• 0-9
  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g
  • h
  • i
  • j
  • k
  • l
  • m
  • n
  • o
  • p
  • q
  • r
  • s
  • t
  • u
  • v
  • w
  • x
  • y
  • z
  • Laguna Beach (California, United States)

    Laguna Beach, city, Orange county, southwestern California, U.S. Lying along the Pacific Ocean, Laguna Beach is about 50 miles (80 km) south of Los Angeles. Part of the Mexican land grant (1837) called Rancho San Joaquin, it was named Lagona, a corruption of the Spanish word meaning “lagoon,” for

  • Laguna Blanca National Park (park, Argentina)

    Neuquén: …the province has Lanín and Laguna Blanca national parks.

  • Laguna de Caratasca (lagoon, Honduras)

    Caratasca Lagoon, lagoon in northeastern Honduras. The country’s largest lagoon, Caratasca extends inland from the Caribbean Sea for approximately 25 miles (40 km) and measures up to 55 miles (88 km) from northwest to southeast. It is linked to the Caribbean by a 3-mile (5-kilometre) channel, on

  • Laguna de los Cerros (archaeological site, Mexico)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: The rise of Olmec civilization: Laguna de los Cerros, just south of the Cerro Cintepec in Veracruz, appears to have been a large Olmec site with outstanding sculptures. La Venta, just east of the Tabasco border, was another contemporary site, but it reached its height after San Lorenzo had gone…

  • Laguna de Tamiahua (lagoon, Mexico)

    Tamiahua Lagoon, long coastal lagoon in Veracruz state, eastern Mexico. An inlet of the Gulf of Mexico, it extends approximately 65 miles (105 km) southward from Tampico. A long, narrow, sandy peninsula from which Cape Rojo projects eastward shelters the 12-mile- (19-km-) wide lagoon from the Gulf.

  • Laguna District (district, Mexico)

    Laguna District, agricultural area comprising adjoining portions of western Coahuila and eastern Durango states, northern Mexico. The district, which contains approximately 312,000 acres (126,000 hectares) of irrigable land, was named for the shallow lagoons that were formed on the plains. The

  • Laguna Project (irrigation project, Mexico)

    Mexico: Agriculture: The Laguna Project near Torreón was the country’s first attempt at providing water to the arid North, and huge cooperative ejidos were formed to farm cotton using modern mechanized methods. This was followed by the Las Delicias Project near Chihuahua, which also featured cotton but later…

  • Laguna Woman (work by Silko)

    Leslie Marmon Silko: …stories and the poetry collection Laguna Woman (1974).

  • Lagunaria patersoni (plant)

    Sugarplum tree, (Lagunaria patersoni), plant of the mallow family (Malvaceae), native to Australia and grown in warm temperate regions as an ornamental. Because of its shapely growth and regularly spaced branches, it is sometimes grown along avenues. The tree grows to about 15 m (50 feet) in height

  • Lagurus lagurus (rodent)

    lemming: …wood lemming (Myopus schisticolor) and steppe lemming (Lagurus lagurus) are the smallest, measuring 8 to 12 cm (3.1 to 4.7 inches) in body length and weighing 20 to 30 grams (0.7 to 1.0 ounce). The other species are larger, weighing 30 to 112 grams, with bodies 10 to 22 cm…

  • Lagurus ovatus (plant)

    Hare’s-tail grass, (Lagurus ovatus), annual grass of the family Poaceae, native to shores of the Mediterranean region. Hare’s-tail grass is cultivated as an ornamental and is commonly used in dried bouquets. The plant has naturalized in parts of Australia and the United Kingdom and is considered an

  • Lagutin, Boris Nikolayevich (Soviet athlete)

    Boris Nikolayevich Lagutin, Soviet boxer who won medals in three consecutive Olympic Games, including gold medals in 1964 and 1968. Fighting as a light middleweight (156 pounds [71 kg]), Lagutin was awarded a bronze medal at the 1960 Olympics in Rome after losing a split decision to the eventual

