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  • Hauz-Khan Reservoir (reservoir, Turkmenistan)

    Turkmenistan: Oases: …the canal, however, and the Hauz-Khan Reservoir built, large areas were irrigated, thus making possible the cultivation of long-staple cotton and the construction of cotton-processing plants. The economic and cultural centre is the town of Tejen.

  • HAV (infectious agent)

    hepatitis: Hepatitis A: Hepatitis A, caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV), is the most common worldwide. The onset of hepatitis A usually occurs 15 to 45 days after exposure to the virus, and some infected individuals, especially children, exhibit no clinical manifestations. In the majority of cases, no special treatment other than…

  • Hava nagila (song)

    Abraham Zevi Idelsohn: Although the song “Hava nagila” (“Come, Let’s Rejoice”) traditionally has been attributed to Idelsohn as a setting of his own text to a tune that he adapted from a Hasidic (a pietistic Jewish movement) melody, more-recent scholarship has suggested that the words to the song actually were composed…

  • Hávamál (Icelandic poem)

    Hávamál, (Old Norse: “Sayings of the High One [Odin]”) a heterogeneous collection of 164 stanzas of aphorisms, homely wisdom, counsels, and magic charms that are ascribed to the Norse god Odin. The work contains at least five separate fragments not originally discovered together and constitutes a

  • Havana (film by Pollack [1990])

    Sydney Pollack: Tootsie and Out of Africa: In 1990 Pollack made Havana, his final collaboration with Redford. The 1950s drama centres on a high-stakes gambler (Redford) who travels to Cuba and falls in love with the wife (Lena Olin) of a communist revolutionary (Raul Julia). However, the film was widely panned, especially for its wholesale borrowing…

  • Havana (national capital, Cuba)

    Havana, city, capital, major port, and leading commercial centre of Cuba. It also constitutes one of Cuba’s 15 provinces: Ciudad de la Habana (City of Havana). The city is located on La Habana (Havana) Bay on the island’s north coast. It is the largest city in the Caribbean region and has one of

  • Havana Charter (international relations)

    World Trade Organization: Origins: …the ITO, known as the Havana Charter, which would have created extensive rules governing trade, investment, services, and business and employment practices. However, the United States failed to ratify the agreement. Meanwhile, an agreement to phase out the use of import quotas and to reduce tariffs on merchandise trade, negotiated…

  • Havana Company (Cuban company)

    Cuba: Sugarcane and the growth of slavery: In 1740 the Havana Company was formed to stimulate agricultural development by increasing slave imports and regulating agricultural exports. The company was unsuccessful, selling fewer slaves in 21 years than the British sold during a 10-month occupation of Havana in 1762. The reforms of Charles III of Spain…

  • Havana Cubans (baseball team)

    Latin Americans in Major League Baseball Through the First Years of the 21st Century: The 1930s through World War II: …AAA International League as the Sugar Kings, a Cincinnati Reds farm team, and became a developer of Latin and not just Cuban talent. Future Cuban major leaguers such as Leonardo Cárdenas, Cookie Rojas, Raúl Sánchez, Miguel Cuéllar, and Orlando Peña played for the Sugar Kings, as did Puerto Rican standout…

  • Havana Moon (song by Berry)

    Chuck Berry: …in Caribbean music on “Havana Moon” (1957) and “Man and the Donkey” (1963), among others. Influenced by a wide variety of artists—including guitar players Carl Hogan, Charlie Christian, and T-Bone Walker and vocalists Nat King Cole, Louis Jordan, and Charles Brown—Berry played a major role in broadening the appeal…

  • Havana, Cathedral of (cathedral, Havana, Cuba)

    Havana: City layout: …to be restored was the Cathedral of Havana, the church of Havana’s patron saint, San Cristóbal (St. Christopher); it was constructed in the 18th century by the Jesuit order. Located near the waterfront, its ornate facade is regarded by art historians as one of the world’s finest examples of Italian…

  • Havana, University of (university, Havana, Cuba)

    Havana: Education: The University of Havana, located in the Vedado section of Havana, was established in 1728 and was once regarded as a leading institution of higher learning in the Western Hemisphere. Soon after Castro came to power in 1959, the university lost its traditional autonomy and was…

  • Havanas in Camelot (essays by Styron)

    William Styron: Havanas in Camelot (2008), a collection of personal essays on topics ranging from the author’s friendship with Pres. John F. Kennedy to his morning walks with his dog, was published posthumously. Compilations of his correspondence were issued as Letters to My Father (2009) and Selected…

  • Havant (England, United Kingdom)

    Havant, town and borough (district), administrative and historic county of Hampshire, southern England. It adjoins Portsmouth in the southeastern corner of the county. The small medieval town of Havant, apart from its 12th-century church, was destroyed by fire in 1760. A township called

  • Havant (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Havant: Havant, town and borough (district), administrative and historic county of Hampshire, southern England. It adjoins Portsmouth in the southeastern corner of the county.

