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  • Heavenly Twins (Baltic religion)

    Dievs: Dievs has two sons (Dieva dēli in Latvian; Dievo sūneliai in Lithuanian), who are known as the Heavenly Twins and the morning and evening stars. Like their Greek (Dioscuri) and Vedic (Aśvins, or Nāsatyas) counterparts, Dieva dēli are skilled horsemen. They associate with Saules meita, the daughter of the…

  • Heavens (residential hotel)

    Father Divine: …opened the first of his Heavens, the residential hotels where his teachings were practiced and where his followers could obtain food, shelter, and job opportunites, as well as spiritual and physical healing.

  • Heavens, The (work by Kang Youwei)

    Kang Youwei: …reflections, completing his last book, The Heavens, in which he blended astronomy with his own metaphysical musing, a year before his death at Qingdao in 1927.

  • heaves (animal pathology)

    Heaves, chronic disorder of the lungs of horses and cows, characterized by difficult breathing and wheezy cough. The symptoms are worsened by vigorous exercise, sudden weather changes, and overfeeding. Heaves resulting from bronchitis may be associated with the feeding of dusty or moldy hay. In

  • Heavier Things (album by Mayer)

    John Mayer: Mayer’s next studio release, Heavier Things (2003), topped the Billboard album chart and featured the hit “Daughters,” which was honoured with two Grammy Awards, including song of the year.

  • heavier-than-air aircraft

    aviation: …the development and operation of heavier-than-air aircraft. The term “civil aviation” refers to the air-transportation service provided to the public by airlines, while “military aviation” refers to the development and use of military aircraft.

  • heavily cratered terrain

    Mercury: Character of the surface: …occupy intercrater areas on the heavily cratered highlands of the Moon. There are also some sparsely cratered regions called smooth plains, many of which surround the most prominent impact structure on Mercury, the immense impact basin known as Caloris, only half of which was in sunlight during the Mariner 10…

  • Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative (International Monetary Fund)

    Ghana: Economy: …Bank and International Monetary Fund’s Heavily Indebted Poor Country program in 2002 and the total debt forgiveness plan agreed upon by the Group of Eight country leaders in Gleneagles, Scotland, in 2005, but by 2015 Ghana was suffering from a high debt burden again.

  • Heaviside layer (atmospheric science)

    E region, ionospheric region that generally extends from an altitude of 90 km (60 miles) to about 160 km (100 miles). As in the D region (70–90 km), the ionization is primarily molecular—i.e., resulting from the splitting of neutral molecules—oxygen (O2) and nitrogen (N2)—into electrons and

  • Heaviside, Oliver (British physicist)

    Oliver Heaviside, physicist who predicted the existence of the ionosphere, an electrically conductive layer in the upper atmosphere that reflects radio waves. In 1870 he became a telegrapher, but increasing deafness forced him to retire in 1874. He then devoted himself to investigations of

  • heavy aircraft

    aerospace industry: Commercial heavy aircraft: The need for large-scale air transportation has been central to commercial aircraft manufacturing. As one of the world’s most vital industries, airlines are key to many aspects of the world economy, from international business and tourism to routine movement of people and goods…

  • heavy artillery

    tactics: The power of the defense: …only by tremendous concentrations of heavy artillery. Directed by forward observers and from balloons and aircraft overlooking the battlefield, artillery fired high explosive, gas, or—ideally, since the two called for different and even contradictory responses—a combination of both. The number of rounds fired could run into the millions; even so,…

  • heavy cavalry (military force)

    tactics: Light and heavy cavalry: The next development following chariots was cavalry, which took two forms. From Mongolia to Persia and Anatolia—and, later, on the North American plains as well—nomadic peoples fought principally with missile weapons, especially the bow in its short, composite variety. Equipped with only light…

  • heavy coal slurry (fuel)

    coal mining: Slurry pipelines: So-called heavy coal slurries or slurry fuels consist of 65 to 75 percent coal, with the remainder being water, methanol, or oil. Unlike traditional slurry—which is transported by pipeline to the user, who separates the water from the coal before burning—slurry fuels can be fired directly into boilers.

  • heavy component (solutions)

    liquid: Equilibrium properties: …vapour pressure is called the heavy component.

