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  • Lajoie, Napoleon (American baseball player)

    Nap Lajoie, American professional baseball player who was one of the game’s best hitters and an outstanding fielder. Lajoie had a .338 career batting average, the second highest ever for a second baseman, with 3,242 hits, the 14th highest total in major league history. Lajoie’s formal education

  • Lajos II (king of Hungary and Bohemia)

    Louis II, king of Hungary and of Bohemia from 1516, who was the last of the Jagiełło line to rule those countries and the last king to rule all of Hungary before the Turks conquered a large portion of it. The only son of Vladislas II of Hungary and Bohemia, Louis was sickly as a child but

  • Lajos Kossuth University (university, Debrecen, Hungary)

    Hungary: Higher education: …Loránd Eötvös University of Budapest, Lajos Kossuth University of Debrecen, Janus Pannonius University of Pécs, Attila József University of Szeged, the Technical University of Budapest, and the Budapest University of Economic Sciences. There were also dozens of specialized schools and colleges throughout the country. In 2000 most of these specialized…

  • Lajos Nagy (king of Hungary)

    Louis I, king of Hungary from 1342 and of Poland (as Louis) from 1370, who, during much of his long reign, was involved in wars with Venice and Naples. Louis was crowned king of Hungary in succession to his father, Charles I, on July 21, 1342. In 1346 he was defeated by the Venetians at Zara (now

  • Lajpat Rai, Lala (Indian writer and politician)

    Lala Lajpat Rai, Indian writer and politician, outspoken in his advocacy of a militant anti-British nationalism in the Indian National Congress (Congress Party) and as a leader of the Hindu supremacy movement. After studying law at the Government College in Lahore, Lajpat Rai practiced at Hissar

  • Lajunen, Samppa (Finnish athlete)

    Olympic Games: Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S., 2002: …silver in Alpine skiing; and Samppa Lajunen of Finland, who won all three Nordic combined events. The Salt Lake Games also saw bobsledder Vonetta Flowers become the first black athlete to win a Winter gold medal. Canadian hockey player Jarome Iginla then became the first black male athlete to win…

  • Lājvard ware (pottery)

    Lājvard ware, type of vase from Kāshān, Iran, mentioned in Abū al-Qāsim’s treatise on ceramics (1301). Vases were executed in simple red, white, black, and gold leaf designs on a turquoise or dark blue matte glaze. The designs were almost exclusively abstract and floral. Lājvard (Persian: “lapis l

  • Lajvardina ware (pottery)

    Lājvard ware, type of vase from Kāshān, Iran, mentioned in Abū al-Qāsim’s treatise on ceramics (1301). Vases were executed in simple red, white, black, and gold leaf designs on a turquoise or dark blue matte glaze. The designs were almost exclusively abstract and floral. Lājvard (Persian: “lapis l

  • Lak language

    Caucasian languages: The Lak-Dargin languages: Lak (also spelled Lakk, with some 100,000 speakers) and Dargin (or Dargwa, with 350,000) are spoken in the central part of Dagestan. Both are written languages. The Lak language is quite homogeneous with regard to its dialects; Dargin, however, possesses several diversified dialects—sometimes considered as…

  • Lak-Dargin languages

    Lak-Dargin languages, two related languages spoken in central Dagestan in the Caucasus—Lak and Dargin. Both are written languages. The dialects of Dargin differ considerably from one another and are considered by some scholars to be separate languages. The Lak-Dargin languages are often placed in t

  • Lak-Dargwa languages

    Lak-Dargin languages, two related languages spoken in central Dagestan in the Caucasus—Lak and Dargin. Both are written languages. The dialects of Dargin differ considerably from one another and are considered by some scholars to be separate languages. The Lak-Dargin languages are often placed in t

  • Laka (people)

    Chad: Ethnic groups: The Laka and Mbum peoples live to the west of the Sara groups and, like the Gula and Tumak of the Goundi area, are culturally distinct from their Sara neighbours. Along the banks of the Chari and Logone rivers, and in the region between the two…