  • Lagynion (golden algae genus)

    algae: Annotated classification: >Lagynion, and Ochromonas. Class Dictyochophyceae Predominantly marine flagellates, including silicoflagellates that form skeletons common in diatomite deposits; fewer than 25 described species. Order Pedinellales When pigmented, has 6

  • LAH (Nazi army unit)

    Josef Dietrich: …in 1932 evolved into the Leibstandarte-SS Adolf Hitler (LAH), which served as Hitler’s personal army and later became a division in the Waffen-SS. As a reward for the role played by the LAH in the violent purge of Ernst Röhm and other high-ranking SA officers in June 1934, Dietrich was…

  • Lahaina (Hawaii, United States)

    Lahaina, city, Maui county, on the northwest coast of Maui island, Hawaii, U.S. Extending for 2 miles (3 km) along the leeward (southern) shore, the city is backed by volcanic peaks culminating in Puu Kukui (5,788 feet [1,764 metres]) and sheltered by thick groves of coconut palms. Originally a

  • Lahamu (Mesopotamian mythology)

    Lahmu and Lahamu, in Mesopotamian mythology, twin deities, the first gods to be born from the chaos that was created by the merging of Apsu (the watery deep beneath the earth) and Tiamat (the personification of the salt waters); this is described in the Babylonian mythological text Enuma elish (c.

  • lahar (volcanic mudflow)

    Lahar, mudflow of volcanic material. Lahars may carry all sizes of material from ash to large boulders and produce deposits of volcanic conglomerate. Lahars may be the result of heavy rain on loose ash material such as deposits of nuées ardentes (dense clouds of gases charged with incandescent

  • Lāhawr (Pakistan)

    Lahore, second largest city of Pakistan and the capital of Punjab province. It lies 811 miles (1,305 km) northeast of Karāchi in the upper Indus plain on the Rāvi River, a tributary of the Indus. Little is known of the history of the settlement prior to the Muslim period. Hindu legend attributes

  • LaHaye, Tim (American Baptist evangelical leader)

    Tim LaHaye, (Timothy Francis LaHaye), American evangelical leader (born April 27, 1926, Detroit, Mich.—died July 25, 2016, San Diego, Calif.), was the coauthor (with Jerry B. Jenkins) of the Left Behind series of novels (1995–2007), a collection of 16 thrillers based on a fundamentalist

  • LaHaye, Timothy Francis (American Baptist evangelical leader)

    Tim LaHaye, (Timothy Francis LaHaye), American evangelical leader (born April 27, 1926, Detroit, Mich.—died July 25, 2016, San Diego, Calif.), was the coauthor (with Jerry B. Jenkins) of the Left Behind series of novels (1995–2007), a collection of 16 thrillers based on a fundamentalist

  • Lahbabi, Mohammed Aziz (Moroccan writer and philosopher)

    Mohammed Aziz Lahbabi, Moroccan novelist, poet, and philosopher whose works are marked by a humanist perspective that stresses the importance of dialogue and of the universal. Lahbabi taught philosophy at the University of Rabat, where he was dean of the faculty of letters as well as professor, and

  • Lahej (Yemen)

    Laḥij, town, southwestern Yemen. Situated on the Wadi Tibban in the coastal plain, some 30 miles (45 km) north of Aden, it is the centre of an agricultural area. Its sparse rainfall occurs chiefly in the winter season. Under the former Aden Protectorate, a British-ruled area, it was capital of the

  • Laḥij (Yemen)

    Laḥij, town, southwestern Yemen. Situated on the Wadi Tibban in the coastal plain, some 30 miles (45 km) north of Aden, it is the centre of an agricultural area. Its sparse rainfall occurs chiefly in the winter season. Under the former Aden Protectorate, a British-ruled area, it was capital of the

  • Lahina (Sikh Guru)

    Angad, second Sikh Guru and standardizer of the Punjabi script, Gurmukhi, in which many parts of the Adi Granth, the sacred book of the Sikhs, are written. While on a pilgrimage to the shrine of a Hindu goddess, Angad met the founder of the Sikh religion, Guru Nanak, whom he resolved to follow.

