the Nashua River, just southeast of Fitchburg and about 40 miles (64 km) northwest of Boston. The site, purchased from the Nashua Indians in 1701, was originally part of Lancaster. It was separately incorporated as a

  • León (Spain)

    León, city, capital of León provincia (province) in Castile-León comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), northwestern Spain. It lies on the northwestern part of the northern Meseta Central (plateau), at the confluence of the Bernesga and Torío rivers. The city developed from the camp of the

  • Leon (medieval kingdom, Spain)

    Leon, medieval Spanish kingdom. Leon proper included the cities of León, Salamanca, and Zamora—the adjacent areas of Vallodolid and Palencia being disputed with Castile, originally its eastern frontier. The kings of Leon ruled Galicia, Asturias, and much of the county of Portugal before Portugal

  • León (Nicaragua)

    León, city situated in western Nicaragua. The city of León was founded on the edge of Lake Managua in 1524, but after an earthquake it was moved in 1610 to the site of the old Indian capital and shrine of Sutiaba. León was the capital of the Spanish province and of the Republic of Nicaragua until

  • León (medieval kingdom, Spain)

    Leon, medieval Spanish kingdom. Leon proper included the cities of León, Salamanca, and Zamora—the adjacent areas of Vallodolid and Palencia being disputed with Castile, originally its eastern frontier. The kings of Leon ruled Galicia, Asturias, and much of the county of Portugal before Portugal

  • León (province, Spain)

    León, provincia (province) in the Castile-León comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), northwestern Spain, consisting of the northern part of the former kingdom of León. In the north are the lofty Cantabrian Mountains, the highest peak of which is the Torrecerredo (8,688 feet [2,648 metres]).

  • León (Mexico)

    León, city, northwestern Guanajuato estado (state), central Mexico. It stands in a fertile plain on the Turbio River, 6,182 feet (1,884 metres) above sea level. Although León was first settled in 1552, it was not formally founded until 1576 and was given city status in 1830. At that time the words

  • León de los Aldamas (Mexico)

    León, city, northwestern Guanajuato estado (state), central Mexico. It stands in a fertile plain on the Turbio River, 6,182 feet (1,884 metres) above sea level. Although León was first settled in 1552, it was not formally founded until 1576 and was given city status in 1830. At that time the words

  • León de Nicaragua (president of Nicaragua)

    Emiliano Chamorro Vargas, prominent diplomat and politician, president of Nicaragua (1917–21). Born to a distinguished Nicaraguan family, Chamorro early became an opponent of the regime of José Santos Zelaya. From 1893 on, Chamorro organized and was active in many of the revolts against this

  • Léon Morin, prêtre (film by Melville [1961])

    Jean-Pierre Melville: Léon Morin, prêtre (1961; “Leon Morin, Priest”) was his first major commercial production. It was followed by a series of highly stylized, Hollywood-inspired gangster films: Le Doulos (1962; Doulos—The Finger Man), Le Deuxième Souffle (1966; “Second Wind”), and Le Samourai (1967; “The Samurai”).

  • Léon Morin, Priest (film by Melville [1961])

    Jean-Pierre Melville: Léon Morin, prêtre (1961; “Leon Morin, Priest”) was his first major commercial production. It was followed by a series of highly stylized, Hollywood-inspired gangster films: Le Doulos (1962; Doulos—The Finger Man), Le Deuxième Souffle (1966; “Second Wind”), and Le Samourai (1967; “The Samurai”).

  • Leon of Modena (Italian rabbi and writer)

    Leone Modena, Italian rabbi, preacher, poet, scholar, gambling addict, and polemicist who wrote an important attack on the Sefer ha-zohar (“Book of Splendour”), the chief text of Kabbala, the influential body of Jewish mystical teachings. By the time Modena was 12, he could translate portions of

  • León Toral, José de (Mexican assassin)

    Mexico: The northern dynasty: Obregón and Calles: …president-elect, he was assassinated by José de León Toral, a religious fanatic.

