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  • Lear, Norman (American producer, writer, and director)

    Norman Lear, American producer, writer, and director known especially for his work on such seminal television series as All in the Family (1971–79), Sanford and Son (1972–77), and The Jeffersons (1975–85). After a brief stint at Emerson College in Boston, Lear enlisted in the U.S. Air Force,

  • Lear, Norman Milton (American producer, writer, and director)

    Norman Lear, American producer, writer, and director known especially for his work on such seminal television series as All in the Family (1971–79), Sanford and Son (1972–77), and The Jeffersons (1975–85). After a brief stint at Emerson College in Boston, Lear enlisted in the U.S. Air Force,

  • Lear, William P. (American engineer and industrialist)

    William P. Lear, self-taught American electrical engineer and industrialist whose Lear Jet Corporation was the first mass-manufacturer of business jet aircraft in the world. Lear also developed the automobile radio, the eight-track stereo tape player for automobiles, and the miniature automatic

  • Lear, William Powell (American engineer and industrialist)

    William P. Lear, self-taught American electrical engineer and industrialist whose Lear Jet Corporation was the first mass-manufacturer of business jet aircraft in the world. Lear also developed the automobile radio, the eight-track stereo tape player for automobiles, and the miniature automatic

  • Learjet 23 (jetliner)

    aerospace industry: Growth of the aircraft industry: His Learjet 23, the first aircraft of this type, began deliveries in 1964.

  • Learmont, Thomas (Scottish poet)

    Thomas The Rhymer, Scottish poet and prophet who was likely the author of the metrical romance Sir Tristrem, a version of the widely diffused Tristan legend. The romance was first printed in 1804 by Sir Walter Scott from a manuscript of about 1300. Thomas is now probably best known through the

  • learned behaviour (psychology)

    learning theory: Contemporary trends in learning theory: …early 1930s the distinction between learned and inherited behaviour seemed clearer than it does now. The view that any bit of behaviour either was learned or simply developed without learning seemed straightforward. Studies based on these expectations led investigators to conclude that rat-killing behaviour among cats is learned rather than…

  • learned helplessness (psychology)

    Learned helplessness, in psychology, a mental state in which an organism forced to bear aversive stimuli, or stimuli that are painful or otherwise unpleasant, becomes unable or unwilling to avoid subsequent encounters with those stimuli, even if they are “escapable,” presumably because it has

  • Learned Ladies, The (play by Molière)

    The Blue-Stockings, comedy in five acts by Molière, produced and published in 1672 as Les Femmes savantes. The play is sometimes translated as The Learned Ladies. Molière ridiculed the intellectual pretensions of the French bourgeoisie in this subtle, biting satire of dilettantes. The central

  • learned motivation (psychology)

    motivation: …both animals and humans; and secondary, or learned, motives, which can differ from animal to animal and person to person. Primary motives are thought to include hunger, thirst, sex, avoidance of pain, and perhaps aggression and fear. Secondary motives typically studied in humans include achievement, power motivation,

  • learned paralysis (pathology)

    phantom limb syndrome: …alleviating pain associated with “learned paralysis,” often experienced by patients whose missing limbs were paralyzed prior to amputation. The box, which does not have a roof, contains a mirror in the centre and usually has two holes, one through which a patient inserts his or her intact limb and…

  • learned society (museum science)

    museum: Collections of learned societies: …of the age was the learned society, many of which were established to promote corporate discussion, experimentation, and collecting. Some commenced as early as the 16th century. Better-known societies, however, date from later years; examples are the Royal Society in London (1660) and the Academy of Sciences in Paris (1666).…

  • Learners, Liturgy of the (Protestant education)

    biblical literature: Protestantism: …Protestant Sunday service is the Liturgy of the Learners, a new revision of the synagogue liturgy. It centres in the biblical word read and preached. The congregation worships in anticipation of and response to the scriptural word. Praise becomes corporate only in hymns sung by the congregation, and prayer voices…

  • learning (psychology)

    Learning, the alteration of behaviour as a result of individual experience. When an organism can perceive and change its behaviour, it is said to learn. The array of learned behaviour includes discrimination learning (where a subject learns to respond to a limited range of sensory characteristics,

