• 0-9
  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g
  • h
  • i
  • j
  • k
  • l
  • m
  • n
  • o
  • p
  • q
  • r
  • s
  • t
  • u
  • v
  • w
  • x
  • y
  • z
  • Hitchcock, Alfred (English-born American director)

    Alfred Hitchcock, English-born American motion-picture director whose suspenseful films and television programs won immense popularity and critical acclaim over a long and tremendously productive career. His films are marked by a macabre sense of humour and a somewhat bleak view of the human

  • Hitchcock, Ethan Allen (American businessman and public official)

    U.S. Bureau of Reclamation: …in 1902 by Interior Secretary Ethan Allen Hitchcock in the administration of President Theodore Roosevelt to provide irrigation water in order to “reclaim” unusably arid land for human benefit. It was initially called the U.S. Reclamation Service but was renamed the Bureau of Reclamation in 1923. It is best known…

  • Hitchcock, Gilbert (United States senator)

    League of Nations: The Covenant: Gilbert Hitchcock of Nebraska, urging loyal Democrats to vote against Lodge’s reservations. The next day, loyal Democrats joined those who were irreconcilably opposed to the treaty to defeat ratification of it with Lodge’s reservations. For the next vote, on the question of ratification without reservations,…

  • Hitchcock, Henry-Russell (American architect)

    Philip Johnson: With Henry-Russell Hitchcock he wrote The International Style: Architecture Since 1922 (1932), which provided a description of (and also a label for) post-World War I modern architecture. In 1940 Johnson returned to Harvard (B.Arch., 1943), where he studied architecture with Marcel Breuer. His real mentor, however,…

  • Hitchcock, Hugh Wiley (American musicologist)

    H. Wiley Hitchcock, American musicologist (born Sept. 28, 1923, Detroit, Mich.—died Dec. 5, 2007, New York, N.Y.), was a founding director (1971–93) of the Institute for Studies in American Music at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York and the coeditor (with Stanley Sadie) of the

  • Hitchcock, Ken (Canadian hockey coach)

    St. Louis Blues: …team brought in head coach Ken Hitchcock 14 games into the 2011–12 season, and the Blues rallied behind the new leadership, winning 49 games and capturing the franchise’s first division title in 14 years. However, postseason success continued to elude the team as the Blues lost in the second round…

  • Hitchcock, Sir Alfred (English-born American director)

    Alfred Hitchcock, English-born American motion-picture director whose suspenseful films and television programs won immense popularity and critical acclaim over a long and tremendously productive career. His films are marked by a macabre sense of humour and a somewhat bleak view of the human

  • Hitchcock, Thomas, Jr. (American polo player)

    Thomas Hitchcock, Jr., American polo player, generally considered the greatest in the history of the sport. The son of an outstanding player, Hitchcock achieved a 10-goal rating (the highest awarded) in 18 of the 19 seasons from 1922 through 1940. He was a member of four U.S. National Open

  • Hitchens, Christopher (British-American writer)

    Christopher Hitchens, British American author, critic, and bon vivant whose trenchant polemics on politics and religion positioned him at the forefront of public intellectual life in the late 20th and early 21st century. Hitchens, the son of a commander in the Royal Navy, spent his early childhood

  • Hitchens, Christopher Eric (British-American writer)

    Christopher Hitchens, British American author, critic, and bon vivant whose trenchant polemics on politics and religion positioned him at the forefront of public intellectual life in the late 20th and early 21st century. Hitchens, the son of a commander in the Royal Navy, spent his early childhood

  • Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, The (novel by Adams)

    The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, the first book (1979) in the highly popular series of comic science fiction novels by British writer Douglas Adams. The saga mocks modern society with humour and cynicism and has as its hero a hapless, deeply ordinary Englishman (Arthur Dent) who unexpectedly

  • Hitchhiker, The (American television series)