  • heavy element (chemistry)

    Milky Way Galaxy: Principal population types: …considerably lower abundances of the heavy elements—by amounts ranging from a factor of 5 or 10 up to a factor of several hundred. The total abundance of heavy elements, Z, for typical Population I stars is 0.04 (given in terms of the mass percent for all elements with atomic weights…

  • heavy ground (mining)

    tunnels and underground excavations: Heavy ground: The miner’s term for very weak or high geostress ground that causes repeated failures and replacement of support is heavy ground. Ingenuity, patience, and large increases of time and funds are invariably required to deal with it. Special techniques have generally been evolved…

  • heavy horse (mammal)

    history of Europe: Technological innovations: …greater striking force, and the draft horse, now shod with iron horseshoes that protected the hooves from the damp clay soils of northern Europe. The draft horse was faster and more efficient than the ox, the traditional beast of burden. The invention of the new horse collar in the 10th…

  • heavy hydrogen (chemical isotope)

    Deuterium, isotope of hydrogen with a nucleus consisting of one proton and one neutron, which is double the mass of the nucleus of ordinary hydrogen (one proton). Deuterium has an atomic weight of 2.014. It is a stable atomic species found in natural hydrogen compounds to the extent of about 0.0156

  • heavy industry (economics)

    industry: Secondary industry: Large-scale industry generally requires heavy capital investment in plants and machinery, serves a large and diverse market including other manufacturing industries, has a complex industrial organization and frequently a skilled specialized labour force, and generates a large volume of output. Examples would include petroleum refining,…

  • heavy infantry (military force)

    tactics: Light and heavy cavalry: …troops such as light and heavy infantry. The function of these cataphracts (from the Greek word for “armour”) was not to engage in long-distance combat but to launch massed shock action, first against the enemy cataphracts and then, having gained the field, against the enemy foot. The fact that ancient…

  • heavy ion (nuclear physics)

    Heavy ion, in nuclear physics, any particle with one or more units of electric charge and a mass exceeding that of the helium-4 nucleus (alpha particle). Special types of accelerators are capable of producing fairly intense, high-energy beams of heavy ions, which are used in basic research, as in

  • Heavy Ion Research, Institute for (laboratory, Darmstadt, Germany)

    copernicium: In 1996 scientists at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research (Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung [GSI]) in Darmstadt, Ger., announced the production of atoms of copernicium from fusing zinc-70 with lead-208. The atoms of copernicium had an atomic weight of 277 and decayed after 0.24 millisecond by emission of an alpha particle…

  • heavy machine gun (weapon)

    machine gun: …War II the term “heavy machine gun” designated a water-cooled machine gun that was belt-fed, handled by a special squad of several soldiers, and mounted on a tripod. Since 1945 the term has designated an automatic weapon firing ammunition larger than that used in ordinary combat rifles; the most…

  • heavy metal (music)

    Heavy metal, genre of rock music that includes a group of related styles that are intense, virtuosic, and powerful. Driven by the aggressive sounds of the distorted electric guitar, heavy metal is arguably the most commercially successful genre of rock music. Although the origin of the term heavy

  • heavy oil

    Heavy oil and tar sand, crude oils below 20° on the American Petroleum Institute (API) gravity scale that require mining or thermal recovery. Although the lighter conventional crudes are often waterflooded to enhance recovery, this method is essentially ineffective for heavy crudes between 20° and

  • heavy particle

    radiation measurement: Interactions of heavy charged particles: The term heavy charged particle refers to those energetic particles whose mass is one atomic mass unit or greater. This category includes alpha particles, together with protons, deuterons, fission fragments, and other energetic heavy particles often produced in accelerators. These particles carry…

  • heavy rail transit

    Rapid transit, system of railways, usually electric, that is used for local transit in a metropolitan area. A rapid transit line may run underground (subway), above street level (elevated transit line), or at street level. Rapid transit is distinguished from other forms of mass transit by its

  • heavy salting

    fish processing: Curing: In heavy or hard-cure salting, an additional step is taken in which warm air is forced over the surface of the fish until the water content is reduced to about 20 percent and the salt content is increased to approximately 30 percent. Most dry-salted fish products are consumed…

  • Heavy Sand (novel by Rybakov)

    Anatoly Rybakov: …II in Tyazhyoly pesok (1979; Heavy Sand), an epic novel that brought him an international audience. With the arrival of Premier Mikhail Gorbachev’s policy of glasnost, Rybakov was allowed to publish Deti Arbata (1987; Children of the Arbat), much of which had been suppressed for more than two decades. The…