  • lakabi ware (pottery)

    Kāshān ware, in Islamic ceramics, a style of lustreware pottery associated with Kāshān, Persia (Iran), from about the beginning of the 11th century until the mid-14th century. It was derived from motifs in earlier textiles and is especially noted for the density and delicate execution of its

  • Lakagígar (volcano, Iceland)

    Laki, volcanic fissure and mountain in southern Iceland, just southwest of Vatna Glacier (Vatnajokull), the island’s largest ice field. Mount Laki was the only conspicuous topographic feature in the path of the developing fissure eruption that is now known as Lakagígar (English: “Laki Craters”).

  • lakalaka (dance)

    Oceanic music and dance: Polynesia: …dance, which flourishes today, the lakalaka, is performed by men and women together in accompaniment to sung poetry only. Solo and small group dances performed by one, four, or eight women often follow the large group dances and are more concerned with beautiful movements than with interpretation of poetry, although…

  • Lakanal, Joseph (French educator)

    Joseph Lakanal, educator who reformed the French educational system during the French Revolution. At the outbreak of the French Revolution in 1789, Lakanal was working as a teacher. In 1792 he was elected to the revolutionary legislature known as the National Convention. He voted for the execution

  • Lakatos, Imré (British philosopher)

    biology, philosophy of: Molecular biology: …strengths—something the Hungarian-born British philosopher Imré Lakatos (1922–74) called a “rational reconstruction.”

  • Lake (people)

    Plateau Indian: Language: and include the Okanagan, Sinkaietk, Lake, Wenatchee, Sanpoil, Nespelim, Spokan, Kalispel, Pend d’Oreille, Coeur d’Alene, and Flathead peoples. Some early works incorrectly denote all Salishan groups as

  • lake (physical feature)

    Lake, any relatively large body of slowly moving or standing water that occupies an inland basin of appreciable size. Definitions that precisely distinguish lakes, ponds, swamps, and even rivers and other bodies of nonoceanic water are not well established. It may be said, however, that rivers and

  • lake (pigment)

    Lake, any of a class of pigments composed of organic dyes that have been rendered insoluble by interaction with a compound of a metal. The interaction may involve the precipitation of a salt in which the proportions of dye to metal are fixed, or it may be a less well defined attraction between the

  • Lake Baikal Coastal Protection Zone (protected area, Russia)

    Lake Baikal: The Lake Baikal Coastal Protection Zone, covering the lake and its environs (a total of 34,000 square miles [88,000 square km]), was created in 1987, and the same area was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1996.

  • lake breeze (meteorology)

    Sea breeze, a local wind system characterized by a flow from sea to land during the day. Sea breezes alternate with land breezes along the coastal regions of oceans or large lakes in the absence of a strong large-scale wind system during periods of strong daytime heating or nighttime cooling. Those

  • Lake Cargelligo (town, New South Wales, Australia)

    Lake Cargelligo, town, central New South Wales, Australia. It is situated on Lake Cargelligo, near the Lachlan River, in the fertile Riverina district. In 1817 British explorer John Oxley was the first European to visit the lake. The first settler (1842) on the site of the present town named it

  • Lake Chad Basin Commission (African agency)

    Africa: Availability for human use: …Niger Basin Authority, and the Lake Chad Basin Commission.

  • Lake Champlain, Battle of (War of 1812)

    Battle of Plattsburgh, also called the Battle of Lake Champlain, (6–11 September 1814), battle during the War of 1812 that resulted in an important American victory on Lake Champlain that saved New York from possible British invasion via the Hudson River valley. In sum, a British army of some

  • Lake Charles (Louisiana, United States)

    Lake Charles, city, seat (1852) of Calcasieu parish, southwestern Louisiana, U.S., on the Calcasieu River about 70 miles (113 km) west of Lafayette. Adjacent to the town of Sulphur, it is a port of entry on a 34-mile (55-km) deepwater channel (completed 1926) and is linked to the Gulf of Mexico via

