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  • Hollywood Cavalcade (film by Cummings [1939])

    Irving Cummings: The comedy Hollywood Cavalcade (1939) also starred Ameche, this time as a silent film director who turns a singer (played by Faye) into a star even as his own career declines with the coming of sound. Arguably the movie’s best scenes were those that featured erstwhile silent-movie…

  • Hollywood Ending (film by Allen [2002])

    Woody Allen: 2000 and beyond: Hollywood Ending (2002) was more ambitious, with Allen playing a washed-up Hollywood director who has to grovel to land a prestige assignment from the studio executive who also happens to be his ex-wife. The appropriately titled Anything Else (2003) was widely viewed as another misfire.…

  • Hollywood Foreign Correspondents Association

    Golden Globe Award: …awards presented annually by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) in recognition of outstanding achievement in motion pictures and television during the previous year. Within the entertainment industry, the Golden Globes are considered second in importance both to the Academy Awards (for film) and to the Emmy Awards (for television),…

  • Hollywood Foreign Press Association

    Golden Globe Award: …awards presented annually by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) in recognition of outstanding achievement in motion pictures and television during the previous year. Within the entertainment industry, the Golden Globes are considered second in importance both to the Academy Awards (for film) and to the Emmy Awards (for television),…

  • Hollywood Freeway (freeway, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Los Angeles: Transportation: The more-modern Hollywood Freeway (completed 1948) soon carried nearly 200,000 cars daily, prompting comedian Bob Hope to call it “the biggest parking lot in the world.” The four-level downtown freeway “stack” became the city’s most familiar icon of the built environment.

  • Hollywood on Television (American television program)

    Betty White: …as a “girl Friday” on Hollywood on Television. She later became host of the show, and in 1952 she cofounded Bandy Productions to develop her own projects. Later that year the television sitcom Life with Elizabeth premiered. White played the title role—a married woman whose various predicaments test the patience…

  • Hollywood or Bust (film by Tashlin [1956])

    Dean Martin: …Irma (1949) and ending with Hollywood or Bust (1956).

  • Hollywood Squares, The (American television game show)

    Paul Lynde: …name as a regular on The Hollywood Squares, a game show in which contestants played tic-tac-toe with each square occupied by a celebrity, often a comedian. Noted for his sharp tongue, Lynde was a popular fixture in the centre square from 1968 to 1979. Frequent quips were thought to reference…

  • Hollywood Ten (American history)

    Hollywood Ten, in U.S. history, 10 motion-picture producers, directors, and screenwriters who appeared before the House Un-American Activities Committee in October 1947, refused to answer questions regarding their possible communist affiliations, and, after spending time in prison for contempt of

  • Hollywoodland (film by Coulter [2006])

    Ben Affleck: Relationships and return to prominence: …George Reeves in the biopic Hollywoodland, a role that earned him critical praise and a Golden Globe Award nomination. In 2009 Affleck starred in He’s Just Not That into You, a romantic comedy that also featured Jennifer Aniston; the crime thriller State of Play; and the workplace satire Extract.

  • Holm, Anne (Danish author)

    children's literature: Denmark: …Denmark’s boldest original talent is Anne Holm, who aroused healthy controversy with her (to some) shocking narrative of a displaced boy’s journey to Denmark, the novel David (1963; Eng. trans., North to Freedom, 1965).