  • heavy spar (mineral)

    Barite, the most common barium mineral, barium sulfate (BaSO4). Barite occurs in hydrothermal ore veins (particularly those containing lead and silver), in sedimentary rocks such as limestone, in clay deposits formed by the weathering of limestone, in marine deposits, and in cavities in igneous

  • heavy water (chemical compound)

    Heavy water (D2O), water composed of deuterium, the hydrogen isotope with a mass double that of ordinary hydrogen, and oxygen. (Ordinary water has a composition represented by H2O.) Thus, heavy water has a molecular weight of about 20 (the sum of twice the atomic weight of deuterium, which is 2,

  • Heavy Weather (novel by Sterling)

    Bruce Sterling: …later works included the novels Heavy Weather (1994), Holy Fire (1996), Distractions (1998), The Caryatids (2009), and Love Is Strange (2012).

  • heavy-ion radioactivity (physics)

    radioactivity: Heavy-ion radioactivity: In 1980 A. Sandulescu, D.N. Poenaru, and W. Greiner described calculations indicating the possibility of a new type of decay of heavy nuclei intermediate between alpha decay and spontaneous fission. The first observation of heavy-ion radioactivity was that of a 30-MeV, carbon-14 emission…

  • heavy-liquid testing

    mineral processing: Mineralogical analysis: …ore can be determined by heavy-liquid testing, in which a single-sized fraction of a ground ore is suspended in a liquid of high specific gravity. Particles of less density than the liquid remain afloat, while denser particles sink. Several different fractions of particles with the same density (and, hence, similar…

  • heavy-media separation

    mineral processing: Gravity separation: In heavy-media separation (also called sink-and-float separation), the medium used is a suspension in water of a finely ground heavy mineral (such as magnetite or arsenopyrite) or technical product (such as ferrosilicon). Such a suspension can simulate a fluid with a higher density than water. When…

  • heavy-metal fluoride glass (glass)

    industrial glass: Heavy-metal fluoride glasses: Of the nonoxide glasses, the heavy-metal fluoride glasses (HMFGs) have potential use in telecommunications fibres, owing to their relatively low optical losses. However, they are also extremely difficult to form and have poor chemical durability. The most studied HMFG is the so-called…

  • heavy-water reactor (physics)

    nuclear reactor: Fuel types: …is the principal type of heavy-water reactor, uses natural uranium compacted into pellets. These pellets are inserted in long tubes and arranged in a lattice. A CANDU reactor fuel assembly measures approximately 1 metre (almost 40 inches) in length. Several assemblies are arranged end-to-end within a channel inside the reactor…

  • Heavysege, Charles (British-Canadian poet)

    Charles Heavysege, British-born Canadian self-taught working-class poet who took Shakespeare and the Bible as his models to create ambitious verse dramas. Although lively and imaginative, his work is somewhat handicapped by an unoriginal and overblown rhetorical style. In 1853 he immigrated to

  • heavyweight (boxing weight class)

    Evander Holyfield: …professional fighter to win the heavyweight championship four separate times and thereby surpass the record of Muhammad Ali, who won it three times.

  • Heavyweight Champ (electronic game)

    electronic fighting game: Eight-bit era: …player-controlled characters was Sega Corporation’s Heavyweight Champ (1976), a black-and-white 8-bit arcade console simulation in which two boxers are shown in profile, or two dimensions, with the players able to throw only high (head) or low (body) punches. The next step in the development of fighting games was Data East…

  • Heb-Sed (Egyptian feast)

    Heb-Sed, one of the oldest feasts of ancient Egypt, celebrated by the king after 30 years of rule and repeated every 3 years thereafter. The festival was in the nature of a jubilee, and it is believed that the ceremonies represented a ritual reenactment of the unification of Egypt, traditionally

  • Hebat (ancient deity)

    Hebat, in the religions of Asia Minor, a Hurrian goddess, the consort of the weather god Teshub. She was called Queen of Heaven and was assimilated by the Hittites to their national goddess, the sun goddess of Arinna. Teshub and Hebat had cult centres at Kummanni (classical Comana Cappadociae) and

  • Hebb, Donald (Canadian psychologist)

    artificial intelligence: Symbolic vs. connectionist approaches: …The Organization of Behavior (1949), Donald Hebb, a psychologist at McGill University, Montreal, Canada, suggested that learning specifically involves strengthening certain patterns of neural activity by increasing the probability (weight) of induced neuron firing between the associated connections. The notion of weighted connections is described in a later section, Connectionism.