  • Lahiri, Jhumpa (American author)

    Jhumpa Lahiri, English-born American novelist and short-story writer whose works illuminate the immigrant experience, in particular that of East Indians. Lahiri was born to Bengali parents from Calcutta (now Kolkata)—her father a university librarian and her mother a schoolteacher—who moved to

  • Lahiri, Nilanjana Sudeshna (American author)

    Jhumpa Lahiri, English-born American novelist and short-story writer whose works illuminate the immigrant experience, in particular that of East Indians. Lahiri was born to Bengali parents from Calcutta (now Kolkata)—her father a university librarian and her mother a schoolteacher—who moved to

  • Lahmiales (order of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: …placed in any class) Order Lahmiales Pathogenic on trees, mainly aspens; example genus is Lahmia. Order Medeolariales Saprotrophic; example genus is Medeolaria. Order Triblidiales Saprotrophic; ascomata solitary or clustered; example genera

  • Lahmu and Lahamu (Mesopotamian mythology)

    Lahmu and Lahamu, in Mesopotamian mythology, twin deities, the first gods to be born from the chaos that was created by the merging of Apsu (the watery deep beneath the earth) and Tiamat (the personification of the salt waters); this is described in the Babylonian mythological text Enuma elish (c.

  • Lahn River (river, Germany)

    Lahn River, river, a right-bank tributary of the Rhine River, rising on the Jagd Berg (2,218 feet [676 m]), a summit of the Rothaar Hills in western Germany. The river, which is 152 miles (245 km) long, first flows eastward and then southward to Giessen, before turning southwestward and, with a

  • Lahnda language (Indo-Aryan language)

    Lahnda language, group of Indo-Aryan dialects spoken in and around the western districts of Punjab province in Pakistan. The Punjabi word lahnda, literally meaning “west,” was first used in this sense by Irish linguist Sir George Grierson in the Linguistic Survey of India (1903–28) as a convenient

  • Lahnda script

    Gurmukhi alphabet: …have been modified from the Lahnda script, which is used to write the Punjabi, Sindhi, and Lahnda (now considered to consist of Siraiki and Hindko) languages. Lahnda, Gurmukhi, and two other scripts used in northwestern India—Sharada and Takri—make up a related group that is probably descended from a common ancestor.…

  • Lahndi language (Indo-Aryan language)

    Lahnda language, group of Indo-Aryan dialects spoken in and around the western districts of Punjab province in Pakistan. The Punjabi word lahnda, literally meaning “west,” was first used in this sense by Irish linguist Sir George Grierson in the Linguistic Survey of India (1903–28) as a convenient

  • Lahontan, Lake (ancient lake, North America)

    North America: Lakes: …rise to the enormous Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville. The Great Salt Lake is a relic of Lake Bonneville, the ancient strandlines of which are up to 1,000 feet (300 metres) above the present shoreline. Similarly, present-day Lake Chapala in Mexico represents only a small portion of the large body of…

  • Lahontan, Louis-Armand de Lom d’Arce, baron de (French soldier)

    Louis-Armand de Lom d’Arce, baron de Lahontan, French soldier and writer who explored parts of what are now Canada and the United States and who prepared valuable accounts of his travels in the New World. Lahontan went to Canada in 1683 as a marine lieutenant. He participated in an unsuccessful

  • Lahore (Pakistan)

    Lahore, second largest city of Pakistan and the capital of Punjab province. It lies 811 miles (1,305 km) northeast of Karāchi in the upper Indus plain on the Rāvi River, a tributary of the Indus. Little is known of the history of the settlement prior to the Muslim period. Hindu legend attributes

  • Lahore Ahmadiyya Movement (Islamic organization)

    Aḥmadiyyah: The Lahore group (Lahore Ahmadiyya Movement) members are also proselytizers, though more concerned in gaining converts to Islam than to their particular sect. Led from its inception to his death in 1951 by Mawlana Muhammad Ali, the sect has been active in English- and Urdu-language publishing and in…

  • Lahore Fort (fort, Pakistan)

    Lahore: …of Wazīr Khān (1634) and Lahore Fort. A walled complex that covers some 36 acres (14.5 hectares), the fort is a splendid example of Mughal architecture; it was partially built by Akbar (reigned 1556–1605) and extended by the next three emperors. The mosque and the fort are decorated in marble…