  • Learning at Home

    Once considered an exotic novelty reserved for such groups as religious fundamentalists, foreign service families, and touring musicians, Home schooling in the United States by 1999 was enrolling more than 1,500,000 students, up from an estimated 12,500 in 1978. In the 12 states with the most

  • learning control (control system)

    control system: Basic principles.: Learning control implies that the control system contains sufficient computational ability so that it can develop representations of the mathematical model of the system being controlled and can modify its own operation to take advantage of this newly developed knowledge. Thus, the learning control system…

  • learning disabilities (education)

    Learning disabilities, Chronic difficulties in learning to read, write, spell, or calculate, which are believed to have a neurological origin. Though their causes and nature are still not fully understood, it is widely agreed that the presence of a learning disability does not indicate subnormal

  • Learning from Las Vegas (work by Venturi)

    Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown: …work, with coauthor Steven Izenour, Learning from Las Vegas (1972). The authors took the thesis of Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture several steps further and analyzed with wry appreciation the neon-lit urban sprawl and the automobile-oriented commercial architecture of Las Vegas. They questioned the Modernist rejection of the use of…

  • Learning Human, Selected Poems (poetry by Murray)

    Les Murray: Later collections such as Learning Human, Selected Poems (2001) and The Biplane Houses (2005) use forms ranging from folk ballads to limericks to express his appreciation for the natural world. In 2002 he published The Full Dress, which pairs poems with selections of art from the National Gallery of…

  • learning technology (education and technology)

    The EdTech Challenge: …short order, most of today’s educational technology apps and Chromebooks may cease to be cool gadgets, too, settling into the background of established tools that help students learn.

  • learning theory (psychology)

    Learning theory, any of the proposals put forth to explain changes in behaviour produced by practice, as opposed to other factors, e.g., physiological development. A common goal in defining any psychological concept is a statement that corresponds to common usage. Acceptance of that aim, however,

  • Learning to Talk (work by Mantel)

    Hilary Mantel: …of loosely autobiographical short stories, Learning to Talk. Additional recognition came for Beyond Black (2005), a wryly humorous novel about a psychic, which was short-listed for the Orange Prize for Fiction (later the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction), but it was her next book that set the literary world abuzz.

  • Learning Tree, The (novel by Parks)

    Gordon Parks: …first work of fiction was The Learning Tree (1963), a coming-of-age novel about a black adolescent in Kansas in the 1920s. He also wrote forthright autobiographies—A Choice of Weapons (1966), To Smile in Autumn (1979), and Voices in the Mirror (1990). He combined poetry and photography in A Poet and…

  • Leary, Timothy (American psychologist)

    Timothy Leary, American psychologist and author who was a leading advocate for the use of LSD and other psychoactive drugs. Leary, the son of a U.S. Army officer, was raised in a Catholic household and attended the College of the Holy Cross, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and the

  • Leary, Timothy Francis (American psychologist)

    Timothy Leary, American psychologist and author who was a leading advocate for the use of LSD and other psychoactive drugs. Leary, the son of a U.S. Army officer, was raised in a Catholic household and attended the College of the Holy Cross, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and the

  • Leas, the (promenade, Folkestone, England, United Kingdom)

    Folkestone: …sandy cliff to the west, the Leas, a broad promenade with lawns, extends 2 miles (3.2 km) to Sandgate above the shore road and gardens. The 17th-century physician William Harvey was a native and is commemorated by a statue on the Leas.

  • lease (contract)

    Lease, a contract for the exclusive possession of property (usually but not necessarily land or buildings) for a determinate period or at will. The person making the grant is called the lessor, and the person receiving the grant is called the lessee. Two important requirements for a lease are that

  • lease rod (weaving)

    textile: Two-bar: Lease (or laze) rods are used to separate the warp yarns, forming a shed and aiding the hands in keeping the yarns separated and in order. Lease rods were found in some form on every later type of improved loom, and their use at this…

  • least action principle (physics)

    calculus of variations: …mathematician Pierre-Louis Moreau de Maupertuis’s principle of least action (c. 1744), which sought to explain all processes as driven by a demand that some property be economized or minimized. In particular, minimizing an integral, called an action integral, led several mathematicians (most notably the Italian-French Joseph-Louis Lagrange in the 18th…

