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  • Hiram College (university, Hiram, Ohio, United States)

    Hiram College, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Hiram, Ohio, U.S., about 35 miles (55 km) southeast of Cleveland. It is a liberal arts college affiliated with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Along with B.A. degrees in arts, sciences, religion, philosophy,

  • Hiram of Tyre (king of Tyre)

    Hiram, Phoenician king of Tyre (reigned 969–936 bc), who appears in the Bible as an ally of the Israelite kings David and Solomon. Hiram maintained friendly relations with Israel, supplying Solomon with men and materials for the construction of the Temple at Jerusalem and cooperating with him in

  • hiramaki-e (Japanese art)

    Hiramaki-e, in Japanese lacquerwork, gold decoration in low, or “flat,” relief, a basic form of maki-e (q.v.). The pattern is first outlined on a sheet of paper with brush and ink. It is then traced on the reverse side of the paper with a mixture of heated wet lacquer and (usually red) pigment.

  • hirameji (Japanese art)

    Hirameji, (Japanese: “flat dust base”), in Japanese lacquerwork, variation of the jimaki technique. For this kind of ground decoration, small, irregularly shaped flakes of sheet gold or silver are used. The hiramefun, or “flat dust,” is made by filing solid gold and then flattening the flakes

  • hiraṇya (cloth)

    Kimkhwāb, Indian brocade woven of silk and gold or silver thread. The word kimkhwāb, derived from the Persian, means “a little dream,” a reference perhaps to the intricate patterns employed; kimkhwāb also means “woven flower,” an interpretation that appears more applicable to the brocade, in view

  • Hiranyagarbha (philosophy)

    Indian philosophy: The principles underlying macrocosm and microcosm: …soul of the world, or Hiranyagarbha, with the vital self; and Ishvara, or God as a self-conscious being, with the thinking self. The transcendent self and brahman as bliss are not correlates but rather are identical.

  • Hiranyakashipu (Hindu mythology)

    Narasimha: The demon Hiranyakashipu—twin brother of Hiranyaksha, the demon overthrown by Vishnu in his previous incarnation as Varaha—obtained a boon from the god Brahma that he could not be killed by human or animal, from inside or outside, by day or by night, and that no weapon could…

  • Hiranyaksha (Hindu mythology)

    Varaha: When a demon named Hiranyaksha dragged the earth to the bottom of the sea, Vishnu took the form of a boar in order to rescue it. They fought for a thousand years. Then Varaha slew the demon and raised the earth out of the water with his tusks. The…

  • Hiraoka Kimitake (Japanese author)

    Mishima Yukio, prolific writer who is regarded by many critics as the most important Japanese novelist of the 20th century. Mishima was the son of a high civil servant and attended the aristocratic Peers School in Tokyo. During World War II, having failed to qualify physically for military service,

  • Hirata Atsutane (Japanese religious leader)

    Hirata Atsutane, Japanese thinker, systematizer, and leader of the Restoration Shintō (also known as Fukko Shintō; q.v.) school. His thought, stressing the divine nature of the emperor, exerted a powerful influence on royalists who fought for the restoration of imperial rule during the second half

  • Hiratsuka (Japan)

    Hiratsuka, city, southern Kanagawa ken (prefecture), east-central Honshu, Japan. It lies along Sagami Bay of the Pacific Ocean, just west of Chigasaki. Hiratsuka developed as a post town along the Tōkaidō (“Eastern Sea Road”)—the main historic land route between Edo (Tokyo) and Kyōto—during the Edo

  • Hiratsuka Un-ichi (Japanese artist)

    printmaking: Other countries: Onchi Kōshirō and Hiratsuka Un’ichi were early exponents who, though working in different styles, did most for the renaissance of this national art, which thrived once again after World War II. Among the notable woodcut artists of the postwar period are Munakata Shikō and Saitō Kiyoshi.