  • Holm, Celeste (American actress)

    Celeste Holm, American actress (born April 29, 1917, New York, N.Y.—died July 15, 2012, New York City), originated the role of flirtatious Ado Annie Carnes in the Broadway musical Oklahoma! (1943) and was forever remembered for her rendition of the play’s showstopping song “I Cain’t Say No.” After

  • Holm, Eleanor (American athlete)

    Eleanor Holm, (Eleanor Holm-Jarrett; Eleanor Holm Whalen), American athlete and entertainer (born Dec. 6, 1913, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died Jan. 31, 2004, Miami, Fla.), made international headlines after being dismissed from the U.S. Olympic swimming team for drinking and breaking curfew during the v

  • Holm, Hanya (American choreographer)

    Hanya Holm, German-born American choreographer of modern dance and Broadway musicals. After early study at the Dalcroze institutes in Frankfurt am Main and Hellerau, she joined Mary Wigman’s Central Institute in Dresden and for several years was chief instructor there. She also danced in and helped

  • Holm, Ian (British actor)

    The Sweet Hereafter: …1997, about a lawyer (Ian Holm) who comes to a small town to sign clients for a lawsuit after a school bus accident. It won the Grand Jury Prize at the Cannes film festival and received Academy Award nominations for best director (Atom Egoyan) and best adapted screenplay (Egoyan).…

  • Holm, Jeanne Marjorie (United States military officer)

    Jeanne Marjorie Holm, major general (ret.) U.S. Air Force (born June 23, 1921, Portland, Ore.—died Feb. 15, 2010, Annapolis, Md.), was a pioneer of equity in the armed forces, becoming the first woman to rise to the rank of general in the U.S. Air Force and the first female to become a two-star

  • Holm, Sven (Danish writer)

    Sven Holm, Danish novelist and short-story writer, a participant in the political movement in Danish literature of the 1960s. In the title story of his first collection, Den store fjende (1961; “The Great Enemy”), Holm described how a village church on a precipice is gradually crumbling and falling

  • Holman, M. Carl (American civil rights leader)

    M. Carl Holman, American civil rights leader, president of the National Urban Coalition (1971–88), who promoted the need for a mutual partnership between industry and government to foster inner-city development. Holman graduated magna cum laude from Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Mo. (1942),

  • Holman, William Arthur (Australian politician)

    New South Wales: Federation: He was succeeded by William Holman, who left the party in 1917 after it split over the question of whether conscription for overseas military services should be introduced. The party held office for most of the 1920s, but in the 1930s power passed to a coalition of the United…

  • Holmberg, Åke (Swedish author)

    children's literature: National and modern literature: …humour and nonsense there are Åke Holmberg, with his parodic Ture Sventon detective series; the outstanding poet Lennart Hellsing, with Daniel Doppsko (1959); Astrid Lindgren, successful in a half dozen genres but perhaps best known as the creator of the supergirl Pippi Longstocking; Gösta Knutsson, with her well-liked Pelle svanslös…

  • Holmboe, J. (Norwegian meteorologist)

    climate: Extratropical cyclones: meteorologists Jacob Bjerknes and Jørgen Holmboe and Swedish American meteorologist Carl-Gustaf Rossby—recognized that transient surface disturbances were accompanied by complementary wave features in the flow in the middle and higher atmospheric layers associated with the jet stream. These wave features are accompanied by regions of mass divergence and convergence…

  • Holmboe, Vagn (Danish composer)

    Vagn Holmboe, Danish composer of more than 350 works, most notably string quartets, and developer of the "metamorphosis" technique, whereby a motif evolves, by means of constant transformation, into a complete composition (b. Dec. 20, 1909--d. Sept. 1,

  • Holmegaard glass (art)

    glassware: The Scandinavian countries: In Denmark the Holmegaard glassworks and in Norway the Hadeland glassworks both followed in some respects the example of Swedish glass. At Holmegaard the movement began in the late 1920s with the appointment as art director of Jacob E. Bang, whose designs included an amount of striking engraved…

  • Holmes & Watson (film by Cohen [2018])

    Will Ferrell: In Holmes & Watson (2018), Ferrell assumed the role of Sherlock Holmes for the comedic take on Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic tales. His later film credits included Downhill (2020), a dramedy about a struggling couple on a family vacation.