  • Lake Chelan National Recreation Area (recreation area, Washington, United States)

    Lake Chelan: …northwestern portion is included within Lake Chelan National Recreation Area (established 1968), which is part of North Cascades National Park Service Complex. The southeastern end of the lake, lying outside of federal lands, is dotted with vacation homes and is heavily visited. The national recreation area is largely within a…

  • lake chubsucker (fish)

    sucker: The lake chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta), for example, is a small species up to 25 cm (10 inches) long, and the bigmouth buffalo fish (Ictiobus cyprinellus), a large sucker, measures up to 90 cm in length and 33 kg (73 pounds) in weight. Suckers are bony but…

  • Lake City (Florida, United States)

    Lake City, city, seat (1832) of Columbia county, northern Florida, U.S., near Osceola National Forest, about 60 miles (100 km) west of Jacksonville. Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto passed through the area in 1539. The city occupies the site of a Seminole village ruled by a chief called Halpatter

  • Lake Clark National Park and Preserve (national park, Alaska, United States)

    Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, rugged wilderness area in southern Alaska, U.S., on the western shore of Cook Inlet, southwest of Anchorage. It was proclaimed a national monument in 1978, and the boundaries and name were altered in 1980 when it became a national park and preserve; the

  • lake current

    lake: Currents: The principal forces acting to initiate water movements in lakes are those due to hydraulic gradients, wind stress, and factors that cause horizontal or vertical density gradients. Lake water movement is usually classified as being turbulent.

  • Lake Debo (lake, Mali)

    Lac Débo, situated in central Mali on a section of the Niger River between Mopti, located 50 mi (80 km) to the south, and Timbuktu, 150 mi to the northeast. In this region the Niger is joined by many lakes, creeks, and backwaters; at high water, Lac Débo becomes part of a general

  • Lake District (region and national park, England, United Kingdom)

    Lake District, famous scenic region and national park in the administrative county of Cumbria, England. It occupies portions of the historic counties of Cumberland, Lancashire, and Westmorland. The national park covers an area of 866 square miles (2,243 square km). It contains the principal English

  • Lake District (geographical region, Chile)

    Chile: Relief: …region, La Frontera and the Lake District (38° to 42° S); and the extreme southern region, Sur (42° S to Cape Horn).

  • Lake Dwellings (pile houses)

    Lake Dwellings, German Pfahlbauten: “pile structures,” remains of prehistoric settlements within what are today the margins of lakes in southern Germany, Switzerland, France, and Italy. According to the theory advanced by the Swiss archaeologist Ferdinand Keller in the mid-19th century, the d

  • Lake Erie, Battle of (United States history)

    Battle of Lake Erie, (Sept. 10, 1813), major U.S. naval victory in the War of 1812, ensuring U.S. control over Lake Erie and precluding any territorial cession in the Northwest to Great Britain in the peace settlement. On Sept. 10, 1813, Master Commandant Oliver Hazard Perry’s fleet of nine ships

  • Lake Forest (Illinois, United States)

    Lake Forest, city, Lake county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. A suburb of Chicago, located 35 miles (55 km) north of downtown, it lies on Lake Michigan. Potawatomi Indians were recent inhabitants of the area when it was first settled in 1835, on a bluff overlooking the lake. It was named in 1855 by

  • Lake Garden (museum, Seremban, Malaysia)

    Seremban: The Lake Gardens, a museum, and a teacher-training college are there. The museum was erected on the model of a Malay house (built without nails, like traditional Sumatran structures). In the foothills, about 25 miles (40 km) east, lies Seri Menanti, site of the palace of…

  • Lake Geneva (Wisconsin, United States)

    Lake Geneva, resort city, Walworth county, southeastern Wisconsin, U.S. It lies on the northeastern shore of Lake Geneva (Geneva Lake) at its outlet, the White River, about 45 miles (70 km) southwest of Milwaukee. It was settled in 1836 and was named for Geneva, New York. Gristmills and sawmills