    Television in the United States: New boundaries: the growth of cable: …such as the suspense anthology The Hitchhiker (1983–91) and the sports sitcom 1st & Ten (1984–90), were of little note save for their adult language and some nudity. Others, such as Tanner ’88 (1988), hinted at the high levels of quality that could be achieved on pay services. Created and…

  • Hitchings, George Herbert (American scientist)

    George Herbert Hitchings, American pharmacologist who, along with Gertrude B. Elion and Sir James W. Black, received the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1988 for their development of drugs that became essential in the treatment of several major diseases. Hitchings received his bachelor’s

  • Hite Report on Male Sexuality, The (work by Hite)

    The Hite Report: The Hite Report on Male Sexuality (1981) recounted the results of about 7,200 questionnaires completed by men. In 1987 Hite published an update of her first study, The Hite Report on Women and Love: A Cultural Revolution in Progress, the content again culled from questionnaires.…

  • Hite Report on Women and Love: A Cultural Revolution in Progress, The (work by Hite)

    The Hite Report: …update of her first study, The Hite Report on Women and Love: A Cultural Revolution in Progress, the content again culled from questionnaires. That book’s revelation that 98 percent of American women found their sex lives lacking stirred controversy once again and brought Hite renewed notoriety. In The Hite Report…

  • Hite Report, The (work by Hite)

    The Hite Report, publication by feminist Shere Hite in 1976 that, while flawed in its handling of statistics, challenged numerous accepted notions about female sexuality. The 478-page book contains the self-reported results of about 3,000 of 100,000 questionnaires Hite distributed to women ranging

  • Hite Report: A Nationwide Study of Female Sexuality, The (work by Hite)

    The Hite Report, publication by feminist Shere Hite in 1976 that, while flawed in its handling of statistics, challenged numerous accepted notions about female sexuality. The 478-page book contains the self-reported results of about 3,000 of 100,000 questionnaires Hite distributed to women ranging

  • Hite, Shere (American writer)

    The Hite Report: …Female Sexuality, publication by feminist Shere Hite in 1976 that, while flawed in its handling of statistics, challenged numerous accepted notions about female sexuality.

  • HiTech (computer)

    chess: Computer chess: In 1988 a computer, HiTech, developed at Carnegie Mellon University, defeated a grandmaster, Arnold Denker, in a short match. In the same year another Carnegie Mellon program, Deep Thought, defeated a top-notch grandmaster, Bent Larsen, in a tournament game.

  • HITECH Act (United States [2009])

    electronic health record: Implementation of EHRs: The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act is the primary financial driving force for EHR implementation in the United States. Passed in 2009 as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the HITECH Act creates financial incentives for providers participating in…

  • Hitler Diaries (diaries attributed to Hitler)

    Hitler Diaries, a 60-volume set of diaries, attributed to Adolf Hitler, at the center of one of the greatest hoaxes of modern times. The diaries had actually been produced between 1981–83 by forger Konrad Kujau, who posed as a Stuttgart antiques dealer, Herr Fischer, and who had previously forged

  • Hitler Youth (Nazi organization)

    Hitler Youth, organization set up by Adolf Hitler in 1933 for educating and training male youth in Nazi principles. Under the leadership of Baldur von Schirach, head of all German youth programs, the Hitler Youth included by 1935 almost 60 percent of German boys. On July 1, 1936, it became a state

  • Hitler’s Madman (film by Sirk [1943])

    Douglas Sirk: Hollywood films of the 1940s: The first was Hitler’s Madman (1943), an effective low-budget thriller about Gestapo commander Reinhard Heydrich (played by John Carradine) that was distributed by Metro Goldwyn Mayer; the second, Summer Storm (1944), was a sensitive adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s only full-length novel, The Shooting Party, with

  • Hitler’s war (1939–1945)

    World War II, conflict that involved virtually every part of the world during the years 1939–45. The principal belligerents were the Axis powers—Germany, Italy, and Japan—and the Allies—France, Great Britain, the United States, the Soviet Union, and, to a lesser extent, China. The war was in many

  • Hitler, Adolf (dictator of Germany)

    Adolf Hitler, leader of the Nazi Party (from 1920/21) and chancellor (Kanzler) and Führer of Germany (1933–45). He was chancellor from January 30, 1933, and, after President Paul von Hindenburg’s death, assumed the twin titles of Führer and chancellor (August 2, 1934). Hitler’s father, Alois (born

  • Hitler, Alois (father of Adolf Hitler)

    Adolf Hitler: Hitler’s father, Alois (born 1837), was illegitimate. For a time he bore his mother’s name, Schicklgruber, but by 1876 he had established his family claim to the surname Hitler. Adolf never used any other surname.

