• 0-9
  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g
  • h
  • i
  • j
  • k
  • l
  • m
  • n
  • o
  • p
  • q
  • r
  • s
  • t
  • u
  • v
  • w
  • x
  • y
  • z
  • Hoglin’s Town (Ohio, United States)

    Martins Ferry, city, Belmont county, eastern Ohio, U.S. It lies along the Ohio River (there bridged to Wheeling, W.Va.), about 60 miles (100 km) west of Pittsburgh, Pa. Squatters in the 1770s and ’80s formed settlements (Hoglin’s, or Mercer’s, Town and Norristown) on the site. In 1795 Absalom

  • Hogmanay (Scottish festival)

    Hogmanay, New Year’s festival in Scotland and parts of northern England. The name is also used for the dole of bread, cake, or sweets then given to the children who go from house to house soliciting it with traditional rhymes, one of which concludes with “Rise up and gie’s our Hogmanay.” On this

  • Hogni (German mythology)

    Hagen, mythological Germanic hero who plays a variety of roles in a number of northern European legends. In the Nibelungenlied, he appears as a vassal of the Burgundian king Gunther and is a grizzled warrior, loyal and wary. He plays a principal role in the epic as the slayer of Siegfried, who

  • hognose snake (reptile, genus Heterodon)

    Hognose snake, (genus Heterodon), any of three species of North American nonvenomous snakes belonging to the family Colubridae. They are named for the upturned snout, which is used for digging. These are the harmless but often-avoided puff adders, or blow snakes, of North America. When threatened,

  • hognut (plant, Conopodium majus)

    Earthnut, (Conopodium majus), European plant of the carrot family (Apiaceae), so called because of its edible tubers. It grows in woods and fields in the British Isles and from Norway, France, Spain, and Portugal to Italy and Corsica. The slender, smooth perennial, growing 750 mm to 1 m (30 to 39

  • Hogoleu Islands (islands, Micronesia)

    Chuuk Islands, cluster of 16 much-eroded high volcanic islands in the Federated States of Micronesia, western Pacific Ocean. The name Chuuk means “high mountains” in the Chuukese language, one of several Malayo-Polynesian languages that are used in the islands. The Chuuk Islands, which form part of

  • hogon (African religious leader)

    Dogon: Each large district has a hogon, or spiritual leader, and there is a supreme hogon for the whole country. In his dress and behaviour the hogon symbolizes the Dogon myth of creation, to which the Dogon relate much of their social organization and culture. Their metaphysical system—which categorizes physical objects,…

  • högstra domstolen (Swedish court)

    Sweden: Justice: …and the Supreme Court (högsta domstolen). District courts play the dominant role. A peculiar feature of these courts is a panel of lay assessors (nämndemän), who take part in the main hearings, primarily on more serious criminal and family cases. In such cases, the bench consists of a legally…

  • hogueras, Las (novel by Alós)

    Concha Alós: Although her third novel, Las hogueras (1964; “Bonfires”), is also in that vein, it begins to reflect a deeper concern with individual psychology; the novel won the Planeta literary prize.

  • Hogwarts (fictional school of magic)

    Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone: Summary: …has been accepted at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. He also sheds light on Harry’s past, informing the boy that his parents, a wizard and a witch, were killed by the evil wizard Voldemort and that Harry acquired the lightning-bolt scar on his forehead during the fatal confrontation.

  • Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry (fictional school of magic)

    Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone: Summary: …has been accepted at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. He also sheds light on Harry’s past, informing the boy that his parents, a wizard and a witch, were killed by the evil wizard Voldemort and that Harry acquired the lightning-bolt scar on his forehead during the fatal confrontation.

  • hogweed (plant, Heracleum genus)

    Hogweed, either of two plant species of the cow parsnip genus (Heracleum) in the parsley family (Apiaceae). Both species are herbaceous biennials or perennials and have large compound leaves. The small five-petaled flowers are characteristically arranged in large dense clusters known as umbels.