  • Lake Habbaniyah (lake, Iraq)

    Hawr Al-Ḥabbāniyyah, lake in Al-Anbār muḥāfaẓah (governorate), western Iraq. It is a shallow body of slightly saline water, 54 sq mi (140 sq km) in area, separated from the Euphrates River to the north by the Asibi and Zaban ridges. The lake has been used since antiquity for storing floodwater from

  • Lake Havasu City (Arizona, United States)

    Lake Havasu City, city, Mohave county, western Arizona, U.S., in the Chemhuevi Valley along the Colorado River, west of the Mohave Mountains. A planned community, Lake Havasu City was founded in 1964 and promoted by the industrialist Robert P. McCulloch as the focal point of a recreational and

  • lake herring (fish)

    Cisco, herringlike type of whitefish

  • Lake Hollywood (play by Guare)

    John Guare: Lake Hollywood (2000) chronicles the lives of dissatisfied people and the futility of their idolization of celebrities, and Chaucer in Rome (2002), a sequel to The House of Blue Leaves, satirizes art, religion, and fame. A Few Stout Individuals (2003) is a colourful account of…

  • Lake House, The (film by Agresti [2006])

    Sandra Bullock: …she reunited with Reeves in The Lake House, a romance about two people who fall in love by sending letters forward and backward in time.

  • lake ice

    Ice in lakes and rivers, a sheet or stretch of ice forming on the surface of lakes and rivers when the temperature drops below freezing (0° C [32° F]). The nature of the ice formations may be as simple as a floating layer that gradually thickens, or it may be extremely complex, particularly when

  • lake life cycle

    lake: Shore erosion and coastal features: In a lake’s early stages of existence, its shore is most susceptible to changes from wave and current action. As these changes occur, there is a tendency over time to an equilibrium condition—a balance between form and processes that depends upon the nature of the materials present…

  • Lake Louise (Alberta, Canada)

    Lake Louise, unincorporated place, southwestern Alberta, Canada. It is located on the Bow River in Banff National Park, immediately northeast of the icy blue-green lake of the same name, which is renowned for its scenic beauty. Originally settled in 1884 as a Canadian Pacific Railway construction

  • Lake Maracaibo, Battle of (Venezuelan history [1823])

    Battle of Lake Maracaibo, also called the "Naval Battle of the Lake," (24 July 1823). Here José Prudencio Padilla led the little fleet of Simón Bolívar’s Republic of Gran Colombia to victory over Ángel Laborde y Navarro’s superior Spanish squadron. Against unequal odds, his remarkable daring and

  • Lake Mead National Recreation Area (recreation area, United States)

    Lake Mead: Lake Mead National Recreation Area, established in 1936, has an area of 2,338 square miles (6,055 square km) and extends 240 miles (386 km) along the Colorado River, from the western end of Grand Canyon National Monument to below Davis Dam (1950). It includes Lake…

  • Lake Nakuru National Park (national park, Kenya)

    Africa: Conservation: …more than 8,000 square miles, Lake Nakuru National Park for flamingos, several montane parks, and a marine park. Uganda has several national parks. Tanzania has the famous Serengeti National Park, with its unrivaled populations of plains ungulates, and the parks of Ngorongoro, Lake Manyara, Arusha, and others. Other countries with…

  • Lake of Delhi and of Aston Clinton, Gerard Lake, 1st Viscount (British general)

    Gerard Lake, 1st Viscount Lake, British general, most prominent for his role in suppressing the Irish Rebellion of 1798 and for his campaigns in India from 1801 to 1806 against Daulat Rāo Sindhia of Gwalior and Jaswant Rāo Holkar, leaders of the Marāthā confederacy. Lake served in the Seven Years’

  • Lake Okeechobee, Battle of (Second Seminole War [1837])

    Battle of Lake Okeechobee, (25–28 December 1837). Conflict in the Florida territory between U.S. settlers and Seminole Indians erupted into major violence in December 1835. Seminole warriors murdered a senior Indian agent and a U.S. army officer, then massacred a column of soldiers, igniting the