  • Leon Trotsky on Lenin

    Leon Trotsky’s essay on Vladimir Lenin is historically significant not because it is trustworthy in its judgments but because it is unique. Here is one giant figure writing about another (who happened to have been his boss) at a time when both had been—until Lenin’s death in 1924—engaged in making

  • Leon, Daniel De (American socialist)

    Daniel De Leon, American socialist, one of the founders of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). He was one of the chief propagandists for socialism in the early American labour movement, but his uncompromising tactics were often divisive. De Leon arrived in the United States in 1874. In 1890

  • León, Fuero de (Spanish municipal franchise)

    fuero: …in the west is the Fuero de León (c. 1020), which contains laws applicable to the kingdom in general and to the city of León in particular. The oldest Aragonese fuero was believed to be that of Sorbrarbe (late 11th or early 12th century), though some modern scholars treat it…

  • Léon, Isla de (Spain)

    San Fernando, city, Cádiz provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Andalusia, southwestern Spain. It is situated on a rocky island surrounded by salt marshes that line the southern shore of the Bay of Cadiz, south of Cádiz city. Founded in 1776, it was known as Isla

  • León, Juan Ponce de (Spanish explorer)

    Juan Ponce de León, Spanish explorer who founded the first European settlement on Puerto Rico and who is credited with being the first European to reach Florida (1513). Born into a noble family, Ponce de León was a page in the royal court of Aragon and later fought in a campaign against the Moors

  • León, Luis de (Spanish poet)

    Luis de León, mystic and poet who contributed greatly to Spanish Renaissance literature. León was a monk educated chiefly at Salamanca, where he obtained his first chair in 1561. Academic rivalry between the Dominicans and the Augustinians, whom he had joined in 1544, led to his denunciation to the

  • Leon, Tony (South African politician)

    Democratic Alliance: …fight back,” and its leader, Tony Leon, cultivated a belligerent attitude toward the ruling ANC.

  • Leonais (mythological land)

    Lyonnesse, mythical “lost” land supposed once to have connected Cornwall in the west of England with the Scilly Isles lying in the English Channel. The name Lyonnesse first appeared in Sir Thomas Malory’s late 15th-century prose account of the rise and fall of King Arthur, Le Morte Darthur, in

  • Leonard and Gertrude (novel by Pestalozzi)

    Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi: …novel Lienhard und Gertrud (1781–87; Leonard and Gertrude, 1801), written for “the people,” was a literary success as the first realistic representation of rural life in German. It describes how an ideal woman exposes corrupt practices and, by her well-ordered homelife, sets a model for the village school and the…

  • Leonard Cohen: I’m Your Man (film by Lunson [2005])

    Leonard Cohen: The critically acclaimed documentary Leonard Cohen: I’m Your Man (2005) blended interview and archival footage with performances of Cohen’s songs by a variety of musicians.

  • Leonard, Benny (American athlete)

    Benny Leonard, American world lightweight (135-lb [61.2-kg]) boxing champion from May 28, 1917, when he knocked out Freddy Welsh in nine rounds in New York City, until Jan. 15, 1925, when he retired. He is regarded as one of the cleverest defensive boxers in the history of professional boxing. A

  • Leonard, Buck (American athlete)

    Buck Leonard, American baseball player who was considered one of the best first basemen in the Negro leagues. He was among the first Negro leaguers to receive election into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Leonard, a left-handed hitter, was a semiprofessional player for several years in North Carolina

  • Leonard, Elmore (American author)

    Elmore Leonard, American author of popular crime novels known for his clean prose style, uncanny ear for realistic dialogue, effective use of violence, unforced satiric wit, and colourful characters. Leonard served in the U.S. Naval Reserve (1943–46), then graduated with a bachelor of philosophy

  • Leonard, Elmore John, Jr. (American author)

    Elmore Leonard, American author of popular crime novels known for his clean prose style, uncanny ear for realistic dialogue, effective use of violence, unforced satiric wit, and colourful characters. Leonard served in the U.S. Naval Reserve (1943–46), then graduated with a bachelor of philosophy

  • Leonard, Erika (British author)

    E.L. James, British author best known for the Fifty Shades series of erotic novels. James was the daughter of a Chilean mother and a Scottish father. She studied history at the University of Kent before taking a job as a studio manager’s assistant at the National Film and Television School in

  • Leonard, Frederick C. (American astronomer)

    Meteoritical Society: …elected its founder, the astronomer Frederick C. Leonard of the University of California at Los Angeles, as its first president. Annual meetings were suspended during World War II; when they reconvened in 1946, the members adopted the name Meteoritical Society. With the advent of the space age, the society grew…