  • Hebbel, Christian Friedrich (German dramatist)

    Friedrich Hebbel, poet and dramatist who added a new psychological dimension to German drama and made use of G.W.F. Hegel’s concepts of history to dramatize conflicts in his historical tragedies. He was concerned not so much with the individual aspects of the characters or events as with the

  • Hebbel, Friedrich (German dramatist)

    Friedrich Hebbel, poet and dramatist who added a new psychological dimension to German drama and made use of G.W.F. Hegel’s concepts of history to dramatize conflicts in his historical tragedies. He was concerned not so much with the individual aspects of the characters or events as with the

  • Hebblethwaite, Peter (British writer)

    Peter Hebblethwaite, British writer (born Sept. 30, 1930, Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire, England—died Dec. 18, 1994, Oxford, England), was considered the foremost "Vaticanologist" in the English-speaking world and wrote the definitive biographies of two popes--John XXIII: Pope of the Council (

  • Hebdomades vel de imaginibus (work by Varro)

    Western painting: Book illustration in antiquity: …Terentius Varro’s 15 books of Hebdomades vel de imaginibus and a portrait of Virgil prefixed to an edition of his poems. Miniatures in the codex of the Iliad in the Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, were painted probably at the end of the 5th or beginning of the 6th century ad but…

  • Hebe (Greek goddess)

    Hebe, (from Greek hēbē, “young maturity,” or “bloom of youth”), daughter of Zeus, the chief god, and his wife Hera. In Homer this princess was a divine domestic, appearing most often as cupbearer to the gods. As the goddess of youth, she was generally worshiped along with her mother, of whom she

  • Hebei (province, China)

    Hebei, sheng (province) of northern China, located on the Bo Hai (Gulf of Chihli) of the Yellow Sea. It is bounded to the northwest by the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region and by the provinces of Liaoning to the northeast, Shandong to the southeast, Henan to the south, and Shanxi to the west. Hebei

  • Hebei Plain (plain, China)

    North China Plain, large alluvial plain of northern China, built up along the shore of the Yellow Sea by deposits of the Huang He (Yellow River) and the Huai, Hai, and a few other minor rivers of northern China. Covering an area of about 158,000 square miles (409,500 square km), most of which is

  • hebephilia

    pedophilia: Pedophilia may be distinguished from hebephilia (sexual preference for individuals who typically are between ages 11 and 14) and ephebophilia (sexual preference for late-stage adolescents, typically ages 15 and 16). In many countries an individual who is convicted in a court of law of child sexual abuse (see child abuse),…

  • hebephrenic schizophrenia (mental disorder)

    Emil Kraepelin: …(either excessively active or inhibited); hebephrenia, characterized by inappropriate emotional reactions and behaviour; and paranoia, characterized by delusions of grandeur and of persecution.

  • Heber City (Utah, United States)

    Heber City, city, seat (1862) of Wasatch county, northern Utah, U.S. Named in 1859 to honour Mormon leader Heber C. Kimball, the original town site contained a fort to protect settlers from Indian attacks, as well as a handful of homes. The city grew to become a locally important centre of

  • Heberden, William (British physician)

    cardiovascular disease: Angina pectoris: …in 1772 by British physician William Heberden when he wrote:

  • Hebern, Edward H. (American cryptologist)

    cryptology: Developments during World Wars I and II: …older mechanical cipher disks, American Edward H. Hebern recognized in about 1917 (and made the first patent claim) that by hardwiring a monoalphabetic substitution in the connections from contacts on one side of an electrical disk (rotor) to contacts on the other side and then cascading a collection of such…

  • Hébert, Anne (Canadian poet and novelist)

    Anne Hébert, French Canadian poet, novelist, and playwright noted as an original literary stylist. She lived most of her adult life in Paris. Hébert spent her early years largely confined to her family’s country home. In her youth she was encouraged to write by her father, who was a well-known poet

  • Hebert, Bobby (American football player)

    New Orleans Saints: …high-scoring offense led by quarterback Bobby Hebert and a stout defense starring linebackers Rickey Jackson and Sam Mills combined to propel the Saints to a 12–3 record and a playoff berth. However, the Saints badly lost their first postseason contest to the Minnesota Vikings. New Orleans had winning records again…