  • Lake Oswego (Oregon, United States)

    Lake Oswego, city, Clackamas county, northwestern Oregon, U.S., on the Willamette River (and its western extension, 405-acre [164-hectare] Oswego Lake), just south of Portland. Ruins of the Willamette Iron Company’s Oswego blast furnace (1867–93) recall the city’s early iron industry based on Iron

  • Lake Peak (mountain, New Mexico, United States)

    Santa Fe: …featuring Santa Fe Baldy and Lake Peak, both more than 12,000 feet (3,650 metres) in elevation. At the mountains’ southern end is Glorieta Mesa, an area of hilly, grassy plains in the Basin and Range Province, with a landscape marked by colourful hills, mesas, and isolated mountains. The Rio Grande,…

  • Lake Pedder National Park (national park, Tasmania, Australia)

    Southwest National Park, national park in southwestern Tasmania, Australia, covering more than 2,350 square miles (6,080 square km). Together with the adjacent Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park (established in 1981), Southwest forms the core of the Tasmanian Wilderness, a World Heritage

  • Lake Peipsi, Battle of (Russian history)

    Lake Peipus: …“Battle on the Ice” (Ledovoye Poboishche). His victory (April 5) forced the grand master of the Knights to relinquish all claims to the Russian lands that he had conquered and substantially reduced the Teutonic threat to northwestern Russia.

  • Lake Placid (New York, United States)

    Lake Placid, village in North Elba town (township), Essex county, northeastern New York, U.S. It lies on Mirror Lake and Lake Placid, at the foot of Whiteface Mountain (4,867 feet [1,483 metres]), in the Adirondack Mountains. The site was settled in 1800 but was abandoned after crop failures.

  • Lake Placid (film by Miner [1999])

    Betty White: …later movies included the thriller Lake Placid (1999) and the romantic comedies The Proposal (2009) and You Again (2010). In 2019 she voiced the character Bitey White, a teething ring, in the animated feature Toy Story 4.

  • Lake Placid 1932 Olympic Winter Games

    Lake Placid 1932 Olympic Winter Games, athletic festival held in Lake Placid, N.Y., that took place Feb. 4–15, 1932. The Lake Placid Games were the third occurrence of the Winter Olympic Games. Worldwide economic depression cast a shadow over the third Winter Olympics. Only 17 countries attended,

  • Lake Placid 1980 Olympic Winter Games

    Lake Placid 1980 Olympic Winter Games, athletic festival held in Lake Placid, N.Y., U.S., that took place Feb. 13–24, 1980. The Lake Placid Games were the 13th occurrence of the Winter Olympic Games. The 1980 Games marked the second time the small upstate New York town had hosted the Winter

  • Lake Plateau (region, East Africa)

    Nile River: Physiography: …into seven major regions: the Lake Plateau of East Africa, the Al-Jabal (El-Jebel), the White Nile, the Blue Nile, the Atbara, the Nile north of Khartoum in Sudan and Egypt, and the Nile delta.

  • Lake poet (English literary circle)

    Lake poet, any of the English poets William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Robert Southey, who lived in the English Lake District of Cumberland and Westmorland (now Cumbria) at the beginning of the 19th century. They were first described derogatorily as the “Lake school” by Francis

  • Lake Pontchartrain Causeway (bridge, Louisiana, United States)

    Lake Pontchartrain: …by several bridges, notably the Pontchartrain Causeway. The causeway consists of two parallel road bridges, completed in 1956 and 1969, respectively, each of which runs for nearly 24 miles (39 km) northward across the lake from Metairie (a suburb of New Orleans) to Mandeville. The twin spans, among the longest…

  • Lake Regions of Central Africa (work by Burton)

    Sir Richard Burton: Exploration in Arabia: His Lake Regions of Central Africa (1860) attacked Speke’s claims and exacerbated their by then public feud.