  • Hitler-Jugend (Nazi organization)

    Hitler Youth, organization set up by Adolf Hitler in 1933 for educating and training male youth in Nazi principles. Under the leadership of Baldur von Schirach, head of all German youth programs, the Hitler Youth included by 1935 almost 60 percent of German boys. On July 1, 1936, it became a state

  • Hitler-Stalin Pact (Germany-Soviet Union [1939])

    German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact, (August 23, 1939), nonaggression pact between Germany and the Soviet Union that was concluded only a few days before the beginning of World War II and which divided eastern Europe into German and Soviet spheres of influence. The Soviet Union had been unable to

  • Hitlerian man (fascism)

    fascism: The new man: ” Fascists aimed to transform the ordinary man into the “new man,” a “virile” being who would put decadent bourgeoisie, cerebral Marxists, and “feminine” liberals to shame. The new man would be physically strong and morally “hard,” admiring what was forceful and vigorous and…

  • Hitlerputsch (German history)

    Beer Hall Putsch, abortive attempt by Adolf Hitler and Erich Ludendorff to start an insurrection in Germany against the Weimar Republic on November 8–9, 1923. The regime of the Weimar Republic was challenged from both right and left in Germany throughout the early 1920s, and there was widespread

  • Hitman’s Bodyguard, The (film by Hughes [2017])

    Samuel L. Jackson: …included Kong: Skull Island and The Hitman’s Bodyguard. In 2019 he reprised two roles from 2000: in Glass he played a comic book dealer/villain from M. Night Shyamalan’s supernatural thriller Unbreakable, and in Shaft he resumed the role of John Shaft. That year he also starred in The Last Full…

  • Hitman, the (American boxer)

    Thomas Hearns, American boxer who became, in 1987, the first person to win world titles in four weight divisions. Renowned as a devastating puncher (rather than as a boxer who relied on textbook technique), Hearns ultimately won world titles in five weight classes (welterweight, light middleweight,

  • Hito-no-michi (Japanese religion)

    Hito-no-michi, (Japanese: “Way of Man”), Japanese religious sect founded by Miki Tokuharu (1871–1938); it was revived in a modified form after World War II as PL Kyōdan (q.v.; from the English words “perfect liberty” and a Japanese term for “church”). Hito-no-michi was a development of an earlier

  • hitogami (Japanese religion)

    Hitogami, (Japanese: “man-god”), a way of distinguishing certain characteristics of Japanese religion by focusing on the close relationship between a deity and his transmitter, such as a seer or a shaman. The Japanese scholar Hori Ichiro contrasts hitogami as a religious system with the ujigami

  • Hitomi Kinue (Japanese athlete)
  • Hitopadesha (work by Narayana)

    Panchatantra: In India the Hitopadesha (“Good Advice”), composed by Narayana in the 12th century and circulated mostly in Bengal, appears to be an independent treatment of the Panchatantra material.