  • least action, principle of (physics)

    calculus of variations: …mathematician Pierre-Louis Moreau de Maupertuis’s principle of least action (c. 1744), which sought to explain all processes as driven by a demand that some property be economized or minimized. In particular, minimizing an integral, called an action integral, led several mathematicians (most notably the Italian-French Joseph-Louis Lagrange in the 18th…

  • least auklet (bird)

    auklet: …of the family is the least auklet (Aethia pusilla), about 15 cm (6 inches) long. It winters far north in rough waters. The plainest and grayest species is Cassin’s auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus), a common resident from the Aleutians to Baja California.

  • least chipmunk (rodent)
  • least common multiple (mathematics)

    arithmetic: Fundamental theory: …of the numbers, called their least common multiple (LCM).

  • Least Concern (IUCN species status)

    endangered species: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: …status in the near future Least Concern (LC), a category containing species that are pervasive and abundant after careful assessment Data Deficient (DD), a condition applied to species in which the amount of available data related to its risk of extinction is lacking in some way. Consequently, a complete assessment…

  • least confusion, circle of (optics)

    aberration: …smallest size known as the circle of least confusion. The image most free of spherical aberration is found at this distance.

  • least curlew (bird)

    curlew: The least curlew (N. minimus), of eastern Asia, is only 30 cm (12 inches) long.

  • least sandpiper (bird)

    sandpiper: The least sandpiper (C. minutilla), less than 15 cm in length, is the smallest sandpiper. It is sometimes called the American stint and is abundant in Alaska and across sub-Arctic Canada to Nova Scotia. It winters on coasts from Oregon and North Carolina to South America.…

  • least seedsnipe (bird)

    seedsnipe: …is the least, pygmy, or Patagonian seedsnipe (Thinocorus rumicivorus). It covers its eggs with sand when it leaves the nest. The largest (about 30 cm, or 12 in.) is Gay’s seedsnipe (Attagis gayi), which nests high in the Andes.

  • least squares approximation (statistics)

    Least squares method, in statistics, a method for estimating the true value of some quantity based on a consideration of errors in observations or measurements. In particular, the line (the function yi = a + bxi, where xi are the values at which yi is measured and i denotes an individual

  • least squares method (statistics)

    Least squares method, in statistics, a method for estimating the true value of some quantity based on a consideration of errors in observations or measurements. In particular, the line (the function yi = a + bxi, where xi are the values at which yi is measured and i denotes an individual

  • least tern (bird)

    tern: The least, or little, tern (S. albifrons), under 25 cm (10 inches) long, is the smallest tern. It breeds on sandy coasts and river sandbars in temperate to tropical regions worldwide except South America. The sooty tern (S. fuscata), about 40 cm (16 inches) long, has…

  • least upper bound (mathematics)

    foundations of mathematics: Impredicative constructions: … of real numbers has a least upper bound a, one proceeds as follows. (For this purpose, it will be convenient to think of a real number, following Dedekind, as a set of rationals that contains all the rationals less than any element of the set.) One lets x ∊ a…

  • least weasel (mammal)

    carnivore: Form and function: …member of Carnivora is the least weasel (Mustela nivalis), which weighs only 25 grams (0.9 ounce). The largest terrestrial form is the Kodiak bear (Ursus arctos middendorffi), an Alaskan grizzly bear that is even larger than the polar bear (Ursus maritimus). The largest aquatic form is the elephant seal (Mirounga…

  • least-developed country (economics)

    marketing: Marketing intermediaries: the distribution channel: …is, shorter and simpler—in the less industrialized nations. There are notable exceptions, however. For instance, the Ghana Cocoa Marketing Board collects cacao beans in Ghana and licenses trading firms to process the commodity. Similar marketing processes are used in other West African nations. Because of the vast number of small-scale…

  • leather (animal product)

    Leather, animal skins and hides that have been treated with chemicals to preserve them and make them suitable for use as clothing, footwear, handbags, furniture, tools, and sports equipment. The term hide is used to designate the skin of larger animals (e.g., cowhide or horsehide), whereas skin

