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  • herbaceous perennial (plant)

    gardening: Herbaceous plants: (3) Herbaceous perennials are those that die down to the ground each year but whose roots remain alive and send up new top growth each year. They are an important group in horticulture, whether grown as individual plants or in the assembly of the herbaceous border.…

  • herbaceous plant (plant form)

    plant: Classification of angiosperms: Herbaceous plants have soft, flexible aerial portions and commonly die back each year.

  • herbad (Zoroastrian priest)

    Zoroastrianism: Priesthood: …of the word, herbad or ervad, designates a priest of the lower degree, who in the more important ceremonies only acts as the assistant priest. Above him is the mobed. Ranked above all of these functionaries is the dastūr, a kind of bishop, who directs and administers one or more…

  • herbal (manual)

    Herbal, ancient manual facilitating the identification of plants for medicinal purposes. Hundreds of medicinal plants were known in India before the Christian era, and the Chinese have a compilation, still authoritative, of 1,892 ancient herbal remedies. The Greeks had written accounts, and,

  • herbal medicine (medicine)

    Ayurveda: The practice of Ayurveda: Bodily exercises, the use of herbal preparations, and Yoga form a part of the remedial measures. The curative aspects of Ayurveda involve the use of herbal medicines, external preparations, physiotherapy, and diet. It is a principle of Ayurveda that the preventive and therapeutic measures be adapted to the personal requirements…

  • herbal oil (plant substance)

    Essential oil, highly volatile substance isolated by a physical process from an odoriferous plant of a single botanical species. The oil bears the name of the plant from which it is derived; for example, rose oil or peppermint oil. Such oils were called essential because they were thought to

  • herbalism (medicine)

    Ayurveda: The practice of Ayurveda: Bodily exercises, the use of herbal preparations, and Yoga form a part of the remedial measures. The curative aspects of Ayurveda involve the use of herbal medicines, external preparations, physiotherapy, and diet. It is a principle of Ayurveda that the preventive and therapeutic measures be adapted to the personal requirements…

  • Herball, or generall historie of plantes, The (work by Gerard)

    John Gerard: …English herbalist, author of The Herball, or generall historie of plantes (1597).

  • Herbals, Their Origin and Evolution (work by Arber)

    Agnes Arber: …most widely read work is Herbals, Their Origin and Evolution (1912), an account of herbals published between 1470 and 1670. Her studies in comparative anatomy include Water Plants: A Study of Aquatic Angiosperms (1920), Monocotyledons: A Morphological Study (1925), and The Gramineae: A Study of Cereal, Bamboo and Grass (1934).…

  • herbaria (botanical collection)

    Herbarium, collection of dried plant specimens mounted on sheets of paper. The plants are usually collected in situ (e.g., where they were growing in nature), identified by experts, pressed, and then carefully mounted to archival paper in such a way that all major morphological characteristics are

  • herbarium (botanical collection)

    Herbarium, collection of dried plant specimens mounted on sheets of paper. The plants are usually collected in situ (e.g., where they were growing in nature), identified by experts, pressed, and then carefully mounted to archival paper in such a way that all major morphological characteristics are

  • Herbarium (garden, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)

    Melbourne: Recreation: The associated National Herbarium of Victoria, which houses a collection of 1,200,000 pressed plant specimens, is internationally recognized and used by scholars. The RBG also maintains a separate 200-acre (80-hectare) facility at Cranbourne, about 30 miles (48 km) southeast of central Melbourne.