  • Holmes à Court, Michael Robert Hamilton (Australian entrepreneur)

    Robert Holmes à Court, Australian entrepreneur nicknamed “the Great Acquirer” for his billion-dollar raids on major companies in England and Australia. Holmes à Court received his early schooling in South Africa, moved with his family to New Zealand in the 1950s, and earned degrees in agricultural

  • Holmes à Court, Robert (Australian entrepreneur)

    Robert Holmes à Court, Australian entrepreneur nicknamed “the Great Acquirer” for his billion-dollar raids on major companies in England and Australia. Holmes à Court received his early schooling in South Africa, moved with his family to New Zealand in the 1950s, and earned degrees in agricultural

  • Holmes v. United States (law case)

    William Johnson: …his circuit court decision in Holmes v. United States (1832), rejecting state nullification of federal statutes.

  • Holmes, Andrew Jeremy (British rower)

    Andy Holmes, (Andrew Jeremy Holmes), British rower (born Oct. 15, 1959, London, Eng.—died Oct. 24, 2010, London), partnered with Steven Redgrave (later Sir Steven) to win the gold medal in the coxed fours (with Martin Cross and Richard Budgett) at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games and followed

  • Holmes, Andy (British rower)

    Andy Holmes, (Andrew Jeremy Holmes), British rower (born Oct. 15, 1959, London, Eng.—died Oct. 24, 2010, London), partnered with Steven Redgrave (later Sir Steven) to win the gold medal in the coxed fours (with Martin Cross and Richard Budgett) at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games and followed

  • Holmes, Arthur (British geologist)

    geochronology: An absolute age framework for the stratigraphic time scale: …the age of the Earth, Arthur Holmes, a student of Strutt, compared the relative (paleontologically determined) stratigraphic ages of certain specimens with their numerical ages as determined in the laboratory. This 1911 analysis provided for the first time the numerical ages for rocks from several Paleozoic geologic periods as well…

  • Holmes, Eleanor (American lawyer and politician)

    Eleanor Holmes Norton, American lawyer and politician who broke several gender and racial barriers during her career, in which she defended the rights of others to equal opportunity. After attending Antioch College (B.A., 1960) in Yellow Springs, Ohio, Norton received degrees from Yale University

  • Holmes, Elizabeth (American entrepreneur)

    Elizabeth Holmes, American entrepreneur who was founder and CEO (2003–18) of the medical diagnostic company Theranos Inc. Holmes was placed on the Forbes list of the 400 richest Americans in 2014, and that year she was dubbed the world’s youngest self-made woman billionaire. By June 2016, however,

  • Holmes, Eric Leighton (British chemist)

    ion-exchange reaction: Ion-exchange materials: …chemists Basil Albert Adams and Eric Leighton Holmes. The resins were chemical relatives of the plastic Bakelite and were made by condensing polyhydric phenols or phenolsulfonic acids with formaldehyde.

  • Holmes, Ernest (American religious leader)

    Religious Science: …in the United States by Ernest Holmes (1887–1960). Holmes and his brother Fenwicke were drawn to New Thought teachings and to a belief in the power of the mind for healing and fulfillment of life. In 1926 Holmes’s major work, The Science of Mind, was published. In 1927 he established…

  • Holmes, H. H. (American serial killer)

    H.H. Holmes, American swindler and confidence trickster who is widely considered the country’s first known serial killer. Mudgett was born into a wealthy family and showed signs of high intelligence from an early age. Always interested in medicine, he allegedly trapped animals and performed surgery

  • Holmes, H. H. (American serial killer)

    H.H. Holmes, American swindler and confidence trickster who is widely considered the country’s first known serial killer. Mudgett was born into a wealthy family and showed signs of high intelligence from an early age. Always interested in medicine, he allegedly trapped animals and performed surgery

  • Holmes, H. H. (American author, editor, and critic)

    Anthony Boucher, American author, editor, and critic in the mystery and science fiction genres who in 1949 cofounded The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, a major science fiction periodical. He was one of the premier critics of mystery; for his reviews he won three Edgar Allan Poe Awards

  • Holmes, Katie (American actress)

    Tom Cruise: …his public relationship with actress Katie Holmes, to whom he was married from 2006 to 2012.