  • Leather Apron Club (social improvement organization)

    Benjamin Franklin: Achievement of security and fame (1726–53): In 1727 he organized the Junto, or Leather Apron Club, to debate questions of morals, politics, and natural philosophy and to exchange knowledge of business affairs. The need of Junto members for easier access to books led in 1731 to the organization of the Library Company of Philadelphia. Through the…

  • Leather-Stocking Tales, The (novels by Cooper)

    The Leatherstocking Tales, series of five novels by James Fenimore Cooper, published between 1823 and 1841. The novels constitute a saga of 18th-century life among Indians and white pioneers on the New York State frontier through their portrayal of the adventures of the main character, Natty

  • leatherback sea turtle (reptile)

    sea turtle: Physical features and feeding habits: The leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) inhabits pelagic (open ocean) environments. Apparently following the blooms of its jellyfish prey, it moves widely throughout the oceans. The shell lengths of few individuals exceed 1.6 metres (5 feet), although some reportedly reach 2.4 metres (8 feet). Adult and…

  • leatherback turtle (reptile)

    sea turtle: Physical features and feeding habits: The leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) inhabits pelagic (open ocean) environments. Apparently following the blooms of its jellyfish prey, it moves widely throughout the oceans. The shell lengths of few individuals exceed 1.6 metres (5 feet), although some reportedly reach 2.4 metres (8 feet). Adult and…

  • Leatherheads (film by Clooney [2008])

    George Clooney: …in the 1920s football film Leatherheads and then reteamed with the Coen brothers for Burn After Reading, a CIA comedy in which he played an adulterous federal marshal. Clooney later starred as a U.S. soldier trained to use mind control in the comedy The Men Who Stare at Goats (2009),…

  • leatherjacket (insect larva)

    crane fly: …long slender larva, called a leatherjacket because of its tough brown skin. The larvae usually feed on decaying plant tissue; some species are carnivorous, and others damage the roots of cereal and grass crops. The larvae feed all winter, then enter a resting stage in the spring. The adult feeding…

  • leatherleaf (plant)

    Leatherleaf, (Chamaedaphne calyculata), evergreen shrub of the heath family (Ericaceae). The name is also sometimes applied to a stiff-leaved fern. C. calyculata occurs in Arctic regions and in North America as far south as Georgia. It forms large beds at the edges of swamps and boggy meadows. The

  • leatherneck (United States military)

    The United States Marine Corps: …nickname for Marines of “leathernecks.” The forest-green service uniform was introduced in 1912. In naval formations, Marines have the privilege of forming on the right of line or at the head of column, the traditional places of honour and seniority.

  • Leatherstocking (fictional character)

    Natty Bumppo, fictional character, a mythic frontiersman and guide who is the protagonist of James Fenimore Cooper’s five novels of frontier life that are known collectively as The Leatherstocking Tales. The character is known by various names throughout the series, including Leather-Stocking,

  • Leatherstocking Tales, The (novels by Cooper)

    The Leatherstocking Tales, series of five novels by James Fenimore Cooper, published between 1823 and 1841. The novels constitute a saga of 18th-century life among Indians and white pioneers on the New York State frontier through their portrayal of the adventures of the main character, Natty

  • Léaud, Jean-Pierre (French actor)

    Jean-Pierre Léaud, French screen actor who played leading roles in some of the most important French New Wave films of the 1960s and ’70s, particularly ones by François Truffaut. The son of a scriptwriter and an actress, Léaud at age 14 was chosen to play the misunderstood adolescent Antoine Doinel

  • Leave Her to Heaven (film by Stahl [1945])

    John M. Stahl: Leave Her to Heaven (1945) was based on Ben Ames Williams’s best seller about pathological jealousy. Gene Tierney starred as an unstable woman whose obsession with her husband (Cornel Wilde) results in murder and suicide; the supporting cast included Vincent Price and Jeanne Crain. Although…

  • Leave It to Beaver (American television series)

    David Butler: …Train, The Deputy, Twilight Zone, Leave It to Beaver, and Daniel Boone. After helming the feature film C’mon, Let’s Live a Little (1967), he retired.