  • hogweed (plant)

    ragweed: The common ragweed (A. artemisiifolia), also called Roman wormwood, hogweed, hogbrake, and bitterweed, is found across the North American continent. It typically grows about 1 metre (3.5 feet) high and has thin, alternate or opposite, much-divided leaves. The great, or giant, ragweed (A. trifida), also called…

  • Hogwood, Christopher (British conductor, keyboardist, and scholar)

    Christopher Hogwood, (Christopher Jarvis Haley Hogwood), British conductor, keyboardist, and scholar (born Sept. 10, 1941, Nottingham, Eng.—died Sept. 24, 2014, Cambridge, Eng.), founded the Academy of Ancient Music (1973; AAM) to discover and present Baroque (and later Classical) music in the

  • Hogwood, Christopher Jarvis Haley (British conductor, keyboardist, and scholar)

    Christopher Hogwood, (Christopher Jarvis Haley Hogwood), British conductor, keyboardist, and scholar (born Sept. 10, 1941, Nottingham, Eng.—died Sept. 24, 2014, Cambridge, Eng.), founded the Academy of Ancient Music (1973; AAM) to discover and present Baroque (and later Classical) music in the

  • hohe Lied, Das (work by Sudermann)

    Hermann Sudermann: …novel Das hohe Lied (1908; The Song of Songs), a sympathetic study of the downward progress of a seduced girl, and Litauische Geschichten (1917; The Excursion to Tilsit), a collection of stories dealing with the simple villagers of his native region, are notable. Das Bilderbuch meiner Jugend (1922; The Book…

  • hohe Minne (literature)

    Courtly love, in the later Middle Ages, a highly conventionalized code that prescribed the behaviour of ladies and their lovers. It also provided the theme of an extensive courtly medieval literature that began with the troubadour poetry of Aquitaine and Provence in southern France toward the end

  • hôhe minne (literature)

    Courtly love, in the later Middle Ages, a highly conventionalized code that prescribed the behaviour of ladies and their lovers. It also provided the theme of an extensive courtly medieval literature that began with the troubadour poetry of Aquitaine and Provence in southern France toward the end

  • Hohe Tauern (mountains, Austria)

    Hohe Tauern, segment of the Eastern Alps in southern Austria, extending for 70 miles (110 km) between the Zillertal Alps and the Italian border (west) and Katschberg Pass (east). Within the range lie many lofty peaks, including Grossglockner (12,460 feet [3,798 metres]), the highest point in

  • Hohenemser, Kurt (American engineer)

    Kurt Hohenemser, German-born American aerospace engineer (born Jan. 3, 1906, Berlin, Ger.—died April 7, 2001, St. Louis, Mo.), was a pioneer in the field of helicopter design. During World War II, Hohenemser worked in Germany for inventor Anton Flettner, helping Flettner build the F1 282 Kolibri, o

  • Hohenheim, Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von (German-Swiss physician)

    Paracelsus, German-Swiss physician and alchemist who established the role of chemistry in medicine. He published Der grossen Wundartzney (Great Surgery Book) in 1536 and a clinical description of syphilis in 1530. Paracelsus, who was known as Theophrastus when he was a boy, was the only son of an

  • Hohenlinden, Battle of (European history)

    Germany: End of the Holy Roman Empire: …Marengo (June 14, 1800) and Hohenlinden (December 3, 1800) forced Emperor Francis II to agree to the Treaty of Lunéville (February 9, 1801), which confirmed the cession of the Rhineland. More than that, those rulers who lost their possessions on the left bank under the terms of the peace were…

  • Hohenlohe (district, Germany)

    Baden-Württemberg: The Hohenlohe district is the granary of Baden-Württemberg. It lies around the old free city of Schwäbisch Hall and extends all the way to the borders of Bavaria at Rothenburg ob der Tauber. Large farms and numerous, often well-preserved, castles provide ample evidence of the wealth…

  • Hohenlohe family (German family)

    Hohenlohe Family, German princely family which took its name from the district of Hohenlohe in Franconia. First mentioned in the 12th century as possessing the castle of Hohenloch or Hohenlohe, near Uffenheim, the family soon extended its influence over several of the Franconian valleys, including

  • Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen, Friedrich Ludwig, Fürst zu (Prussian field marshal)