  • Hirayama Tōgo (Japanese author)

    Ihara Saikaku, poet and novelist, one of the most brilliant figures of the 17th-century revival of Japanese literature. He enchanted readers with racy accounts of the amorous and financial affairs of the merchant class and the demimonde. Saikaku first won fame for his amazing facility in composing

  • Hirayama, Hideko (Japanese actress)

    Hideko Takamine, (Hideko Hirayama), Japanese actress (born March 27, 1924, Hakodate, Japan—died Dec. 28, 2010, Tokyo, Japan), was considered by critics to be one of the great actresses of the classical Japanese cinema. During a career that spanned 50 years (1929–79), Takamine was most noted for her

  • Hirāʾ, Mount (mountain, Saudi Arabia)

    Mecca: City site: Mount Hirāʾ rises to 2,080 feet on the northeast and contains a cave in which Muhammad sought isolation and visions before he became a prophet. It was also in this cave that he received the first verse (āyah) of the holy Qurʾān. South of the…

  • hird (Scandinavian royal troops)

    Housecarl, member of the personal or household troops or bodyguard of Scandinavian kings and chieftains in the Viking and medieval periods. The housecarls achieved a celebrated place in European history as the Danish occupation force in England under Canute the Great in 1015–35. Canute’s 3,000-man

  • hire-purchase (law)

    property law: Security interests in property: …payments have been made (hire purchase). In the United States the differences between the various types of personal property security agreements have been considerably reduced by uniform legislation that deals with all of them under one heading. (See also installment credit.)

  • hire-purchase plan (finance)

    Installment credit, in business, credit that is granted on condition of its repayment at regular intervals, or installments, over a specified period of time until paid in full. Installment credit is the means by which most durable goods such as automobiles and large home appliances are bought by

  • híres nevezetes Toldi Miklósnak jeles cselekedetiről, Az (work by Selymes)

    Hungarian literature: Renaissance and Reformation: …the author of a romance, Az híres nevezetes Toldi Miklósnak jeles cselekedetiről (1574; “The Story of the Remarkable Nicholas Toldi’s Extraordinary and Brave Deeds”), which achieved great popularity in Hungary and served as a basis for a masterpiece by János Arany in the 19th century. This romance was the one…

  • Hiri (language)

    Hiri Motu, pidgin variety of vernacular Motu, an Austronesian language originally spoken in the area surrounding Port Moresby, the capital of Papua New Guinea. The name Hiri Motu may have been adopted because of a now-disputed association with hiris, precolonial trade voyages on the Gulf of Papua

  • Hiri Motu (language)

    Hiri Motu, pidgin variety of vernacular Motu, an Austronesian language originally spoken in the area surrounding Port Moresby, the capital of Papua New Guinea. The name Hiri Motu may have been adopted because of a now-disputed association with hiris, precolonial trade voyages on the Gulf of Papua

  • Hirlas Owain (work by Owain)

    Owain Cyfeiliog: The poem Hirlas Owain (“The Drinking Horn of Owain”) is noteworthy for its dramatic presentation. It is set at court, where Owain’s warriors, weary from battle, are gathered at the banquet table. Each stanza begins with instructions to the cupbearer to pour a drink for a hero;…

  • Hirnantian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Hirnantian Stage, last of three internationally defined stages of the Upper Ordovician Series, encompassing all rocks deposited during the Hirnantian Age (445.2 million to 443.4 million years ago) of the Ordovician Period. The name of this interval is derived from the Hirnant Beds in Wales, which

  • Hiro (Maori figure)

    Raiatea: Hiro, the leader of a Polynesian migratory expedition, is said to have left Raiatea about ce 1300 in the Aotea canoe for New Zealand, and the Maori traditionally regard Raiatea as a seat of learning. Taputapuatea, the marae (place of worship), near Opoa, is well…

  • Hiroa, Te Rangi (Maori anthropologist, physician, and politician)