  • Leave Us Alone Coalition (American political organization)

    Grover Norquist: …well as myriad business leaders—the Leave Us Alone Coalition.

  • Leaven of Malice (novel by Davies)

    Leaven of Malice, novel by Robertson Davies, the second in a series known collectively as the Salterton

  • leavening (cooking process)

    baking: Chemically leavened products: Many bakery products depend on the evolution of gas from added chemical reactants as their leavening source. Items produced by this system include layer cakes, cookies, muffins, biscuits, corn bread, and some doughnuts.

  • leavening agent (baking)

    Leavening agent, substance causing expansion of doughs and batters by the release of gases within such mixtures, producing baked products with porous structure. Such agents include air, steam, yeast, baking powder, and baking soda. Leavening of baked foods with air is achieved by vigorous mixing

  • Leavenworth (Kansas, United States)

    Leavenworth, city, seat (1855) of Leavenworth county, northeastern Kansas, U.S. It lies on the Missouri River. First settled as Fort Leavenworth in 1827 by Colonel Henry H. Leavenworth to protect travelers on the Santa Fe and Oregon trails, the town was organized and laid out in 1854. The following

  • Leavenworth, Fort (fort, Kansas, United States)

    Leavenworth: Fort Leavenworth, 3 miles (5 km) north, includes the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, a national cemetery, and a museum. Leavenworth has long been associated with prisons, and indeed the city’s self-image and marketing revolves around the prison theme; area prisons include a…

  • Leaves from the Notebook of a Tamed Cynic (work by Niebuhr)

    Reinhold Niebuhr: Pastor and theologian: His Leaves from the Notebook of a Tamed Cynic (1929) is an account of his years in Detroit. Niebuhr left the pastoral ministry in 1928 to teach at Union Theological Seminary in New York City, where he served as professor of applied Christianity (from 1930) and…

  • Leaves of Grass (work by Whitman)

    Leaves of Grass, collection of poetry by American author Walt Whitman, first presented as a group of 12 poems published anonymously in 1855. It was followed by five revised and three reissued editions during the author’s lifetime. Poems not published in his lifetime were added in 1897. The

  • Leaves of Grass (film by Nelson [2009])

    Richard Dreyfuss: …drug mogul in the comedy-thriller Leaves of Grass (2009). In 2010 he appeared in the horror movie Piranha 3D in a role intended as an homage to his character in Jaws and then played a wealthy villain in the action comedy RED. Dreyfuss’s roles from 2018 included a man courting…

  • Leaving (play by Havel)

    Václav Havel: …more than 20 years—Odcházení (Leaving), a tragicomedy that draws on his experiences as president and presents a chancellor leaving his post while grappling with a political enemy—premiered in 2008. Havel subsequently directed its film adaptation (2011).

  • Leaving Home, Coming Home: A Portrait of Robert Frank (film by Fox [2004])

    Robert Frank: …was chronicled in the documentaries Leaving Home, Coming Home: A Portrait of Robert Frank (2004) and Don’t Blink—Robert Frank (2015).

  • Leaving Las Vegas (film by Figgis [1995])

    Nicolas Cage: …a self-destructive alcoholic writer in Leaving Las Vegas. He went on to star in a series of large-budget explosive-laden films that were hits at the box office. In The Rock (1996), Con Air (1997), and Face/Off (1997), he appeared opposite such actors as Sean Connery, John Cusack, and John Travolta,…

  • Leaving Neverland (film by Reed [2019])

    Michael Jackson: Child molestation accusations, financial difficulties, and death: Later documentaries included Leaving Neverland (2019), which centres on two men who allege that Jackson sexually abused them when they were children.