    Friedrich Ludwig, prince zu Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen, Prussian field marshal who commanded one of the two Prussian armies that were decisively defeated by Napoleon at the twin battles of Jena and Auerstädt in 1806, a disaster that turned his country into a French dependency. Hohenlohe entered the

  • Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen, Kraft, Prinz zu (Prussian military officer)

    Kraft, prince zu Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen, Prussian army officer and military writer. The son of Adolf, Prinz zu Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen, he joined the Prussian Guard Artillery in 1845. During the Seven Weeks’ War, Hohenlohe led the Guard Artillery with great success against the Austrian Corps right

  • Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst, Chlodwig Karl Viktor, Fürst zu (German chancellor)

    Chlodwig Karl Viktor, prince of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst, imperial German chancellor and Prussian prime minister from October 1894 to October 1900, the “Uncle Chlodwig” whose fatherly relationship with the emperor William II did not enable him to prevent his sovereign’s demagogic excesses. A

  • Hohenstaufen dynasty (German dynasty)

    Hohenstaufen dynasty, German dynasty that ruled the Holy Roman Empire from 1138 to 1208 and from 1212 to 1254. The founder of the line was the count Frederick (died 1105), who built Staufen Castle in the Swabian Jura Mountains and was rewarded for his fidelity to Emperor Henry IV by being appointed

  • Hohenwart, Karl Siegmund, Graf von (prime minister of Austria)

    Karl Siegmund, count von Hohenwart, Austrian statesman who served briefly as prime minister of Austria (1871). After service in the provincial administrations of Carniola (now in Slovenia) and Trentino, Italy, Hohenwart was appointed Statthalter (governor) of Upper Austria (1868). A Roman Catholic

  • Hohenzollern dynasty (European dynasty)

    Hohenzollern dynasty, dynasty prominent in European history, chiefly as the ruling house of Brandenburg-Prussia (1415–1918) and of imperial Germany (1871–1918). It takes its name from a castle in Swabia first mentioned as Zolorin or Zolre (the modern Hohenzollern, south of Tübingen, in the Land

  • Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, Karl Eitel Friedrich, Prinz Von (king of Romania)

    Carol I, first king of Romania, whose long reign (as prince, 1866–81, and as king, 1881–1914) brought notable military and economic development along Western lines but failed to solve the basic problems of an overwhelmingly rural country. As a German prince, Carol was educated in Dresden and Bonn

  • Höher Kranz Mountain (mountain, Germany)

    Mittenwald: …a chairlift up the nearby Hoher Kranz Mountain (4,564 feet [1,391 metres]). Zugspitze, Germany’s highest peak at 9,718 feet (2,962 metres), is just west of Mittenwald. Pop. (2007 est.) 7,735.

  • Hohfeld, Wesley Newcomb (American legal scholar)

    philosophy of logic: Law: , a theory developed by Wesley Newcomb Hohfeld, a pre-World War I U.S. legal scholar, of what he called the fundamental legal conceptions. Although originally presented in informal terms, this theory is closely related to recent deontic logic (in some cases in combination with suitable causal notions). Even some of…

  • Hohhot (China)

    Hohhot, city and (since 1952) provincial capital of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China. The city is a prefecture-level municipality (shi) and the command headquarters of the Inner Mongolia Military Region. It is situated in the upper valley of the Dahei River (a westward-flowing

  • Hohle Fels Cave (archaeological site, Germany)

    Paleolithic Period: Paleolithic art: …five finger holes, found at Hohle Fels Cave, near Ulm, Germany, and dated to about 35,000 years ago. Those flutes give evidence of yet another art form practiced in prehistoric cultures.