  • Havard-Williams, Peter (Welsh librarian)

    Peter Havard-Williams, Welsh librarian and international library management consultant whose more than 40-year career included influential posts at university libraries in England, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Canada, and Botswana (b. July 11, 1922--d. Aug. 16,

  • Hávardar saga Ísfirðings (Icelandic saga)

    saga: Sagas of Icelanders: …feuds between several interrelated families; Hávarðar saga Ísfirðings is about an old farmer who takes revenge on his son’s killer, the local chieftain; Víga-Glúms saga tells of a ruthless chieftain who commits several killings and swears an ambiguous oath in order to cover his guilt; while Vatnsdæla saga is the…

  • Havas, Charles (French journalist)

    history of publishing: Foundations of modern journalism: The French businessman Charles Havas had begun this development in 1835 by turning a translation company into an agency offering the French press translated items from the chief European papers. His carrier-pigeon service between London, Paris, and Brussels followed, turning the company into an international concern that sold…

  • Havasupai (people)

    Native American dance: The Great Basin, the Plateau, and California: …Basin Indians, such as the Havasupai of the Grand Canyon and the related Yumans, developed agricultural dances. The Yuman Mojave (Mohave) stress cremation processions and ceremonies, but, like the Navajo, they also have curative and animal dances with long song cycles. In this area the vision quest ceremony is at…

  • Havdala (Jewish ceremony)

    Havdala, (Hebrew: “Separation”, ) a ceremony in Jewish homes and in synagogues concluding the Sabbath and religious festivals. The ceremony consists of benedictions that are recited over a cup of wine (and, on the night of the Sabbath, over spices and a braided candle) to praise God, who deigned to

  • Havdalah (Jewish ceremony)

    Havdala, (Hebrew: “Separation”, ) a ceremony in Jewish homes and in synagogues concluding the Sabbath and religious festivals. The ceremony consists of benedictions that are recited over a cup of wine (and, on the night of the Sabbath, over spices and a braided candle) to praise God, who deigned to

  • Have a Little Faith (album by Staples)

    Mavis Staples: …to the studio to record Have a Little Faith as a tribute to her father, whose influence—musical, parental, and spiritual—was everywhere evident on the album. Included on it was Staples’s rendition of “Will the Circle Be Unbroken,” a favourite of her father’s, as well as “Pops Recipe,” which incorporated in…

  • Have Gun-Will Travel (American television program)

    Richard Boone: …in the classic television western Have Gun—Will Travel. Garbed in black and armed with a Colt .45 revolver, Paladin sells his services to those who are unable to protect themselves. The show was a huge hit, and Boone also directed a number of episodes.

  • Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas (song)

    Meet Me in St. Louis: …the beautiful but sombre “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.”

  • Havel River (river, Germany)

    Havel River, tributary of the Elbe River in Germany. It rises on the Mecklenburg Plateau 7 miles (11 km) northwest of Neustrelitz and flows through the Mecklenburg lakes before heading south as far as Spandau (in Berlin), where it is joined by the Spree River. Curving southwest past Potsdam and

  • Havel, Václav (president of Czech Republic)

    Václav Havel, Czech playwright, poet, and political dissident, who, after the fall of communism, was president of Czechoslovakia (1989–92) and of the Czech Republic (1993–2003). Havel was the son of a wealthy restaurateur whose property was confiscated by the communist government of Czechoslovakia

  • Havelange, Jean-Marie Faustin Godefroid de (Brazilian businessman and sports official)

    João Havelange, Brazilian businessman and sports official who served as president (1974–98) of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the governing body of football (soccer), and transformed it into one of the largest and most-powerful sports organizations in the world but

  • Havelange, João (Brazilian businessman and sports official)

    João Havelange, Brazilian businessman and sports official who served as president (1974–98) of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the governing body of football (soccer), and transformed it into one of the largest and most-powerful sports organizations in the world but