  • Lahore Museum (museum, Lahore, Pakistan)

    Lahore Museum, in Lahore, Pak., archaeological museum opened in 1894 and containing examples of the arts and crafts of the province of Punjab, including sculpture, coins, and Kangra (Pahari) and Mughal paintings and fabrics. Greco-Buddhist sculptures excavated from sites in the Peshāwar district

  • Lahore Resolution (Indian-Pakistani history)

    India: The impact of World War II: The famous Lahore Resolution, later known as the Pakistan Resolution, was passed by the largest gathering of league delegates just one day after Jinnah informed his followers that “the problem of India is not of an inter-communal but manifestly of an international character.” The league resolved, therefore,…

  • Lahore, Treaty of (Indian history)

    India: The completion of dominion and expansion: By the Treaty of Lahore they took Kashmir and its dependencies, with the fertile Jullundur (now Jalandhar) area, reduced the regular army to 20,000 infantry and 12,000 cavalry, and exacted a sizable cash indemnity. The British then sold Kashmir to the Hindu chief Gulab Singh of Jammu,…

  • Lahoud, Émile (president of Lebanon)

    Émile Lahoud, Lebanese military commander who served as president of Lebanon (1998–2007). Born into a Maronite Christian family, Émile Lahoud was the son of pro-independence military general and politician Jamil Lahoud, who is often credited with having established the Lebanese Army. Émile Lahoud

  • Lahoud, Émile Jamil (president of Lebanon)

    Émile Lahoud, Lebanese military commander who served as president of Lebanon (1998–2007). Born into a Maronite Christian family, Émile Lahoud was the son of pro-independence military general and politician Jamil Lahoud, who is often credited with having established the Lebanese Army. Émile Lahoud

  • Lahr, Bert (American actor)

    Bert Lahr, American stage and screen actor who was best known for his dynamic portrayal of the Cowardly Lion in the film The Wizard of Oz (1939). Lahr was a lackadaisical student who left school after failing eighth grade. In 1910 he joined a friend’s burlesque act, and he honed his energetic and

  • Lahrheim, Irving (American actor)

    Bert Lahr, American stage and screen actor who was best known for his dynamic portrayal of the Cowardly Lion in the film The Wizard of Oz (1939). Lahr was a lackadaisical student who left school after failing eighth grade. In 1910 he joined a friend’s burlesque act, and he honed his energetic and

  • Lahti (Finland)

    Lahti, city, southern Finland. It lies at the southern end of Lake Vesi, northeast of Helsinki. Founded in 1878, it was incorporated in 1905. A developing industrial centre linked to the rest of Finland by major rail, road, and lake routes, it produces most of the nation’s furniture, as well as

  • Lahu (people)

    Lahu, peoples living in upland areas of Yunnan, China, eastern Myanmar (Burma), northern Thailand, northern Laos, and Vietnam who speak related dialects of Tibeto-Burman languages. Although there is no indigenous Lahu system of writing, three different romanized Lahu orthographies exist; two of

  • Lahu language

    Sino-Tibetan languages: Tibeto-Burman languages: application) includes Yi (Lolo), Hani, Lahu, Lisu, Kachin (Jingpo), Kuki-Chin, the obsolete Xixia (Tangut), and other languages. The Tibetan writing system (which dates from the 7th century) and the Burmese (dating from the 11th century) are derived from the Indo-Aryan (Indic) tradition. The Xixia system (developed in the 11th–13th century…

  • Lāhūn, Al- (ancient site, Egypt)

    Al-Lāhūn, ancient Egyptian site, located southwest of Al-Fayyūm near the southward turn of the Baḥr Yūsuf canal in Al-Fayyūm muḥāfaẓah (governorate). Al-Lāhūn was the location of a Middle Kingdom (1938–c. 1630 bce) pyramid and of a workmen’s village of approximately the same date, and findings in

  • Lāhūtī, Abū al-Qāsim (Tajik author)

    Tajikistan: Literature: Abū al-Qāsim Lāhūtī’s poem Taj va bayraq (1935; Crown and Banner) and Mirzo Tursunzade’s Hasani arobakash (1954; Hasan the Cart Driver) responded to the changes of the Soviet era. The latter’s lyric cycle Sadoyi Osiyo (1956; The Voice of Asia) won major communist awards. A…

  • Lai (people)

    Mizo: …to the entire Mizo community), Pawi (Lai), Lakher (Mara), and Hmar. In the early 21st century the Mizo numbered about one million.