  • Höhlen der grossen Jäger, Die (work by Baumann)

    children's literature: War and beyond: , The Caves of the Great Hunters, 1954; rev. ed., 1962), is a minor classic. Mention should be made of Fritz Mühlenweg, a veteran of the Sven Hedin expedition of 1928–32 to Inner Mongolia and the author of Grosser-Tiger und Kompass-Berg (1950; Eng. trans., Big Tiger…

  • Hohlfeld, M. (German mathematician)

    electrostatic precipitator: In 1824 M. Hohlfeld, a mathematics teacher in Leipzig, first described the precipitation of smoke particles by electricity. The first commercially successful process was patented in 1908 following experiments by American chemist Frederick Gardner Cottrell at the University of California, Berkeley. Early units were used to remove…

  • hohlraum (physics)

    fusion reactor: Principles of inertial confinement: …cylindrical shell known as a hohlraum, and the driver is aimed at the walls of the hohlraum. The hohlraum absorbs the driver’s energy and then radiates the target with intense X-rays, which cause the pellet to heat and implode. Because a hohlraum is effectively a resonant cavity, the X-ray intensity…

  • Hohman (Indiana, United States)

    Hammond, city, Lake county, northwestern Indiana, U.S. It is located in the Calumet industrial complex between Chicago and Gary, on the Grand Calumet River, near Lake Michigan. It was founded in 1869 when George Hammond, a pioneer in the shipping of refrigerated beef, established with Marcus Towle

  • Hohmann orbit

    Hohmann orbit, most economical path (though not the shortest or fastest) for a spacecraft to take from one planet to another. The German engineer Walter Hohmann showed in 1925 that elliptical orbits tangent to the orbits of both the planet of departure and the target planet require the least fuel a

  • Hohmichele (archaeological site, Germany)

    history of Europe: Prestige and status: …these rich Hallstatt graves was Hohmichele, located within the complex around Heuneburg on the Danube. This barrow was one of the satellite graves surrounding the large hill fort. It covered a central grave and 12 secondary burials. The barrow was constructed in several stages, resulting in a large imposing monument…

  • Hohn, Uwe (German athlete)

    athletics: The javelin throw: …in 1964, and by 1984 Uwe Hohn (East Germany) had thrown a prodigious 104.80 metres (343.8 feet), a throw so great that it influenced a change in the design of the javelin to keep it within the safe confines of the field. Beginning in 1985, throwers used a javelin that,…

  • Höhnel, Ludwig von (Austrian naval officer and explorer)

    East African lakes: Study and exploration: …later Count Sámuel Teleki and Ludwig von Höhnel reached Lake Rudolf. Considerable scientific study of the lakes region has been conducted since that time.

  • Hohokam culture (prehistoric North American Indian culture)

    Hohokam culture, prehistoric North American Indians who lived approximately from 200 to 1400 ce in the semiarid region of present-day central and southern Arizona, largely along the Gila and Salt rivers. The term Hohokam is said to be Pima for “those who have vanished.” The culture is customarily

  • Hohokam Pima National Monument (monument, Arizona, United States)

    Casa Grande Ruins National Monument: …northwest of Casa Grande is Hohokam Pima National Monument (established 1972), which covers 2.6 square miles (6.7 square km). The monument, which is in the Gila River Indian Reservation, preserves partially excavated village sites established many centuries before the Salado by the Hohokam people. The Hohokam (whose name is a…

  • Hoi An (Vietnam)

    Vietnam: Western penetration of Vietnam: …were established at Faifo (modern Hoi An), south of present-day Da Nang. More Portuguese missionaries arrived later in the 16th century, and they were followed by other Europeans. The best-known of these was the French Jesuit missionary Alexandre de Rhodes, who completed a transcription of the Vietnamese language into Roman…

  • Hoiberg, Dale (American editor)

    Encyclopædia Britannica: Britannica in the digital era: …1999, under editor in chief Dale Hoiberg, the editorial division began a massive multiyear review and revision of the encyclopaedia’s database. Scholars from around the world reviewed the content, making revisions to or suggesting major rewriting of existing content and recommending new articles on subjects not covered. At the same…

  • Høiby, Mette-Marit Tjessem (Norwegian princess)

    Crown Princess Mette-Marit, Norwegian of middle-class background who, despite intense public scrutiny of what was seen by many as her checkered past, wed Crown Prince Haakon of Norway. Mette-Marit was the daughter of a journalist and a bank employee. Her parents divorced when she was young, and she

  • Hoihow (China)

    Haikou, city and capital of Hainan sheng (province), southern China. It is situated on the north coast of Hainan Island, facing the Leizhou Peninsula, across the Hainan (Qiongzhou) Strait (9.5 miles [15 km] wide). Haikou originally grew up as the port for Qiongshan, the ancient administrative