  • Leonard, Harlan (American musician)

    Tadd Dameron: …big bands, in particular for Harlan Leonard and His Rockets in the early 1940s. Dizzy Gillespie introduced some of his finest songs, including “Good Bait” and “Our Delight”; Gillespie also premiered his extended orchestral work Soulphony at Carnegie Hall in 1948. The small groups Dameron led on the East Coast…

  • Leonard, Helen Louise (American actress)

    Lillian Russell, American singer and actress in light comedies who represented the feminine ideal of her generation. She was as famous for her flamboyant personal life as for her beauty and voice. Helen Leonard attended convent and private schools in Chicago. About 1877 or 1878 she was taken by her

  • Leonard, Hugh (Irish dramatist)

    Hugh Leonard, (John Joseph Byrne; John Keyes Byrne), Irish dramatist (born Nov. 9, 1926, Dalkey, County Dublin, Ire.—died Feb. 12, 2009, Dublin, Ire.), was admired in Ireland as one of the country’s best playwrights, but outside his native land he was best known for the play Da, a bittersweet

  • Leonard, John (American literary critic)

    John Leonard, American literary critic (born Feb. 25, 1939, Washington, D.C.—died Nov. 5, 2008, New York, N.Y.), with his stylistically ornate and humorous prose, was regarded as one of the preeminent cultural critics of his time. Though he was a lifelong leftist, Leonard began his journalism

  • Leonard, Kawhi (American basketball player)

    San Antonio Spurs: Led by emerging star forward Kawhi Leonard, the Spurs continued to be among the NBA’s elite teams in the years following their fifth championship. In 2015–16 San Antonio won a franchise-record 67 games, which was tied for the fifth highest win total in league history at the time, but the…

  • Leonard, Lionel Frederick (British playwright)

    Frederick Leonard Lonsdale, British playwright and librettist whose lightweight comedies of manners were admired because of their tight construction and epigrammatic wit. Lonsdale established himself as a librettist of musical comedies, chief among them being The King of Cadonia (1908), The Balkan

  • Leonard, Ray Charles (American boxer and television commentator)

    Sugar Ray Leonard, American boxer, known for his agility and finesse, who won 36 of 40 professional matches and various titles. As an amateur, he took an Olympic gold medal in the light-welterweight class at the 1976 Games in Montreal. By his mid-teens Leonard proved adept at boxing, and, as an

  • Leonard, Robert Z. (American director)

    Robert Z. Leonard, American film director who was one of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s premier directors for some 30 years, best known for a series of popular musicals. Leonard studied law at the University of Colorado before moving to Hollywood in 1907. The following year he began acting in short films,

  • Leonard, Robert Zigler (American director)

    Robert Z. Leonard, American film director who was one of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s premier directors for some 30 years, best known for a series of popular musicals. Leonard studied law at the University of Colorado before moving to Hollywood in 1907. The following year he began acting in short films,

  • Leonard, Samuel Leeson (American zoologist)

    Samuel Leeson Leonard, American zoologist (born Nov. 16, 1905, Elizabeth, N.J.—died Nov. 11/12, 2007, Ithaca, N.Y.), conducted pioneering hormone research in animals. In the late 1920s he discovered that the female sex hormone estrogen could prevent ovulation in rats, a result that helped lead to

  • Leonard, Sheldon (American actor and director)

    Sheldon Leonard, American performer, producer, and director whose career ranged from playing roles as rogues on Jack Benny’s radio show and in such films as Guys and Dolls and It’s a Wonderful Life to producing and directing a number of popular television shows, among them "I Spy" and "The Dick V

  • Leonard, Sugar Ray (American boxer and television commentator)

    Sugar Ray Leonard, American boxer, known for his agility and finesse, who won 36 of 40 professional matches and various titles. As an amateur, he took an Olympic gold medal in the light-welterweight class at the 1976 Games in Montreal. By his mid-teens Leonard proved adept at boxing, and, as an

  • Leonard, Walter Fenner (American athlete)

    Buck Leonard, American baseball player who was considered one of the best first basemen in the Negro leagues. He was among the first Negro leaguers to receive election into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Leonard, a left-handed hitter, was a semiprofessional player for several years in North Carolina

  • Leonardi, Giovanni (Roman Catholic priest)

    Saint John Leonardi, ; canonized 1938; feast day October 9), founder of the Roman Catholic Ordo Clericorum Regularium Matris Dei (Clerks Regular of the Mother of God), whose members were commonly called Leonardini; the order was distinguished for learning and was originally devoted to combatting

  • Leonardian Stage (geology)

    Permian Period: Later work: …of four series—namely, the Wolfcampian, Leonardian, Guadalupian, and Ochoan—on the basis of the succession in West Texas and New Mexico.