  • lai (musical form)

    Lai, medieval poetic and musical form, cultivated especially among the trouvères, or poet-musicians, of northern France in the 12th and 13th centuries but also among their slightly earlier, Provençal-language counterparts, the troubadours, and, called Leich, by the German minnesingers. The lai was

  • lai (literature)

    Descort, a synonym for lai, a medieval Provençal lyric in which the stanzas are nonuniform. The term also refers to a poem in medieval Provençal literature with stanzas in different languages. Derived from Old French and Old Provençal, the word literally means “a quarrel” or

  • lai Breton (literature)

    Breton lay, poetic form so called because Breton professional storytellers supposedly recited similar poems, though none are extant. A short, rhymed romance recounting a love story, it includes supernatural elements, mythology transformed by medieval chivalry, and the Celtic idea of faerie, the

  • Lai de l’ombre (work by Renart)

    Jean Renart: …defends her reputation; and the Lai de l’ombre, about a knight who presses a ring on his lady and, when she refuses it, throws it to her reflection in a well—a gesture that persuades her to accept him. Renart’s authorship of the first two works, which had each survived only…

  • Lai language

    Tibeto-Burman languages: Tibeto-Burman and areal grammar: …Chin languages such as Mizo, Lai, and Tiddim typically have two forms, with complex distribution patterns. In Lai, for instance, Form I occurs mostly in independent clauses and Form II mostly in subordinate ones, but with many complications (e.g., kaap (I) / kaʔ (II) ‘shoot’; toŋ (I) / ton (II)…

  • Lai, Afong (Chinese photographer)

    history of photography: Landscape and architectural documentation: …exceptions included the Chinese photographer Afong Lai and the Brazilian photographer Marc Ferrez, both of whom produced excellent views of their native countries. In particular, Lai’s serene compositions reflected the conventions of the long-standing tradition of Chinese landscape painting.

  • Lai, Francis (French composer)
  • LAIA (international organization)

    Latin American Integration Association, organization that was established by the Treaty of Montevideo (August 1980) and became operational in March 1981. It seeks economic cooperation among its members. Original members were Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Paraguay,

  • Laibach (national capital, Slovenia)

    Ljubljana, capital city and economic, political, and cultural centre of Slovenia, located on the Ljubljanica River. The city lies in central Slovenia in a natural depression surrounded by high peaks of the Julian Alps. A walled Roman encampment was built there in the mid-1st century bce by Roman

  • Laibach, Congress of (European history)

    Congress of Laibach, (Jan. 26–May 12, 1821), meeting of the Holy Alliance powers (all European rulers except those of Britain, the Ottoman Empire, and the papacy) at Laibach (now Ljubljana, Slovenia) that set the conditions for Austrian intervention in and occupation of the Two Sicilies in action

  • laibon (African ritual leader)

    eastern Africa: The Luo and Maasai: …the auspices of their rival laibons, or ritual leaders—among whom Mbatian, who succeeded his father, Subet, in 1866, was the most famous—in a succession of internecine conflicts largely over cattle and grazing grounds. Their wars denuded the Laikipia and Uasin Gishu plateaus of their former Maasai, the so-called Wakwavi, who,…

  • Laidlaw, Alice Ann (Canadian author)

    Alice Munro, Canadian short-story writer who gained international recognition with her exquisitely drawn narratives. The Swedish Academy dubbed her a “master of the contemporary short story” when it awarded her the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2013. Munro’s work was noted for its precise imagery