    Sir Peter Buck, Maori anthropologist, physician, and politician who made major contributions to Maori public health and became one of the world’s leading Polynesian studies scholars. The son of William Henry Buck and Ngarongo-ki-tua, a Ngati Mutunga Maori tribeswoman, Buck was a medical officer for

  • Hirohito (emperor of Japan)

    Hirohito, emperor of Japan from 1926 until his death in 1989. He was the longest-reigning monarch in Japan’s history. Hirohito was born at the Aoyama Palace in Tokyo, the son of the Taishō emperor and grandson of the Meiji emperor. He was educated at the Peers’ School and at the Crown Prince’s

  • Hironaka Heisuke (Japanese mathematician)

    Hironaka Heisuke, Japanese mathematician who was awarded the Fields Medal in 1970 for his work in algebraic geometry. Hironaka graduated from Kyōto University (1954) and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S. (Ph.D., 1960); at the latter he studied under Oscar Zariski. Hironaka held an

  • Hirono, Mazie (United States senator)

    Mazie Hirono, Japanese-born American politician who was elected as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 2012 and began representing Hawaii the following year. She was the first Asian immigrant and the first Buddhist to serve in the Senate and the first woman to represent Hawaii in that legislative

  • Hirono, Mazie Keiko (United States senator)

    Mazie Hirono, Japanese-born American politician who was elected as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 2012 and began representing Hawaii the following year. She was the first Asian immigrant and the first Buddhist to serve in the Senate and the first woman to represent Hawaii in that legislative

  • Hironomiya Naruhito (emperor of Japan)

    Naruhito, emperor of Japan from 2019. He is Japan’s 126th emperor, and, according to tradition, traces his lineage directly to Jimmu, the legendary first emperor of Japan. At birth, Naruhito became heir presumptive to the Japanese imperial throne, being the eldest son of Akihito, then the crown

  • Hirosaki (Japan)

    Hirosaki, city, southwestern Aomori ken (prefecture), northern Honshu, Japan. It is located on the Iwaki River in the Tsugaru Plain. The isolated volcanic cone of Mount Iwaki (5,331 feet [1,625 metres]), a pilgrimage site, rises to the northwest. Hirosaki developed as a castle town during the Edo

  • Hirosaki University (university, Hirosaki, Japan)

    Hirosaki: Hirosaki University was founded in 1949. Pop. (2010) 183,473; (2015) 177,411.

  • Hiroshige (Japanese artist)

    Hiroshige, Japanese artist, one of the last great ukiyo-e (“pictures of the floating world”) masters of the colour woodblock print. His genius for landscape compositions was first recognized in the West by the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists. His print series Fifty-three Stations of the

  • Hiroshima (work by Hersey)

    American literature: Literary biography and the new journalism: John Hersey’s Hiroshima (1946) was a deliberately controlled, unemotional account of atomic holocaust. In Notes of a Native Son (1955), Nobody Knows My Name (1961), and The Fire Next Time (1963), the novelist James Baldwin published a body of the most eloquent essays written in the United…

  • Hiroshima (Japan)

    Hiroshima, city, capital of Hiroshimaken (prefecture), southwestern Honshu, Japan. It lies at the head of Hiroshima Bay, an embayment of the Inland Sea. On August 6, 1945, Hiroshima became the first city in the world to be struck by an atomic bomb. Hiroshima, whose name means “broad island,” is

  • Hiroshima (prefecture, Japan)

    Hiroshima, ken (prefecture), southwestern Honshu, Japan. The Chūgoku Range runs along the northern boundary, and delta plains of the Ōta River are extensively developed along the Inland Sea in the south. The city of Hiroshima, situated on the plain, is the prefectural capital and centre of the

  • Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art (museum, Hiroshima, Japan)

    Kurokawa Kishō: When he built the Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art (1988–89), it was the first art museum built there since World War II. To represent the dropping of the atomic bomb on the city, Kurokawa designed an empty circular space at the core of the steel-and-concrete museum. In his…