  • Herbart, Johann Friedrich (German educator)

    Johann Friedrich Herbart, German philosopher and educator, who led the renewed 19th-century interest in Realism and is considered among the founders of modern scientific pedagogy. After studying under Johann Gottlieb Fichte at Jena (1794), Herbart worked as a tutor at Interlaken, Switz., from 1797

  • Herbartianism (education)

    Herbartianism, pedagogical system of German educator Johann Friedrich Herbart (1776–1841). Herbart’s educational ideas, which applied particularly to the instruction of adolescents, had a profound influence on late 19th-century teaching practices, especially in the United States, where educators

  • Herbarum vivae eicones (work by Brunfels)

    biology: Advances in botany: …the two volumes of his Herbarum vivae eicones, a book about plants, which, with its fresh and vigorous illustrations, contrasted sharply with earlier texts, whose authors had been content merely to copy from old manuscripts. In addition to books on the same subject, Hieronymus Bock (Latinized to Tragus) and Leonhard…

  • Herbe à brûler, L’  (work by Detrez)

    Conrad Detrez: …is L’Herbe à brûler (1978; A Weed for Burning), in which he recounts with carnivalesque glee the fatal return of his disillusioned protagonist—who has wandered for years in South America—to a Europe sapped of its revolutionary zeal. Criticism of leftist intelligentsia continued to be a theme in Detrez’s later work.…

  • Herber, Lewis (American anarchist, political philosopher, trade-union organizer, and educator)

    Murray Bookchin, American anarchist, political philosopher, trade-union organizer, and educator best known for his organizing activities on behalf of labour unions and his vehement critiques of capitalism, globalization, and humanity’s treatment of the environment. Bookchin was the son of Russian

  • Herberg, Evelin (East German athlete)

    Evelin Schlaak, East German athlete who won an upset victory in the discus throw at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal. She went on to set world records in the discus and won a second Olympic gold medal at the 1980 Games in Moscow. Schlaak began throwing the discus at the age of 13, winning the

  • Herbert (robot)

    nouvelle artificial intelligence: …nouvelle AI is Brooks’s robot Herbert (named after the AI pioneer Herbert Simon), whose environment is the busy offices of the MIT AI Laboratory. Herbert searches desks and tables for empty soda cans, which it picks up and carries away. The robot’s seemingly goal-directed behaviour emerges from the interaction of…

  • Herbert (count of Vermandois)

    Charles III: …was soon taken prisoner by Herbert, count of Vermandois, who used him for his own gain against Rudolf, Robert’s son-in-law and the new king.

  • Herbert of Bosham (English biblical scholar)

    biblical literature: The medieval period: Herbert of Bosham (c. 1180) produced a commentary on Jerome’s Hebrew Psalter. Robert Grosseteste, bishop of Lincoln (died 1253), wrote commentaries on the days of creation and the Psalter that both drew on the Greek fathers and profited by his direct study of the Hebrew…

  • Herbert of Castile Island, Baron (British philosopher)

    Edward Herbert, 1st Baron Herbert, English courtier, soldier, diplomat, historian, metaphysical poet, and philosopher (“the father of English Deism”), also remembered for his revealing Autobiography. Brother of the devotional poet George Herbert, he was educated at Oxford. From 1608 to 1617 he

  • Herbert of Cherbury, Edward Herbert, 1st Baron (British philosopher)

    Edward Herbert, 1st Baron Herbert, English courtier, soldier, diplomat, historian, metaphysical poet, and philosopher (“the father of English Deism”), also remembered for his revealing Autobiography. Brother of the devotional poet George Herbert, he was educated at Oxford. From 1608 to 1617 he

  • Herbert of Raglan, Lord (English Royalist)

    Edward Somerset, 2nd marquess of Worcester, prominent Royalist during the English Civil Wars. His father, Henry Somerset, 5th Earl of Worcester, advanced large sums of money to Charles I at the outbreak of the wars and was created Marquess of Worcester in 1643. In the following year, Edward was

  • Herbert Peak (mountain, New Zealand)

    Banks Peninsula: …3,012 feet (918 m) at Herbert Peak. The peninsula was originally an island formed by two contiguous volcanic cones but was joined to the mainland by sediments of the Waimakariri River. It was visited (1770) by Captain James Cook, who named it after Sir Joseph Banks, and it was surveyed…

  • Herbert River (river, Queensland, Australia)