  • Hébert, Georges (French physical educator and trainer)

    parkour: …before World War I by Georges Hébert and known as “la méthode naturelle.” The regimen involved training in running, jumping, climbing, balancing, swimming, and defending and the use of obstacle courses called “parcours du combattant.” Hébert’s system came to underpin French military training. Later, during the 1940s and ’50s, Raymond…

  • Hébert, Jacques (French political journalist)

    Jacques Hébert, political journalist during the French Revolution who became the chief spokesman for the Parisian sansculottes (extreme radical revolutionaries). He and his followers, who were called Hébertists, pressured the Jacobin regime of 1793–94 into instituting the most radical measures of

  • Hébert, Jacques-René (French political journalist)

    Jacques Hébert, political journalist during the French Revolution who became the chief spokesman for the Parisian sansculottes (extreme radical revolutionaries). He and his followers, who were called Hébertists, pressured the Jacobin regime of 1793–94 into instituting the most radical measures of

  • Hébertist (French political history)

    Hébertist, any of the group of extremists of the French Revolution, followers of Jacques-René Hébert, who demanded a Revolutionary government that was anti-Christian and dedicated to the eradication of Girondists and other moderates. The faction arose during the violence of August 1792, when Louis

  • Hébertiste (French political history)

    Hébertist, any of the group of extremists of the French Revolution, followers of Jacques-René Hébert, who demanded a Revolutionary government that was anti-Christian and dedicated to the eradication of Girondists and other moderates. The faction arose during the violence of August 1792, when Louis

  • Hebi (China)

    Hebi, prefecture-level city, northern Henan sheng (province), China. Once a county seat in Anyang prefecture, Hebi is situated in the foothills of the southern Taihang Mountains, some 16 miles (25 km) southwest of Anyang. Until the early 1950s Hebi was little more than a local market town, but the

  • Hebi ni piasu (work by Kanehara)

    Kanehara Hitomi: …with Hebi ni piasu (2003; Snakes and Earrings), which describes a 19-year-old girl’s obsession with body alteration. This explicit novel paints a bleak picture of the isolated alcoholic teen’s underground life as she adds painful tattoos to her back and pierces her tongue. Kanehara incorporated the vocabulary of the Tokyo…

  • Hebiji (China)

    Hebi, prefecture-level city, northern Henan sheng (province), China. Once a county seat in Anyang prefecture, Hebi is situated in the foothills of the southern Taihang Mountains, some 16 miles (25 km) southwest of Anyang. Until the early 1950s Hebi was little more than a local market town, but the

  • Hebra, Ferdinand von (Moravian physician)

    dermatology: …century by the Austrian physician Ferdinand von Hebra. Hebra emphasized an approach to skin diseases based on the microscopic examination of skin lesions. Following Hebra’s work, dermatologists concentrated chiefly on the description and classification of skin diseases, but a new emphasis on the biochemistry and physiology of these diseases, begun…

  • Hebraeus, Bar (Syrian philosopher)

    Bar Hebraeus, medieval Syrian scholar noted for his encyclopaedic learning in science and philosophy and for his enrichment of Syriac literature by the introduction of Arabic culture. Motivated toward scholarly pursuits by his father, a Jewish convert to Christianity, Bar Hebraeus emigrated to

  • Hebraic law

    Hebraic law, body of ancient Hebrew law codes found in various places in the Old Testament and similar to earlier law codes of ancient Middle Eastern monarchs—such as the Code of Hammurabi, an 18th–17th-century-bc Babylonian king, and the Code of Lipit-Ishtar, a 20th-century-bc king of the

  • Hebreo, Léon (Spanish writer)

    Spanish literature: Mystical writings: …in the expatriate Spanish Jew León Hebreo, whose Dialoghi di amore (1535; “The Dialogues of Love”), written in Italian, profoundly influenced 16th-century and later Spanish thought. The mystics’ literary importance derives from attempts to transcend language’s limitations, liberating previously untapped resources of expression. The writings of St. Teresa of Ávila,…

  • Hebrew (people)

    Hebrew, any member of an ancient northern Semitic people that were the ancestors of the Jews. Biblical scholars use the term Hebrews to designate the descendants of the patriarchs of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament)—i.e., Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (also called Israel [Genesis 33:28])—from that

