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  • Herriot, James (British veterinarian and writer)

    James Herriot, British veterinarian and writer. Wight joined the practice of two veterinarian brothers working in the Yorkshire Dales and at age 50 was persuaded by his wife to write down his collection of anecdotes. His humorous, fictionalized reminiscences were published under the name James

  • Herrmann und Dorothea (work by Goethe)

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: Friendship with Schiller (1794–1805): …Revolution and the associated wars: Herrmann und Dorothea, published in 1797, one of the most successful (and lucrative) of his works. (A second hexameter epic, on the subject of Achilles, did not get beyond the first canto.) At the same time, he and Schiller jointly composed a collection of satirical…

  • Herrmann, Bernard (American composer and conductor)

    Bernard Herrmann, American composer and conductor, widely recognized for his film scores. His music for Psycho (1960) has remained a paragon of suspense-film sound tracks. Herrmann was born into a family of Russian immigrants. While still a student at DeWitt Clinton public high school in the Bronx,

  • Herrmann, Edward (American actor)

    Edward Kirk Herrmann, American actor (born July 21, 1943, Washington, D.C.—died Dec. 31, 2014, New York, N.Y.), possessed a commanding presence, a towering height (1.96 m [6 ft 5 in]), and an authoritative voice that led him to be often cast as a wealthy, powerful man. He was especially adept at

  • Herrmann, Edward Kirk (American actor)

    Edward Kirk Herrmann, American actor (born July 21, 1943, Washington, D.C.—died Dec. 31, 2014, New York, N.Y.), possessed a commanding presence, a towering height (1.96 m [6 ft 5 in]), and an authoritative voice that led him to be often cast as a wealthy, powerful man. He was especially adept at

  • Herrmann, Johann Wilhelm (German theologian)

    Wilhelm Herrmann, liberal German Protestant theologian who taught that faith should be grounded in the direct experience of the reality of the life of Christ rather than in doctrine. A disciple of Albrecht Ritschl, whose emphasis on ethics and rejection of metaphysics he continued, Herrmann was

  • Herrmann, Wilhelm (German theologian)

    Wilhelm Herrmann, liberal German Protestant theologian who taught that faith should be grounded in the direct experience of the reality of the life of Christ rather than in doctrine. A disciple of Albrecht Ritschl, whose emphasis on ethics and rejection of metaphysics he continued, Herrmann was

  • Herrn Eugen Dührings Umwälzung der Wissenschaft (work by Engels)

    Marxism: The contributions of Engels: …in Science, better known as Anti-Dühring), and an unfinished work, Dialektik und Natur (Dialectics of Nature), which he had begun around 1875–76. The importance of these writings to the subsequent development of Marxism can be seen from Lenin’s observation that Engels “developed, in a clear and often polemical style, the…

  • Herrnhut (historical site, Germany)

    Moravian church: History: …Saxony, where he had founded Herrnhut as a Christian community. Exiles from Bohemia and Moravia, as well as Pietists from Germany and beyond, were attracted to Herrnhut. The community held services at an assembly hall in Herrnhut and took the sacraments and worshiped in the Lutheran parish church in the…

  • Herrnhuters (religious group)

    Unitas Fratrum, (Latin: “Unity of Brethren”), Protestant religious group inspired by Hussite spiritual ideals in Bohemia in the mid-15th century. They followed a simple, humble life of nonviolence, using the Bible as their sole rule of faith. They denied transubstantiation but received the

  • Herrold, Charles (American radio broadcaster)

    radio: Radio’s early years: …the United States, for example, Charles (“Doc”) Herrold began operating a wireless transmitter in conjunction with his radio school in San Jose, California, about 1908. Herrold was soon providing regularly scheduled voice and music programs to a small local audience of amateur radio operators in what may have been the…

  • Herron, Helen (American first lady)

    Helen Taft, American first lady (1909–13), the wife of William Howard Taft, 27th U.S. president and 10th chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. The fourth of 11 children, Helen Taft came by her interest in politics through her parents, John Herron, a prominent lawyer and Republican Party