  • Leonardini (Roman Catholic order)

    Saint John Leonardi: …founder of the Roman Catholic Ordo Clericorum Regularium Matris Dei (Clerks Regular of the Mother of God), whose members were commonly called Leonardini; the order was distinguished for learning and was originally devoted to combatting Protestantism and to promoting the Counter-Reformation.

  • Leonardo (Italian periodical)

    Giovanni Papini: …an influential Florentine literary magazine, Leonardo (1903). During this period he wrote several violently antitraditionalist works, such as Il crepuscolo dei filosofi (1906; “The Twilight of the Philosophers”), in which he expressed disenchantment with traditional philosophies. One of his best-known and most frequently translated books is the autobiographical novel Un…

  • Leonardo da Vinci (Italian artist, engineer, and scientist)

    Leonardo da Vinci, (Italian: “Leonardo from Vinci”) Italian painter, draftsman, sculptor, architect, and engineer whose genius, perhaps more than that of any other figure, epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal. His Last Supper (1495–98) and Mona Lisa (c. 1503–19) are among the most widely

  • Leonardo da Vinci Museum of Science and Technology (museum, Milan, Italy)

    Leonardo da Vinci Museum of Science and Technology, in Milan, museum devoted to the evolution of science since the 15th century, including transport, metallurgy, physics, and navigation. It is housed in the old Olivetan convent of San Vittore, which dates from the early 16th century. The building

  • Leonardo da Vinci’s parachute

    Leonardo da Vinci discussed the parachute in a notebook entry now contained in the Codex Atlanticus. Although it is unlikely that he actually tested his idea, a drawing by da Vinci in the codex shows a pyramid-shaped parachute and is accompanied by the following text: On June 26, 2000, British

  • Leonardo Pisano (Italian mathematician)

    Fibonacci, medieval Italian mathematician who wrote Liber abaci (1202; “Book of the Abacus”), the first European work on Indian and Arabian mathematics. Little is known about Fibonacci’s life beyond the few facts given in his mathematical writings. During Fibonacci’s boyhood his father, Guglielmo,

  • Leoncavallo, Ruggero (Italian composer)

    Ruggero Leoncavallo, Neapolitan opera composer whose fame rests on the opera Pagliacci, which, with Pietro Mascagni’s Cavalleria rusticana (1890), represented a reaction against Richard Wagner and against Romantic Italian opera; both works substituted for the quasi-historical plot a sensational

  • Leonce und Lena (play by Büchner)

    Georg Büchner: Leonce und Lena (written 1836), a satire on the nebulous nature of Romantic ideas, shows the influence of Alfred de Musset and Clemens Brentano. His last work, Woyzeck, a fragment, anticipated the social drama of the 1890s with its compassion for the poor and oppressed.…

  • Leone d’Argento (motion-picture award)

    Venice Film Festival: Among these is the Leone d’Argento (Silver Lion), which has been awarded for achievements such as best direction and best short film, as well as for runners-up among films competing for the Leone d’Oro. Notable Leone d’Oro winners include Rashomon (1950), Last Year at Marienbad (1961), and Brokeback Mountain…

  • Leone d’Oro (motion-picture award)

    Venice Film Festival: …festival’s highest honour by the Leone d’Oro (Golden Lion), awarded to the best film. In 1968 students began to protest the Venice Biennale because of what they perceived to be its increasing commodification of art; as a result, no film prizes were awarded in 1969–79, and the festival’s reputation briefly…

  • Leone de Sommi Portaleone (Italian writer)