  • Hiroshima mon amour (film by Resnais [1959])

    Marguerite Duras: …Alain Resnais’s critically acclaimed film Hiroshima mon amour, about a brief love affair in postwar Hiroshima between a Japanese businessman and a French actress. She directed as well as wrote the 1975 film adaptation of her play India Song, which offers a static, moody portrayal of the wife of the…

  • Hiroshima Peace Memorial (dome, Hiroshima, Japan)

    Hiroshima: Atomic Bomb Dome (Genbaku dōmu), which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1996, is the remains of one of the few buildings not obliterated by the blast. Pop. (2015) 1,194,034; (2018 est.) 1,199,252.

  • Hiroshima Toyo Carp (Japanese baseball team)

    Central League: Chūnichi Dragons, Hanshin Tigers, Hiroshima Tōyō Carp, Tokyo Yakult Swallows, Yokohama BayStars, and Yomiuri (Tokyo) Giants. The regular playing season culminates in the Japan Series, a seven-game series between the respective champion teams of the Pacific and Central leagues.

  • Hirpini (ancient Italian tribe)

    Hirpini, in ancient times, an inland Samnite tribe in the south of Italy. To the north of them were the Pentri and Caraceni, who, with the Hirpini and Caudini, constituted the Samnite confederation in the wars of the 4th century bc. The Roman policy of separation cut the Hirpini off from these

  • Hirsch auf Gereuth, Moritz, Freiherr von (European businessman)

    Maurice, baron de Hirsch, Jewish businessman noted for his extensive philanthropy. Born into a wealthy family, Hirsch increased his inheritance by his business acumen at the international banking house of Bischoffsheim and Goldschmidt, of Paris and London, and by financial speculations, beginning

  • Hirsch, Crazylegs (American football player)

    Elroy Hirsch, American gridiron football player, sports administrator, and actor who rose to fame as a collegiate star and who was a record-setting wide receiver with the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL). In 1942 Hirsch played halfback on the University of Wisconsin’s football

  • Hirsch, E. D., Jr. (American literary critic and educator)

    E.D. Hirsch, Jr., American literary critic and educator who is best known for his Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know (1987). He also cowrote The Dictionary of Cultural Literacy (1988; with Joseph F. Kett and James Trefil) and was the main editor of A First Dictionary of Cultural

  • Hirsch, Eli (American philosopher)

    universal: Possibilia: The American philosopher Eli Hirsch has provided an elegant definition of “natural class,” using a resemblance relation holding among trios—one thing’s being more similar to another thing than the latter is to some third thing. It is unfortunate, for nominalists, that Hirsch’s definition prohibits imperfect communities only if…

  • Hirsch, Elroy (American football player)

    Elroy Hirsch, American gridiron football player, sports administrator, and actor who rose to fame as a collegiate star and who was a record-setting wide receiver with the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL). In 1942 Hirsch played halfback on the University of Wisconsin’s football

  • Hirsch, Elroy Leon (American football player)

    Elroy Hirsch, American gridiron football player, sports administrator, and actor who rose to fame as a collegiate star and who was a record-setting wide receiver with the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL). In 1942 Hirsch played halfback on the University of Wisconsin’s football

  • Hirsch, Eric Donald, Jr. (American literary critic and educator)

    E.D. Hirsch, Jr., American literary critic and educator who is best known for his Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know (1987). He also cowrote The Dictionary of Cultural Literacy (1988; with Joseph F. Kett and James Trefil) and was the main editor of A First Dictionary of Cultural

  • Hirsch, Maurice, baron de (European businessman)

    Maurice, baron de Hirsch, Jewish businessman noted for his extensive philanthropy. Born into a wealthy family, Hirsch increased his inheritance by his business acumen at the international banking house of Bischoffsheim and Goldschmidt, of Paris and London, and by financial speculations, beginning

  • Hirsch, Moshe (American-born rabbi)