  • HERS (technology)

    zero-energy building: Home Energy Rating System: A Home Energy Rating System (or HERS) is a measurement of a home’s energy efficiency used primarily in the United States. HERS ratings make use of a relative energy-use index called the HERS Index. The HERS Index typically ranges from 0…

  • Hers’ disease

    Hers’ disease, hereditary deficiency of the liver enzyme glycogen phosphorylase, which governs the metabolic breakdown of glycogen to the simple sugar glucose, which can then be used to meet the body’s energy needs. The enzyme’s absence causes glycogen to accumulate, greatly enlarging the liver a

  • Hersant, Robert Joseph Émile (French publisher and politician)

    Robert Joseph Émile Hersant, French publisher and politician who, as founder of France’s largest media empire, was accused of controlling the press, particularly to advance his political career while a member of the French Parliament, 1956-78 (b. Jan. 31, 1920--d. April 21,

  • Hersart de La Villemarqué, Théodore (French editor)

    Barzaz Breiz: …literature of Breton peasants, by Théodore Hersart de La Villemarqué and was published in 1839. In the 1870s it was demonstrated that Barzaz Breiz was not an anthology of Breton folk poetry but rather a mixture of old poems, chiefly love songs and ballads, that were rearranged by the editor…

  • Herschbach, Dudley R. (American chemist and educator)

    Dudley R. Herschbach, American chemist and educator who, with Yuan T. Lee and John C. Polanyi, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1986 for his pioneering use of molecular beams to analyze chemical reactions. Herschbach attended Stanford University (B.S., M.S.) and received a Ph.D. in

  • Herschbach, Dudley Robert (American chemist and educator)

    Dudley R. Herschbach, American chemist and educator who, with Yuan T. Lee and John C. Polanyi, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1986 for his pioneering use of molecular beams to analyze chemical reactions. Herschbach attended Stanford University (B.S., M.S.) and received a Ph.D. in

  • Herschel (planet)

    Uranus, seventh planet in distance from the Sun and the least massive of the solar system’s four giant, or Jovian, planets, which also include Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune. At its brightest, Uranus is just visible to the unaided eye as a blue-green point of light. It is designated by the symbol ♅.

  • Herschel (space telescope)

    Herschel, European Space Agency space telescope, launched on May 14, 2009, that studied infrared radiation from astronomical objects. It was named in honour of German-born British astronomer Sir William Herschel, who discovered infrared radiation in 1800. Herschel was launched on an Ariane 5 rocket

  • Herschel (island, Canada)

    Beaufort Sea: …of the Mackenzie River mouth—Herschel (7 sq mi) and Barter (5 sq mi). Very small islands and banks are found in the Mackenzie River Delta.

  • Herschel (crater)

    Mimas: …130-km- (80-mile-) diameter crater named Herschel, which is near the centre of the leading hemisphere. The crater’s outer walls are 5 km (3 miles) high, its floor 10 km (6 miles) deep, and the central peak 6 km (4 miles) high. Herschel is one of the largest impact structures, relative…

  • Herschel, Sir William Frederick (British-German astronomer)

    William Herschel, German-born British astronomer, the founder of sidereal astronomy for the systematic observation of the heavens. He discovered the planet Uranus, hypothesized that nebulae are composed of stars, and developed a theory of stellar evolution. He was knighted in 1816. Herschel’s

  • Herschel, Caroline (British-German astronomer)

    Caroline Herschel, German-born British astronomer who was a pioneer in the field and is considered the first professional female astronomer. She made important contributions to the work of her brother Sir William Herschel, executing many of the calculations connected with his studies. On her own,

  • Herschel, Caroline Lucretia (British-German astronomer)

    Caroline Herschel, German-born British astronomer who was a pioneer in the field and is considered the first professional female astronomer. She made important contributions to the work of her brother Sir William Herschel, executing many of the calculations connected with his studies. On her own,