  • Lake Reminiscences (work by De Quincey)

    Thomas De Quincey: …other autobiographical writings, the so-called Lake Reminiscences (first printed in Tait’s Magazine, 1834–40), which deeply offended Wordsworth and the other Lake poets, remains of great interest, although it is highly subjective, not without malice, and unreliable in matters of detail. As a literary critic De Quincey is best known for…

  • Lake Ridge (ridge, North America)

    Niagara Escarpment, ridge in North America that extends (with breaks) for more than 650 miles (1,050 km) from southeastern Wisconsin north to the Door Peninsula in the eastern part of the state, through the Manitoulin Islands of Ontario in northern Lake Huron, southward across the Bruce Peninsula,

  • lake salmon (fish)

    Atlantic salmon: …ouananiche) of rivers and the sebago, or lake, salmon (S. salar sebago) are smaller, landlocked forms of Atlantic salmon, also prized for sport. The Atlantic salmon has also been successfully introduced into the Great Lakes of the United States. (See also salmon.)

  • Lake Shore Drive (highway, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Potter Palmer: …developing it into the beautiful Lake Shore Drive area.

  • Lake Shore Drive (area, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Potter Palmer: …developing it into the beautiful Lake Shore Drive area.

  • Lake Shore Drive Apartments (building, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Ludwig Mies van der Rohe: Mies in America: …Apartments in Chicago (1949), the Lake Shore Drive Apartments (1949–51) in that city, and the Seagram Building (1956–58) in New York City, a skyscraper office building with a glass, bronze, and marble exterior that Mies designed with Philip Johnson. These buildings exemplify Mies’s famous principle that “less is more” and…

  • Lake Skadarsko (lake, Europe)

    Lake Scutari, largest lake in the Balkans, on the frontier between Montenegro and Albania. Its area is 150 square miles (390 square km), but it reaches 205 square miles (530 square km) at its seasonal high water. The lake was formerly an arm of the Adriatic Sea. On its west and northwest are steep

  • lake stratification

    lake: Salinity, nutrients, and oxygen: In the warmer seasons, although surface waters may remain more or less saturated and even supersaturated, the concentrations are lower. Beneath the surface, oxygen consumption through biological decay may cause serious depletion. Oxygen depletion also occurs near the bottom because of processes at the mud-water interface, many of which are…

  • lake sturgeon (fish)

    sturgeon: Distribution: The lake, or rock, sturgeon (A. fulvescens) of North America occurs in the Mississippi River valley, Great Lakes, and Canada and may weigh more than 90 kg (200 pounds). The white, Oregon, or Sacramento sturgeon (A. transmontanus) occurs on the Pacific coast and is the largest…

  • Lake Superior Provincial Park (park, Ontario, Canada)

    Lake Superior Provincial Park, park, central Ontario, Canada, on the eastern shore of Lake Superior. Established in 1944 to preserve the rugged shoreline and surrounding region of pink granitic hills, it has an area of 595 square miles (1,540 square km). Among the park’s attractions are the Agawa

  • Lake Superior whitefish (fish)

    whitefish: …by such other names as Lake Superior whitefish, whiting, and shad. It averages about 2 kg (4.5 pounds) in weight.

  • Lake Superior-type banded-iron formation deposit

    mineral deposit: Iron deposits: …Lake Superior and are called Lake Superior-type deposits. Their individual sediment layers can be as thin as 0.5 millimetre (0.02 inch) or as thick as 2.5 centimetres (1 inch), but the alternation of a siliceous band and an iron mineral band is invariable. Several points about Lake Superior-type deposits are…

  • Lake Superior-type BIF deposit

    mineral deposit: Iron deposits: …Lake Superior and are called Lake Superior-type deposits. Their individual sediment layers can be as thin as 0.5 millimetre (0.02 inch) or as thick as 2.5 centimetres (1 inch), but the alternation of a siliceous band and an iron mineral band is invariable. Several points about Lake Superior-type deposits are…

  • Lake Telets (lake, Russia)