  • Holmes, Kelly (British athlete)

    Athens 2004 Olympic Games: On the track, Kelly Holmes of Great Britain and Ethiopia’s Hicham El Guerrouj were double gold medalists, and hurdler Liu Xiang won China’s first gold medal in men’s athletics (track and field). The concluding event, the men’s marathon, was won by Stefano Baldini of Italy after the leader,…

  • Holmes, Larry (American boxer)

    Larry Holmes, American heavyweight boxing champion of the late 1970s and early ’80s who was known for his solid defense. Holmes, a street fighter in his youth, entered organized boxing at a youth centre in Easton, Pennsylvania. He won 19 of his 22 fights and several titles before turning

  • Holmes, Martha Louise (American photographer)

    Martha Louise Holmes, American photographer (born Feb. 7, 1923, Louisville, Ky.—died Sept. 19, 2006, New York, N.Y.), specialized in taking intimate portraits of celebrities, politicians, and sports figures while working for 35 years as a freelancer for Life magazine. Her most famous image—that o

  • Holmes, Odetta (American folk singer)

    Odetta, American folk singer who was noted especially for her versions of spirituals and who became for many the voice of the civil rights movement of the early 1960s. After her father’s death in 1937, Odetta moved with her mother to Los Angeles. She began classical voice training at age 13, and

  • Holmes, Oliver Wendell (American physician and writer)

    Oliver Wendell Holmes, American physician, poet, and humorist notable for his medical research and teaching, and as the author of the “Breakfast-Table” series of essays. Holmes read law at Harvard University before deciding on a medical career; and, following studies at Harvard and in Paris, he

  • Holmes, Oliver Wendell, Jr. (United States jurist)

    Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, U.S. legal historian and philosopher who advocated judicial restraint. He stated the concept of “clear and present danger” as the only basis for limiting the right of freedom of speech. Holmes was the first child of

  • Holmes, Priest (American football player)

    Kansas City Chiefs: …high-scoring offense featuring running back Priest Holmes and tight end Tony Gonzalez—again won 13 games and a division crown in 2003. Once again, a stellar regular season was followed by playoff disappointment as the Chiefs were again upset at home by the Colts. The team then had a series of…

  • Holmes, Rhoda Carleton Marion (British-American artist)

    Rhoda Holmes Nicholls, British-American artist and art instructor of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a noted watercolourist of her day. Rhoda Holmes was the daughter of a vicar. Early on she displayed a talent for art and was sent to London to study at the Bloomsbury School of Art and then

  • Holmes, Sherlock (fictional character)

    Sherlock Holmes, fictional character created by the Scottish writer Arthur Conan Doyle. The prototype for the modern mastermind detective, Holmes first appeared in Conan Doyle’s A Study in Scarlet, published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual of 1887. As the world’s first and only “consulting detective,”

  • Holmes, William Henry (American archaeologist)

    William Henry Holmes, American archaeologist, artist, and museum director who helped to establish professional archaeology in the United States. Holmes became interested in geology while serving as an artist on a survey of the Rocky Mountains in 1872. That interest led to archaeology when in 1875

  • Holmgren, Mike (American football coach)

    Green Bay Packers: …Packers brought in head coach Mike Holmgren and quarterback Brett Favre, who were the key pieces in the team’s renaissance in the 1990s. Beginning in 1993, Green Bay qualified for the postseason in six straight years, including two NFC championships and subsequent trips to the Super Bowl. The team’s third…

  • holmiid (trilobite)

    Cambrian Period: Paleogeography: …were exterminated near Laurentia, the holmiids went extinct at the margins of Baltica, and the redlichiids vanished from the shallow-shelf ecosystems near Gondwana. Also, diverse and abundant reef-dwelling archaeocyathans (extinct group of sponges thought to have helped construct the first reefs) disappeared from most low-latitude warm-water continental shelves.