  • Herschel, Friedrich Wilhelm (British-German astronomer)

    William Herschel, German-born British astronomer, the founder of sidereal astronomy for the systematic observation of the heavens. He discovered the planet Uranus, hypothesized that nebulae are composed of stars, and developed a theory of stellar evolution. He was knighted in 1816. Herschel’s

  • Herschel, Mount (mountain, Antarctica)

    Edmund Hillary: …was among those who scaled Mount Herschel (10,941 feet [3,335 metres]) for the first time. In 1977 he led the first jet boat expedition up the Ganges River and continued by climbing to its source in the Himalayas. His autobiography, Nothing Venture, Nothing Win, was published in 1975.

  • Herschel, Sir John (English astronomer)

    Sir John Herschel, 1st Baronet, English astronomer and successor to his father, Sir William Herschel, in the field of stellar and nebular observation and discovery. An only child, John was educated briefly at Eton and then privately. In 1809 he entered the University of Cambridge in the company of

  • Herschel, Sir John Frederick William, 1st Baronet (English astronomer)

    Sir John Herschel, 1st Baronet, English astronomer and successor to his father, Sir William Herschel, in the field of stellar and nebular observation and discovery. An only child, John was educated briefly at Eton and then privately. In 1809 he entered the University of Cambridge in the company of

  • Herschel, Sir John, 1st Baronet (English astronomer)

    Sir John Herschel, 1st Baronet, English astronomer and successor to his father, Sir William Herschel, in the field of stellar and nebular observation and discovery. An only child, John was educated briefly at Eton and then privately. In 1809 he entered the University of Cambridge in the company of

  • Herschel, William (British-German astronomer)

    William Herschel, German-born British astronomer, the founder of sidereal astronomy for the systematic observation of the heavens. He discovered the planet Uranus, hypothesized that nebulae are composed of stars, and developed a theory of stellar evolution. He was knighted in 1816. Herschel’s

  • Herse (Greek mythology)

    Aglauros: …to frustrate his abduction of Herse, Aglauros’ youngest sister. Aglauros and her sisters (Herse and Pandrosos) were apparently at first fertility deities. Aglauros had a sanctuary on the Acropolis in which young men of military age swore an oath to her as well as to Zeus and to other deities.…

  • Herself Surprised (novel by Cary)

    Herself Surprised, first novel of an acclaimed trilogy by Joyce Cary, first published in 1941 and followed by To Be a Pilgrim (1942) and The Horse’s Mouth (1944). Herself Surprised is narrated by its protagonist, Sara Monday. A passionate woman, Sara is emotionally involved with three men: her

  • Hersey, John (American author)

    John Hersey, American novelist and journalist noted for his documentary fiction about catastrophic events in World War II. Hersey lived in China, where his father was a secretary for the Young Men’s Christian Association and his mother was a missionary, until he was 10, at which time his family

  • Hersey, John Richard (American author)

    John Hersey, American novelist and journalist noted for his documentary fiction about catastrophic events in World War II. Hersey lived in China, where his father was a secretary for the Young Men’s Christian Association and his mother was a missionary, until he was 10, at which time his family

  • Hersh, Seymour (American journalist)

    Seymour Hersh, American journalist whose reporting generally focused on the U.S. government and its involvement abroad. He was especially noted for his investigations into the My Lai Massacre and the Abu Ghraib prison scandal. Hersh was the son of Polish and Lithuanian immigrants whose deep belief

  • Hersh, Seymour Myron (American journalist)

    Seymour Hersh, American journalist whose reporting generally focused on the U.S. government and its involvement abroad. He was especially noted for his investigations into the My Lai Massacre and the Abu Ghraib prison scandal. Hersh was the son of Polish and Lithuanian immigrants whose deep belief

  • Hershey (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Hershey, unincorporated community within Derry township, Dauphin county, south-central Pennsylvania, U.S. It is situated 12 miles (19 km) east of Harrisburg. The community was founded in 1903 by the entrepreneur Milton Snavely Hershey around Derry Church as the site for his chocolate factory. In