  • Havell, E. B. (Indian artist)

    South Asian arts: Modern period: …Tagore and its theoretician was E.B. Havell, the principal of the Calcutta School of Art. Nostalgic in mood, the work was mainly sentimental though often of considerable charm. The Bengal school did a great deal to reshape contemporary taste and to make Indian artists aware of their own heritage. Amrita…

  • Havell, Robert, Jr. (American painter)

    Robert Havell, Jr., American landscape painter and printmaker who engraved many of the plates for John James Audubon’s four-volume The Birds of America (435 hand-coloured plates, 1827–38). Growing up in Great Britain, Havell developed his skills as an aquatint artist under the guidance of his

  • Havelli (people)

    Brandenburg: …Brennaburg) by the West Slavic Havelli tribe and was captured by the German king Henry I the Fowler in 928. A bishopric was first established there in 948. The city was retaken by the Slavs in 983, but it was inherited from the childless Havellian king Pribislav-Henry in 1134 by…

  • Havelock (Eswatini)

    Havelock, town on the northwest border of Swaziland. Located in the Highveld, it is the site of one of the world’s largest asbestos mines. Operations began in the 1930s, and asbestos was Swaziland’s economic mainstay until the 1950s, when agricultural products began to play an equally important

  • Havelock, Eric (scholar)

    writing: History of writing systems: As the British classicist Eric A. Havelock wrote,

  • Havelock, Sir Henry (British soldier)

    Sir Henry Havelock, British soldier in India who distinguished himself in 1857 during the Indian Mutiny. Raised in a religious environment, Havelock obtained a commission in the army at age 20, but he spent eight restless years in England while studying military strategy. To join two brothers in

  • Havelok the Dane, The Lay of (Middle English verse romance)

    The Lay of Havelok the Dane, Middle English metrical romance of some 3,000 lines, written c. 1300. Of the literature produced after the Norman Conquest, it offers the first view of ordinary life. Composed in a Lincolnshire dialect and containing many local traditions, it tells the story of the

  • Havens, Richard Pierce (American musician)

    Richie Havens, (Richard Pierce Havens), American folk singer and guitarist (born Jan. 21, 1941, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died April 22, 2013, Jersey City, N.J.), transfixed audiences at the legendary rock festival known as Woodstock as he kickstarted the event and set the tone for the three-day (Aug. 15–18,

  • Havens, Richie (American musician)

    Richie Havens, (Richard Pierce Havens), American folk singer and guitarist (born Jan. 21, 1941, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died April 22, 2013, Jersey City, N.J.), transfixed audiences at the legendary rock festival known as Woodstock as he kickstarted the event and set the tone for the three-day (Aug. 15–18,

  • Haverford College (college, Haverford, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Haverford College, private coeducational institution of higher learning in Haverford, Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia. Founded by the Society of Friends (Quakers) in 1833 as a men’s school, the Haverford School Association, it was the first institution of high education to be established by them.

  • Haverfordwest (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Haverfordwest, market town, historic and present county of Pembrokeshire (Sir Benfro), southwestern Wales. It is situated at the head of navigation on a deep inlet of the Irish Sea and is the administrative centre of Pembrokeshire county. The town grew up as a walled borough with a castle (c. 1120)

  • Haverhill (Massachusetts, United States)

    Haverhill, city, Essex county, northeastern Massachusetts, U.S., on the Merrimack River. Founded by the Reverend John Ward in 1640, it was named for Haverhill, England. Early agricultural efforts gave way to shipbuilding and leather industries during the early 19th century. By 1836 it had become a

  • haverhill fever (pathology)

    Streptobacillary fever, acute infection caused by the microorganism Streptobacillus moniliformis, transmitted to humans by rat bite or by the ingestion of contaminated foods and characterized by the sudden onset of chills, fever, and vomiting followed by the development of a skin rash and

  • Havering (borough, London, United Kingdom)

    Havering, outer borough of London, England, forming part of the northeastern perimeter of the metropolis. Havering belongs to the historic county of Essex. The present borough was created in 1965 from the former borough of Romford and the urban district of Hornchurch, and it includes such areas as

  • Haverkamp, Sigebertus (Dutch scholar)

    textual criticism: From Bentley to Lachmann: …century and were used by S. Haverkamp in his Lucretius (1725) in something like the modern style, they did not become normal until the second half of the 19th century.