    Moshe Hirsch, American-born Orthodox Jewish rabbi (born 1923, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died May 2, 2010, Jerusalem, Israel), was a leading figure in Neturei Karta, a politically active anti-Zionist Orthodox sect that opposed the existence of a sovereign Jewish state. After studying at a rabbinical yeshiva in

  • Hirsch, Samson Raphael (German Jewish religious theorist)

    Samson Raphael Hirsch, major Jewish religious thinker and founder of Trennungsorthodoxie (Separatist Orthodoxy), or Neo-Orthodoxy, a theological system that helped make Orthodox Judaism viable in Germany. Hirsch was a rabbi successively in Oldenburg, Emden, Nikolsburg, and Frankfurt am Main. While

  • Hirsch, Samuel (American religious philosopher and rabbi)

    Samuel Hirsch, religious philosopher, rabbi, and a leading advocate of radical Reform Judaism. He was among the first to propose holding Jewish services on Sunday. Educated at the universities of Bonn, Berlin, and Leipzig, Hirsch became rabbi at Dessau in 1838 but was forced to resign (1841)

  • Hirschberg (Poland)

    Jelenia Góra, city, Dolnośląskie województwo (province), southwestern Poland. It lies in the Sudeten (Sudety) mountains near the Czech border, at the confluence of the Bóbr and Kamienna rivers. Archaeological data indicate that the site was occupied by an ancient Slavic tribe. Permanent settlement

  • Hirscher, Marcel (Austrian skier)

    Marcel Hirscher, Austrian skier who won a record eight consecutive World Cup overall championships (2012–19). Hirscher grew up in the Alpine village of Annaberg-Lungötz, where his father, who was also his coach, and his mother operated a skiing school. He attributed his success in Alpine skiing’s

  • Hirschfeld, Al (American caricaturist)

    Al Hirschfeld, American caricature artist, especially known for his drawings appearing in The New York Times, portraying show-business personalities. Hirschfeld’s family moved from St. Louis to upper Manhattan in New York City when he was 11, and at age 17 he went to work as the art director of

  • Hirschfeld, Albert (American caricaturist)

    Al Hirschfeld, American caricature artist, especially known for his drawings appearing in The New York Times, portraying show-business personalities. Hirschfeld’s family moved from St. Louis to upper Manhattan in New York City when he was 11, and at age 17 he went to work as the art director of

  • Hirschfeld, Magnus (German physician)

    Magnus Hirschfeld, German physician who was an important theorist of sexuality and a prominent advocate of gay rights in the early 20th century. Hirschfeld was born to Jewish parents in a Prussian town on the Baltic coast. He first studied modern languages and then medicine, obtaining a doctoral

  • Hirschhorn, Joel (American songwriter and composer)
  • Hirschi, Travis (American criminologist)

    Travis Hirschi, American criminologist known for his social-control perspective on juvenile delinquency and his self-control perspective on crime. Hirschi received a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley (1968), and taught at several universities before joining the faculty

  • Hirschman, Albert O. (German economist)

    Herfindahl-Hirschman index: Herfindahl and the German economist Albert O. Hirschman, it is based on the following formula: HHI = s12 + s22 + ⋯ + sn2 where n is the number of firms in the market and sn denotes the market share of the nth firm. Higher values of the index indicate…

  • Hirschmann, Ralph F. (American chemist)

    Ralph F. Hirschmann, American chemist who is best known for his development of techniques for the chemical synthesis of peptides. Hirschmann’s work significantly impacted the area of medicinal chemistry, proving fundamental to breakthroughs in drug development in the late 20th and early 21st

  • Hirschsprung disease (pathology)

    megacolon: …syndrome are congenital megacolon, or Hirschsprung disease, and acquired megacolon. In congenital megacolon, the lowermost portion of the large intestine is congenitally lacking in normal nerve fibres; thus, peristalsis, or involuntary contractions, of the muscles of this part of the intestine cannot occur, and the bowel’s contents are not pushed…