  • holmium (chemical element)

    Holmium (Ho), chemical element, a rare-earth metal of the lanthanide series of the periodic table. Holmium is a moderately hard, silvery white metal that is relatively stable in air. It readily reacts with diluted acids but does not react with either diluted or concentrated hydrofluoric acid (HF),

  • Holmskioldia sanguinea (plant)

    Verbenaceae: …tropical plants such as the Chinese hat plant (Holmskioldia sanguinea) and species of pigeon berry, or golden dewdrop (Duranta), and glory-bower (Clerodendrum) are cultivated as ornamentals. The shrub lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) is notable for its fragrant oil. The family also includes teak (Tectona grandis), an important timber tree of

  • Holmström, Bengt (Finnish economist)

    Bengt Holmström, Finnish economist who, with Oliver Hart, was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize for Economics for his contributions to contract theory. Starting in the late 1970s, Holmström and various colleagues undertook pioneering research on the design of employment contracts that are optimal (from

  • Holmström, Bengt Robert (Finnish economist)

    Bengt Holmström, Finnish economist who, with Oliver Hart, was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize for Economics for his contributions to contract theory. Starting in the late 1970s, Holmström and various colleagues undertook pioneering research on the design of employment contracts that are optimal (from

  • Holness, Andrew (prime minister of Jamaica)

    Portia Simpson Miller: …in October 2011, his successor, Andrew Holness, called for early elections to be held on December 29. The PNP, still headed by Simpson Miller, won convincingly, with 42 seats to the JLP’s 21. In her January 2012 inaugural speech, the newly reinstalled prime minister emphasized her administration’s commitment to regional…

  • Holo-holo-ku (temple, Kapaa, Hawaii, United States)

    Kapaa: Another nearby feature is Holoholoku Heiau, restored (1933) by the Bishop Museum of Honolulu and one of the oldest heiaus (ceremonial and religious structures) in Hawaii; it contained the sacred birth stones where Kauai queens went to bear their children. The temple was sacred to the war god Ku,…

  • Holo-Holo-Ku Heiau (temple, Kapaa, Hawaii, United States)

    Kapaa: Another nearby feature is Holoholoku Heiau, restored (1933) by the Bishop Museum of Honolulu and one of the oldest heiaus (ceremonial and religious structures) in Hawaii; it contained the sacred birth stones where Kauai queens went to bear their children. The temple was sacred to the war god Ku,…

  • Holo/Olho (work by Kac)

    Eduardo Kac: …published his first “holopoem,” “Holo/Olho” (“Holo/Eye”), which rendered the words of the title in holographic text that shifted as the viewer changed position. The next year, he debuted a digital poem, “Não!” (“No!”), which comprised a block of text that scrolled across an LED display. Kac created a number…

  • Holocaust (American television miniseries)

    Meryl Streep: Stardom: The Deer Hunter, Sophie’s Choice, and Silkwood: …starred in the television miniseries Holocaust, for which she won an Emmy Award.

  • Holocaust (European history)

    Holocaust, the systematic state-sponsored killing of six million Jewish men, women, and children and millions of others by NaziGermany and its collaborators during World War II. The Germans called this “the final solution to the Jewish question.” Yiddish-speaking Jews and survivors in the years

  • Holocaust Day (Israeli holiday)

    feast: National and local festivals: In Israel, Holocaust Remembrance Day commemorates the systematic destruction of European Jews by Nazi Germany in the 1930s and ’40s.