  • Hebrew alphabet

    Hebrew alphabet, either of two distinct Semitic alphabets—the Early Hebrew and the Classical, or Square, Hebrew. Early Hebrew was the alphabet used by the Jewish nation in the period before the Babylonian Exile—i.e., prior to the 6th century bce—although some inscriptions in this alphabet may be of

  • Hebrew Bible (Jewish sacred writings)

    Hebrew Bible, collection of writings that was first compiled and preserved as the sacred books of the Jewish people. It constitutes a large portion of the Christian Bible. A brief treatment of the Hebrew Bible follows. For full treatment, see biblical literature. In its general framework, the

  • Hebrew calendar

    Jewish religious year, the cycle of Sabbaths and holidays that are commonly observed by the Jewish religious community—and officially in Israel by the Jewish secular community as well. The Sabbath and festivals are bound to the Jewish calendar, reoccur at fixed intervals, and are celebrated at home

  • Hebrew canon (Jewish sacred writings)

    Hebrew Bible, collection of writings that was first compiled and preserved as the sacred books of the Jewish people. It constitutes a large portion of the Christian Bible. A brief treatment of the Hebrew Bible follows. For full treatment, see biblical literature. In its general framework, the

  • Hebrew language

    Hebrew language, Semitic language of the Northern Central (also called Northwestern) group; it is closely related to Phoenician and Moabite, with which it is often placed by scholars in a Canaanite subgroup. Spoken in ancient times in Palestine, Hebrew was supplanted by the western dialect of

  • Hebrew literature

    Hebrew literature, the body of written works produced in the Hebrew language and distinct from Jewish literature, which also exists in other languages. Literature in Hebrew has been produced uninterruptedly from the early 12th century bc, and certain excavated tablets may indicate a literature of

  • Hebrew numeral

    numerals and numeral systems: Ciphered numeral systems: …systems include Coptic, Hindu Brahmin, Hebrew, Syrian, and early Arabic. The last three, like the Ionic, are alphabetic ciphered numeral systems. The Hebrew system is shown in the Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.figure.

  • Hebrew Scriptures (Jewish sacred writings)

    Hebrew Bible, collection of writings that was first compiled and preserved as the sacred books of the Jewish people. It constitutes a large portion of the Christian Bible. A brief treatment of the Hebrew Bible follows. For full treatment, see biblical literature. In its general framework, the

  • Hebrew Sunday School Society of Philadelphia (American organization)

    Rebecca Gratz: …Hebrew Benevolent Society, founded the Hebrew Sunday School Society of Philadelphia, of which she served as president until 1864. The society was the first such organization in the United States and served as a model for others like it. The fame she enjoyed in her own day and the enduring…

  • Hebrew talent (unit of weight)

    talent: The Hebrew talent, or kikkār, probably of Babylonian origin, was the basic unit of weight among the ancient Hebrews. In the sacred system of weights, the Talmudic talent was equal to 60 Talmudic minas.

  • Hebrew Union College (American seminary)

    Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion (HUC-JIR), the oldest Jewish seminary in the United States for the training of rabbis, long a stronghold of American Reform Judaism. It was founded as the Hebrew Union College in 1875 at Cincinnati, Ohio, by Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise, and it later

  • Hebrew Union College Biblical and Archaeological School (seminary, Jerusalem)
  • Hebrew Union College Museum (museum, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion: …Hebrew Union College Museum (now Skirball Museum) was established in 1913. HUC-JIR’s publications include the Hebrew Union College Annual and Studies in Bibliography and Booklore.

  • Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion (American seminary)

    Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion (HUC-JIR), the oldest Jewish seminary in the United States for the training of rabbis, long a stronghold of American Reform Judaism. It was founded as the Hebrew Union College in 1875 at Cincinnati, Ohio, by Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise, and it later

  • Hebrew University Medical Center (institution, Jerusalem)

    Jerusalem: Health: The Hadassah Medical Centre at ʿEn Kerem, one of the most-advanced institutions of its kind in the world, treats patients from throughout Israel, as well as from the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, and Jordan, as does the Hadassah Hospital on Mount Scopus. Other hospitals include…

  • Hebrew University of Jerusalem (university, Jerusalem)

    Hebrew University of Jerusalem, state-subsidized institution of higher learning in Jerusalem. The foremost university in Israel, it attracts many Jewish students from abroad. Originally inaugurated (1925) on Mount Scopus, it was transferred to Givʿat Ram in the Israeli-controlled sector of J