    Judah Leone ben Isaac Sommo, Italian author whose writings are a primary source of information about 16th-century theatrical production in Italy. Sommo wrote the first known Hebrew drama, Tzaḥut bediḥuta de-qiddushin (1550; “An Eloquent Comedy of a Marriage”), in which characters such as the pining

  • Leone, Giovanni (Islamic scholar)

    Leo Africanus, traveler whose writings remained for some 400 years one of Europe’s principal sources of information about Islam. Educated at Fès, in Morocco, Leo Africanus traveled widely as a young man on commercial and diplomatic missions through North Africa and may also have visited the city of

  • Leone, Giovanni (president of Italy)

    Giovanni Leone, Italian politician (born Nov. 3, 1908, Pomigliano d’Arco, Italy—died Nov. 9, 2001, Rome, Italy), was a respected member of the Christian Democratic Party, a practicing attorney and professor of criminal law (from 1933), a longtime member of the Italian parliament (1948–67), a life s

  • Leone, Sergio (Italian director)

    Sergio Leone, Italian motion-picture director who was known primarily for his popularization of the “spaghetti western,” a subgenre of movies that were made in Italy but set in the 19th-century American West. The son of a film industry pioneer and an actress, Leone became involved in Italian

  • Leonello d’Este (lord of Ferrara)

    Leon Battista Alberti: Contribution to philosophy, science, and the arts: At the Este court in Ferrara, where Alberti was first made a welcome guest in 1438, the Marchese Leonello encouraged (and commissioned) him to direct his talents toward another field of endeavour: architecture. Alberti’s earliest effort at reviving classical forms of building still stands in Ferrara, a…

  • Leones, Desierto de los (national park, Mexico)

    Mexico: Sports and recreation: …and its first national park, Desierto de los Leones (“Desert of the Lions”), near Mexico City in 1917. The backbone of the park system was created by two presidents: during the 1930s Lázaro Cárdenas established some 40 national parks and 7 reserves, and José López Portillo (1976–82) added another 9…

  • Leones, Patio de los (patio, Granada, Spain)

    court: …centuries, has six, including the Court of the Lions and Court of the Myrtles, the most celebrated of all Muslim patios. In Tudor and Elizabethan England of the 16th century, the principal mansions frequently had a forecourt, with wings of the house projecting forward on either side. The larger houses…

  • Leonhardt and Andra (German company)

    bridge: U.S. designs: …with the German firm of Leonhardt and Andra, its cost was not significantly different from those of other proposals with more conventional designs. The same designers produced the East End Bridge across the Ohio River between Proctorville, Ohio, and Huntington, West Virginia, in 1985. The East End has a major…

  • Leonhardt, Gustav Maria (Dutch harpsichordist and music scholar)

    Gustav Maria Leonhardt, Dutch harpsichordist and music scholar (born May 30, 1928, ’s-Graveland, Neth.—died Jan. 16, 2012, Amsterdam, Neth.), devoted his life to the understanding, appreciation, and recording of the harpsichord and early music in general, notably the works of such Baroque composers

  • Leoni, Leone (Italian sculptor)

    Leone Leoni, Florentine sculptor, goldsmith, and medalist who had a tumultuous, yet successful, career in Milan and was a sculptor for the Spanish court. Leoni was the son of a stonemason, and he began his career as a goldsmith and medalist at the mint in Ferrara (Italy). He was excused from that

  • Leoni, Pompeo (Italian sculptor)

    Pompeo Leoni, Italian late Renaissance sculptor and medalist who, like his father, Leone, was known for his expressive sculpture portraits. In 1556 Pompeo went to Spain to help his father. He produced a large-scale sculpture for the wedding of King Philip II and Anna of Austria in 1570. Also in

  • Leoni, Raúl (Venezuelan politician)

    Venezuela: Technocrats and party politics: …by the Democratic Action candidate Raúl Leoni. The Christian Democrats thereupon withdrew from the governing coalition, but they were replaced by the labour-leftist Democratic Republican Union. The oil and iron ore industries began to boom once more, and a new petrochemical industry was launched. Although prosperity had returned, growing popular…

  • Leonid meteor (astronomy)

    meteor and meteoroid: Meteor showers: The Leonid meteor shower represents a recently formed meteor stream. This shower, though it occurs every year, tends to increase greatly in visual strength every 33 or 34 years, which is the orbital period of the parent comet, Tempel-Tuttle. Such behaviour results from the fact that…