    Asia: Lakes: …furthermore, encircled by lava, and Lake Telets was gouged out by ancient glaciation. A number of lakes were formed as the result of landslides (Lake Sarez in the Pamirs), karst processes (the lakes of the western Taurus, in Turkey), or the formation of lava dams (Lake Jingpo in northeastern China…

  • lake trout (fish)

    Lake trout, (Salvelinus namaycush), large, voracious char, family Salmonidae, widely distributed from northern Canada and Alaska, U.S., south to New England and the Great Lakes basin. It is usually found in deep, cool lakes. The fish are greenish gray and covered with pale spots. In spring, lake

  • Lake Turkana remains (hominin fossils)

    Lake Turkana remains, collection of hominin fossils found along the shores of Lake Turkana (Lake Rudolf) in northwestern Kenya. The Koobi Fora site on the lake’s eastern shore, excavated by the Leakey family and others, has proved to be the richest trove of hominin remains anywhere in the world,

  • Lake Tyers (Victoria, Australia)

    Lake Tyers: Lake Tyers opens into the Tasman Sea to the south. The lake was named for Charles James Tyers, a surveyor who was appointed commissioner of crown lands in 1842. The nearby township of Lake Tyers, together with 4,000 acres (1,600 hectares), was an Aboriginal reserve…

  • Lake Võrts (lake, Estonia)

    Võrtsjärv, lake (järv) in south-central Estonia, with an area of about 110 square miles (280 square km). Võrtsjärv forms part of the 124-mile (200-km) course of the Ema River (German: Embach), which enters the lake from the south and drains it toward the north and east into Lake Peipus on the

  • Lake Wales (Florida, United States)

    Lake Wales, city, Polk county, central Florida, U.S., 55 miles (90 km) east of Tampa. The site was surveyed in 1879 by Sidney Wailes, and the lake (originally called Watts) was renamed for him. The town was founded in 1911, and its name had been changed to Wales by the time a post office was

  • Lake Washington Ship Canal (waterway, United States)

    Lake Washington Ship Canal, waterway, Seattle, Washington, U.S., 8 miles (13 km) long, with a minimum depth of 28.5 feet (8.7 metres), connecting Shilshole Bay (Puget Sound) with Lake Washington, passing through Lake Union, Portage Bay, and Union Bay. The canal was constructed between 1901 and 1911

  • lake whitefish (fish)

    protacanthopterygian: Ecology: …of the Northern Hemisphere, several whitefish species (Coregonus) are comparable, ecologically, to the herrings in the ocean. Such whitefishes, which are often called freshwater herrings, cruise the open water of lakes, filtering out minute organisms by straining the water through a fine mesh of gill rakers—minute bony elements attached to…

  • Lake’s Crossing (Nevada, United States)

    Reno, city, seat (1871) of Washoe county, western Nevada, U.S. Although it is one of Nevada’s largest cities, its traditional nickname is “The Biggest Little City in the World.” The city lies on the Truckee River, near the California border and the Sierra Nevada foothills, amid magnificent and

  • Lake, Anthony (United States statesman)

    20th-century international relations: Assertive multilateralism in theory and practice: …Christopher and National Security Adviser Anthony Lake, included veterans of the Carter administration, which had emphasized human rights. They, in turn, were influenced by academic theories holding that military power was now less important than economic power and that the end of the Cold War would finally permit the United…

  • Lake, Gerard (British general)

    Gerard Lake, 1st Viscount Lake, British general, most prominent for his role in suppressing the Irish Rebellion of 1798 and for his campaigns in India from 1801 to 1806 against Daulat Rāo Sindhia of Gwalior and Jaswant Rāo Holkar, leaders of the Marāthā confederacy. Lake served in the Seven Years’

  • Lake, Gerard Lake, 1st Viscount (British general)

    Gerard Lake, 1st Viscount Lake, British general, most prominent for his role in suppressing the Irish Rebellion of 1798 and for his campaigns in India from 1801 to 1806 against Daulat Rāo Sindhia of Gwalior and Jaswant Rāo Holkar, leaders of the Marāthā confederacy. Lake served in the Seven Years’