    Herbert River, river in northeastern Queensland, Australia. The river rises in the Eastern Highlands, flows for 150 miles (240 km) southeast across the Atherton Plateau past Ingham, and enters the Coral Sea at Halifax Bay in the Hinchinbrook Channel. A relatively deep stream, the longest tributary

  • Herbert, Alfred Francis Xavier (Australian author)

    Xavier Herbert, Australian novelist and short-story writer best known for his voluble novel Capricornia (1938), a comic chronicle about life in the Northern Territory of Australia and the inhumane treatment suffered by the Aborigines there at the hands of white men. The son of a railroad engineer,

  • Herbert, Bob (American journalist and commentator)

    Bob Herbert, American journalist and commentator who was a liberal op-ed columnist for The New York Times (1993–2011). Herbert grew up in Montclair, New Jersey. He began his career in journalism in 1970 as a reporter for The Star-Ledger in Newark, New Jersey; three years later he became the

  • Herbert, Don (American television personality)

    Don Herbert, (Donald Jeffry Herbert), American television personality (born July 10, 1917, Waconia, Minn.—died June 12, 2007 , Los Angeles, Calif. ), was praised for his ability to engage and instruct his young viewers with simple scientific experiments as host (1951–65; 1971) of Watch Mr. Wizard,

  • Herbert, Donald Jeffry (American television personality)

    Don Herbert, (Donald Jeffry Herbert), American television personality (born July 10, 1917, Waconia, Minn.—died June 12, 2007 , Los Angeles, Calif. ), was praised for his ability to engage and instruct his young viewers with simple scientific experiments as host (1951–65; 1971) of Watch Mr. Wizard,

  • Herbert, Frank (American author)

    Frank Herbert, American science-fiction writer noted as the author of the best-selling Dune series of futuristic novels, a group of highly complex works that explore such themes as ecology, human evolution, the consequences of genetic manipulation, and mystical and psychic possibilities. Until

  • Herbert, Frank Patrick (American author)

    Frank Herbert, American science-fiction writer noted as the author of the best-selling Dune series of futuristic novels, a group of highly complex works that explore such themes as ecology, human evolution, the consequences of genetic manipulation, and mystical and psychic possibilities. Until

  • Herbert, George (British poet)

    George Herbert, English religious poet, a major metaphysical poet, notable for the purity and effectiveness of his choice of words. A younger brother of Edward Herbert, 1st Baron Herbert of Cherbury, a notable secular metaphysical poet, George in 1610 sent his mother for New Year’s two sonnets on

  • Herbert, George Edward Stanhope Molyneux (British Egyptologist)

    George Edward Stanhope Molyneux Herbert, 5th earl of Carnarvon, British Egyptologist who was the patron and associate of archaeologist Howard Carter in the discovery of the tomb of King Tutankhamen. Carnarvon was educated at Eton and at Trinity College, Cambridge. He began excavations in Thebes in

  • Herbert, Henry George Reginald Molyneux, 7th earl of Carnarvon (British racehorse manager)

    Henry George Reginald Molyneux Herbert, 7th earl of Carnarvon, British horse racing manager (born Jan. 19, 1924, Highclere, Hampshire, Eng.—died Sept. 11, 2001, Winchester, Hampshire), managed a stud farm and a racing stable for his own horses and those of Queen Elizabeth II, who was also a close p

  • Herbert, Henry Howard Molyneux (British statesman)

    Henry Howard Molyneux Herbert, 4th earl of Carnarvon, British statesman, a liberally inclined member of Conservative Party governments, who tried, with varying success, to establish federal self-government in British overseas possessions. He was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford,

  • Herbert, Henry, 1st Earl of Carnarvon (English noble)

    Highclere Castle: Henry Herbert, a descendant of Sawyer, inherited Highclere Castle in 1769 and was created 1st earl of Carnarvon in 1793. He brought in the noted landscape architect Lancelot Brown, who planted large numbers of trees and made other changes that gave the grounds a more…

  • Herbert, James (British novelist)