  • Hitotsubashi family (Japanese family)

    Tokugawa Yoshinobu: …Nariaki, was adopted into the Hitotsubashi family, he greatly increased his chance to succeed to the shogunate. When the shogun Tokugawa Iesada died without heir in 1858, Nariaki attempted to push his son’s candidacy as a way of implementing his own reformist policies. A more moderate group prevailed, however, and…

  • Hitsville (American corporation)

    Motown, recording company founded by Berry Gordy, Jr., in Detroit, Michigan, U.S., in January 1959 that became one of the most successful black-owned businesses and one of the most influential independent record companies in American history. The company gave its name to the hugely popular style of

  • hitter (baseball)

    baseball: Play of the game: …as home plate, where a batter, holding a formed stick (a bat), waits for him to throw a hard leather-covered ball. The goal of the batter is to hit the ball out of the reach of the fielders and eventually (most often with the help of hits by subsequent batters)…

  • Hittite (people)

    Hittite, member of an ancient Indo-European people who appeared in Anatolia at the beginning of the 2nd millennium bce; by 1340 bce they had become one of the dominant powers of the Middle East. Probably originating from the area beyond the Black Sea, the Hittites first occupied central Anatolia,

  • Hittite hieroglyphic writing

    epigraphy: The decipherment of ancient languages: …a true decipherment because the script was a relatively common variety of syllabic cuneiform. The interpretation was helped by the nature of the writing on the one hand (including intelligible ideograms, while an alphabet yields no such clues), and by the presence of Akkadian-Hittite bilinguals on the other; the soon-recognized…

  • Hittite language

    Hittite language, most important of the extinct Indo-European languages of ancient Anatolia. Hittite was closely related to Carian, Luwian, Lydian, Lycian, and Palaic (see also Anatolian languages). Hittite is known primarily from the approximately 30,000 cuneiform tablets or fragments of tablets

  • Hittite religion

    Judaism: Myths: … and the monster Tiamat; the Hittites told of a battle between the weather god and the dragon Illuyankas; while a Canaanite poem from Ras Shamra (ancient Ugarit) in northern Syria relates the discomfiture of Sir Sea by the deity Baal and the rout of an opponent named Leviathan. Originally, this…

  • Hittites, The (work by Gurney)

    Anatolia: The Hittite empire to c. 1180 bce: Evidently, the battle was inconclusive, as Muwatallis subsequently advanced as far south as Damascus, and the Hittites maintained their ascendancy in Syria. The king then found it necessary to transfer his residence to Dattassa, a city somewhere in the Taurus…

  • Hittorf, Johann Wilhelm (German physicist)

    Johann Wilhelm Hittorf, German physicist who first computed the electricity-carrying capacity of charged atoms and molecules (ions), an important factor in understanding electrochemical reactions. Hittorf’s early investigations were on the allotropes (different physical forms) of phosphorus and

  • Hittorff, Jacques-Ignace (French architect)

    Western architecture: France: Jacques-Ignace Hittorff was typical of those architects who combined the practice of modern classicism with archaeological investigation into Greek and Roman architecture. His Gare du Nord, Paris (1861–65), showed brilliantly how a language ultimately inspired by the triumphal arches of ancient Rome could lend an…

  • HIV (virus)

    HIV, retrovirus that attacks and gradually destroys the immune system, leaving the host unprotected against infection. HIV is classified as a lentivirus (meaning “slow virus”). Persons who are infected with HIV often die from secondary infections or cancer. AIDS is the final stage of HIV infection.

  • HIV Organ Policy Equity Act (United States [2013])

    Dorry Segev: …helped draft legislation for the HIV Organ Policy Equity (HOPE) Act (2013), which made transplants between HIV-positive donors and HIV-positive recipients legal for the first time in the country since being banned in the 1980s.

  • HIV-1 (infectious agent)

    AIDS: The origin of HIV: …strain of HIV, known as HIV-1 group M, have indicated that the virus emerged between 1884 and 1924 in central and western Africa. Researchers estimate that that strain of the virus began spreading throughout those areas in the late 1950s. Later, in the mid-1960s, an evolved strain called HIV-1 group…

  • HIV-1 genome (genetics)

    AIDS: Genome of HIV: The HIV-1 genome in 2009 was the first HIV genome to be sequenced in its entirety. Prior to that achievement, the ability of HIV RNA to fold into highly intricate structures had complicated attempts to elucidate the genomic sequence, and scientists could sequence only small segments…