  • Laidlaw, Patrick P. (British scientist)

    virus: Andrewes, and Patrick P. Laidlaw were able to transmit influenza to ferrets, and the influenza virus was subsequently adapted to mice. In 1941 the American scientist George K. Hirst found that influenza virus grown in tissues of the chicken embryo could be detected by its capacity to…

  • Laidoner, Johan (Estonian patriot)

    Johan Laidoner, Estonian soldier and patriot who led the Estonian liberation army in 1918 and supported the authoritarian regime of Konstantin Päts in the 1930s. Educated in Russia for a military career, Laidoner earned the rank of lieutenant colonel in Russian service. He served in World War I

  • Laie (Hawaii, United States)

    Laie, town, Honolulu county, on Laie Bay, northeastern Oahu island, Hawaii, U.S. The land was acquired by Mormon missionaries in 1864 and settled by a colony of Hawaiian Mormons. The impressive white Laie Temple, where the highest rites of the Mormon church can be performed, was built in 1919 on

  • Laighin (ancient kingdom, Ireland)

    Ireland: Political and social organization: (Ulaidh), Meath (Midhe), Leinster (Laighin), Munster (Mumhain), and Connaught (Connacht).

  • Laighton, Celia (American poet)

    Celia Laighton Thaxter, American poet whose work centred thematically on the islands and ocean of her youth. Celia Laighton grew up among the Isles of Shoals off the New Hampshire coast. On Appledore Island her father operated a successful resort hotel that included among its guests Ralph Waldo

  • Laigin (province, Ireland)

    Leinster, the southeastern province of Ireland. It comprises the counties of Carlow, Dublin, Kildare, Kilkenny, Offaly, Longford, Louth, Meath, Laoighis, Westmeath, Wexford, and Wicklow. In its present form the province incorporates the ancient kingdom of Meath (Midhe) as well as that of Leinster,

  • Laika (Soviet dog cosmonaut)

    Laika, a dog that was the first living creature to be launched into Earth orbit, on board the Soviet artificial satellite Sputnik 2, on November 3, 1957. It was always understood that Laika would not survive the mission, but her actual fate was misrepresented for decades. Laika was a small (13

  • Laima (Baltic deity)

    Laima, (from Lithuanian laimė, “happiness,” “luck”), in Baltic religion, the goddess of fate, generally associated with the linden tree. Together with Dievs, the sky, and Saule, the sun, Laima determines the length and fortune of human life. In the course of each life she helps arrange marriages, o

  • Laima-Dalia (Baltic deity)

    Laima, (from Lithuanian laimė, “happiness,” “luck”), in Baltic religion, the goddess of fate, generally associated with the linden tree. Together with Dievs, the sky, and Saule, the sun, Laima determines the length and fortune of human life. In the course of each life she helps arrange marriages, o

  • Laine, Cleo (British singer)

    Cleo Laine, British singer and actress who mastered a variety of styles but was best known as the “Queen of Jazz.” Laine was born to a Jamaican father and an English mother. She quit school at age 14 and took a variety of jobs while auditioning for singing jobs. Her first break came in 1951, when

  • Laine, Dame Cleo (British singer)

    Cleo Laine, British singer and actress who mastered a variety of styles but was best known as the “Queen of Jazz.” Laine was born to a Jamaican father and an English mother. She quit school at age 14 and took a variety of jobs while auditioning for singing jobs. Her first break came in 1951, when

  • Laine, Denny (British musician)

    the Moody Blues: …30, 1941, Rochester, Kent, England), Denny Laine (original name Brian Hines; b. October 29, 1944, near Jersey, Channel Islands), and Clint Warwick (original name Clinton Eccles; b. June 25, 1939, Birmingham). Later members included Justin Hayward (in full David Justin Hayward; b. October 14, 1946, Swindon, Wiltshire, England), John Lodge…

  • Laine, Frankie (American singer)

    Frankie Laine, (Francesco Paolo LoVecchio), American singer (born March 30, 1913, Chicago, Ill.—died Feb. 6, 2007 , San Diego, Calif.), had a string of hit songs in the 1950s but was perhaps best remembered for recording the theme song to the long-running television show Rawhide. Laine’s robust