    James Herbert, British novelist (born April 8, 1943, London, Eng.—died March 20, 2013, Woodmancote, West Sussex, Eng.), simultaneously shocked and delighted his fans with gruesome graphic thrillers, ghost stories, and tales of horror—notably his debut novel, The Rats (1974; film title Deadly Eyes,

  • Herbert, Mary, Countess of Pembroke (English translator)

    Mary Herbert, countess of Pembroke, patron of the arts and scholarship, poet, and translator. She was the sister of Sir Philip Sidney, who dedicated to her his Arcadia. After his death she published it and completed his verse translation of the Psalms. In 1575 Queen Elizabeth I invited Mary to

  • Herbert, Robert (American journalist and commentator)

    Bob Herbert, American journalist and commentator who was a liberal op-ed columnist for The New York Times (1993–2011). Herbert grew up in Montclair, New Jersey. He began his career in journalism in 1970 as a reporter for The Star-Ledger in Newark, New Jersey; three years later he became the

  • Herbert, Sidney (British noble)

    Florence Nightingale: Nursing in peace and war: Sidney Herbert, secretary of state at war for the British government, wrote to Nightingale requesting that she lead a group of nurses to Scutari. At the same time, Nightingale wrote to her friend Liz Herbert, Sidney’s wife, asking that she be allowed to lead a…

  • Herbert, Sir A. P. (English writer and politician)

    Sir A. P. Herbert, English novelist, playwright, poet, and politician, author of more than 50 books, famous for his witty championing of minority causes. More importantly, as an independent member of Parliament for Oxford University (1935–50), he introduced the matrimonial causes bill (enacted in

  • Herbert, Sir Alan Patrick (English writer and politician)

    Sir A. P. Herbert, English novelist, playwright, poet, and politician, author of more than 50 books, famous for his witty championing of minority causes. More importantly, as an independent member of Parliament for Oxford University (1935–50), he introduced the matrimonial causes bill (enacted in

  • Herbert, Sir Henry (English court official)

    Master of the Revels: …point during the mastership of Sir Henry Herbert (1623–42), after which England’s theatres were closed during the Puritan interregnum. After the Restoration (1660), Herbert was reinstalled as master until his death in 1673, but the office was gradually stripped of its power. The Licensing Act of 1737 abolished it entirely,…

  • Herbert, Sir Wally (British explorer)

    Sir Wally Herbert, (Walter William Herbert), British polar explorer (born Oct. 24, 1934, York, Eng.—died June 12, 2007, Inverness, Scot.), led the British Transarctic Expedition that crossed the Arctic Ocean via the North Pole on an epic 15-month trek from Point Barrow, Alaska, to Spitsbergen in

  • Herbert, Sir William (English noble)

    William Herbert, 1st earl of Pembroke, the earl of Pembroke of the second Herbert creation, a leading figure in the reigns of Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I of England. His father, Sir Richard Herbert, was an illegitimate son of William, the 1st earl of Pembroke of the first creation. Sir

  • Herbert, Victor (American composer)

    Victor Herbert, Irish-born American composer of operettas and light music. Herbert became active in Germany as a composer and cello virtuoso (studying with Max Seifritz and Bernhard Cossmann, respectively). In 1886 he went to the United States with his wife, Therese Förster, who became a prima

  • Herbert, Walter William (British explorer)

    Sir Wally Herbert, (Walter William Herbert), British polar explorer (born Oct. 24, 1934, York, Eng.—died June 12, 2007, Inverness, Scot.), led the British Transarctic Expedition that crossed the Arctic Ocean via the North Pole on an epic 15-month trek from Point Barrow, Alaska, to Spitsbergen in

  • Herbert, Xavier (Australian author)

    Xavier Herbert, Australian novelist and short-story writer best known for his voluble novel Capricornia (1938), a comic chronicle about life in the Northern Territory of Australia and the inhumane treatment suffered by the Aborigines there at the hands of white men. The son of a railroad engineer,

  • Herbert, Zbigniew (Polish author)