  • HIV-2

    AIDS: Groups and subtypes of HIV: HIV-2 is divided into groups A through E, with subtypes A and B being the most relevant to human infection. HIV-2, which is found primarily in western Africa, can cause AIDS, but it does so more slowly than HIV-1. There is some evidence that HIV-2…

  • Hiva Oa (island, French Polynesia)

    Hiva Oa, largest island of the southeastern Marquesas Islands, French Polynesia, central South Pacific. The volcanic island’s mountainous slopes rise directly from the sea, reaching an elevation of some 4,000 feet (1,200 metres) at Mount Temetiu. There is neither a coastal plain nor a fringing

  • hive (beekeeping)

    lepidopteran: Importance: …mellonella) causes considerable damage in beehives.

  • hive tool (beekeeping)

    beekeeping: Beekeeping equipment: …blunt steel blade called a hive tool, for separating the frames and other hive parts for examination; the uncapping knife, for opening the cells of honey; and the extractor, for centrifuging the honey from the cells.

  • Hive, The (work by Cela)

    Camilo José Cela: …second novel, La colmena (1951; The Hive), with its fragmented chronology and large cast of characters, is an innovative and perceptive story of postwar Madrid. It solidified Cela’s critical and popular reputation. Another of his better-known avant-garde novels, San Camilo, 1936 (1969), is one continuous stream of consciousness. His later…

  • hives (dermatology)

    Hives, a hypersensitive skin reaction characterized by the sudden appearance of very itchy, slightly raised, smooth, flat-topped wheals and plaques that are usually redder or paler than the surrounding skin. In the acute form, the skin lesions generally subside in 6 to 24 hours, but they may come

  • Hiwassee River (river, United States)

    Hiwassee River, river rising in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Towns county, northern Georgia, U.S. It flows north into North Carolina past Hayesville, northwest past Murphy, into southeastern Tennessee, where it joins the Tennessee River 31 miles (50 km) northeast of Chattanooga at the Chickamauga

  • Ḥiwi al-Balkhī (Jewish pamphleteer)

    Judaism: Anti-rabbinic reactions: Ḥiwi al-Balkhī, a 9th-century skeptical Jewish pamphleteer, scandalized the faithful by openly attacking the morality of Scripture and by issuing for schools an expurgated edition of the Bible that omitted “offensive” material (e.g., alleged stories of God acting dishonestly). A mystifying Hebrew tract titled Sefer…

  • Hiyōi (Buddhist goddess)

    Parnashavari, in Vajrayana or Tantric Buddhism, a goddess distinguished by the girdle of leaves she wears. She is known as Lo-ma-gyon-ma in Tibet and as Hiyōi in Japan. Parnashavari is apparently derived from an aboriginal deity, and one of her titles is Sarvashavaranam Bhagavati, or “goddess of

  • Hiyoshimaru (Japanese leader)

    Toyotomi Hideyoshi, feudal lord and chief Imperial minister (1585–98), who completed the 16th-century unification of Japan begun by Oda Nobunaga. He was the son of a peasant; when he was still a boy, he left home for Tōtōmi province (present-day Shizuoka prefecture) and became page to a retainer of

  • Ḥizb al-Baʿath al-ʿArabī al-Ishtirākī (Arab political party)

    Baʿath Party, Pan-Arabist political party advocating the formation of a single Arab socialist nation. It has branches in many Middle Eastern countries and was the ruling party in Syria from 1963 and in Iraq from 1968 to 2003. The Baʿath Party was founded in 1943 in Damascus, Syria, by Michel Aflaq

  • Ḥizb al-Baʿth al-ʿArabī al-Ishtirākī (Arab political party)

    Baʿath Party, Pan-Arabist political party advocating the formation of a single Arab socialist nation. It has branches in many Middle Eastern countries and was the ruling party in Syria from 1963 and in Iraq from 1968 to 2003. The Baʿath Party was founded in 1943 in Damascus, Syria, by Michel Aflaq

  • Ḥizb al-Ḥurr ad-Dustūrī at-Tūnusī, al- (political party, Tunisia)