  • Hershey Chocolate Co. (American company)

    Hershey Company, American manufacturer of food products, chiefly chocolate and sugar-based confections. Hershey’s Milk Chocolate, in its brown-and-silver wrapper, was perhaps the best-known American candy bar of the 20th century. Company headquarters are in Hershey, Pennsylvania. The Hershey

  • Hershey Chocolate Corporation (American company)

    Hershey Company, American manufacturer of food products, chiefly chocolate and sugar-based confections. Hershey’s Milk Chocolate, in its brown-and-silver wrapper, was perhaps the best-known American candy bar of the 20th century. Company headquarters are in Hershey, Pennsylvania. The Hershey

  • Hershey Company (American company)

    Hershey Company, American manufacturer of food products, chiefly chocolate and sugar-based confections. Hershey’s Milk Chocolate, in its brown-and-silver wrapper, was perhaps the best-known American candy bar of the 20th century. Company headquarters are in Hershey, Pennsylvania. The Hershey

  • Hershey Foods Corporation (American company)

    Hershey Company, American manufacturer of food products, chiefly chocolate and sugar-based confections. Hershey’s Milk Chocolate, in its brown-and-silver wrapper, was perhaps the best-known American candy bar of the 20th century. Company headquarters are in Hershey, Pennsylvania. The Hershey

  • Hershey, A. D. (American biologist)

    A.D. Hershey, American biologist who, along with Max Delbrück and Salvador Luria, won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1969. The prize was given for research done on bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria). Hershey earned a doctorate in chemistry from Michigan State College (now

  • Hershey, Alfred Day (American biologist)

    A.D. Hershey, American biologist who, along with Max Delbrück and Salvador Luria, won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1969. The prize was given for research done on bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria). Hershey earned a doctorate in chemistry from Michigan State College (now

  • Hershey, Milton Snavely (American manufacturer)

    Milton Snavely Hershey, American manufacturer and philanthropist who founded the Hershey Chocolate Corporation and was instrumental in popularizing chocolate candy throughout much of the world. Following an incomplete rural school education, Hershey was apprenticed at age 15 to a confectioner in

  • Hershiser, Orel (American baseball player)

    Los Angeles Dodgers: …NL Cy Young Award-winning pitcher Orel Hershiser in 1988. At the end of that season, the Dodgers defeated the Oakland A’s in the World Series, which featured a dramatic game-winning pinch-hit home run by Gibson in game one.

  • Hershko, Avram (Israeli chemist)

    Avram Hershko, Hungarian-born Israeli biochemist who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize for Chemistry with Aaron J. Ciechanover and Irwin Rose for their joint discovery of the mechanism by which the cells of most living organisms remove unwanted proteins. Hershko’s family emigrated from Hungary to Israel.

  • Hershlag, Natalie (Israeli American actress)

    Natalie Portman, Israeli American actress known for the aristocratic poise and nuance with which she evinced the struggles of complex precocious young women. Natalie Hershlag was born in Jerusalem; her mother was American and her father, who later became a fertility doctor, was Israeli. In 1984 the

  • Herskó, Ferenc (Israeli chemist)

    Avram Hershko, Hungarian-born Israeli biochemist who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize for Chemistry with Aaron J. Ciechanover and Irwin Rose for their joint discovery of the mechanism by which the cells of most living organisms remove unwanted proteins. Hershko’s family emigrated from Hungary to Israel.

  • Herskovits, Melville J. (American anthropologist)

    Melville J. Herskovits, American anthropologist noted for having opened up the study of the “New World Negro” as a new field of research. Herskovits was also known for his humanistic and relativistic writings on culture. Herskovits took his Ph.B. at the University of Chicago (1920) and his M.A.