    Zbigniew Herbert, one of the leading Polish poets of the post-World War II generation. Herbert attended an underground high school during the wartime German occupation of Poland and also took secret military training courses with the Polish Home Army. After World War II he earned degrees in

  • Herbertson, Andrew John (British cartographer)

    geography: The development of academic geography in the United Kingdom: Andrew John Herbertson took over the department at the University of Oxford after Mackinder. He drew on European roots and emphasized regional study, using climatic and other parameters to define regions at the global scale; others developed the regional concept, using a wider range of…

  • herbes folles, Les (film by Resnais)

    Alain Resnais: …comedy Les Herbes folles (Wild Grasses) premiered at Cannes, and the film festival presented Resnais with a Lifetime Achievement Award. His final films, Vous n’avez encore rien vu (2012; You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet) and Aimer, boire et chanter (2014; Life of Riley), were also praised by critics.

  • herbicide

    Herbicide, an agent, usually chemical, for killing or inhibiting the growth of unwanted plants, such as residential or agricultural weeds and invasive species. A great advantage of chemical herbicides over mechanical weed control is the ease of application, which often saves on the cost of labour.

  • herbicide-resistant crop (genetics)

    agricultural sciences: Emerging agricultural sciences: Herbicide-resistant crops (HRC) have been available since the mid-1980s; these crops enable fairly effective chemical control of weeds, since generally only the HRC plants can survive in fields treated with the corresponding herbicide, though some weed species have also gained resistance. Some food crops have…

  • Herbig-Haro object (astronomy)

    star cluster: OB and T associations: …related variables, nonvariable stars, and Herbig-Haro objects—small nebulosities 10,000 astronomical units in diameter, each containing several starlike condensations in configurations similar to the Trapezium, Theta Orionis, in the sword of Orion. These objects are considered to be star groups at the very beginning of life.

  • Herbin, Auguste (French artist)

    Abstraction-Création: Georges Vantongerloo, Jean Hélion, and Auguste Herbin worked together to form a similar association, and by 1931 they managed to attract over 40 members to a group they called Abstraction-Création. That same year an annual periodical published by Hélion and Herbin, Abstraction-Création, debuted and took over the Cercle et Carré’s…

  • herbivore

    Herbivore, animal adapted to subsist solely on plant tissues. The herbivores range from insects (such as aphids) to large mammals (such as

  • herbivory

    Herbivore, animal adapted to subsist solely on plant tissues. The herbivores range from insects (such as aphids) to large mammals (such as

  • Herblock (American cartoonist)

    Herblock, American editorial cartoonist who won Pulitzer Prizes in 1942, 1954, and 1979. Herblock’s first cartoons appeared in the Chicago Daily News in 1929. He worked for the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA) from 1933 to 1943 and joined The Washington Post in 1946. A leading cartoon

  • Herbois, Jean-Marie Collot d’ (French radical)

    Jean-Marie Collot d’Herbois, radical democrat and member of the Committee of Public Safety that ruled revolutionary France during the period of the Jacobin dictatorship (1793–94). The son of a Parisian goldsmith, Collot d’Herbois became a professional actor and a writer of comedies. In 1787 he was

  • Herbrand, Jacques (French mathematician)

    metalogic: Discoveries about formal mathematical systems: …that had been offered by Jacques Herbrand, a French mathematician, and introduced a general concept of recursive functions—i.e., of functions mechanically computable by a finite series of purely combinatorial steps. In 1936 Alonzo Church, a mathematical logician, Alan Mathison Turing, originator of a theory of computability, and Emil L. Post,…

  • Herbstfrühling (work by Wildgans)

    Anton Wildgans: …among which was the collection Herbstfrühling (1909; “Autumn-Spring”), sold well; they recall the themes of idealism and reality in the late romantic works of Hugo von Hofmannsthal. Wildgans’ plays, such as the trilogy Armut (1914; “Poverty”), Liebe (1916; “Love”), and Dies irae (1918), begin in a realistic world that becomes…

  • Herbstreise durch Skandinavien (work by Alexis)

    Willibald Alexis: …in travel books, among them Herbstreise durch Skandinavien (1828; “Autumn Journey Through Scandinavia”).