  • Leonidaeum (ruins, Olympia, Greece)

    Olympia: The remains: …of the Altis stood the Leonidaeum, a large hostel for the reception of distinguished visitors, which was built in the 4th century bce and remodeled in Roman times. To the northwest were the Palaestra, where wrestlers and boxers trained, and the gymnasium, which included an elaborate entrance gateway and a…

  • Leonidas (king of Sparta)

    Leonidas, Spartan king whose stand against the invading Persian army at the pass of Thermopylae in central Greece is one of the enduring tales of Greek heroism, invoked throughout Western history as the epitome of bravery exhibited against overwhelming odds. A member of the Agiad house, Leonidas

  • Leônidas (Brazilian athlete)

    Leônidas, (Leônidas da Silva), Brazilian association football (soccer) player (born Sept. 6, 1913, Rio de Janeiro, Braz.—died Jan. 24, 2004, São Paulo, Braz.), was Brazil’s first football hero and the high scorer at the 1938 World Cup finals with eight goals, including four against Poland in a r

  • Leonidas II (king of Sparta)

    Agis IV: …led by the other king, Leonidas II, defeated these proposals, Leonidas was deposed. The ephors of 242 tried to restore him to his throne, but they were replaced by a board headed by Agesilaus.

  • Leonidas of Tarentum (Greek poet)

    Leonidas of Tarentum, Greek poet more important for his influence on the later Greek epigram than for his own poems. About 100 epigrams attributed to him survive, all but two collected in the Greek Anthology. They contain little personal information; he speaks of himself as an impoverished wanderer

  • Leonidas Overlook (area, Minnesota, United States)

    Eveleth: The Leonidas Overlook offers a panoramic view of extensive current mining operations such as the Thunderbird Mine and of former mines such as the Hull-Nelson (closed 1978). The overlook is a man-made hill constructed from mining debris, primarily from the Leonidas Mine (closed 1980), which, at…

  • Leonidov, Leonid (Russian actor)

    Leonid Leonidov, Russian actor, director, and teacher who represented in his work and teachings the precepts of Konstantin Stanislavsky. Leonidov studied at the Moscow Imperial Theatrical School and worked as an actor in Kiev, Odessa, and at Moscow’s Korsh Theatre before joining the Moscow Art

  • Leonidov, Leonid Mironovich (Russian actor)

    Leonid Leonidov, Russian actor, director, and teacher who represented in his work and teachings the precepts of Konstantin Stanislavsky. Leonidov studied at the Moscow Imperial Theatrical School and worked as an actor in Kiev, Odessa, and at Moscow’s Korsh Theatre before joining the Moscow Art

  • Léonin (French composer)

    Léonin, leading liturgical composer of his generation, associated with the Notre Dame, or Parisian, school of composition. The details of Léonin’s life are not known. To him is attributed the Magnus liber organi (c. 1170; “Great Book of Organum”), a collection of two-voiced organum settings,

  • Leonine City (historical district, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: Factional struggles: papacy and nobility: …to be known as the Leonine City. From the late 9th through the mid-11th century, Rome and the papacy were controlled by various families from Rome’s landed nobility, with brief interludes of intervention from the German emperors that were the successors of Charlemagne.

  • leonine verse (poetry)

    Leonine verse, Latin or French verse in which the last word in the line rhymes with the word just before the caesura (as in “gloria factorum temere conceditus horum”). Such rhymes were already referred to as rime leonine in the anonymous 12th-century romance Guillaume d’Angleterre. A later

  • Leoninus (French composer)

    Léonin, leading liturgical composer of his generation, associated with the Notre Dame, or Parisian, school of composition. The details of Léonin’s life are not known. To him is attributed the Magnus liber organi (c. 1170; “Great Book of Organum”), a collection of two-voiced organum settings,

  • Leonor de Castilla (queen of England)

    Eleanor Of Castile, queen consort of King Edward I of England (ruled 1272–1307). Her devotion to Edward helped bring out his better qualities; after her death, his rule became somewhat arbitrary. Eleanor was the daughter of King Ferdinand III of Castile and his wife, Joan of Ponthieu. In 1254 E

  • Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
    Subscribe Today!