  • Laine, Papa Jack (American musician)

    Dixieland: …city’s two most popular musicians, “Papa” Jack Laine and Buddy Bolden. Laine, a drummer who led bands in New Orleans from 1891, is often referred to as the father of white jazz. Specializing first in French and German marching music, his band by 1910 had converted almost entirely to ragtime.…

  • Laing, Alexander Gordon (Scottish explorer)

    Alexander Gordon Laing, Scottish explorer of western Africa and the first European known to have reached the ancient city of Timbuktu. Serving with the British army in Sierra Leone (1822), Laing was sent among the Mande people of the region by the governor, Charles (later Sir Charles) M’Carthy, to

  • Laing, Bob (British art director)
  • Laing, R. D. (British psychiatrist)

    R.D. Laing, British psychiatrist noted for his alternative approach to the treatment of schizophrenia. Laing was born into a working-class family and grew up in Glasgow. He studied medicine and psychiatry and earned a doctoral degree in medicine at the University of Glasgow in 1951. After serving

  • Laing, Ronald David (British psychiatrist)

    R.D. Laing, British psychiatrist noted for his alternative approach to the treatment of schizophrenia. Laing was born into a working-class family and grew up in Glasgow. He studied medicine and psychiatry and earned a doctoral degree in medicine at the University of Glasgow in 1951. After serving

  • Laingiomedusae (cnidarian suborder)

    cnidarian: Annotated classification: Suborder Laingiomedusae Medusae with features of both Narcomedusae and Trachymedusae. Polyp unknown. Suborder Narcomedusae Scalloped margin; gonads on stomach walls. Manubrium lacking. Suborder Trachymedusae Smooth bell margin; gonads on radial canals arising from the

  • Lainsitz River (river, Europe)

    Lužnice River, river in Niederösterreich Bundesland (“federal state”), Austria, and Jihočeský kraj (region), Czech Republic. The Lužnice rises in the Freiwald forest of Austria as the Lainsitz River. It flows northward, soon crossing into the Czech Republic and passing through the Třeboň lake

  • Laird, Macgregor (British explorer)

    Macgregor Laird, Scottish explorer, shipbuilder, and merchant who contributed to the knowledge of the Niger River. In 1832 Laird accompanied his Liverpool firm’s expedition, commanded by the Cornish explorer Richard Lander, to the delta of the Niger River. Among the three ships was the Alburkah, a

  • Laird, Melvin (American public official)

    Melvin Laird, (Melvin Robert Laird, Jr.), American public official (born Sept. 1, 1922, Omaha, Neb.—died Nov. 16, 2016, Fort Myers, Fla.), served (1969–73) as secretary of defense under U.S. Pres. Richard M. Nixon and helped to end both American involvement in the Vietnam War and the policy of

  • Laird, Melvin Robert, Jr. (American public official)

    Melvin Laird, (Melvin Robert Laird, Jr.), American public official (born Sept. 1, 1922, Omaha, Neb.—died Nov. 16, 2016, Fort Myers, Fla.), served (1969–73) as secretary of defense under U.S. Pres. Richard M. Nixon and helped to end both American involvement in the Vietnam War and the policy of

  • Laird, Peter (American cartoonist)

    Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: …by cartoonists Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird, who published the first TMNT comic book (1984) in black and white, financed by a tax refund and a family loan. They also put together an inexpensive press kit and mailed it to a number of media outlets. Their kit generated a surprising…

  • Laird, William (British manufacturer)

    Birkenhead: …the Mersey, in 1824 by William Laird, a pioneer in the construction of iron ships. Laird also laid out the nucleus of the town on a grid plan. In 1828 proposals were made for the conversion of Wallasey Pool into an artificial basin. The first docks were built in less…

  • Lairesse, Gérard de (writer)

    Rembrandt van Rijn: The myth of Rembrandt’s fall: …artist and writer on art Gérard de Lairesse (1640–1711), who met Rembrandt as a young man and was portrayed by him in 1665, confessed in 1707: “I do not want to deny that once I had a special preference for his manner; but at that time I had hardly begun…

  • Lais, Le (poem by Villon)

