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  • Hayden, Carla Diane (American librarian)

    Carla D. Hayden, American librarian who, in 2016, became the first woman and the first African American to serve as the Librarian of Congress. She is also known for defending library users’ privacy and for her efforts to ensure widespread access to public libraries and their resources. Hayden

  • Hayden, Ferdinand Vandiveer (American geologist)

    Ferdinand Vandiveer Hayden, American geologist who was a pioneer investigator of the western United States. His explorations and geologic studies of the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains helped lay the foundation of the U.S. Geological Survey. In 1853 Hayden made a trip with the paleontologist

  • Hayden, Melissa (American ballet dancer)

    Melissa Hayden, Canadian-born ballet dancer, whose technical and dramatic skills shone in the many and various roles she created. Hayden began studying dance while a schoolgirl. In 1945 she went to New York City and found a position in the corps de ballet at Radio City Music Hall. Within a few

  • Hayden, Palmer (American artist)

    Palmer Hayden, African American painter who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance. He is known best for his seascapes and his lively depictions of everyday life in Harlem. Peyton Cole Hedgeman (as he was originally named) started drawing when he was a child. He moved to Washington, D.C.,

  • Hayden, Robert (American poet)

    Robert Hayden, African American poet whose subject matter is most often the black experience. Hayden grew up in Detroit and attended Detroit City College (now Wayne State University; B.A., 1936). He joined the Federal Writers’ Project, researching black folklore and the history of the Underground

  • Hayden, Robert Earl (American poet)

    Robert Hayden, African American poet whose subject matter is most often the black experience. Hayden grew up in Detroit and attended Detroit City College (now Wayne State University; B.A., 1936). He joined the Federal Writers’ Project, researching black folklore and the history of the Underground

  • Hayden, Sophia (American architect)

    Sophia Hayden, American architect who fought for the aesthetic integrity of her design for the Woman’s Building of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The building was the only design of Hayden’s that was ever built. Hayden was educated in Boston, where from age six she lived with her

  • Hayden, Sterling (American actor)

    Asphalt Jungle, The: Cast:

  • Hayden, Thomas Emmett (American activist and author)

    Tom Hayden, American activist and author. One of the preeminent activists of the 1960s, Hayden helped found Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and was arrested as one of the Chicago Seven indicted for conspiracy to incite the riots that accompanied the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago.

  • Hayden, Tom (American activist and author)

    Tom Hayden, American activist and author. One of the preeminent activists of the 1960s, Hayden helped found Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and was arrested as one of the Chicago Seven indicted for conspiracy to incite the riots that accompanied the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago.

  • Hayder, Qurratulain (Indian writer)

    Qurratulain Hyder, Indian writer, editor, scholar, and translator who helped the novel become a serious genre of hitherto poetry-oriented Urdu literature. Her masterwork, Aag ka darya (1959; River of Fire), has been compared to those of Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez and Czech novelist

  • Haydn, Franz Joseph (Austrian composer)

    Joseph Haydn, Austrian composer who was one of the most important figures in the development of the Classical style in music during the 18th century. He helped establish the forms and styles for the string quartet and the symphony. Haydn was the second son of humble parents. His father was a

  • Haydn, Johann Michael (German musician)

    Michael Haydn, one of the most accomplished composers of church music in the later 18th century. He was the younger brother of Joseph Haydn. Like his brother, Michael Haydn became a choirboy at St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna, receiving his early musical instruction there. He was dismissed from

  • Haydn, Joseph (Austrian composer)

    Joseph Haydn, Austrian composer who was one of the most important figures in the development of the Classical style in music during the 18th century. He helped establish the forms and styles for the string quartet and the symphony. Haydn was the second son of humble parents. His father was a

  • Haydn, Michael (German musician)

    Michael Haydn, one of the most accomplished composers of church music in the later 18th century. He was the younger brother of Joseph Haydn. Like his brother, Michael Haydn became a choirboy at St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna, receiving his early musical instruction there. He was dismissed from

  • Haydon, Benjamin Robert (English painter and writer)

    Benjamin Robert Haydon, English historical painter and writer, whose Autobiography has proved more enduring than his painting. The son of a Plymouth bookseller, Haydon went to London to attend the Royal Academy schools. He first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1807, but because of subsequent

  • Haye, La (national seat of government, Netherlands)