  • Holocaust Memorial (memorial, Miami Beach, Florida, United States)

    Miami Beach: The Holocaust Memorial includes a 40-foot (12-metre) bronze sculpture of a hand reaching out of the ground and panels listing names of victims. The South Beach area, one of Miami Beach’s most popular spots, has a large district of restored Art Deco buildings. Biscayne National Park…

  • Holocaust Memorial (memorial, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States)

    Leonard Baskin: …for his memorials, including the Holocaust Memorial (dedicated 1994) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, which features a 7-foot (2.1-metre) figure, seated and in anguish with a hand raised above the head. In his woodcuts Baskin developed a distinctively wiry and nervous linearity. Man of Peace (1952) and Everyman (1960) are among…

  • Holocaust museum

    Holocaust museum, any of several educational institutions and research centres dedicated to preserving the experiences of people who were victimized by the Nazis and their collaborators during the Holocaust (1933–45). Among the victims were Jews, Roma, homosexuals, Christians who helped to hide

  • Holocaust Remembrance and Heroism Day (Israeli holiday)

    feast: National and local festivals: In Israel, Holocaust Remembrance Day commemorates the systematic destruction of European Jews by Nazi Germany in the 1930s and ’40s.

  • Holocaust remembrance days (international holidays)

    Holocaust remembrance days, international commemoration of the millions of victims of Nazi Germany’s genocidal policies. The commemoration, observed on different days in different countries, often marks the victims’ efforts at resistance and concentrates on contemporary efforts to battle hatred and

  • Holocaust, The (sculpture by Segal)

    Holocaust: Artistic responses to the Holocaust: George Segal’s memorial sculpture, Holocaust, is but one notable example. Visual art in response to the Holocaust includes paintings by Holocaust refugees Marc Chagall and George Grosz and the illustrated story Maus (published in installments 1980–85) by Art Spiegelman, the son of a survivor. Notable musical responses to

  • Holocene Epoch (geochronology)

    Holocene Epoch, younger of the two formally recognized epochs that constitute the Quaternary Period and the latest interval of geologic time, covering approximately the last 11,700 years of Earth’s history. The sediments of the Holocene, both continental and marine, cover the largest area of the

  • Holocentridae (fish family)

    atheriniform: Natural history: …the squirrelfishes and soldierfishes (family Holocentridae), abundant around coral reefs in warm seas. Typical of beryciforms, they are red in colour, with large eyes. Holocentrids are nocturnal, sheltering in crevices during the day and emerging at night to feed. They are notable sound producers, having special drumming muscles attached to…

  • Holocentrus spinifer (fish)

    squirrelfish: The largest species is probably Holocentrus spinifer, a Pacific squirrelfish growing about 60 cm (24 inches) long. Squirrelfish are carnivorous and nocturnal, hiding by day among the reefs.

  • Holocephali (fish subclass)

    Chimaera, (subclass Holocephali), any of numerous cartilaginous fishes related to sharks and rays in the class Chondrichthyes but separated from them as the subclass (or sometimes class) Holocephali. Like sharks and rays, chimaeras have cartilaginous skeletons, and the males possess external

  • holocrystalline rock (geology)

    igneous rock: Crystallinity: Those holocrystalline rocks in which mineral grains can be recognized with the unaided eye are called phanerites, and their texture is called phaneritic. Those with mineral grains so small that their outlines cannot be resolved without the aid of a hand lens or microscope are termed…

  • Holodomor (Ukrainian history)

    Holodomor, man-made famine that convulsed the Soviet republic of Ukraine from 1932 to 1933, peaking in the late spring of 1933. It was part of a broader Soviet famine (1931–34) that also caused mass starvation in the grain-growing regions of Soviet Russia and Kazakhstan. The Ukrainian famine,

  • Holofernes (Assyrian general)

    Book of Judith: …of Assyria, sent his general Holofernes on an expedition against Palestine. At the siege of the Jewish city of Bethulia, a general named Achior warned Holofernes of the danger of attacking the Jews. A beautiful Jewish widow named Judith left the besieged city in pretended flight and foretold to Holofernes…

  • hologram (optics)

    magnetic resonance imaging: …possible for radiologists to construct holograms that provide three-dimensional images from the digital cross sections obtained by conventional MRI scanners. These holograms can be useful in locating lesions precisely. MRI is particularly valuable in imaging the brain, the spinal cord, pelvic organs such as the urinary bladder, and cancellous (or…