  • Leavis, F. R. (British critic)

    F.R. Leavis, English literary critic who championed seriousness and moral depth in literature and criticized what he considered the amateur belletrism of his time. Leavis attended Cambridge University and then served throughout World War I as an ambulance bearer on the Western Front. He lectured at

  • Leavis, Frank Raymond (British critic)

    F.R. Leavis, English literary critic who championed seriousness and moral depth in literature and criticized what he considered the amateur belletrism of his time. Leavis attended Cambridge University and then served throughout World War I as an ambulance bearer on the Western Front. He lectured at

  • Leavitt, David (American author)

    United States: Literature: …novelists, including Edmund White and David Leavitt, who have made art out of previously repressed and unnarrated areas of homoerotic experience. Literature is above all the narrative medium of the arts, the one that still best relates What Happened to Me, and American literature, at least, has only been enriched…

  • Leavitt, Henrietta Swan (American astronomer)

    Henrietta Swan Leavitt, American astronomer known for her discovery of the relationship between period and luminosity in Cepheid variables, pulsating stars that vary regularly in brightness in periods ranging from a few days to several months. Leavitt attended Oberlin College for two years

  • Leavitt, Sam (American cinematographer)
  • Leb (antigen)

    Lewis blood group system: A second antigen, Leb (identified 1948), occurs only when alleles Le and H (of the ABO blood group system) interact; Leb is found only in secretors and reaches a frequency of 70 percent in Europeans.

  • Lebachia (fossil plant genus)

    Lebachia, a genus of extinct cone-bearing plants known from fossils of the Late Carboniferous and Early Permian epochs (from about 318 million to 271 million years ago). Lebachia and related genera in the family Lebachiaceae, order Coniferales (sometimes family Voltziaceae, order Voltziales),

  • Leballo, Potlako (South African black nationalist leader)

    Pan-Africanist Congress of Azania: …group led by Anton Lembede, Potlako Leballo, A.P. Mda, and Robert Sobukwe emerged within the ANC. They wanted South Africa returned to its indigenous inhabitants (“Africa for the Africans”) and were unwilling to give equal rights to all races. The latter point was an axiom of the Freedom Charter of…

  • Lebanese Civil War (Lebanese history)

    Lebanon: Civil war: The attempt to establish a centralized state bureaucracy, begun by Chehab and continued by Hélou, came to an end with the election of Suleiman Franjieh to the presidency in August 1970. Franjieh, a traditional Maronite clan leader from the Zghartā region of northern Lebanon,…

  • Lebanese Forces (Lebanese military unit)

    Beirut: Modern Beirut: …unified Christian militia of the Lebanese Forces (LF). In West Beirut, however, the situation drifted to near total anarchy, as the different Muslim militias repeatedly clashed with one another in the streets to settle sectarian or partisan scores. Security collapsed under these circumstances, and many Lebanese and resident foreigners were…

  • Lebanese National Pact (Lebanese history)

    Lebanese National Pact, power-sharing arrangement established in 1943 between Lebanese Christians and Muslims whereby the president is always a Maronite Christian and the prime minister a Sunni Muslim. The speaker of the National Assembly must be a Shiʿi Muslim. Amendments proposed in the Ṭāʾif

  • Lebanon (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Lebanon, city, seat (1813) of Lebanon county, southeastern Pennsylvania, U.S., in the Lebanon Valley, 23 miles (37 km) east of Harrisburg. Settled by immigrant Germans in the 1720s, it was laid out (c. 1750) by George Steitz and was first called Steitztown. Later it was renamed for the biblical

  • Lebanon (Tennessee, United States)

    Lebanon, city, seat of Wilson county, north-central Tennessee, U.S., about 30 miles (50 km) east of Nashville and about 5 miles (10 km) south of the Cumberland River. Established in 1802 on an overland stagecoach route, it was named for the biblical Lebanon, which had a profusion of cedar trees,

  • Lebanon (county, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Lebanon, county, southeastern Pennsylvania, U.S., located midway between the cities of Harrisburg and Reading. It consists of a central plain that rises to low hills in the south and to Blue Mountain in the north. The county is drained by Swatara, Stony, Little Swatara, Quittapahilla, Tulpehocken,

  • Lebanon (New Hampshire, United States)

    Lebanon, city, Grafton county, western New Hampshire, U.S., on the Mascoma River near its junction with the Connecticut River, just south of Hanover. Founded in 1761 by settlers from Connecticut, the town grew slowly until the arrival (1848) of the railroad brought industrial development.