  • haversian system (anatomy)

    Osteon, the chief structural unit of compact (cortical) bone, consisting of concentric bone layers called lamellae, which surround a long hollow passageway, the Haversian canal (named for Clopton Havers, a 17th-century English physician). The Haversian canal contains small blood vessels responsible

  • Haviland Crater (crater, Kansas, United States)

    Haviland Crater, small, shallow impact crater in farmland near Haviland, Kiowa county, Kansas, U.S. The depression, some 50 feet (15 metres) in diameter, is oval in shape. The first meteorite fragment, now known to be of the strong-iron, or pallasite, type, was found at the site in 1885, but the

  • Haviland ware (pottery)

    Limoges ware: under the name Haviland ware, which now is produced there as well.

  • Havilland, Dame Olivia Mary de (American actress)

    Olivia de Havilland, American motion-picture actress remembered for the lovely and gentle ingenues of her early career as well as for the later, more-substantial roles she fought to secure. The daughter of a British patent attorney, de Havilland and her younger sister, Joan Fontaine, moved to

  • Havilland, Olivia de (American actress)

    Olivia de Havilland, American motion-picture actress remembered for the lovely and gentle ingenues of her early career as well as for the later, more-substantial roles she fought to secure. The daughter of a British patent attorney, de Havilland and her younger sister, Joan Fontaine, moved to

  • Havilland, Sir Geoffrey de (British aircraft designer)

    Geoffrey de Havilland, English aircraft designer, manufacturer, and pioneer in long-distance jet flying. He was one of the first to make jet-propelled aircraft, producing the Vampire and Venom jet fighters. In 1910 he successfully built and flew an airplane with a 50-horsepower engine. De Havilland

  • Having a Wild Weekend (film by Boorman [1965])

    John Boorman: Boorman’s first feature film, Catch Us If You Can (1965; also known as Having a Wild Weekend), followed the British rock group the Dave Clark Five through Bristol, using the cityscape as backdrop. Although inspired by the Beatles’ A Hard Day’s Night (1964), it highlighted the director’s innovative style.…

  • Havířov (Czech Republic)

    Havířov, town, northeastern Czech Republic. It lies along the Lučina River (a tributary of the Ostravice), just southeast of Ostrava. It is a planned new town in the Czech part of the Upper Silesian coalfield and is associated with the Ostrava industrial region. Chartered in 1955, it quickly grew

  • Havisham, Estella (fictional character)

    Great Expectations: Summary: …House is her adopted daughter, Estella, whom she is teaching to torment men with her beauty. Pip, at first cautious, later falls in love with Estella, who does not return his affection. He grows increasing ashamed of his humble background and hopes to become a gentleman, in part to win…

  • Havisham, Miss (fictional character)

    Miss Havisham, fictional character, a half-crazed, embittered jilted bride in Charles Dickens’s novel Great Expectations

  • Havlíček Borovský, Karel (Czech writer)

    Karel Havlíček Borovský, Czech author and political journalist, a master prose stylist and epigrammatist who reacted against Romanticism and through his writings gave the Czech language a more modern character. A student at Prague, Havlíček first became a tutor in Russia, but in the 1840s he became

  • Havlicek, John (American basketball player)

    John Havlicek, American collegiate and professional basketball player who came to be regarded as the best “sixth man” (bench player) in the history of the National Basketball Association (NBA) while a member of the Boston Celtics. He was the first player to compile 16 consecutive 1,000-point

  • Havoc (aircraft)

    attack aircraft: Douglas A-20 Havoc, which were armed with 20-millimetre cannons and .30- or .50-inch machine guns. Two other American attack aircraft of the 1940s and ’50s were the Douglas B-26 Invader and the Douglas A-1 Skyraider. All of these types were piston-engined, propeller-driven aircraft.

  • Havoc (work by Kristensen)

    Tom Kristensen: Hærværk (1930; Havoc), his best-known novel, is a brilliant examination of disillusionment and identity. As it probes the consciousness and conscience of its characters, it also gives an account of the interwar years of Kristensen’s generation. A chapter from his autobiography, En bogorms barndom (“A Bookworm’s Boyhood”),…

  • HAVOC (United States space project)

    Venus: Spacecraft exploration: …studied a mission concept called High Altitude Venus Operational Concept (HAVOC), designed to lead to a program for the long-term exploration of Venus. The mission would use crewed airships to explore Venus’s atmosphere at an altitude of 50 km, where the pressure and temperature are like those of Earth.