  • herceg (Bosnian title)

    Bosnia and Herzegovina: Ancient and medieval periods: …and giving himself the title herceg (duke), from which the name Herzegovina is derived. Ottoman forces captured an important part of central Bosnia in 1448, centred on the settlement of Vrhbosna, which they developed into the city of Sarajevo. In 1463 they conquered most of the rest of Bosnia proper,…

  • Hercegnovi (Montenegro)

    Gulf of Kotor: …to the gulf system is Hercegnovi, founded in 1382 and occupied at various times by Turks, Spaniards, Venetians, Russians, French, and Austrians. East of Hercegnovi is Savina Monastery, dating from 1030, which contains historic treasures. In the Middle Ages a “Boka Navy” was created with ships from the town of…

  • Hercegovina

    Bosnia and Herzegovina, country situated in the western Balkan Peninsula of Europe. The larger region of Bosnia occupies the northern and central parts of the country, and Herzegovina occupies the south and southwest. These historical regions do not correspond with the two autonomous political

  • Herceptin (drug)

    breast cancer: Treatment: Herceptin is a manufactured antibody that binds to growth factor receptors on the surface of cancer cells and thereby blocks cell proliferation. Letrozole is used to inhibit the synthesis of estrogen in postmenopausal women who have hormone-dependent breast cancers.

  • Hercilio Luz Bridge (bridge, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil)

    David Barnard Steinman: …United States in constructing the Florianópolis Bridge in Brazil, the beginning of a long partnership. That bridge, then the largest in South America, incorporated a new type of stiffening truss and new cable construction.

  • Hercolani, Giuliantonio (Italian engraver)

    calligraphy: Writing manuals and copybooks (16th to 18th century): …Sorts of Cursive Chancery”) by Giuliantonio Hercolani. This copybook is less ornate than Perret’s, but it clearly shows how metal engraving can reproduce the subtleties of any writing style done with a broad-edged pen.

  • Herculaneum (ancient city, Italy)

    Herculaneum, ancient city of 4,000–5,000 inhabitants in Campania, Italy. It lay 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Naples, at the western base of Mount Vesuvius, and was destroyed—together with Pompeii, Torre Annunziata, and Stabiae—by the Vesuvius eruption of ad 79. The town of Ercolano (pop. [1995 est.]

  • Herculano de Carvalho e Araújo, Alexandre (Portuguese historian)

    Alexandre Herculano, historian, novelist, and poet, one of the writers who is credited with introducing Romanticism to Portugal. As a historian he was a leader of liberal opinion, enjoying a national prestige comparable to that of Victor Hugo in France. As a young man Herculano took part in the

  • Herculano, Alexandre (Portuguese historian)

    Alexandre Herculano, historian, novelist, and poet, one of the writers who is credited with introducing Romanticism to Portugal. As a historian he was a leader of liberal opinion, enjoying a national prestige comparable to that of Victor Hugo in France. As a young man Herculano took part in the

  • Hercules (work by Stiernhielm)

    Georg Stiernhielm: …is the allegorical, didactic epic, Hercules (written about 1647; published 1658), a fine example of late Renaissance classicism. It is a sermon on virtue and honour and is imbued with the spirit of humanism. The theme is developed with power and originality; the imagery is exuberant; the construction, faultless. It…

  • Hercules (film by Francisci)

    Steve Reeves: …Le fatiche di Ercole (1957; Hercules, 1959). Hercules was a box-office success in America and set the stage for a series of swashbuckling “sword-and-sandal” epics that showcased Reeves as a heroic strongman. Although Reeves had other Italian-American hits—Agi Murad il diavolo bianco (1959; The White Warrior, 1961), Gli ultimi giorni…

  • Hercules (constellation)