    The Hague, seat of government of the Netherlands. It is situated on a coastal plain, with the city centre just inland from the North Sea. The Hague is the administrative capital of the country and the home of the court and government, though Amsterdam is the official capital. The city’s name

  • Haye, Sir Gilbert of the (Scottish translator)

    Sir Gilbert Hay, Scottish translator of works from the French, whose prose translations are the earliest extant examples of literary Scots prose. Hay may have been the Gylbertus Hay named in the registers of St. Andrews University in 1418 and 1419. That he received a degree as a master of arts,

  • Hayek Jiménez, Salma Valgarma (Mexican American actress, director, and producer)

    Salma Hayek, Mexican American actress, director, and producer who, at the end of the 20th century, broke barriers as one of the first Latina actresses to establish a successful film career in the United States. Hayek grew up in Mexico but attended Catholic school in New Orleans before enrolling at

  • Hayek Pinault, Salma (Mexican American actress, director, and producer)

    Salma Hayek, Mexican American actress, director, and producer who, at the end of the 20th century, broke barriers as one of the first Latina actresses to establish a successful film career in the United States. Hayek grew up in Mexico but attended Catholic school in New Orleans before enrolling at

  • Hayek, F. A. (British economist)

    F.A. Hayek, Austrian-born British economist noted for his criticisms of the Keynesian welfare state and of totalitarian socialism. In 1974 he shared the Nobel Prize for Economics with Swedish economist Gunnar Myrdal. Hayek’s father, August, was a physician and a professor of botany at the

  • Hayek, Friedrich A. (British economist)

    F.A. Hayek, Austrian-born British economist noted for his criticisms of the Keynesian welfare state and of totalitarian socialism. In 1974 he shared the Nobel Prize for Economics with Swedish economist Gunnar Myrdal. Hayek’s father, August, was a physician and a professor of botany at the

  • Hayek, Friedrich August von (British economist)

    F.A. Hayek, Austrian-born British economist noted for his criticisms of the Keynesian welfare state and of totalitarian socialism. In 1974 he shared the Nobel Prize for Economics with Swedish economist Gunnar Myrdal. Hayek’s father, August, was a physician and a professor of botany at the

  • Hayek, Friedrich von (British economist)

    F.A. Hayek, Austrian-born British economist noted for his criticisms of the Keynesian welfare state and of totalitarian socialism. In 1974 he shared the Nobel Prize for Economics with Swedish economist Gunnar Myrdal. Hayek’s father, August, was a physician and a professor of botany at the

  • Hayek, Nicolas George (Lebanese-born Swiss entrepreneur)

    Nicolas George Hayek, Lebanese-born Swiss entrepreneur (born Feb. 19, 1928, Beirut, Leb.—died June 28, 2010, Biel, Swiz.), rejuvenated the failing Swiss watchmaking industry in the early 1980s when he initiated and marketed the inexpensive, stylish, and collectable Swatch line of watches. He was

  • Hayek, Salma (Mexican American actress, director, and producer)

    Salma Hayek, Mexican American actress, director, and producer who, at the end of the 20th century, broke barriers as one of the first Latina actresses to establish a successful film career in the United States. Hayek grew up in Mexico but attended Catholic school in New Orleans before enrolling at

  • Hayeren

    Armenian language, language that forms a separate branch of the Indo-European language family; it was once erroneously considered a dialect of Iranian. In the early 21st century the Armenian language is spoken by some 6.7 million individuals. The majority (about 3.4 million) of these live in

  • Hayes River (river, Canada)

    Hayes River, river in northeastern Manitoba, Canada, rising from several lakes in the central part of the province and flowing northeastward for 300 miles (500 km) across the Canadian Shield (a region of rocky, ice-smoothed hills dotted with lakes) to enter Hudson Bay at York Factory. The river,

  • Hayes sonic depth finder (measurement device)

    depth finder: …practical depth sounders, the so-called Hayes sonic depth finder, developed by the U.S. Navy in 1919, consisted of (1) a device to generate and send sound waves to the ocean floor and receive the reflected waves and (2) a timer calibrated at the speed of sound in seawater that directly…

  • Hayes, Bob (American athlete)

    Bob Hayes, American sprinter who, although he was relatively slow out of the starting block and had an almost lumbering style of running, was a remarkably powerful sprinter with as much raw speed as any athlete in history. He also was a noted American football player. Hayes began running as a boy

  • Hayes, Bullet Bob (American athlete)