  • Hirshbein, Peretz (American writer)

    Yiddish literature: Yiddish theatre: Peretz Hirshbein tried his hand at short avant-garde plays such as Eynzame veltn (first published in Hebrew, 1905; in Yiddish, 1906; “Solitary Worlds”) as well as more traditional dramas. His Tkies kaf (1908; “The Vow”) anticipated S. Ansky’s Der dibek, discussed below. Hirshbein’s first naturalistic…

  • Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (art museum and sculpture garden, Washington, District of Columbia, United States)

    Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, art museum and sculpture garden located in Washington, D.C., part of the Smithsonian Institution. The museum, which specializes in modern and contemporary art, is located on the national Mall, halfway between the Washington Monument and the U.S. Capitol. Plans

  • Hirsi Ali, Ayaan (Dutch politician)

    Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Somali-born Dutch American activist, writer, and politician best known for her contention that Islam is fundamentally incompatible with Western democratic values, especially those upholding the rights of women. Projecting her views most extensively through her internationally

  • Hirsi Magan, Ayaan (Dutch politician)

    Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Somali-born Dutch American activist, writer, and politician best known for her contention that Islam is fundamentally incompatible with Western democratic values, especially those upholding the rights of women. Projecting her views most extensively through her internationally

  • Hirst, Damien (British artist)

    Damien Hirst, British assemblagist, painter, and conceptual artist whose deliberately provocative art addresses vanitas and beauty, death and rebirth, and medicine, technology, and mortality. Considered an enfant terrible of the 1990s art world, Hirst presented dead animals in formaldehyde as art.

  • Hirst, Damien Steven (British artist)

    Damien Hirst, British assemblagist, painter, and conceptual artist whose deliberately provocative art addresses vanitas and beauty, death and rebirth, and medicine, technology, and mortality. Considered an enfant terrible of the 1990s art world, Hirst presented dead animals in formaldehyde as art.

  • Hirst, George K. (American scientist)

    neuraminidase: In the 1940s American scientist George Hirst identified in samples of influenza virus mixed with red blood cells (erythrocytes) a substance that broke down receptors on the surfaces of red cells. Shortly thereafter, German-born British biochemist Alfred Gottschalk discovered that these receptor-destroying enzymes were neuraminidases. Today, these enzymes are known…

  • Hirst, Ivan (British military official)

    Ivan Hirst, British army officer (born March 1, 1916, Saddleworth, Yorkshire, Eng.—died March 10, 2000, Marsden, West Yorkshire, Eng.), was credited with resurrecting post-World War II German heavy industry when he retooled Volkswagen’s bombed-out factory in Wolfsburg, Ger., convinced the British m

  • hirsutism (congenital disorder)

    Hypertrichosis, excessive, abnormal hairiness that may be localized or cover the entire body. Hypertrichosis is associated with disorders such as anorexia, repeated skin trauma, systemic illness, metabolic disorders, and exposure to certain drugs and chemicals. In very rare instances the disorder

  • Hirt auf dem Felsen, Der (song by Schubert)

    Der Hirt auf dem Felsen, (German: “The Shepherd on the Rock”) song setting by Austrian composer Franz Schubert with text by German poet Wilhelm Müller and German playwright Helmina von Chézy. The song was composed in 1828 barely a month before Schubert’s death at age 31, and it is one of his

  • Hirt, Al (American musician)

    Alois Maxwell Hirt, (“Al”), American jazz and pop musician (born Nov. 7, 1922, New Orleans, La.—died April 27, 1999, New Orleans), became the most popular American trumpeter of the 1960s, with 17 hit albums during 1961–68 and a number of hit singles, notably the Grammy Award-winning “Java” (

  • Hirt, Alois Maxwell (American musician)

    Alois Maxwell Hirt, (“Al”), American jazz and pop musician (born Nov. 7, 1922, New Orleans, La.—died April 27, 1999, New Orleans), became the most popular American trumpeter of the 1960s, with 17 hit albums during 1961–68 and a number of hit singles, notably the Grammy Award-winning “Java” (