  • Herskovits, Melville Jean (American anthropologist)

    Melville J. Herskovits, American anthropologist noted for having opened up the study of the “New World Negro” as a new field of research. Herskovits was also known for his humanistic and relativistic writings on culture. Herskovits took his Ph.B. at the University of Chicago (1920) and his M.A.

  • Herstmonceux (England, United Kingdom)

    Herstmonceux, village (parish), Wealden district, administrative county of East Sussex, historic county of Sussex, southestern England. The parish is the site of the well-known castle of Herstmonceux, completed about 1444 by Sir Roger de Fiennes as a fortified manor surrounded by a moat. It is one

  • Herstmonceux Castle (castle, Herstmonceux, England, United Kingdom)

    Herstmonceux: …the site of the well-known castle of Herstmonceux, completed about 1444 by Sir Roger de Fiennes as a fortified manor surrounded by a moat. It is one of the finest early brick buildings in England. The parish also contains All Saints Church, which dates from the late 12th century. Herstmonceux…

  • Herter, Lori (author)

    vampire: History: In 1991 Lori Herter published Obsession, one of the first vampire novels to be categorized as romance rather than science fiction, fantasy, or horror. Buffy the Vampire Slayer, a television show in which the title character has a star-crossed romance with a

  • Hertford (England, United Kingdom)

    Hertford, town (parish), East Hertfordshire district, administrative and historic county of Hertfordshire, southeast-central England. It lies along the River Lea north of London and is the administrative centre of Hertfordshire county. Hertford was first recorded as the scene of a general synod

  • Hertford, Edward Seymour, Earl of (Protector of England)

    Edward Seymour, 1st duke of Somerset, the Protector of England during part of the minority of King Edward VI (reigned 1547–53). While admiring Somerset’s personal qualities and motives, scholars have generally blamed his lack of political acumen for the failure of his policies. After the marriage

  • Hertford, Edward Seymour, Earl of, Baron Beauchamp (English lord [1539-1621])

    Edward Seymour, earl of Hertford, English lord whose secret marriage to an heir to the throne angered Queen Elizabeth I and probably influenced her choice of James VI of Scotland as her successor. Seymour was the eldest son of the Protector (Edward Seymour, duke of Somerset) by his second marriage.

  • Hertfordshire (county, England, United Kingdom)

    Hertfordshire, administrative and historic county of southern England, adjoining Greater London to the south. The administrative county and the historic county cover slightly different areas. The administrative county comprises 10 districts: East Hertfordshire, North Hertfordshire, Three Rivers,

  • Hertling, Georg Friedrich, Graf von (German statesman)

    Georg, count von Hertling, conservative German statesman and philosopher who became imperial chancellor during the last year of World War I but was little more than a caretaker for the military, which actually controlled the country. A devout Catholic scholar, Hertling exercised considerable

  • Hertogenbosch, ’s- (Netherlands)

    ’s-Hertogenbosch, gemeente (municipality), south-central Netherlands. It is situated where the Dommel and Aa rivers join to form the Dieze and lies along the Zuidwillemsvaart (canal). Chartered in 1185 by Henry I, duke of Brabant, who had a hunting lodge nearby (hence the name, meaning “the duke’s

  • Hertsmere (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Hertsmere, borough (district), administrative county of Hertfordshire, England. Most of the borough belongs to the historic county of Hertfordshire, but the eastern part of the borough, including Potters Bar, lies in the historic county of Middlesex. The district headquarters are at Borehamwood.