  • Hebrews, Letter to the (New Testament)

    Letter to the Hebrews, New Testament letter traditionally attributed to Paul but now widely believed to be the work of a Jewish Christian, perhaps one of Paul’s associates. The letter was composed sometime during the latter half of the 1st century. To judge from its contents, the letter was

  • Hebridae (insect)

    Velvet water bug, (family Hebridae), any of approximately 120 species of insects in the true bug order, Heteroptera, that are covered with fine, velvetlike hairs. The bodies of these small, plump insects are usually less than 3 mm (0.1 inch) long. Although relatively rare, they can be found in

  • Hebriden, Die (overture by Mendelssohn)

    The Hebrides, Op. 26, concert overture (resembling an operatic overture, though intended for concert performance rather than as a prelude to a theatrical work) by German composer Felix Mendelssohn, a tempestuous one-movement work in sonata form, inspired by the composer’s visit to the Hebrides

  • Hebrides (islands, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Hebrides, group of islands extending in an arc off the Atlantic (west) coast of Scotland. They are subdivided into two groups—the Inner Hebrides to the east and the Outer Hebrides to the west—which are separated from each other by channels called the Minch and the Little Minch. The Outer Hebrides

  • Hebrides Overture (overture by Mendelssohn)

    The Hebrides, Op. 26, concert overture (resembling an operatic overture, though intended for concert performance rather than as a prelude to a theatrical work) by German composer Felix Mendelssohn, a tempestuous one-movement work in sonata form, inspired by the composer’s visit to the Hebrides

  • Hebrides, The, Op. 26 (overture by Mendelssohn)

    The Hebrides, Op. 26, concert overture (resembling an operatic overture, though intended for concert performance rather than as a prelude to a theatrical work) by German composer Felix Mendelssohn, a tempestuous one-movement work in sonata form, inspired by the composer’s visit to the Hebrides

  • Hebron (city, West Bank)

    Hebron, city in the West Bank, situated in the southern Judaean Hills south-southwest of Jerusalem. Located about 3,050 feet (930 metres) above sea level, Hebron long benefited from its mountainous clime, which encouraged the cultivation of fruit trees and vineyards. In addition, its location at a

  • Hébuterne, Jeanne (French painter)

    Amedeo Modigliani: …affair with the young painter Jeanne Hébuterne, with whom he went to live on the Côte d’Azur. Their daughter, Jeanne, was born in November 1918. His painting became increasingly refined in line and delicate in colour. A more-tranquil life and the climate of the Mediterranean, however, did not restore the…

  • Hecale (work by Callimachus)

    Latin literature: Epic and epyllion: With his Hecale, Callimachus had inaugurated the short, carefully composed hexameter narrative (called epyllion by modern scholars) to replace grand epic. The Hecale had started a convention of insetting an independent story. Catullus inset the story of Ariadne on Naxos into that of the marriage of Peleus…

  • Hecataeus of Abdera (Greco-Egyptian writer)

    Judaism: Egyptian Jewish literature: As early as 290 bce, Hecataeus of Abdera, a Greek living in Egypt, had remarked that under the Persians and Macedonians the Jews had greatly modified the traditions of their fathers. Other papyri indicate that at least three-fourths of Egyptian Jews had personal names of Greek rather than Hebrew origin.…

  • Hecataeus of Miletus (Greek author)

    Hecataeus of Miletus, groundbreaking Greek author of an early history and geography. When the Persian Empire ruled Asia Minor, Hecataeus tried to dissuade the Ionians from revolt against Persia (500 bc), and in 494, when they were obliged to sue for terms, he was one of the ambassadors to the

  • Hecate (Greek goddess)

    Hecate, goddess accepted at an early date into Greek religion but probably derived from the Carians in southwest Asia Minor. In Hesiod she is the daughter of the Titan Perses and the nymph Asteria and has power over heaven, earth, and sea; hence, she bestows wealth and all the blessings of daily

  • Hecate Strait (strait, Canada)

    Hecate Strait, passage of the eastern North Pacific, off central British Columbia, Canada. Stretching south from Dixon Entrance 160 miles (260 km) to Queen Charlotte Sound, the waterway, which ranges in width from 40 to 80 miles (65 to 130 km), separates the Haida Gwaii (formerly the Queen

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