    Bob Hayes, American sprinter who, although he was relatively slow out of the starting block and had an almost lumbering style of running, was a remarkably powerful sprinter with as much raw speed as any athlete in history. He also was a noted American football player. Hayes began running as a boy

  • Hayes, Denis (American environmentalist)

    Earth Day: …use of the pesticide DDT—hired Denis Hayes, a graduate student at Harvard University. They sought to infuse the energy of student-led anti-war activism with the public’s emerging environmental consciousness in order to propel environmental protections into the national political agenda. Together they organized the first Earth Day, which took place…

  • Hayes, Elvin (American basketball player)

    Elvin Hayes, American basketball player who was one of the most prolific scorers and rebounders in the history of the National Basketball Association (NBA). After averaging 35 points per game in high school in Louisiana, Hayes went to the University of Houston (Texas), where he was named

  • Hayes, Elvin Ernest (American basketball player)

    Elvin Hayes, American basketball player who was one of the most prolific scorers and rebounders in the history of the National Basketball Association (NBA). After averaging 35 points per game in high school in Louisiana, Hayes went to the University of Houston (Texas), where he was named

  • Hayes, Helen (American actress)

    Helen Hayes, American actress who was widely considered to be the “First Lady of the American Theatre.” At the behest of her mother, a touring stage performer, Hayes attended dancing class as a youngster, and, from 1905 to 1909, she performed with the Columbia Players. At age nine, she made her

  • Hayes, Isaac (American singer-songwriter, musician, and actor)

    Isaac Lee Hayes, Jr., American singer-songwriter, musician, and actor (born Aug. 20, 1942, Covington, Tenn.—died Aug. 10, 2008, East Memphis, Tenn.), was a pioneering figure in soul music whose recordings influenced the development of such musical genres as disco, rap, and urban-contemporary. The

  • Hayes, Isaac Israel (American explorer)

    Isaac Israel Hayes, American physician and Arctic explorer who sought to prove the existence of open seas around the North Pole. After receiving his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania (1853), Hayes volunteered to serve as surgeon with Elisha Kent Kane’s Arctic expedition, which planned to

  • Hayes, James (American calligrapher)

    calligraphy: Revival of calligraphy (19th and 20th centuries): Hunter Middleton, James Hayes, Ray DaBoll, and Bruce Beck.

  • Hayes, John (British military officer)

    Papua New Guinea: The colonial period: John Hayes, a British naval officer, near Manokwari, now in Papua province, Indonesia. It was the Dutch, however, who claimed the western half of the island as part of the Dutch East Indies in 1828; their control remained nominal until 1898, when their first permanent…

  • Hayes, John Joseph (American athlete)

    Dorando Pietri: Falling at the Finish: Pietri and the winner, John Joseph Hayes of the United States, had both been long shots. The favourite, Charles Hefferon of South Africa, led until the final six miles. Pietri’s handler reportedly then gave the Italian an invigorating shot of strychnine. With less than 2 miles (3 km) to…

  • Hayes, John Michael, Jr. (American screenwriter)

    John Michael Hayes, Jr., American screenwriter (born May 11, 1919, Worcester, Mass.—died Nov. 19, 2008, Hanover, N.H.), crafted the screenplays for some of director Alfred Hitchcock’s best-loved films, notably Rear Window (1954), for which Hayes garnered an Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of

  • Hayes, Lucy (American first lady)

    Lucy Hayes, American first lady (1877–81), the wife of Rutherford B. Hayes, 19th president of the United States, and the first presidential wife to graduate from college. Lucy Webb was the daughter of James Webb, a physician and ardent abolitionist, and Maria Cook Webb, who raised Lucy and her two

  • Hayes, Patrick Joseph (archbishop of New York)

    Patrick Joseph Hayes, archbishop of New York and cardinal who unified Roman Catholic welfare activities under a central agency, Catholic Charities. After graduate study at the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., Hayes went to New York City as curate at St. Gabriel’s parish, becoming

  • Hayes, Paul Raymond (American jurist)

    Paul R. Hays, American judge best known for his participation in the tribunal that ruled on the Pentagon Papers case (1971). While studying at Columbia University (B.A., 1925; M.A., 1927; LL.B., 1933), Hays was an instructor (1926–32) there in Latin and Greek. After briefly working with the law

  • Hayes, Peter Lind (American entertainer)