    Destour, Tunisian political party, especially active in the 1920s and ’30s in arousing Tunisian national consciousness and opposition to the French protectorate. The forerunner of the Destour, the Young Tunisians, had engaged the Tunisian intellectual elite but lacked widespread support. Forced

  • Ḥizb al-Istiqlāl (political party, Morocco)

    Morocco: The French Zone: …took the new title of Ḥizb al-Istiqlāl (Independence Party). In January 1944 the party submitted to the sultan and the Allied (including the French) authorities a memorandum asking for independence under a constitutional regime. The nationalist leaders, including Aḥmad Balafrej, secretary general of the Istiqlāl, were unjustly accused and arrested…

  • Ḥizb al-Waṭanī, al- (political party, Egypt)

    ʿAbbās II: …to the formation of the National Party, headed by Muṣṭafā Kāmil, to counter the Ummah Party of the moderate nationalists, which was supported by the British. With the appointment of Lord Kitchener as consul general (1912–14), the leaders of the National Party were exiled or imprisoned, and ʿAbbās’s authority was…

  • Ḥizb Allāh (Lebanese organization)

    Hezbollah, political party and militant group that first emerged during Lebanon’s civil war as a militia after the Israeli invasion of that country in 1982. Shiʿi Muslims, traditionally the weakest religious group in Lebanon, first found their voice in the moderate and largely secular Amal

  • Hizb-i Islami (political party, Afghanistan)

    Afghanistan: The Ashraf Ghani presidency, NATO withdrawal, and pursuit of peace: In 2016 Hizb-i Islami, the largest militant group after the Taliban, agreed to accept the country’s constitution and renounce violence in a peace deal with the central government. Many observers hoped the deal would pave the way for an agreement with the Taliban down the road. In…

  • Hizbullah (Lebanese organization)

    Hezbollah, political party and militant group that first emerged during Lebanon’s civil war as a militia after the Israeli invasion of that country in 1982. Shiʿi Muslims, traditionally the weakest religious group in Lebanon, first found their voice in the moderate and largely secular Amal

  • Hizikia (algae)

    algae: Ecological and commercial importance: Undaria, and Hizikia (a type of brown algae) are also harvested from wild beds along rocky shores, particularly in Japan, Korea, and China, where they may be eaten with meat or fish and in soups. The green algae Monostroma and Ulva look somewhat like leaves of lettuce…

  • Hızır (Turkmen ruler)

    Saruhan Dynasty: 1410, the last Saruhan ruler, Hızır, was killed by the Ottoman prince Mehmed Çelebi (later Sultan Mehmed I), and Saruhan was reincorporated into the Ottoman Empire.

  • Hızır Bey, Mosque of (mosque, Kırklareli, Turkey)

    Kırklareli: …Ottoman monuments, including the 15th-century Mosque of Hızır Bey. An important trade centre (chiefly in dairy products, cereals, and tobacco), it is linked by a branch line with the Edirne-Istanbul railway.

  • Hizmet (Islamic movement)

    Turkey: AKP challenges Kemalist, military entrenchment: …the military involved in the Hizmet movement, a network of followers of the moderate Islamist cleric Fethullah Gülen. Nearly 300 military officers, academics, journalists, and others were convicted by the end of the mass trial in 2013. While many hailed the investigations and trials for rooting out a secularist “deep…

  • Ḥizqiyya (king of Judah)

    Hezekiah, son of Ahaz, and the 13th successor of David as king of Judah at Jerusalem. The dates of his reign are often given as about 715 to about 686 bc, but inconsistencies in biblical and Assyrian cuneiform records have yielded a wide range of possible dates. Hezekiah reigned at a time when the

  • Hjärne, Harald Gabriel (Swedish politician)

    Harald Gabriel Hjärne, historian, politician, and political writer known for his influence on Swedish historical scholarship and for his contributions to Swedish conservative and right-wing liberal thought. After studying at the University of Uppsala, Hjärne joined the faculty there in 1872. His