  • Hertspiegel (work by Spieghel)

    Henric Laurenszoon Spieghel: In Spieghel’s greatest work, Hertspiegel (1614; “Heart-Mirror”), a long, often allegorical poem written in hexametres, he set out his philosophical vision in simple, direct style. His strong religious faith is based on an amalgamation of Christian and Platonic ideas, together with an underlying pantheism that sees God manifested in…

  • Hertwig, Oskar Wilhelm August (German biologist)

    Oskar Hertwig, German embryologist and cytologist who was the first to recognize that the fusion of the nuclei of the sperm and ovum was the essential event in fertilization. After studying medicine and zoology at Jena, Zürich, and Bonn, he obtained a lectureship in anatomy at the University of

  • Hertwig, Richard Carl Wilhelm Theodor von (German biologist)

    Richard von Hertwig, German biologist particularly noted for the development of the germ-layer theory, which proposes that all organs and tissues are derived variously from three basic tissue layers, and for his contributions to the study of protozoans. Educated at the universities of Zürich, Jena,

  • hertz (unit of measurement)

    Hertz, unit of frequency. The number of hertz (abbreviated Hz) equals the number of cycles per second. The frequency of any phenomenon with regular periodic variations can be expressed in hertz, but the term is used most frequently in connection with alternating electric currents, electromagnetic

  • Hertz, Gustav (German physicist)

    Gustav Hertz, German physicist who, with James Franck, received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1925 for the Franck-Hertz experiment, which confirmed the quantum theory that energy can be absorbed by an atom only in definite amounts and provided an important confirmation of the Bohr atomic model. A

  • Hertz, Gustav Ludwig (German physicist)

    Gustav Hertz, German physicist who, with James Franck, received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1925 for the Franck-Hertz experiment, which confirmed the quantum theory that energy can be absorbed by an atom only in definite amounts and provided an important confirmation of the Bohr atomic model. A

  • Hertz, Gustav Ludwig (German physicist)

    Gustav Hertz, German physicist who, with James Franck, received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1925 for the Franck-Hertz experiment, which confirmed the quantum theory that energy can be absorbed by an atom only in definite amounts and provided an important confirmation of the Bohr atomic model. A

  • Hertz, Heinrich (German physicist)

    Heinrich Hertz, German physicist who showed that Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell’s theory of electromagnetism was correct and that light and heat are electromagnetic radiations. He received a Ph.D. magna cum laude from the University of Berlin in 1880, where he studied under Hermann von

  • Hertz, Heinrich Rudolf (German physicist)

    Heinrich Hertz, German physicist who showed that Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell’s theory of electromagnetism was correct and that light and heat are electromagnetic radiations. He received a Ph.D. magna cum laude from the University of Berlin in 1880, where he studied under Hermann von

  • Hertz, Henrik (Danish author)

    Henrik Hertz, dramatist and poet, once among the most popular Danish dramatists. Orphaned early, Hertz took his first inspiration from an unhappy love affair. Initially, he imitated his friend Johan Ludvig Heiberg, whom he joined in attacking older Romantics. Like Heiberg, he regarded perfection of

  • Hertz, Heyman (Danish author)

    Henrik Hertz, dramatist and poet, once among the most popular Danish dramatists. Orphaned early, Hertz took his first inspiration from an unhappy love affair. Initially, he imitated his friend Johan Ludvig Heiberg, whom he joined in attacking older Romantics. Like Heiberg, he regarded perfection of

  • Hertz, John D. (American businessman)

    Count Fleet: Breeding and early years: In 1927 John D. Hertz (founder of the Yellow Cab taxicab and Hertz rental car companies) bought a young colt who had exhibited an unusual competitive spirit by having reached out and bitten another horse during a race. That colt, Reigh Count, would bring Hertz his first…

  • Hertz, Joseph Herman (British rabbi)

    Joseph Herman Hertz, chief rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth and author of books on Judaism and of influential commentaries on the Bible expressing a fundamentalist viewpoint. Emigrating to New York City as a boy, he was the first rabbinical graduate of the newly founded

  • Hertzberg, Arthur (American rabbi and intellectual)

    Arthur Hertzberg, American rabbi and intellectual (born June 9, 1921, Lubaczow, Pol.—died April 17, 2006, Westwood, N.J.), advocated for a range of causes, including the creation of Israel and civil rights for minorities. He served as president (1972–78) of the American Jewish Congress and as v

  • Hertzberg, Ewald Friedrich, Graf von (Prussian statesman)