    Peter Lind Hayes, American entertainer who was best known for his appearances with his wife, Mary Healy, in nightclub acts, in several television series, on radio, in films, and on Broadway (b. June 25, 1915, San Francisco, Calif.--d. April 21, 1998, Las Vegas,

  • Hayes, Robert Lee (American athlete)

    Bob Hayes, American sprinter who, although he was relatively slow out of the starting block and had an almost lumbering style of running, was a remarkably powerful sprinter with as much raw speed as any athlete in history. He also was a noted American football player. Hayes began running as a boy

  • Hayes, Rutherford B. (president of United States)

    Rutherford B. Hayes, 19th president of the United States (1877–81), who brought post-Civil War Reconstruction to an end in the South and who tried to establish new standards of official integrity after eight years of corruption in Washington, D.C. He was the only president to hold office by

  • Hayes, Rutherford Birchard (president of United States)

    Rutherford B. Hayes, 19th president of the United States (1877–81), who brought post-Civil War Reconstruction to an end in the South and who tried to establish new standards of official integrity after eight years of corruption in Washington, D.C. He was the only president to hold office by

  • Hayes, Wayne Woodrow (American football coach)

    Woody Hayes, American collegiate gridiron football coach whose career coaching record was 238 games won, 72 lost, and 10 tied. He developed 58 All-American players, and his Ohio State University teams (1951–78) won 3 national championships (1954, 1957, and 1968) and 13 Big Ten championships and

  • Hayes, Woody (American football coach)

    Woody Hayes, American collegiate gridiron football coach whose career coaching record was 238 games won, 72 lost, and 10 tied. He developed 58 All-American players, and his Ohio State University teams (1951–78) won 3 national championships (1954, 1957, and 1968) and 13 Big Ten championships and

  • Hayes-Tilden affair (United States history)

    United States: The Ulysses S. Grant administrations, 1869–77: >disputed election of 1876 strengthened Hayes’s intention to work with the Southern whites, even if it meant abandoning the few Radical regimes that remained in the South. In an election marked by widespread fraud and many irregularities, the Democratic candidate, Samuel J. Tilden, received the…

  • Hayfield, The (painting by Bastien-Lepage)

    Jules Bastien-Lepage: …stylistically owes a little to Édouard Manet. The Hayfield (1878) follows in the tradition of Jean-François Millet and reveals the sentimental element that characterizes Bastien-Lepage’s work. Joan of Arc Listening to the Voices, which represents Joan as a Lorraine peasant, typifies his subject pictures. He was also a portraitist of…

  • Hayford, John Fillmore (American engineer and geodesist)

    John Fillmore Hayford, American civil engineer and early geodesist who established the theory of isostasy. Hayford’s theory assumes that there must be a compensatory distribution of rock materials of varying density so that the Earth’s crust exerts an essentially consistent pressure that is brought

  • Hayhanen, Reino (Soviet spy)

    Rudolf Abel: …testimony by Soviet Lieutenant Colonel Reino Hayhanen, who had defected to the West and who stated that he had been Abel’s chief coconspirator in the United States. The court sentenced Abel to 30 years’ imprisonment.

  • Hayk (people)

    Armenian, member of a people with an ancient culture who originally lived in the region known as Armenia, which comprised what are now northeastern Turkey and the Republic of Armenia. Although some remain in Turkey, more than three million Armenians live in the republic; large numbers also live in

  • Haykal, Muḥammad Ḥusayn (Egyptian writer)

    Arabic literature: The novel: The author, Muḥammad Ḥusayn Haykal, had written the work while studying in France, and the influence of a variety of European Romantic narrative traditions is very clear. Elsewhere within the region, novel writing was initiated at a later date: in Iraq by Maḥmūd Aḥmad al-Sayyid with Fī…

  • Hayley, William (English poet and biographer)

    William Hayley, English poet, biographer, and patron of the arts. Hayley is best remembered for his friendships with William Blake, the great pre-Romantic poet, painter, and designer, and with the 18th-century poet William Cowper. He was also a patron of less well-known writers, including the poet

  • Hayman Island (island, Coral Sea)

    Hayman Island, northernmost of the Cumberland Islands, at the northern entrance to Whitsunday Passage (Coral Sea), off northeastern Queensland, Australia. An inshore coral-fringed continental island, it measures 2 miles (3 km) by 1 12 miles (2.5 km) and has an area of 960 acres (390 hectares).