  • Hjelm, Peter Jacob (Swedish chemist)

    Peter Jacob Hjelm, Swedish chemist who isolated the element molybdenum in 1781. Hjelm was educated at Uppsala University and was a friend of the great Swedish chemist Carl Wilhelm Scheele. In 1781 Scheele sent him an oxide of molybdenum, which he had succeeded in obtaining by acid treatment of the

  • Hjelmslev, Louis (Danish linguist)

    glossematics: …proposed by the Danish scholar Louis Hjelmslev (1899–1965) and his collaborators, who were strongly influenced by the work of the Swiss linguist Ferdinand de Saussure. Glossematics has been an important component of European structuralism but has had relatively little influence in the United States, except in relation to stratificational grammar,…

  • Hjemkomst Center (cultural centre, Moorhead, Minnesota, United States)

    Moorhead: …roots are celebrated through the Hjemkomst Center, which contains a replica Viking ship and a replica stave church, and an annual festival in June. Buffalo River State Park is to the east. Inc. 1881. Pop. (2000) 32,177; (2010) 38,065.

  • Hjo (Sweden)

    Lake Vätter: On the western shore, Hjo developed as a spa in the late 18th century and still thrives as a lakeside resort.

  • Hjørring (Denmark)

    Hjørring, city, northern Jutland, Denmark. The ancient capital of the Vendsyssel region, Hjørring was chartered in 1243 and remains the commercial centre of the district. The Church of St. Catharinæ dates from about 1250; the churches of St. Hans and St. Olai date from the 12th century. Local

  • Hjortspring (Denmark)

    history of Europe: Rituals, religion, and art: …is the votive deposit at Hjortspring, Den., where a large wooden boat equipped for war with wooden shields, spears, and swords was destroyed and deposited in a small bog. The events behind these hoards were known to Classical writers such as Tacitus and Orosius, who gave accounts of war offerings…

  • HJV (infectious agent)

    Sendai virus, (genus Respirovirus), infectious agent of the genus Respirovirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. Discovered in Sendai, Japan, the Sendai virus is naturally found in mice, rats, hamsters, guinea pigs, and pigs and primarily affects the respiratory system. The virus is highly contagious

  • Hkakabo Razi (mountain, Myanmar)

    Myanmar: Relief: …19,296 feet (5,881 metres) at Mount Hkakabo (the country’s highest peak) in the extreme north to sea level at the Irrawaddy (Ayeyarwady) and Sittang (Sittoung) river deltas. The mountain ranges generally run from north to south. The country as a whole can be divided into five physiographic regions—the northern mountains,…

  • Hkakabo, Mount (mountain, Myanmar)

    Myanmar: Relief: …19,296 feet (5,881 metres) at Mount Hkakabo (the country’s highest peak) in the extreme north to sea level at the Irrawaddy (Ayeyarwady) and Sittang (Sittoung) river deltas. The mountain ranges generally run from north to south. The country as a whole can be divided into five physiographic regions—the northern mountains,…

  • Hkawa (people)

    Wa, peoples of the upland areas of eastern Myanmar (Burma) and southwestern Yunnan province of China. They speak a variety of Austroasiatic languages related to those spoken by upland-dwelling groups in northern Thailand and Laos. At the beginning of the 21st century, the Wa numbered approximately

  • HKBP (church, Indonesia)

    Batak Protestant Christian Church, church in northern Sumatra, Indon., organized as an independent church in 1930 and constituting the largest Lutheran church in Asia. It developed from the work of missionaries of the Rhenish Mission Society, established in Barmen, Ger., in 1828. Under the

  • HKI (international organization)

    Helen Keller International (HKI), one of the oldest international nonprofit organizations working to prevent blindness and fight malnutrition. Headquarters are in New York City. In 1915 the American merchant George Kessler and his wife, Cora Parsons Kessler, organized in Paris the British, French,

  • HLA (biochemistry)

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA), any of the numerous antigens (substances capable of stimulating an immune response) involved in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans. The HLA genes encode the cell-surface proteins that are part of the MHC. HLA antigens are programmed by a highly

  • HLA-B27 (genetics)

    Reiter syndrome: A genetic factor (HLA-B27) has been identified that predisposes a person to the disorder. Arthritis usually involves multiple joints, particularly the knees, ankles, and bones of the feet. In most cases, the joint pain seems to resolve spontaneously in a few months, but it has a tendency to…

  • HLA-DR4 (genetics)

    arthritis: Spondyloarthropathies: …if the patient has the HLA-DR4 genotype.