    Ewald Friedrich, count von Hertzberg, Prussian statesman and foreign minister who aimed at the expansion of Prussia and its establishment as the arbiter of Europe through a strong alliance between Britain, the Netherlands, Russia, and Prussia aimed against France, Austria, and Spain. Hertzberg

  • Hertzen, Aleksandr Ivanovich (Russian writer)

    Aleksandr Ivanovich Herzen, political thinker, activist, and writer who originated the theory of a unique Russian path to socialism known as peasant populism. Herzen chronicled his career in My Past and Thoughts (1861–67), which is considered to be one of the greatest works of Russian prose. Herzen

  • Hertzian cone fracture (mechanics)

    industrial glass: Strength and fracturing: …what is known as a Hertzian cone fracture, in which an expanding cone of glass is ejected from the side of glass opposite to the impact.

  • Hertzian wave (physics)

    radiation: Effects of Hertzian waves and infrared rays: The effects of Hertzian waves (electromagnetic waves in the radar and radio range) and of infrared rays usually are regarded as equivalent to the effect produced by heating. The longer radio waves induce chiefly thermal agitation of molecules…

  • Hertzog, J. B. M. (prime minister of South Africa)

    J.B.M. Hertzog, soldier and statesman who held the post of prime minister of the Union of South Africa (see South Africa) from 1924 to 1939. His political principles, as first stated in his speeches in 1912, were “South Africa First” (even before the British Empire) and the “Two Streams Policy,”

  • Hertzog, James Barry Munnik (prime minister of South Africa)

    J.B.M. Hertzog, soldier and statesman who held the post of prime minister of the Union of South Africa (see South Africa) from 1924 to 1939. His political principles, as first stated in his speeches in 1912, were “South Africa First” (even before the British Empire) and the “Two Streams Policy,”

  • Hertzsprung gap (astronomy)

    star: Hertzsprung-Russell diagram: …the main sequence by a gap named for Hertzsprung, who in 1911 became the first to recognize the difference between main-sequence and giant stars. The actual concentration of stars differs considerably in different parts of the diagram. Highly luminous stars are rare, whereas those of low luminosity are very numerous.

  • Hertzsprung, Ejnar (Danish astronomer)

    Ejnar Hertzsprung, Danish astronomer who classified types of stars by relating their colour to their absolute brightness—an accomplishment of fundamental importance to modern astronomy. The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of stellar types was named (in part) for him. In 1913 he established the

  • Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (astronomy)

    Hertzsprung–Russell diagram, in astronomy, graph in which the absolute magnitudes (intrinsic brightness) of stars are plotted against their spectral types. Of great importance to theories of stellar evolution, it evolved from charts begun in 1911 by the Danish astronomer Ejnar Hertzsprung and

  • Heru (Egyptian god)

    Horus, in ancient Egyptian religion, a god in the form of a falcon whose right eye was the sun or morning star, representing power and quintessence, and whose left eye was the moon or evening star, representing healing. Falcon cults, which were in evidence from late predynastic times, were

  • Heruka (Buddhist deity)

    Heruka, in the Vajrayana Buddhism of Tibet and Central Asia, a fierce protective deity. He is an emanation of the buddha Aksobhya, whose figure is incorporated in his headdress. He is depicted as blue in colour with two arms, which hold a vajra (thunderbolt) and a kapala (skull cup) full of blood.

  • Heruli (German people)

    Heruli, an east Germanic people originally from Scandinavia. They raided towns in the Roman Empire, scoring their greatest success in ad 267, when they captured Byzantium and sacked Greek cities. Two years later, the eastern Heruli were crushingly defeated by the Roman emperor Claudius II Gothicus

  • Herut Party (political party, Israel)

    Menachem Begin: …1948 the Irgun formed the Ḥerut (“Freedom”) Party with Begin as its head and leader of the opposition in the Knesset (Parliament) until 1967. Begin joined the National Unity government (1967–70) as a minister without portfolio and in 1973 became joint chairman of the Likud (“Unity”) coalition.