  • Lake, Greg (British musician)

    Greg Lake, (Gregory Stuart Lake), British musician (born Nov. 10, 1947, Poole, Dorset, Eng.—died Dec. 7, 2016, London, Eng.), was a founding member of the progressive rock bands King Crimson and Emerson Lake & Palmer (ELP). Lake was admired for his soaring vocals and his musicianship on the bass

  • Lake, Gregory Stuart (British musician)

    Greg Lake, (Gregory Stuart Lake), British musician (born Nov. 10, 1947, Poole, Dorset, Eng.—died Dec. 7, 2016, London, Eng.), was a founding member of the progressive rock bands King Crimson and Emerson Lake & Palmer (ELP). Lake was admired for his soaring vocals and his musicianship on the bass

  • Lake, Harriette (American actress)

    Ann Sothern, (Harriette Lake), American actress (born Jan. 22, 1909, Valley City, N.D.—died March 15, 2001, Ketchum, Idaho), achieved fame with her roles in films that included Maisie (1939) and Lady Be Good (1941) and as the star of the 1950s television series Private Secretary. Sothern began h

  • Lake, Kirsopp (British scholar)

    biblical literature: Minuscules: …20th century, the English scholar Kirsopp Lake (hence, Lake group) discovered a textual family of manuscripts known as Family 1:1, 118, 131, and 209 (from the 12th to 14th centuries) that have a text type similar to that of Θ, a 3rd–4th-century Caesarean type. At the end of the 19th…

  • Lake, Max Emory (Australian surgeon, winemaker, and author)

    Max Emory Lake, Australian surgeon, winemaker, and author (born July 24, 1924, Albany, N.Y.—died April 14, 2009, Sydney, Australia), founded (1963) Lake’s Folly, the first modern vineyard in New South Wales’s Hunter Valley, where he pioneered Australia’s boutique wine industry. When Lake was born,

  • Lake, Simon (American inventor)

    Simon Lake, U.S. inventor who built the “Argonaut,” the first submarine to operate extensively in the open sea. Lake’s first experimental submarine, the “Argonaut, Jr.,” built in 1894, had a wooden hull and was about 14 feet (4 metres) long. It travelled the sea bottom on wheels turned by hand. The

  • Lake, The (novel by Moore)

    George Moore: …and a short poetic novel, The Lake (1905). The real fruits of his life in Ireland, however, came with the trilogy Hail and Farewell (Ave, 1911; Salve, 1912; Vale, 1914). Discursive, affectionate, and satirical by turns, it reads like a sustained monologue that is both a carefully studied piece of…

  • Lake, Veronica (American actress)

    The Blue Dahlia: …of actors Alan Ladd and Veronica Lake. The screenplay was written by novelist Raymond Chandler, who earned an Academy Award nomination.

  • lake-level fluctuation

    East African lakes: Geology, climate, and hydrology: The levels of the East African lakes are perceptibly sensitive to climatic fluctuations. Average seasonal ranges of level are small: no more than 1 foot (0.3 metre) on Lake Victoria, 1.3 feet (0.4 km) on Lake Albert, and 3 to 4 feet (0.9 to 1.2 metres)…

  • Lakeba Island (island, Fiji)

    Lakeba Island, volcanic Pacific island in the Lau Group of Fiji, South Pacific Ocean. It is 22 square miles (57 square km) in area, rises to 720 feet (220 metres), and was the site, in 1835, of Fiji’s first Wesleyan missionary settlement (1835). The Lakemba Passage separates Lakeba from the islets

  • Lakehead (city, Ontario, Canada)

    Thunder Bay, city, seat of Thunder Bay district, west-central Ontario, Canada, on Lake Superior’s Thunder Bay, at the mouth of the Kaministiquia River. Probably first occupied by French fur traders as early as 1678, its site was permanently settled only after the birth of the towns Port Arthur and

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