    François Villon: Life: …himself entitled Le Lais (The Legacy). It takes the form of a list of “bequests,” ironically conceived, made to friends and acquaintances before leaving them and the city. To his barber he leaves the clippings from his hair; to three well-known local usurers, some small change; to the clerk…

  • laissez-faire (economics)

    Laissez-faire, (French: “allow to do”) policy of minimum governmental interference in the economic affairs of individuals and society. The origin of the term is uncertain, but folklore suggests that it is derived from the answer Jean-Baptiste Colbert, comptroller general of finance under King Louis

  • laity (religion)

    Buddhism: Popular religious practices: …takes place between monks and laypersons. Like the Buddha himself, the monks embody or represent the higher levels of spiritual achievement, which they make available in various ways to the laity. The laity improve their soteriological condition by giving the monks material gifts that function as sacrificial offerings. Although the…

  • Laius (Greek mythology)

    Oedipus: …one version of the story, Laius, king of Thebes, was warned by an oracle that his son would slay him. Accordingly, when his wife, Jocasta (Iocaste; in Homer, Epicaste), bore a son, he had the baby exposed (a form of infanticide) on Cithaeron. (Tradition has it that his name, which…

  • Laja River (river, Mexico)

    Laja River, river in Guanajuato estado (state), north-central Mexico. After rising in the Sierra Madre Occidental near San Felipe (Doctor Hernandez Alvarez), the Laja arches eastward and then southeastward through the central plateau, past the cities of Dolores Hidalgo, San Miguel de Allende,

  • Laja, Río (river, Mexico)

    Laja River, river in Guanajuato estado (state), north-central Mexico. After rising in the Sierra Madre Occidental near San Felipe (Doctor Hernandez Alvarez), the Laja arches eastward and then southeastward through the central plateau, past the cities of Dolores Hidalgo, San Miguel de Allende,

  • Lajāʾ, Al- (region, Syria)

    Al-Lajāʾ, (Arabic: “Refuge”) volcanic region in southern Syria known for its unique and rugged topography and for its numerous archaeological ruins. Al-Lajāʾ, some 30 miles (50 km) southeast of Damascus, is somewhat triangular in shape, with its apex near Burāq and its base drawn roughly between

  • Lajes (Brazil)

    Lajes, city, east-central Santa Catarina estado (state), southern Brazil, lying north of the Caveiras River in the Paraná Mountains, at 3,000 feet (900 metres) above sea level. Formed as a municipality in 1800, it was settled chiefly by Germans and in 1866 was elevated to city status. Livestock

  • Lajnah, Al- (novel by Ibrāhīm)

    Ṣunʿ Allāh Ibrāhīm: In Al-Lajnah (1981; The Committee), his best-known novel, he satirized Egyptian Pres. Anwar el-Sādāt’s policy of infitāḥ (Arabic: “opening”), which decentralized the economy and opened Egypt to foreign investment but failed to curb censorship. Because of that censorship, the novel had to be published in Lebanon.

  • Lajnat al-Difāʿ ʿan al-Ḥuqūq al-Sharʿiyyah (Sunni Muslim group)

    Committee for the Defense of Legitimate Rights, Sunnite Muslim group opposed to the ruling Saud dynasty in Saudi Arabia. The group was founded in 1992 and consists largely of academics and lower-level Muslim clergy. It considers itself a pressure group for peaceful reform and for improving human

  • lajnat al-qirāʾah (censorship authority)

    Arabic literature: Drama: …by censorship authorities (known as lajnat al-qirāʾah). These practical issues aside, modern Arabic drama continued to exist in a cultural milieu in which there was ongoing tension between the perceived tastes (and concomitant financial support) of elite and popular audiences and between the differing aesthetic criteria applied to productions in…

  • Lajoie, Nap (American baseball player)

    Nap Lajoie, American professional baseball player who was one of the game’s best hitters and an outstanding fielder. Lajoie had a .338 career batting average, the second highest ever for a second baseman, with 3,242 hits, the 14th highest total in major league history. Lajoie’s formal education

  • Your preference has been recorded
    Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
    Subscribe Today!