  • Havoc (Soviet helicopter)

    military aircraft: Assault and attack helicopters: Later the Soviets produced the Mi-28 Havoc, a refinement of the Hind that, with no passenger bay, was purely a gunship.

  • Havoc, June (Canadian-born American actress)

    June Havoc, (Ellen Evangeline Hovick), Canadian-born American actress (born Nov. 8, 1912, Vancouver, B.C.—died March 28, 2010, Stamford, Conn.), enjoyed a successful stage and screen career, beginning with vaudeville performances at the age of two as Baby June (later Dainty June) with her sister,

  • Havre (Montana, United States)

    Havre, city, seat (1911) of Hill county, north-central Montana, U.S. It lies along the Milk River, to the east of the Fresno Dam and Reservoir and to the north of the Chippewa (Ojibwa)-Cree Rocky Boy’s Reservation. The city was named for Le Havre, France, the birthplace of the original

  • Havre, Le (France)

    Le Havre, seaport and city, Seine-Maritime département, Normandy région, northwestern France. It is on the English Channel coast and on the right bank of the Seine estuary, 134 miles (216 km) west-northwest of Paris and 53 miles (85 km) west of Rouen by road. Le Havre was only a fishing village

  • Havre-de-Grâce (harbour, Le Havre, France)

    Le Havre: …a harbour built there named Havre-de-Grâce (“Haven of Grace”). Enlarged and fortified under the Cardinal de Richelieu and Louis XIV in the 17th century, it was adapted to accommodate bigger vessels under Louis XVI in the late 18th century and was further improved under Napoleon III in the mid-19th century.…

  • Havre-Saint-Pierre (Quebec, Canada)

    Havre-Saint-Pierre, village, Côte-Nord (North Shore) region, eastern Quebec province, Canada. It lies along the north shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, north of Anticosti Island. Settled in 1857 as an Acadian fishing community, it was known as Saint-Pierre-de-la-Pointe-aux-Esquimaux until the

  • Havrevold, Finn (Norwegian author)

    children's literature: Norway: …collections have won state prizes; Finn Havrevold, whose toughminded boys’ teenage novel Han Var Min Ven became available in English translation as Undertow in 1968, and who also wrote successfully for girls; Leif Hamre, specializing in air force adventures; the prolific, widely translated Aimée Sommerfelt, whose works range from “puberty…

  • haw (anatomy)

    cat: Senses: …nictitating membrane, commonly called the haw. Its appearance is used frequently as an indicator of the cat’s general state of health.

  • Haw (Chinese bandits)

    Oun Kham: …invading bands of Chinese (Ho, or Haw) freebooters and bandits, against whom Oun Kham’s weak forces were powerless. When he was unable to resist effectively an attack on Luang Prabang in 1885, his overlord, the king of Siam (Thailand), dispatched an army to defend the area, as well as…

  • haw (plant)

    Hawthorn, (genus Crataegus), large genus of thorny shrubs or small trees in the rose family (Rosaceae), native to the north temperate zone. Many species are common to North America, and a number of cultivated varieties are grown as ornamentals for their attractive flowers and fruits. The hawthorn

  • Haw-Haw, Lord (English-language propagandist)

    William Joyce, English-language propaganda broadcaster from Nazi Germany during World War II whose nickname was derived from the sneering manner of his speech. Though his father was a naturalized U.S. citizen, Joyce lived most of his life in Ireland and England. He was active in Sir Oswald Mosley’s

  • Hawai‘i (island, Hawaii, United States)

    Hawaii, volcanic island, Hawaii, U.S. It lies southeast of Maui island and constitutes Hawaii county. Known as the Big Island, it is the southeasternmost and largest of the Hawaiian Islands. Its area of some 4,030 square miles (10,438 square km) continues to grow as Kilauea, the world’s most active

  • Hawai’i jewel orchid (plant)

    jewel orchid: The Hawai’i jewel orchid (Anoectochilus sandvicensis), A. setaceus, A. sikkimensis, Dossinia marmorata, Ludisia discolor, and Macodes petola are found in Southeast Asia and the Pacific and feature spikes of small white flowers. These species have wide

  • Hawai’i One Summer (work by Kingston)

    Maxine Hong Kingston: …collection of 12 prose sketches, Hawai’i One Summer (1987), was published in a limited edition with original woodblock prints and calligraphy. Beginning in 1993 Kingston ran a series of writing and meditation workshops for veterans of various conflicts and their families. From these workshops came the material for Veterans of…

  • Hawaii (film by Hill [1966])

    George Roy Hill: Film directing: …dramatic contrast to the epic Hawaii (1966), which was adapted from the sprawling novel by James Michener. More than three hours long when released, the film meanders but is held together by leads Julie Andrews and Richard Harris.