  • Hologram for the King, A (novel by Eggers)

    Dave Eggers: …Hurricane Katrina, and the novel A Hologram for the King (2012; film 2016), which reflected anxieties about globalization with its tale of a middle-aged American pursuing business in Saudi Arabia. Eggers examined the pernicious effects of digital and social media in the novel The Circle (2013), which chronicles the travails…

  • Hologram for the King, A (film by Tykwer [2016])

    Tom Hanks: A Hologram for the King (2016), an adaptation of a novel by Dave Eggers, starred Hanks as a salesman who journeys to Saudi Arabia in an attempt to revive his fortunes. Also in 2016 he appeared as the title character in Sully, Clint Eastwood’s drama…

  • holographic interferometry (holography)

    optics: Optical elements: Holographic interferometry can be done in several ways. The basic technique involves recording a hologram of the object of interest and then interfering the image produced from this hologram with the coherently illuminated object itself. A variation on this technique would be to form two…

  • holographic will (law)

    inheritance: Formalities of wills: Under the system of the holographic will, which is available not only in most civil-law countries but also in numerous states of the South and West in the United States, the entire instrument, generally including the date and the indication of the place of execution, must be exclusively in the…

  • holography (optics)

    Holography, means of creating a unique photographic image without the use of a lens. The photographic recording of the image is called a hologram, which appears to be an unrecognizable pattern of stripes and whorls but which—when illuminated by coherent light, as by a laser beam—organizes the light

  • Holomastigotoides (protozoan genus)

    Holomastigotoides, genus of large, pear-shaped zooflagellate protozoans; they are intestinal inhabitants of termites. The species H. tusitala, whose chromosomal behaviour during nuclear division has been studied, ranges from 130 to 200 micrometres (0.005 to 0.008 inch) in length and has five

  • Holometabola (insect division)

    insect: Annotated classification: Superorder Endopterygota (Holometabola) Metamorphosis complex, accompanied by a pupal instar; immature stages differ from adult in structure and habits; wings develop internally during larval stages. Order Megaloptera (alderflies, dobsonflies

  • holometabolous metamorphosis (biology)

    metamorphosis: Complete, or holometabolous, metamorphosis is characteristic of beetles, butterflies and moths, flies, and wasps. Their life cycle includes four stages: egg, larva (q.v.), pupa (q.v.), and adult. The larva differs greatly from the adult. It is wingless, and its form and habits are suited for growth and…

  • holomictic lake (geology)

    lake: Vertical mixing and overturn: …least once throughout are called holomictic. It is possible, however, for lakes to be stable despite the thermal processes that normally induce overturn, owing to the existence of a positive salinity gradient with depth (chemocline). This type is called meromictic, and, in those cases where stability is permanent in at…

  • Holonyak, Nick, Jr. (American engineer)

    Nick Holonyak, Jr., American engineer who was known for his pioneering work with light-emitting diodes (LEDs), notably creating the first visible LED. Holonyak was the son of immigrants from what is now Ukraine. He studied electrical engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,

  • holoplankton (biology)

    zooplankton: Permanent plankton, or holoplankton, such as protozoa and copepods (an important food for larger animals), spend their lives as plankton. Temporary plankton, or meroplankton, such as young starfish, clams, worms, and other bottom-dwelling animals, live and feed as plankton until they leave to become adults in their proper…

  • Holopoda (gastropod suborder)

    gastropod: Classification: Suborder Holopoda A group of 3 superfamilies. Superfamily Polygyracea Common woodland snails of eastern North America (Polygyridae), plus a Neotropical group (Thysanophoridae) and a relict group of Asia (Corillidae). Superfamily