  • Hayman-Joyce, Anna Valetta (American painter)

    Bronisław Malinowski: Mature career: …1940 Malinowski married again, to Anna Valetta Hayman-Joyce, an artist who painted under the name Valetta Swann and who assisted him in his Mexican studies and was primarily responsible for the publication of his Scientific Theory of Culture (1944) and other posthumous works.

  • Haymarket Affair (United States history [1886])

    Haymarket Affair, violent confrontation between police and labour protesters in Chicago on May 4, 1886, that became a symbol of the international struggle for workers’ rights. It has been associated with May Day (May 1) since that day’s designation as International Workers’ Day by the Second

  • Haymarket Massacre (United States history [1886])

    Haymarket Affair, violent confrontation between police and labour protesters in Chicago on May 4, 1886, that became a symbol of the international struggle for workers’ rights. It has been associated with May Day (May 1) since that day’s designation as International Workers’ Day by the Second

  • Haymarket Riot (United States history [1886])

    Haymarket Affair, violent confrontation between police and labour protesters in Chicago on May 4, 1886, that became a symbol of the international struggle for workers’ rights. It has been associated with May Day (May 1) since that day’s designation as International Workers’ Day by the Second

  • Haymarket Theatre (theatre, London, United Kingdom)

    proscenium: …of the stage at London’s Haymarket Theatre in 1880, creating a “picture frame” or an imaginary fourth wall through which the audience experienced the illusion of spying on characters behaving exactly as if they were unobserved. With the advent of electricity, the illusion was further enhanced by controlled lighting, which…

  • Haymerle, Heinrich, Baron von (Austrian diplomat)

    Heinrich, baron von Haymerle, diplomat and foreign minister of the Habsburg Empire (1879–81) who secured a treaty with Serbia giving Austria-Hungary virtual control over Serbian foreign policy. Entering the imperial diplomatic service in 1850, Haymerle served in Turkey, Greece (1857), and, after

  • Haymes, Dick (Argentinian-born American singer)

    Gregory Ratoff: Films of the 1930s and ’40s: …You Love Me (1946) featured Dick Haymes as a singer who woos the dean of a music school (Maureen O’Hara), and Haymes returned for Carnival in Costa Rica (1947), which also starred Vera-Ellen. In 1947 Ratoff turned to murder mysteries with Moss Rose (1947), a thriller set in turn-of-the-century London;…

  • Haynau, Julius Jacob, Freiherr von (Austrian general)

    Julius, baron von Haynau, Austrian general whose military successes were overshadowed by his notorious brutality. Entering the Austrian Army in 1801, Haynau saw action throughout the Napoleonic Wars and remained in service after the Congress of Vienna (1814–15). During the revolutions of 1848–49,

  • Hayne, Paul Hamilton (American poet)

    Paul Hamilton Hayne, American poet and literary leader, one of the best-known poets of the Confederate cause. After growing up in the home of his uncle, Robert Young Hayne, and practicing law for a short time, Hayne wrote for the Charleston Evening News and the Richmond Southern Literary Messenger

  • Hayne, Robert Young (American politician)

    Robert Young Hayne, American lawyer, political leader, and spokesman for the South, best-remembered for his debate with Daniel Webster (1830), in which he set forth a doctrine of nullification. Hayne entered the U.S. Senate in 1823 and soon became prominent as a spokesman for the South and for the

  • Haynes Automobile Company (American company)

    Elwood Haynes: …Elmer Apperson, Haynes formed the Haynes–Apperson Company, Kokomo, and began producing automobiles in 1898. Haynes and the Appersons split up in 1902, and three years later the company name was changed to Haynes Automobile Company. It ceased operations in 1925.

  • Haynes, Alfred C. (American pilot)

    United Airlines Flight 232: The pilots, Captain Alfred Haynes and First Officer William Records, quickly discovered that neither the autopilot nor the manual controls had any effect. In desperation, Haynes closed the throttle to the left engine and pushed all the power to the right, and the aircraft righted itself. The…

  • Haynes, Desmond (West Indian cricketer)

    Desmond Haynes, West Indian cricketer considered one of the greatest opening batsmen in the history of the game. Haynes played in 116 Test matches and 238 one-day internationals, scoring more than 16,000 runs in both formats combined. Haynes had a brilliant record in both the Test (international

  • Haynes, Desmond Leo (West Indian cricketer)