  • Ḥerut Party (political party, Israel)

    Menachem Begin: …1948 the Irgun formed the Ḥerut (“Freedom”) Party with Begin as its head and leader of the opposition in the Knesset (Parliament) until 1967. Begin joined the National Unity government (1967–70) as a minister without portfolio and in 1973 became joint chairman of the Likud (“Unity”) coalition.

  • HERV (virus group)

    retrovirus: Human ERVs (HERVs) have become distributed within human DNA over the course of evolution. They are passed from one generation to the next and make up an estimated 1 to nearly 5 percent of the human genome. HERVs are suspected of having influenced the evolution…

  • Hervas, Juan (Spanish bishop)

    cursillo: …founded in 1949 by Bishop Juan Hervas of Ciudad Real, Spain, brings together a group of about 40 men or women from different races, educational backgrounds, and economic and social status for spiritual exercises conducted by a team of priests and laymen. The exercises are centred on the celebration of…

  • Hervé, Mademoiselle (French actress)

    Geneviève Béjart, French actress and early member of Molière’s Illustre Théâtre company. Geneviève played as Mlle Hervé, adopting her mother’s name. She acted with the Béjart family company managed by her sister Madeleine before they joined forces with Molière. She attained note as a

  • Hervé-Bazin, Jean-Pierre-Marie (French author)

    Hervé Bazin, French author whose witty and satirical novels often focus on the problems within families and marriages. Hervé was the great-nephew of the Roman Catholic traditionalist novelist René Bazin. After solid academic training, years of family conflict, and financial and professional

  • Hervet, Gentian (Catholic scholar)

    skepticism: The Reformation: ” Similarly, the Catholic scholar Gentian Hervet, in the preface to his 1569 translation of Sextus, saw skeptical arguments as the definitive answer to Calvinism and the way to true Christianity.

  • Hervey Bay (city, Queensland, Australia)

    Hervey Bay, inlet and city on the Pacific Ocean between Fraser Island and Burnett Heads, southeastern Queensland, Australia. The bay was named in 1770 by the British navigator Captain James Cook and was surveyed in 1804 by the British navigator Matthew Flinders. Measuring 55 by 40 miles (89 by 64

  • Hervey Islands (atoll, Cook Islands, Pacific Ocean)

    Manuae Atoll, one of the southern Cook Islands, a self-governing state in free association with New Zealand in the South Pacific Ocean. It is a coral atoll of two islets joined by a coral reef enclosing a large lagoon, with a total land area of 2.4 square miles (6.2 square km). Manuae, on the west,

  • Hervey of Ickworth, Baron (English politician)

    John Hervey, 1st earl of Bristol, the first earl of Bristol in the Hervey line, son of Sir Thomas Hervey (d. 1694) and nephew of John Hervey (1616–79), treasurer to Catherine of Braganza, queen consort of Charles II. He was educated at Clare Hall, Cambridge, and became member of Parliament for Bury

  • Hervey of Ickworth, John Hervey, Baron (English politician [1696-1743])

    John Hervey, Baron Hervey, politician and wit whose Memoirs of the Reign of George the Second are of first importance and, along with the writings of Horace Walpole, are largely responsible for many of posterity’s impressions of 18th-century England. The eldest surviving son of John Hervey, 1st

  • Hervey, John (English politician)

    John Hervey, 1st earl of Bristol, the first earl of Bristol in the Hervey line, son of Sir Thomas Hervey (d. 1694) and nephew of John Hervey (1616–79), treasurer to Catherine of Braganza, queen consort of Charles II. He was educated at Clare Hall, Cambridge, and became member of Parliament for Bury

  • Hervieu, Paul (French author)

    Paul Hervieu, French novelist and playwright, most of whose dramas were tragedies centring on family conflicts and relationships, intended to teach some moral lesson. After training as a lawyer, Hervieu entered the diplomatic service. Later, he began writing novels and short stories, of which the

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