  • Lebanon

    Lebanon, country located on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea; it consists of a narrow strip of territory and is one of the world’s smaller sovereign states. The capital is Beirut. Though Lebanon, particularly its coastal region, was the site of some of the oldest human settlements in the

  • Lebanon (Missouri, United States)

    Lebanon, city, seat (1849) of Laclede county, south-central Missouri, U.S., in the Ozark Mountains about 50 miles (80 km) northeast of Springfield. Founded about 1849, it was originally called Wyota for the Native Americans who had populated the area, then renamed for Lebanon, Tenn. During the

  • Lebanon (Connecticut, United States)

    Lebanon, town (township), New London county, east-central Connecticut, U.S. Settled in 1695 and incorporated in 1700, its name was inspired by a nearby cedar forest that suggested the biblical cedars of Lebanon. In colonial times the town was on the most direct road between New York City and

  • Lebanon Mountains (mountain range, Lebanon)

    Lebanon Mountains, mountain range, extending almost the entire length of Lebanon, paralleling the Mediterranean coast for about 150 mi (240 km), with northern outliers extending into Syria. The northern section, north of the saddle, or pass, of Ḍahr al-Baydar (through which the Beirut–Damascus

  • Lebanon oak (plant)

    oak: frainetto), Lebanon oak (Q. libani), Macedonian oak (Q. trojana), and Portuguese oak (Q. lusitanica). Popular Asian ornamentals include the blue Japanese oak (Q. glauca), daimyo oak (Q. dentata), Japanese evergreen oak (Q. acuta), and

  • Lebanon stonecress (plant)

    stonecress: Lebanon stonecress (A. cordifolium) has rose-pink flowers on 10- to 25-cm (4- to 10-inch) plants. Fragrant Persian stonecress (A. schistosum) rarely reaches more than 30 cm in height and is cultivated for its fragrant pink flowers.

  • Lebanon, cedar of (plant)

    cedar: deodara), and the cedar of Lebanon (C. libani) are the true cedars. They are tall trees with large trunks and massive, irregular heads of spreading branches. Young trees are covered with smooth, dark-gray bark that becomes brown, fissured, and scaly with age. The needlelike, three-sided, rigid leaves are…

  • Lebanon, flag of

    horizontally striped red-white-red national flag with a central green cedar tree. The width-to-length ratio of the flag is 2 to 3.On September 1, 1920, the state of Greater Lebanon, with French military administration, was proclaimed under a flag derived from French and biblical symbols. The cedar

  • Lebanon, history of

    Lebanon: History: The evidence of tools found in caves along the coast of what is now Lebanon shows that the area was inhabited from the Paleolithic Period (Old Stone Age) through the Neolithic Period (New Stone Age). Village life

  • Lebanon, Mount (mountain range, Lebanon)

    Lebanon Mountains, mountain range, extending almost the entire length of Lebanon, paralleling the Mediterranean coast for about 150 mi (240 km), with northern outliers extending into Syria. The northern section, north of the saddle, or pass, of Ḍahr al-Baydar (through which the Beirut–Damascus

  • Lebanon, Republic of

    Lebanon, country located on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea; it consists of a narrow strip of territory and is one of the world’s smaller sovereign states. The capital is Beirut. Though Lebanon, particularly its coastal region, was the site of some of the oldest human settlements in the

  • Lebanov, Ivan (Bulgarian skier)

    Olympic Games: Lake Placid, New York, U.S., 1980: …won three gold medals, and Ivan Lebanov brought home Bulgaria’s first Winter Olympic medal, a bronze in the 30-km race.

  • Lebap (oblast, Turkmenistan)

    Lebap, oblast (province), southeastern Turkmenistan. It lies along the middle reaches of the Amu Darya (ancient Oxus River), with the Karakum Desert on the left bank and the Kyzylkum and Sundukli deserts on the right. It is largely flat, but in the extreme southeast the spurs of the Gissar

  • Lebar na Núachongbála (Irish literature)

    The Book of Leinster, compilation of Irish verse and prose from older manuscripts and oral tradition and from 12th- and 13th-century religious and secular sources. It was tentatively identified in 1907 and finally in 1954 as the Lebar na Núachongbála (“The Book of Noughval”), which was thought

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