    Desmond Haynes, West Indian cricketer considered one of the greatest opening batsmen in the history of the game. Haynes played in 116 Test matches and 238 one-day internationals, scoring more than 16,000 runs in both formats combined. Haynes had a brilliant record in both the Test (international

  • Haynes, Elwood (American industrialist)

    Elwood Haynes, American automobile pioneer who built one of the first automobiles. He successfully tested his one-horsepower, one-cylinder vehicle at 6 or 7 miles (10 or 11 km) per hour on July 4, 1894, at Kokomo, Ind. Haynes claimed that he received the first U.S. traffic ticket when in 1895 a

  • Haynes, Euphemia Lofton (American educator and mathematician)

    Euphemia Lofton Haynes, American educator and mathematician who was the first African American woman to receive a doctoral degree in mathematics. Lofton was born into a socially prominent African American family. Her father, William, was a dentist, and her mother, Lavinia, was a kindergarten

  • Haynes, Henry Doyle (American entertainer)

    Homer and Jethro: With Homer strumming the guitar and Jethro playing the mandolin, they performed on radio in Knoxville before becoming cast regulars in 1939 on the “Renfro Valley Barn Dance” radio program. The team broke up during World War II, but they reunited in 1945 and performed for…

  • Haynes, Homer (American entertainer)

    Homer and Jethro: With Homer strumming the guitar and Jethro playing the mandolin, they performed on radio in Knoxville before becoming cast regulars in 1939 on the “Renfro Valley Barn Dance” radio program. The team broke up during World War II, but they reunited in 1945 and performed for…

  • Haynes, Johnny (English athlete)

    Johnny Haynes, English association football (soccer) player (born Oct. 17, 1934, London, Eng.—died Oct. 18, 2005, Edinburgh, Scot.), played the midfield for Fulham Football Club (1950–70) and England (1954–62). He was the first player to earn £100 (about $280) a week at a time (1958) when the a

  • Haynes, Lemuel (American clergyman)

    Middlebury College: …honorary degree to black clergyman Lemuel Haynes. Women were first admitted in 1883.

  • Haynes, Marques (American basketball player)

    Marques Oreole Haynes, American basketball player (born March 10, 1926, Sand Springs, Okla.—died May 22, 2015, Plano, Texas), possessed exceptional skills in ballhandling, especially dribbling, that earned him worldwide admiration; he was the first member of the Harlem Globetrotters to be enshrined

  • Haynes, Marques Oreole (American basketball player)

    Marques Oreole Haynes, American basketball player (born March 10, 1926, Sand Springs, Okla.—died May 22, 2015, Plano, Texas), possessed exceptional skills in ballhandling, especially dribbling, that earned him worldwide admiration; he was the first member of the Harlem Globetrotters to be enshrined

  • Haynes, Mike (American football player)

    New England Patriots: …future Hall of Fame cornerback Mike Haynes, and quarterback Steve Grogan, the Patriots experienced sporadic success in the 1970s and ’80s. They advanced to their first Super Bowl in 1986 but lost to a dominant Chicago Bears team, 46–10. Eleven years would pass before the Patriots would return to the…

  • Haynes, Todd (American screenwriter and director)

    Todd Haynes, American screenwriter and director known for films that examine fame, sexuality, and the lives of people on the periphery of mainstream society. Haynes graduated from Brown University in 1985 with a B.A. in art and semiotics. In 1987 he earned attention for Superstar: The Karen

  • Haynes, Warren (American musician)

    Grateful Dead: former Allman Brothers Band guitarist Warren Haynes to the lineup the following year. Personality conflicts surfaced during the 2004 tour season, however, and a four-year hiatus for the band followed. The Dead reunited in 2008 to headline a fund-raiser for the presidential campaign of Barack Obama, and the success of…

  • Haynes–Apperson Company (American company)

    Elwood Haynes: …Elmer Apperson, Haynes formed the Haynes–Apperson Company, Kokomo, and began producing automobiles in 1898. Haynes and the Appersons split up in 1902, and three years later the company name was changed to Haynes Automobile Company. It ceased operations in 1925.