  • Hirt, Hermann (German linguist)

    Hermann Hirt, German linguist whose comprehensive Indogermanische Grammatik, 7 vol. (1921–37; “Indo-European Grammar”), remains influential. Earlier, Hirt had made original studies of accent and ablaut (vowel changes) in Indo-European. His concern with prehistory extended beyond language to the

  • Hirt, Hermann Alfred (German linguist)

    Hermann Hirt, German linguist whose comprehensive Indogermanische Grammatik, 7 vol. (1921–37; “Indo-European Grammar”), remains influential. Earlier, Hirt had made original studies of accent and ablaut (vowel changes) in Indo-European. His concern with prehistory extended beyond language to the

  • Hirta (island, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Saint Kilda: …35 people who lived on Hirta, the largest of the islands, were evacuated in 1930, thus ending settlement on the island that had been continuous since prehistoric times. The islands now constitute a nature reserve under the authority of the National Trust for Scotland, and they were designated a UNESCO…

  • Hirtius, Aulus (Roman soldier)

    Aulus Hirtius, Roman soldier and writer. Beginning about 54 bc Hirtius served under Julius Caesar in Gaul and was sent to negotiate with Caesar’s rival, Pompey, in December 50. Hirtius then served in Spain and the East and was praetor (46) and governor (45) of Transalpine Gaul. He was nominated

  • Hiru-ko (Japanese deity)

    Ebisu: …shrines Ebisu is identified with Hiru-ko (usually translated “Leech Child”), the misconceived firstborn son of the creator couple Izanami and Izanagi, who considered him inadequate and set him adrift in a reed boat. Ebisu is also sometimes associated with Koto-shiro-nushi (“Sign-Master”), a son of the mythological hero Ōkuninushi and associated…

  • hirudin (anticoagulant)

    annelid: Importance: Hirudin, an extract from leeches, is used as a blood anticoagulant.

  • Hirudinea (annelid)

    Leech, (subclass Hirudinea), any of about 650 species of segmented worms (phylum Annelida) characterized by a small sucker, which contains the mouth, at the anterior end of the body and a large sucker located at the posterior end. All leeches have 34 body segments. The length of the body ranges

  • Hirudo (leech genus)

    annelid: Annotated classification: …20 cm; examples of genera: Hirudo, Haemopis, Erpobdella. Most authors accept the annelids as having three major classes: Polychaeta, Oligochaeta, and Hirudinea. Older systems would place the polychaetes and oligochaetes under the class Chaetopoda because both groups possess

  • Hirudo medicinalis (annelid)

    leech: …the body tissues of the European medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis), is used to prevent blood clots following surgery; another chemical isolated from Amazonian leeches is used to dissolve existing blood clots.

  • Hiruko (Japanese deity)

    Ebisu: …shrines Ebisu is identified with Hiru-ko (usually translated “Leech Child”), the misconceived firstborn son of the creator couple Izanami and Izanagi, who considered him inadequate and set him adrift in a reed boat. Ebisu is also sometimes associated with Koto-shiro-nushi (“Sign-Master”), a son of the mythological hero Ōkuninushi and associated…

  • Hirundinidae (bird family)

    Hirundinidae, songbird family, order Passeriformes, consisting of swallows and martins, approximately 90 species of small, streamlined birds, noted for their strong and nimble flight. They are found worldwide except in polar regions and on certain islands. Members range in size from 11.5 to 23 cm

  • Hirundo rustica (bird)

    swallow: The common swallow (Hirundo rustica) is almost worldwide in migration; an American species, called barn swallow, may summer in Canada and winter in Argentina. The 10 species of Petrochelidon, which make flask-shaped mud nests, include the cliff swallow (P. pyrrhonota), the bird of San Juan Capistrano…

  • Hiruy Walde Selassie (Ethiopian writer)

    Ethiopian literature: …an important anthology compiled by Hiruy Walde Selassie was published at Addis Ababa in 1926.