  • Hawaii (state, United States)

    Hawaii, constituent state of the United States of America. Hawaii (Hawaiian: Hawai‘i) became the 50th U.S. state on August 21, 1959. Hawaii is a group of volcanic islands in the central Pacific Ocean. The islands lie 2,397 miles (3,857 km) from San Francisco, California, to the east and 5,293 miles

  • Hawaii (island, Hawaii, United States)

    Hawaii, volcanic island, Hawaii, U.S. It lies southeast of Maui island and constitutes Hawaii county. Known as the Big Island, it is the southeasternmost and largest of the Hawaiian Islands. Its area of some 4,030 square miles (10,438 square km) continues to grow as Kilauea, the world’s most active

  • Hawaii (novel by Michener)

    James Michener: Novels such as Hawaii (1959) and The Source (1965) typically open with the earliest history of an area—the geology, flora, and fauna—and ultimately encompass the people who settle and rule there. He sometimes spent years preparing a book, as he did in Spain for Iberia: Spanish Travels and…

  • Hawaii (archipelago, Pacific Ocean)

    volcano: Intraplate volcanism: …the southeast end of the Hawaiian chain are all less than one million years old. Two of these, Kilauea and Mauna Loa, are two of the most active volcanoes in the world. Northwestward along the Hawaiian chain each island is progressively older. The extinct volcano or volcanoes that formed the…

  • Hawaii Five-O (American television program)

    the Ventures: …theme for the television series Hawaii Five-O, came in 1969. In the 1970s the band became immensely popular in Japan. Despite numerous personnel changes, including the addition of Leon Taylor on drums after the death of his father Mel in 1996, the Ventures continued to produce records and perform in…

  • Hawaii Islands (state, United States)

    Hawaii, constituent state of the United States of America. Hawaii (Hawaiian: Hawai‘i) became the 50th U.S. state on August 21, 1959. Hawaii is a group of volcanic islands in the central Pacific Ocean. The islands lie 2,397 miles (3,857 km) from San Francisco, California, to the east and 5,293 miles

  • Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (national park, Hawaii, United States)

    Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, active volcanic area along the southeastern shore of the island of Hawaii, Hawaii state, U.S., located southwest of Hilo. Established in 1961 and formerly a part of Hawaii National Park (established 1916), it occupies an area of 505 square miles (1,308 square km) and

  • Hawaii, College of (university system, Hawaii, United States)

    University of Hawaii, state university system of Hawaii, U.S., consisting of three universities and seven community colleges. Its main campus is the University of Hawaii at Manoa in Honolulu, on the island of Oahu. Originally known as the College of Hawaii, it opened in 1907 in temporary

  • Hawaii, flag of (United States state flag)

    U.S. state flag consisting of alternating horizontal stripes of white, red, and blue with the Union Jack in the canton.In 1793 Captain George Vancouver from Great Britain presented the Union Jack to the conquering king Kamehameha I, who was then uniting the islands into a single state; the Union

  • Hawaii, University of (university system, Hawaii, United States)

    University of Hawaii, state university system of Hawaii, U.S., consisting of three universities and seven community colleges. Its main campus is the University of Hawaii at Manoa in Honolulu, on the island of Oahu. Originally known as the College of Hawaii, it opened in 1907 in temporary

  • Hawaiian (people)

    Hawaiian, any of the aboriginal people of Hawaii, descendants of Polynesians who migrated to Hawaii in two waves: the first from the Marquesas Islands, probably about ad 400; the second from Tahiti in the 9th or 10th century. Numbering about 300,000 at the time of Captain James Cook’s arrival at

  • Hawaiian aholehole (fish)

    aholehole: The Hawaiian aholehole (Kuhlia sandvicensis) is restricted to coastal waters throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Its maximum length is about 30 cm (12 inches). Some species in the family reach lengths of 45 cm (18 inches).