  • Haynesville (Tennessee, United States)

    Johnson City, city, Washington county, northeastern Tennessee, U.S. It lies in a valley in the southern Appalachian Mountains, about 100 miles (160 km) northeast of Knoxville and just west of Elizabethton. The area was settled in the 1760s. Originally a part of North Carolina, it was included in

  • Haynesville Shale (shale basin, United States)

    shale gas: Shale gas resources of the United States: …mainly in Oklahoma; and the Haynesville Shale, straddling the Texas-Louisiana state line. The Barnett Shale was the proving ground of horizontal drilling and fracking starting in the 1990s; more than 10,000 wells have been drilled in that basin. Other shale basins are found in some Rocky Mountains and Great Plains…

  • Hayq (people)

    Armenian, member of a people with an ancient culture who originally lived in the region known as Armenia, which comprised what are now northeastern Turkey and the Republic of Armenia. Although some remain in Turkey, more than three million Armenians live in the republic; large numbers also live in

  • Hays (Kansas, United States)

    Hays, city, seat (1867) of Ellis county, central Kansas, U.S. It lies on Big Creek. The city was founded in 1867 after the establishment of Fort Hays (a frontier post built as Fort Fletcher in 1865). In 1876 Volga Germans settled the area on land ceded by the Kansas Pacific Railroad. The fort was

  • Hays Office (United States history)

    Hays Office, American organization that promulgated a moral code for films. In 1922, after a number of scandals involving Hollywood personalities, film industry leaders formed the organization to counteract the threat of government censorship and to create favourable publicity for the industry.

  • Hays Production Code

    Bride of Frankenstein: …came under fire from the Hays Office of film standards, which insisted on a less-revealing costume for the mate, a reduction in the number of murders depicted, and the removal of a scene in which the monster attempts to “rescue” a figure of Christ on a cross. Censors in other…

  • Hays, Arthur Garfield (American lawyer)

    Arthur Garfield Hays, American lawyer who defended, usually without charge, persons accused in many prominent civil-liberties cases in the 1920s. Educated at Columbia University (B.A., 1902; M.A. and LL.B., 1905), Hays was admitted to the New York bar. In 1914–15 he practiced international law in

  • Hays, Lee (American musician)

    Pete Seeger: …formed another group, the Weavers—with Lee Hays, Ronnie Gilbert, and Fred Hellerman—which achieved considerable success on college campuses, in concert, and on several records. Shortly after the group achieved national fame, however, a great deal of controversy was stirred up concerning Seeger’s previous activities in left-wing and labour politics, and…

  • Hays, Mary Ludwig (American patriot)

    Molly Pitcher, heroine of the Battle of Monmouth Court House during the American Revolution. According to legend, at the Battle of Monmouth (June 28, 1778), Mary Hays, wife of artilleryman William Hays, carried water to cool both the cannon and the soldiers in her husband’s battery—hence the

  • Hays, Paul R. (American jurist)

    Paul R. Hays, American judge best known for his participation in the tribunal that ruled on the Pentagon Papers case (1971). While studying at Columbia University (B.A., 1925; M.A., 1927; LL.B., 1933), Hays was an instructor (1926–32) there in Latin and Greek. After briefly working with the law

  • Hays, Will H. (American politician)

    Will H. Hays, prominent American political figure who was president of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA, later called the Motion Picture Association of America) from 1922 to 1945. Because of his pervasive influence on the censorship office of the association, it was

  • Hays, William Harrison (American politician)

    Will H. Hays, prominent American political figure who was president of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA, later called the Motion Picture Association of America) from 1922 to 1945. Because of his pervasive influence on the censorship office of the association, it was

  • Haysbert, Raymond Victor (American businessman)

    Raymond Victor Haysbert, American businessman (born Jan. 19, 1920, Cincinnati, Ohio—died May 24, 2010, Baltimore, Md.), blazed a trail as a member (1942–45) of the Tuskegee Airmen, the first African-American flying unit in the U.S. military, and as co-owner of Parks Sausage Co., the first

  • haystack hill (geological formation)

    Pepino hill, (from Spanish: pepino meaning “cucumber”) conical hill of residual limestone in a deeply eroded karst region. Pepino hills generally form on relatively flat-lying limestones that are jointed in large rectangles. In an alternating wet and dry climate, high areas become increasingly hard

  • Haystack Observatory (observatory, Westford, Massachusetts, United States)

    Venus: Observations from Earth: …desert of southern California, and Haystack Observatory in Massachusetts. The first successful radar observations of Venus took place at Goldstone and Haystack in 1961 and revealed the planet’s slow rotation. Subsequent observations determined the rotation properties more precisely and began to unveil some of the major features on the planet’s…

  • Haystacks (paintings by Monet)

    Claude Monet: Last years: …specific weather effects of the haystack and cathedral series.

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