    Hercules, constellation in the northern sky at about 17 hours right ascension and 30° north in declination. Its brightest star is Beta Herculis, with a magnitude of 2.8. Hercules contains the solar apex, the point on the sky toward which the Sun is moving as it orbits in the Milky Way Galaxy, and

  • Hercules (classical mythology)

    Heracles, one of the most famous Greco-Roman legendary heroes. Traditionally, Heracles was the son of Zeus and Alcmene (see Amphitryon), granddaughter of Perseus. Zeus swore that the next son born of the Perseid house should become ruler of Greece, but—by a trick of Zeus’s jealous wife,

  • Hercules and Antaeus (work by Pollaiuolo)

    Western sculpture: Early Renaissance: His small bronze “Hercules and Antaeus” (c. 1475; Bargello, Florence) is a forceful depiction of the struggle between these two powerful men from classical mythology. The angular contours of the limbs and the jagged voids between the figures are all directed toward expressing tautness, muscular and emotional strain,…

  • Hercules and Deianira (painting by Gossart)

    Jan Gossart: …and Amphitrite (1516) and the Hercules and Deianira (1517), in which his early, complex designs have given way to a comparatively simple and direct conception.

  • Hercules and the Birds of Stymphalis (painting by Dürer)

    Albrecht Dürer: First journey to Italy: …of Deianira for his painting Hercules and the Birds of Stymphalis. A purely mythological painting in the Renaissance tradition, Hercules is exceptional among Dürer’s works. The centre panel from the Dresden Altarpiece, which Dürer painted in about 1498, is stylistically similar to Hercules and betrays influences of Mantegna. In most…

  • Hercules Archer (sculpture by Bourdelle)

    Antoine Bourdelle: …triumph in the Salon with Herakles (also called Hercules Archer), which again owes much to Archaic art, although the pose is far more sinuous and the musculature more exaggerated; he made several sculptures of this subject. Also in 1910 he created the full-length portrait Rodin at Work, the head of…

  • Hercules beetle (insect subfamily)

    Rhinoceros beetle, (subfamily Dynastinae), any of numerous species of beetles, some of which are among the largest beetles on Earth, named for the impressive hornlike structures on the frontal portions of males. These beetles have rounded, convex backs, and their coloration varies from black to

  • Hercules beetle (insect)

    rhinoceros beetle: Some species, such as the Hercules beetle (Dynastes hercules), can grow to more than 18 cm (7 inches) long, of which 10 cm (4 inches) may be horn. The Hercules beetle and rhinoceros beetle (D. neptunus) are spectacular, resembling an enormous pair of pincers. Found in American tropical forests, these…

  • Hercules Fountain (work by Vries)

    Adriaen de Vries: …and well-known works are the Hercules Fountain (1596–1602) and the Mercury Fountain (1599), monumental Italianate bronze works created in Augsburg. His Psyche with Pandora’s Box is a characteristic example of his style—shimmering satin finish, spiraling complexity, and a soaring grace.

  • Hercules furens (work by Euripides)

    The Madness of Heracles, drama by Euripides, performed about 416 bce. The action of the play occurs after Heracles performed the 12 labours. Temporarily driven mad by the goddess Hera, Heracles kills his wife and children. When he recovers his reason, he fights suicidal despair and then is taken to

  • Hercules Killing Cacus (work by Goltzius)

    Hendrik Goltzius: … and the chiaroscuro woodcut of Hercules Killing Cacus. His miniature portraits are distinguished both by their finish and as studies of character.