  • hoisin sauce (food)

    Hoisin sauce, commercially prepared, thick reddish-brown sauce used in Chinese cuisine both as an ingredient in cooking and as a table condiment. Made from soybeans, flour, sugar, water, spices, garlic, and chili, it is sweet and spicy. It is used in cooking shellfish and fatty meats such as pork

  • hoist (flag)

    flag: …the staff is called the hoist, and the outer part is called the fly. A flag’s length (also called the fly) usually exceeds its width (hoist). The main portion of the flag, constituting all or most of its area, is called the field or ground. In addition, flags often have…

  • hoist (mechanical device)

    Hoist, mechanical device used primarily for raising and lowering heavy loads but occasionally for moving objects horizontally. It usually consists of a block and tackle—a combination of one or more fixed pulleys, a moving pulley with a hook or other similar means of attaching loads, and a rope (or

  • hojarasca, La (work by García Márquez)

    Gabriel García Márquez: Works: …two novels, La hojarasca (1955; The Leaf Storm) and La mala hora (1962; In Evil Hour); a novella, El coronel no tiene quien le escriba (1961; No One Writes to the Colonel); and a few short stories. Then came One Hundred Years of Solitude, in which García Márquez tells the…

  • Hojas al viento (poems by Casal)

    Julián del Casal: His first volume of poetry, Hojas al viento (1890; “Leaves in the Wind”), clearly shows the influence of the French Parnassian poets, especially Baudelaire. Throughout his poetry, Casal expressed an almost compulsive preference for the artificial and man-made over the natural. A chronic invalid, he died of tuberculosis while preparing…

  • Hōjō family (Japanese family)

    Hōjō Family, family of hereditary regents to the shogunate of Japan who exercised actual rule from 1199 to 1333. During that period, nine successive members of the family held the regency. The Hōjō took their name from their small estate in the Kanogawa Valley in Izu Province. Hōjō Tokimasa

  • Hojo Hideji (Japanese playwright)

    Hideji Hojo, Japanese playwright (born 1902, Osaka, Japan—died May 19, 1996, Kamakura, Japan), was the author of more than 200 plays and the leader of commercial theatre in Japan after World War II. His psychological dramas about average citizens appealed to mainstream audiences. Hojo studied J

  • Hōjō Masako (Japanese nun)

    Hōjō Masako, wife of Minamoto Yoritomo (1147–99), the first shogun, or military dictator, of Japan. She is said to have been largely responsible for Yoritomo’s success, and after his death she assumed great power. Masako fell in love with Yoritomo when he was exiled from the capital by his family’s

  • Hōjō no umi (novel by Mishima)

    The Sea of Fertility, four-part epic novel by Mishima Yukio, published in Japanese in 1965–70 as Hōjō no umi and widely regarded as his most lasting achievement. Each of the four parts—Haru no yuki (Spring Snow), Homma (Runaway Horses), Akatsuki no tera (The Temple of Dawn), and Tennin gosui (The

  • Hōjō Sanetoki (Japanese warrior leader)

    Japan: Kamakura culture: the new Buddhism and its influence: One was Hōjō Sanetoki, who collected Japanese and Chinese books and founded a famous library, the Kanazawa Bunko, in the Shōmyō Temple (at what is now Yokohama). Reflecting the rise of the warrior class, military epics became popular. The most famous is the anonymously written The Tale…

  • Hōjō Takatoki (Japanese regent)

    Go-Daigo: Early years.: …the youth of the regent, Hōjō Takatoki, who, at investiture, was only eight years old. As he grew to manhood, his questionable intelligence and dissolute ways—spending much time, for example, watching dogfights—led to a widespread loss of confidence in the shogunate. Further alienation of many traditional supporters of the shogunate…

  • Hōjō Tokimasa (Japanese warrior and regent)

    Hōjō Tokimasa, Japanese warrior who aided Minamoto Yoritomo in establishing the Kamakura shogunate, the military government by which Yoritomo ruled the country from his base at Kamakura in central Japan, while the emperor continued to rule only symbolically from his residence at Kyōto, to the

  • Hōjō Tokimune (Japanese regent)

    Hōjō Tokimune, young regent to the shogun (military dictator of Japan), under whom the country fought off two Mongol invasions, the only serious foreign threats to the Japanese islands before modern times. Tokimune was 17 when he assumed the office of regent in 1268, the year that the Mongol

  • Hōjō Tokiyori (Japanese regent)

    Japan: The Hōjō regency: In 1249 the regent Hōjō Tokiyori also set up a judicial court, the Hikitsuke-shū, to secure greater impartiality and promptness in legal decisions.