  • Hawaiian Creole English (dialect)

    Hawaii: Population composition: …has come to be called Hawaiian Creole English. Commonly referred to as pidgin, Hawaiian Creole English is a dialect of English created by children in the multilingual environment of Hawaiian plantation camps. Hawaiian Creole English has been used increasingly in Hawaiian fiction, poetry, and drama.

  • Hawaiian crow (bird)

    crow: moneduloides) and the ‘alalā, or Hawaiian crow (C. hawaiiensis)—use stick-type foraging tools to obtain food from small holes and crevices. Such sophisticated tool use is only practiced by a handful of animal species.

  • Hawaiian eruption (volcanism)

    volcano: Six types of eruptions: The Hawaiian type is similar to the Icelandic variety. In this case, however, fluid lava flows from a volcano’s summit and radial fissures to form shield volcanoes, which are quite large and have gentle slopes.

  • Hawaiian goose (bird)

    Nene, (Branta sandvicensis), endangered species of goose of the family Anatidae (order Anseriformes) and the official state bird of Hawaii. The nene is a relative of the Canada goose that evolved in the Hawaiian Islands into a nonmigratory, nonaquatic species with shortened wings and half-webbed

  • Hawaiian guitar (musical instrument)

    Oceanic music and dance: Hawaii: The Hawaiian, or steel, guitar is a metal-stringed adaptation of the European instrument that is played by stopping the strings with a metal bar.

  • Hawaiian high (meteorology)

    China: The air masses: In China the tropical Pacific air mass is the chief source of summer rainfall. When it predominates, it may cover the eastern half of China and penetrate deep into the border areas of the Mongolian Plateau and onto the eastern edge of the Plateau of Tibet. In summer the…

  • Hawaiian honeycreeper (bird)

    Hawaiian honeycreeper, any member of a group of related birds, many of them nectar-eating, that evolved in the forests of the Hawaiian Islands and are found only there. Recent evidence from osteology, behaviour, plumage, breeding biology, and genetics has led to a consensus that the Hawaiian

  • Hawaiian Ironman (triathlon)

    triathlon: …San Diego race, established the Hawaiian Ironman. That triathlon begins with a 3.8-km (2.4-mile) swim, followed by a 180-km (112-mile) bicycle ride and a 42-km (26.2-mile) run (the equivalent of a marathon). Only 15 athletes participated in the inaugural Hawaiian Ironman triathlon, but the race quickly gained international attention and…

  • Hawaiian Islands (state, United States)

    Hawaii, constituent state of the United States of America. Hawaii (Hawaiian: Hawai‘i) became the 50th U.S. state on August 21, 1959. Hawaii is a group of volcanic islands in the central Pacific Ocean. The islands lie 2,397 miles (3,857 km) from San Francisco, California, to the east and 5,293 miles

  • Hawaiian language

    biblical literature: Non-European versions: >Hawaiian and Low Malay in 1835. By 1854 the whole Bible had appeared in all but the last of these languages as well as in Rarotonga (1851).

  • Hawaiian monk seal (mammal)

    monk seal: monachus) and the Hawaiian, or Laysan, monk seal (M. schauinslandi). The seals are threatened by human disturbance of their coastal habitats, disease, and continued hunting. By the 1990s there were only about 1,400 Hawaiian monk seals and 300 to 600 Mediterranean monk seals still alive.

  • Hawaiian region (faunal region)

    biogeographic region: Hawaiian region: The Hawaiian region (Figure 2) consists of Hawaii and boasts a few endemic invertebrate families and one avian family, Drepanididae (Hawaiian honeycreepers).

  • Hawaiian Ridge (ridge, Pacific Ocean)

    Pacific Ocean: Principal ridges and basins: The Hawaiian Ridge extends westward from Hawaii to the 180° meridian.

  • Hawaiian sling (weapon)

    spearfishing: The simplest weapon is the Hawaiian sling, a wooden tube with an elastic loop at one end. The shaft, which is tipped by one of a variety of spearheads, is drawn through the tube and pulled back, stretching the loop. When released, the shaft is propelled forward. In the mid-1930s,…

  • Hawaiian-Emperor chain (aseismic ridge, Pacific Ocean)

    aseismic ridge: The Hawaiian-Emperor chain is the best displayed aseismic ridge. Earthquakes do occur there, but only at the end of the ridge where volcanism is current—in this case, on the island of Hawaii (commonly known as the Big Island) to the southeast end of the island chain.…

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