  • Hlai (Asian people)

    Li, indigenous people of Hainan Island, off the southern coast of China, and an official minority of China. The official name Li is applied to a number of different local groups, most of whom speak languages distantly related to the Tai language family. Until Chinese linguists created a romanized

  • Hlai languages

    Li: …groups, most of whom speak languages distantly related to the Tai language family. Until Chinese linguists created a romanized orthography for their language in the 1950s, they had no writing system of their own.

  • Hlavsa, Mejla (Czech musician)

    Milan Hlavsa, (Mejla Hlavsa), Czech musician (born March 6, 1951, Prague, Czech. [now Czech Rep.]—died Jan. 5, 2001, Prague), founded (1968) and served as songwriter and bass guitarist for the underground rock and roll band Plastic People of the Universe, which became a symbol of political unrest i

  • Hlavsa, Milan (Czech musician)

    Milan Hlavsa, (Mejla Hlavsa), Czech musician (born March 6, 1951, Prague, Czech. [now Czech Rep.]—died Jan. 5, 2001, Prague), founded (1968) and served as songwriter and bass guitarist for the underground rock and roll band Plastic People of the Universe, which became a symbol of political unrest i

  • Hlinka, Andrej (Slovak patriot)

    Andrej Hlinka, Slovak Roman Catholic priest and patriot who was the leader of the Slovak autonomist opposition to the Czechoslovak government in the 1920s and ’30s. Hlinka became priest of the small industrial town of Ružomberok in 1905 and eagerly supported the Slovak nationalist candidates there

  • HLL (computing)

    computer: Machine language: …mathematics or some other “high-level language” to machine language was therefore necessary before computers would be useful to a broader class of users. As early as the 1830s, Charles Babbage and Lady Lovelace had recognized that such translation could be done by machine (see the earlier section Lady Lovelace,…

  • Hlódyn (Norse mythology)

    Jörd, (Old Norse: “Earth”, ) in Norse mythology, a giantess, mother of the deity Thor and mistress of the god Odin. In the late pre-Christian era she was believed to have had a husband of the same name, perhaps indicating her transformation into a masculine personality. Her name is connected with

  • Hlothere (king of Kent)

    Hlothere, king of Kent in Anglo-Saxon England. He was the son of Erconberht and brother of Egbert, whom he succeeded in 673. Hlothere appears to have shared power with his nephew Eadric (Egbert’s son); laws still extant seem to have been issued in their joint names. A quarrel between them caused

  • Hluhluwe Game Reserve (reserve, South Africa)

    Hluhluwe Game Reserve, game reserve in northern KwaZulu/Natal province, South Africa, established in 1897. It lies 140 miles (225 km) northeast of Durban and has an area of 89 square miles (231 square km). Its name is a Zulu word for the local thorny rope plant. Hluhluwe, a subtropical region of

  • Hlutdaw (Myanmar government)

    Hlutdaw, (Burmese: “Place of Release”), the primary ministerial council in Myanmar (Burma) from approximately the 13th to the 19th century. The Hlutdaw held executive and judicial authority and was the principal administrative organ of the king. It predominated over weak kings and was often

  • Hluttaw (Myanmar government)

    Hlutdaw, (Burmese: “Place of Release”), the primary ministerial council in Myanmar (Burma) from approximately the 13th to the 19th century. The Hlutdaw held executive and judicial authority and was the principal administrative organ of the king. It predominated over weak kings and was often

  • Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
    Subscribe Today!