  • Hōjō Yasutoki (Japanese regent)

    Hōjō Yasutoki, regent whose administrative innovations in the shogunate, or military dictatorship, were responsible for institutionalizing that office as the major ruling body in Japan until 1868 and for stabilizing Hōjō rule of Japan for almost a century. The office of shogun originated with

  • Hōjō Yoshitoki (Japanese regent)

    Hōjō Yoshitoki, warrior responsible for the consolidation of the power of the Kamakura shogunate, the military dictatorship that ruled Japan from the city of Kamakura in central Japan (1192–1333). Yoshitoki succeeded his father, Hōjō Tokimasa (q.v.), as regent, making this office the hereditary

  • Hōjō-ki (work by Kamo)

    An Account of My Hut, poetic diary by Kamo Chōmei, written in Japanese in 1212 as Hōjōki. It is admired as a classic literary and philosophical work. An Account of My Hut (the title is sometimes translated as The Ten Foot Square Hut) relates the musings of a Buddhist who renounces the world to live

  • hojŏk (South Korean society)

    South Korea: Economic and social developments: …new family register system (hojŏk) that took effect in 2008. Under the old system only men could register as family heads; thus, children were legally part of the father’s family register, not the mother’s. The new system increased women’s legal standing in, among other things, divorce and child-custody cases.…

  • Hōjōki (work by Kamo)

    An Account of My Hut, poetic diary by Kamo Chōmei, written in Japanese in 1212 as Hōjōki. It is admired as a classic literary and philosophical work. An Account of My Hut (the title is sometimes translated as The Ten Foot Square Hut) relates the musings of a Buddhist who renounces the world to live

  • Hoka Priests, The (play by Zenchiku Ujinobu)

    tragedy: Absence of tragedy in Asian drama: In The Hoka Priests, by Zenchiku Ujinobu (1414–99), a son is confronted with Hamlet’s problem—i.e., that of avenging the death of his father. He is uncertain how to proceed, since his father’s murderer has many bold fellows to stand by him, while he is all alone.…

  • Hokan hypothesis (American Indian language)

    Hokan hypothesis, proposed but controversial and largely abandoned grouping, or phylum, of American Indian languages. Different versions of the Hokan hypothesis include different members, most of them spoken in California and the U.S. Southwest, though several of them extend into Mexico and beyond.

  • Hokchia language (Chinese language)

    Hakka language, Chinese language spoken by considerably fewer than the estimated 80 million Hakka people living mainly in eastern and northern Guangdong province but also in Fujian, Jiangxi, Guangxi, Hunan, and Sichuan provinces. Hakka is also spoken by perhaps 7 million immigrants in widely

  • Hoke-Kyō (Buddhist text)

    Lotus Sutra, (“Lotus of the Good Law [or True Doctrine] Sutra”), one of the earlier Mahāyāna Buddhist texts venerated as the quintessence of truth by the Japanese Tendai (Chinese T’ien-t’ai) and Nichiren sects. The Lotus Sutra is regarded by many others as a religious classic of great beauty and p

  • hoket (music)

    Hocket, in medieval polyphonic (multipart) music, the device of alternating between parts, single notes, or groups of notes. The result is a more or less continuous flow with one voice resting while the other voice sounds. The hocket was a popular device in the motet and the cantilena (vernacular

  • Ḥokhma (religion)

    Christianity: The doctrine of the Virgin Mary and holy Wisdom: The doctrine of the heavenly Wisdom (Sophia) represents an Eastern Church particularity. In late Judaism, speculations about the heavenly Wisdom—a figure beside God that presents itself to humanity as mediator in the work of creation as well as mediator of the knowledge of God—abounded. In Roman Catholic doctrine, Mary, the…