  • Hercules knot (decorative art)

    jewelry: Greek: …rigid elliptical shape with a Hercules knot in the centre and pendants hanging down over the forehead. The Hercules knot was the most famous one used in ancient times, as it was considered a magic knot and, in jewels, took on the significance of an amulet. It also was used…

  • hercules moth

    saturniid moth: …cm (6 inches), but the hercules moth (Coscinocera hercules) from the tropical forests of Australia has a wing area that reportedly exceeds that of any other insect. This moth, sometimes mistaken for a bird, has broad, dark-brown wings with tails on the hind pair and a wingspan of about 28…

  • Hercules’ club (tree)

    Angelica tree , (species Aralia spinosa), prickly-stemmed shrub or tree, of the ginseng family (Araliaceae), that can reach a height of 15 m (about 50 feet). Its leaves are large, with leaflets arranged feather-fashion and often prickly. The angelica tree is native to low-lying areas from Delaware

  • Hercules’-club (plant, Zanthoxylum clava-herculis)

    prickly ash: clava-herculis, variously called the Hercules’-club, the sea ash, or the pepperwood. West Indian satinwood, or yellowheart (Z. flavum), produces shiny golden brown timber for cabinetwork. Some species are cultivated as bonsai.

  • Hercules, Labours of (classical mythology)

    girdle: For his ninth labour, Heracles was tasked with obtaining the enchanted girdle of Hippolyte, queen of the Amazons. In Sir Gawayne and the Grene Knight, the Arthurian knight Gawain accepts the gift of a girdle of invulnerability, but he forsakes his honour as a Christian knight to…

  • Hercules, Tower of (lighthouse, A Coruña, Spain)

    Tower of Hercules, probably the only ancient Roman lighthouse still in use. The tower stands at the entrance of A Coruña harbour in the autonomous community of Galicia in northwestern Spain. A Phoenician tower may have occupied the site originally, but the present structure, 185 feet (56.8 metres)

  • Hercules: The Legendary Journeys (American television show)

    Lucy Lawless: …appearance on the hit show Hercules: The Legendary Journeys. Her portrayal of Xena, a female warrior, inspired a spinoff program, Xena: Warrior Princess, in 1995. As the statuesque warrior, Lawless combined toughness and femininity to redefine television’s version of the female action hero. The show attracted a widespread audience that…

  • Herculeum, Fretum (channel)

    Strait of Gibraltar, channel connecting the Mediterranean Sea with the Atlantic Ocean, lying between southernmost Spain and northwesternmost Africa. It is 36 miles (58 km) long and narrows to 8 miles (13 km) in width between Point Marroquí (Spain) and Point Cires (Morocco). The strait’s western

  • Herculii dynasty (Roman history)

    ancient Rome: Diocletian: …hero Hercules, formed the “Herculii.” This “Epiphany of the Tetrarchs” served as the divine foundation of the regime. The ideological recourse to two traditional Roman divinities represented a break with the Orientalizing attempts of Elagabalus and Aurelian. Even though he honoured Mithra equally, Diocletian wanted to be seen as…

  • Hercynian orogenic belt (mountain range, Europe)

    Variscan orogenic belt, series of mountain ranges that developed during a span of time extending from 370 million to 290 million years ago—during the Devonian Period (which occurred about 419 million to 359 million years ago), the Carboniferous Period (359 million to 299 million years ago), and the

  • Hercynian orogeny (geology)

    Carboniferous Period: Paleogeography: …Gondwana became fused by the Appalachian-Hercynian orogeny (mountain-building event), which continued into the Permian Period. The position of the landmass that would become the eastern United States and northern Europe remained equatorial, while the China and Siberia cratons continued to reside at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere.

  • hercynite (mineral)

    Hercynite, the mineral iron aluminum oxide, a member of the spinel (q.v.)

  • Herczeg, Ferenc (Hungarian writer)

    Ferenc Herczeg, novelist and playwright, the leading literary exponent of conservative-nationalist opinion in early 20th-century Hungary. Herczeg was born into a well-to-do family of German origin. Although he studied law, he chose a literary career, which was successful from the publication of his

  • Herczeg, Geza (Hungarian-American screenwriter)
  • herd (biology)

    animal social behaviour: The range of social behaviour in animals: herds that form during migration and coalitions that form due to group advantages in holding or acquiring a reproductive vacancy. Coalitions of male African lions (Panthera leo) that compete for control of groups of females (called prides) are a classic example of the latter. Migration…

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