  • Holopodopes (gastropod suborder)

    gastropod: Classification: Suborder Holopodopes A group of 4 superfamilies. Superfamily Achatinacea Besides the giant African snail, 4 families, including many species spread by commerce throughout the world. Superfamilies Streptaxacea and Rhytidacea Carnivorous snails and

  • holoprosencephaly (birth defect)

    cephalic disorder: Holoprosencephaly: Holoprosencephaly results from the failed development of the prosencephalon (forebrain) in the embryo. The prosencephalon fails to divide and form the two cerebral hemispheres, resulting in defects in both the brain and the face. About one-half of holoprosencephaly cases are caused by chromosomal defects,…

  • Holoptelea (tree genus)

    Ulmaceae: Major genera and species: Members of the genus Holoptelea are found in Asia and Africa and are used locally as medicinal plants.

  • holoptic eye (anatomy)

    dipteran: Eyes: …in the middle line (holoptic). In female flies, with few exceptions, the eyes do not meet (dichoptic). In some families, notably robber flies and small acalyptrate flies, both sexes are dichoptic. Parasitic flies, or those that live in secluded places, may have very small eyes or none at all.…

  • Holoptilinae (insect, subfamily Holoptilinae)

    assassin bug: Predatory behaviour: …the subfamily Holoptilinae, commonly called feather-legged bugs, possess a specialized outgrowth on the abdomen known as a trichome. A secretion released from the trichome attracts ants, which lick the substance and become paralyzed. The feather-legged bug then pierces the ant with its beak and sucks out the body fluids. The…

  • holostean (fish)

    Holostean, (infraclass Holostei), any member of a group of primitive bony fishes that make up one of the three major subdivisions of the superclass Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes). Holosteans are represented today by the bowfins (order Amiiformes) of North America and the gars (order

  • Holostei (fish)

    Holostean, (infraclass Holostei), any member of a group of primitive bony fishes that make up one of the three major subdivisions of the superclass Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes). Holosteans are represented today by the bowfins (order Amiiformes) of North America and the gars (order

  • Holothuria (echinoderm)

    circulatory system: Echinodermata: …most highly developed in the holothurians (sea cucumbers), in which it consists of an anterior hemal ring and radial hemal sinuses. The most prominent features are the dorsal and ventral sinuses, which accompany the intestine and supply it through numerous smaller channels. The dorsal sinus is contractile, and fluid is…

  • holothurian (echinoderm)

    circulatory system: Echinodermata: …most highly developed in the holothurians (sea cucumbers), in which it consists of an anterior hemal ring and radial hemal sinuses. The most prominent features are the dorsal and ventral sinuses, which accompany the intestine and supply it through numerous smaller channels. The dorsal sinus is contractile, and fluid is…

  • holothurin (toxin)

    steroid: Steroids of insects, fungi, and other organisms: …sea cucumbers (Holothuroideae) produce the holothurinogenins, a group of lanosterol derivatives toxic to nerve tissue. An example of a holothurinogenin (13) is shown here.

  • holothurinogenin (toxin)

    steroid: Steroids of insects, fungi, and other organisms: …sea cucumbers (Holothuroideae) produce the holothurinogenins, a group of lanosterol derivatives toxic to nerve tissue. An example of a holothurinogenin (13) is shown here.

  • Holothurioidea (echinoderm)

    Sea cucumber, (class Holothuroidea), any of 1,200 species of marine invertebrates that constitute a class within the phylum Echinodermata. The soft cylindrical body, 2 to 200 cm (about 0.75 inch to 6.5 feet) long and 1 to 20 cm (0.4–8 inches) thick, is usually a dull, dark colour and often warty,

  • holothuroid (echinoderm)

    Sea cucumber, (class Holothuroidea), any of 1,200 species of marine invertebrates that constitute a class within the phylum Echinodermata. The soft cylindrical body, 2 to 200 cm (about 0.75 inch to 6.5 feet) long and 1 to 20 cm (0.4–8 inches) thick, is usually a dull, dark colour and often warty,

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