  • Ḥokhmat Yeshuaʿ Ben-Sira (biblical literature)

    Ecclesiasticus, deuterocanonical biblical work (accepted in the Roman Catholic canon but noncanonical for Jews and Protestants), an outstanding example of the wisdom genre of religious literature that was popular in the early Hellenistic period of Judaism (3rd century bc to 3rd century ad). This

  • Hokinson, Helen (American cartoonist)

    Helen Hokinson, American cartoonist best known for her gently satirical drawings of plump, slightly bewildered suburban matrons and clubwomen. Her “girls” were unworldly and naïve, concerned with diets, hats, propriety, and the diligent pursuit of culture and self-improvement. Hokinson attended the

  • Hokitika (borough, New Zealand)

    Hokitika, town on the west coast of South Island, New Zealand. It lies at the mouth of the Hokitika River, which rises in the Southern Alps and, fed by the Mungo, Whitcombe, and Kokatahi rivers, flows northward 40 miles (64 km) to Westland Bight of the Tasman Sea. A store was erected at the river

  • Hokitika River (river, New Zealand)

    Hokitika: …at the mouth of the Hokitika River, which rises in the Southern Alps and, fed by the Mungo, Whitcombe, and Kokatahi rivers, flows northward 40 miles (64 km) to Westland Bight of the Tasman Sea.

  • Hokkaido (island, Japan)

    Hokkaido, northernmost of the four main islands of Japan. It is bordered by the Sea of Japan (East Sea) to the west, the Sea of Okhotsk to the north, and the Pacific Ocean to the east and south. Together with a few small adjacent islands, it constitutes a dō (province) of Japan. Sapporo, in the

  • Hokkaidō (island, Japan)

    Hokkaido, northernmost of the four main islands of Japan. It is bordered by the Sea of Japan (East Sea) to the west, the Sea of Okhotsk to the north, and the Pacific Ocean to the east and south. Together with a few small adjacent islands, it constitutes a dō (province) of Japan. Sapporo, in the

  • Hokkaido Nippon Ham Fighters (Japanese baseball team)

    Pacific League: …Lotte Marines, Fukuoka Softbank Hawks, Hokkaido Nippon Ham Fighters, Orix Buffaloes, Saitama Seibu Lions, and Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles. The regular playing season culminates in the Japan Series, a seven-game series between the respective champion teams of the Pacific and Central leagues.

  • Hokkaido University (university, Sapporo, Japan)

    William Smith Clark: …organize Sapporo Agricultural School, later Hokkaido University, in Japan. He also stimulated the development of a Christian movement in Japan.

  • Hokke Hall (temple building, Nara, Japan)

    Japanese art: Sculpture: …construction of Tōdai Temple is Hokkedō, also known as Sangatsudō, located at the eastern edge of the Tōdai complex. Tradition suggests that Hokkedō, the oldest building in the Tōdai complex, may have been the temple of the monk Rōben, who, working in tandem with Emperor Shōmu, was the driving force…

  • Hokke school (Buddhist school)

    Tiantai, rationalist school of Buddhist thought that takes its name from the mountain in southeastern China where its founder and greatest exponent, Zhiyi, lived and taught in the 6th century. The school was introduced into Japan in 806 by Saichō, known posthumously as Dengyō Daishi. The chief

  • Hokke-dō (temple building, Nara, Japan)

    Japanese art: Sculpture: …construction of Tōdai Temple is Hokkedō, also known as Sangatsudō, located at the eastern edge of the Tōdai complex. Tradition suggests that Hokkedō, the oldest building in the Tōdai complex, may have been the temple of the monk Rōben, who, working in tandem with Emperor Shōmu, was the driving force…

  • hokku (Japanese literature)

    Haiku, unrhymed poetic form consisting of 17 syllables arranged in three lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively. The haiku first emerged in Japanese literature during the 17th century, as a terse reaction to elaborate poetic traditions, though it did not become known by the name haiku until

  • hōkōshū (Japanese government)