  • Hirwaun (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Hirwaun, locality, Rhondda Cynon Taff county borough, historic county of Glamorgan (Morgannwg), Wales, at the northwestern end of the Cynon valley. The Brecon Beacons mountain range rises to the north of Hirwaun, and to the west rise the uplands of Hirwaun Common and Craig-y-Llyn peak, with an

  • Hirzebruch, Friedrich Ernst Peter (German mathematician)

    Friedrich Ernst Peter Hirzebruch, German mathematician (born Oct. 17, 1927, Hamm, Westphalia, Ger.—died May 27, 2012, Bonn, Ger.), made significant contributions to topology, algebraic geometry, and differential geometry, and he played a leading role in the reconstruction of German mathematics

  • His Bright Light (work by Steel)

    Danielle Steel: …collection Love: Poems (1981) and His Bright Light (1998), a nonfiction tribute to her son, Nick Traina, who committed suicide at age 19 after battling substance abuse and mental illness. Steel also wrote two series of children’s books that centred on the characters Max and Martha (1989–91) and Freddie (1992).

  • His Dark Materials (book trilogy by Pullman)

    Philip Pullman: …known for the fantasy trilogy His Dark Materials (1995–2000).

  • His Dark Materials (television series)

    Lin-Manuel Miranda: …starred in the TV series His Dark Materials (2019– ), which was based on Philip Pullman’s best-selling fantasy trilogy.

  • His Day Is Done (poem by Angelou)

    Maya Angelou: …Mandela in the poem “His Day Is Done” (2013), which was commissioned by the U.S. State Department and released in the wake of the South African leader’s death. In 2011 Angelou was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

  • His Excellency Eugène Rougon (work by Zola)

    Rougon-Macquart cycle: Son Excellence Eugène Rougon (1876; His Excellency Eugène Rougon) traces the machinations and maneuverings of cabinet officials in Napoleon III’s government.

  • His Frowns Struck Terror (work by Ngubane)

    Jordan Kush Ngubane: Ngubane’s one Zulu-language novel, Uvalo Lwezinhlonzi (1957; “His Frowns Struck Terror”), was popular when it appeared and was even a required school text before being banned from 1962 to 1967. His nonfictional works include An African Explains Apartheid (1963) and Conflict of Minds (1979). In 1979 he published a…

  • His Girl Friday (film by Hawks [1940])

    His Girl Friday, American screwball comedy film, released in 1940, that was director Howard Hawks’s innovative remake of The Front Page (1931). The lightning-fast repartee and prickly courtship of the film’s two leads made it a classic in the genre. Cary Grant played a self-centred newsman

  • His Hour (work by Glyn)

    Elinor Glyn: His Hour (1910), one of her best romances, was set in the court of St. Petersburg and was executed in a keenly observant style. In 1916 she wrote The Career of Katherine Bush, the first novel in which her heroine was not of aristocratic birth.

  • His Illegal Self (work by Carey)

    Peter Carey: His Illegal Self (2008) relates the story of Che, the son of radical students who left him with a wealthy grandmother, from whom he is seized and then taken on a continent-spanning journey with the ostensible purpose of reuniting with his parents. Parrot and Olivier…

  • His Kind of Woman (film by Farrow [1951])

    John Farrow: Films of the 1950s: Mitchum also appeared in His Kind of Woman (1951), with Jane Russell; Farrow played the overplotted story half for laughs, producing an enjoyable parody of Mitchum’s hit film noir Out of the Past (1947). Submarine Command (1951) had Holden trying to adjust to peacetime life in the military, and…

  • His Magic Band (American musical group)

    Captain Beefheart: …lineup of musicians known as His Magic Band, Captain Beefheart produced a series of albums from the 1960s to the ’80s that had limited commercial appeal but were a major influence on punk and experimental rock.

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