    Japan: Muromachi government structure: …their own private guard, the hōkōshū. In local administration, a special administrator was set up in Kamakura to control the 10 provinces of the Kantō area. This office came to be held by heads of the Ashikaga Motouji family. The 11 provinces of Kyushu were placed under control of an…

  • Hokuriku (industrial area, Japan)

    Hokuriku, industrial region, west-central Honshu, Japan, lying along the Sea of Japan. It is neither an administrative nor a political entity. The northeastern portion of the area, occupying parts of Niigata and Toyama ken (prefectures), specializes in heavy and chemical industries and has close

  • Hokusai (Japanese artist)

    Hokusai, Japanese master artist and printmaker of the ukiyo-e (“pictures of the floating world”) school. His early works represent the full spectrum of ukiyo-e art, including single-sheet prints of landscapes and actors, hand paintings, and surimono (“printed things”), such as greetings and

  • Hokusai manga (work by Hokusai)

    Hokusai: Mature years.: …amateur artists (including the famous Hokusai manga). Very likely his intention was to find new pupils and hence new patronage, and in this he succeeded to some degree.

  • ḥol ha-moʿed (Judaism)

    Ḥol ha-moʿed, in Judaism, the less festive days or semiholidays that occur between the initial and final days of the Passover (Pesaḥ) and Sukkot religious holidays. Because Jews in Israel celebrate Passover for seven days and Sukkot for eight, and Jews outside Israel add an additional day to each

  • hol hamoed (Judaism)

    Ḥol ha-moʿed, in Judaism, the less festive days or semiholidays that occur between the initial and final days of the Passover (Pesaḥ) and Sukkot religious holidays. Because Jews in Israel celebrate Passover for seven days and Sukkot for eight, and Jews outside Israel add an additional day to each

  • Hola Mahalla (Sikh festival)

    Sikhism: Rites and festivals: …festival of Baisakhi, Diwali, and Hola Mahalla. Festivals are marked by processions in the streets and visits to gurdwaras, particularly to those associated with one of the Gurus or with some historical event. Speeches are commonly made to crowds of worshipers. Diwali, the Festival of Light, is observed by both…

  • Holabird, William (American architect)

    William Holabird, American architect who, with his partner, Martin Roche, was a leading exponent of the influential Chicago School of commercial architecture; their Tacoma Building (Chicago, 1886–89) established the use of a total steel skeleton as a framework for building skyscrapers—a significant

  • Holacanthus ciliaris (fish)

    angelfish: …of the Atlantic; and the queen angelfish (Holacanthus ciliaris), a blue and yellow fish of the Atlantic.

  • Holan, Vladimír (Czech poet)

    Czech Republic: Literature: Vítězslav Nezval, František Halas, Vladimír Holan, Josef Hora, and Nobel Prize winner Jaroslav Seifert were among other writers whose poetry came to prominence during the first half of the 20th century. As World War II and German-imposed censorship closed in, poetry became even more popular than in peacetime; the…

  • Holand, Thomas de (English noble)

    Thomas Holland, duke of Surrey, prominent English noble in the reign of Richard II. Son of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent (1350–97), he aided in the arrest and destruction of Richard II’s enemies and was awarded with the dukedom of Surrey in 1397. In 1398 he was created marshal of England and

  • Holanda, A (work by Ortigão)

    José Duarte Ramalho Ortigão: His outstanding book is probably A Holanda (1885; “Holland”), in which he praises the mode of life and achievements of the Dutch people and upholds them as a model for the Portuguese. With advancing years his political outlook became more conservative; he was opposed to the revolution of 1910, which…

  • Holappa, Pentti (Finnish writer)

    Finnish literature: The 1960s and beyond: …a somewhat different path was Pentti Holappa, a political columnist and poet, praised for the formal mastery of his diction. He introduced the French nouveau roman (New Novel) to Finland.

  • Hólar (Iceland)

    Iceland: Christianization: …1056 and the other at Hólar in 1106. Literate Christian culture also transformed lay life. Codification of the law was begun in 1117–18. Later the Icelanders began to write sagas, which were to reach their pinnacle of literary achievement in the next century.

  • Your preference has been recorded
    Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
    Subscribe Today!