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  • Harpo Productions, Inc. (American company)

    Oprah Winfrey: …her own television production company, Harpo Productions, Inc., in 1986, and a film production company, Harpo Films, in 1990. The companies began buying film rights to literary works, including Connie May Fowler’s Before Women Had Wings, which appeared in 1997 with Winfrey as both star and producer, and Toni Morrison’s…

  • Harpoon (missile)

    rocket and missile system: Antiship: antiship missile was the turbojet-powered Harpoon, which weighed about 1,200 pounds in its air-launched version and had a 420-pound warhead. Employing both active and passive radar homing, this missile could be programmed for sea-skimming attack or a “pop-up and dive” maneuver to evade a ship’s close-in defense systems. The turbojet-powered…

  • harpoon (spear)

    Harpoon, barbed spear used to kill whales, tuna, swordfish, and other large sea creatures, formerly thrown by hand but now, in the case of whales, shot from especially constructed guns. The hand-thrown harpoon has two sets of sharp barbs and is made in two parts, the lily iron, about 5 inches (13

  • HARPS (astronomy)

    Michel Mayor: …the principal investigator of the High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) project, which used a spectrometer at La Silla to observe radial velocity changes of 30 cm per second. HARPS began observations in 2003 and has found more than 100 extrasolar planet candidates, including several “super-Earths,” rocky planets that…

  • harpsichord (musical instrument)

    Harpsichord, keyboard musical instrument in which strings are set in vibration by plucking. It was one of the most important keyboard instruments in European music from the 16th through the first half of the 18th century. A brief treatment of harpsichords follows. For full treatment, see keyboard

  • harpsichord family (musical instrument)

    keyboard instrument: Keyboard size and range: …as on Flemish and Italian harpsichords of the 16th–18th centuries, whereas that of English keyboards was generally 6 38 inches (16.2 centimetres). On most French and German instruments of the 18th century, the octave span was even narrower (6 14 inches [15.9 centimetres]), permitting the playing of tenths—such as C…

  • Harpur, Charles (Australian poet)

    Charles Harpur, early Australian poet, best known for poems on Australian themes that use traditional English poetic forms. Harpur went to Sydney to work as a postal clerk. In 1842 he went to live with his brother on a farm and published his first volume of verse, Thoughts; A Series of Sonnets

  • Harpy (mythology)

    Harpy, in Greco-Roman classical mythology, a fabulous creature, probably a wind spirit. The presence of harpies as tomb figures, however, makes it possible that they were also conceived of as ghosts. In Homer’s Odyssey they were winds that carried people away. Elsewhere, they were sometimes

  • harpy eagle (bird)

    eagle: The harpy eagles, named after the foul, malign creatures (part woman and part bird) of Greek mythology, are large, powerful, crested eagles of the tropical forests of South America and the South Pacific. They nest in the tops of the tallest trees and hunt macaws, monkeys,…

  • Harpyopsis novaeguineae (bird)

    eagle: The New Guinea harpy eagle (Harpyopsis novaeguineae) is about 75 cm (30 inches) long. It is gray-brown and has a long tail and a short but full crest. Very similar in appearance and habits is the Philippine eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi). It is about 90 cm (35…

  • harquebus (weapon)

    Harquebus, first gun fired from the shoulder, a smoothbore matchlock with a stock resembling that of a rifle. The harquebus was invented in Spain in the mid-15th century. It was often fired from a support, against which the recoil was transferred from a hook on the gun. Its name seems to derive

  • harquebusier (military)

    tactics: Adaptation of pike and cavalry tactics: …pikemen surrounded by “sleeves” of harquebusiers on each corner. Much like the light armed troops of antiquity and the crossbowmen who accompanied the Swiss Haufen, harquebusiers would open the action and then retreat behind the pikemen as the latter came to close quarters with the enemy. Hence, 16th- and early…

  • Harrah Independent School District v. Martin (law case)

    Harrah Independent School District v. Martin, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on February 26, 1979, ruled (9–0) that an Oklahoma school board did not deny a teacher her Fourteenth Amendment due process or equal protection rights when it fired her for refusing to take continuing-education

  • Harran (ancient city, Turkey)

    Harran, ancient city of strategic importance, now a village, in southeastern Turkey. It lies along the Balīkh River, 24 miles (38 km) southeast of Urfa. The town was located on the road that ran from Nineveh to Carchemish and was regarded as of considerable importance by the Assyrian kings. Its

  • Harran, Battle of (First Crusade [1104])

    Battle of Harran, (7 May 1104). The religious fervor of the First Crusade was over by 1104 as the new crusader lords attempted to secure their hold on the captured lands and to fend off further Muslim assaults. The defeat at Harran (in southeastern Turkey) was the first suffered by the crusader

  • Harranian (Turkish sect)

    astrology: Nature and significance: Some astrologers, such as the Harranians (from the ancient Mesopotamian city of Harran) and the Hindus, regard the planets themselves as potent deities whose decrees can be changed through supplication and liturgy or through theurgy, the science of persuading the gods or other supernatural powers. In still other interpretations—e.g., that…

  • Harratin (social class)

    Haratin, inhabitants of oases in the Sahara, especially in southern Morocco and Mauritania, who constitute a socially and ethnically distinct class of workers. In the 17th century they were forcibly recruited into the ʿAbīd al-Bukhārī, the elite army of the Moroccan ruler Ismāʿīl. In modern times

  • Harrell, Tom (American musician)

    Tom Harrell, American jazz trumpet player and composer who was recognized for his lyrical, vibratoless improvisations and for his facility in both traditional and experimental styles of jazz. Harrell spent most of his youth in the San Francisco Bay area, where he began playing in jazz groups when

  • Harrer, Heinrich (explorer and writer)

    Heinrich Harrer, Austrian explorer and writer (born July 6, 1912, Hüttenberg, Austria-Hungary—died Jan. 7, 2006, Friesach, Austria), chronicled his mountain-climbing exploits and adventures in books, notably the best-selling Die weisse Spinne (1958; The White Spider: The History of the Eiger’s N

  • Harrier (airplane)

    Harrier, single-engine, “jump-jet” fighter-bomber designed to fly from combat areas and aircraft carriers and to support ground forces. It was made by Hawker Siddeley Aviation and first flew on Aug. 31, 1966, after a long period of development. (Hawker Siddeley became part of British Aerospace in

  • harrier (bird)

    Harrier, any of about 11 species of hawks of the subfamily Circinae (family Accipitridae). They are plain-looking, long-legged, and long-tailed birds of slender build that cruise low over meadows and marshes looking for mice, snakes, frogs, small birds, and insects. Harriers are about 50 cm (20

  • harrier eagle (bird)

    eagle: The harrier eagles, six species of Circaetus (subfamily Circaetinae, serpent eagles), of Europe, Asia, and Africa, are about 60 cm (24 inches) long and have short unfeathered legs. They nest in the tops of trees and hunt snakes.

  • Harries reaction (chemical reaction)

    Ozonolysis, a reaction used in organic chemistry to determine the position of a carbon-carbon double bond in unsaturated compounds. It involves the reaction of the compound with ozone leading to the formation of an ozonide, and the ozonide yields on hydrogenation or treatment with acid a mixture

  • Harries, Carl Dietrich (German chemist)

    Carl Dietrich Harries, German chemist and industrialist who developed the ozonolysis process (Harries reaction) for determining the structure of natural rubber (polyisoprene) and who contributed to the early development of synthetic rubber. Harries studied chemistry at the University of Jena

  • Harriet Craig (film by Sherman [1950])

    Vincent Sherman: Women’s pictures: …become a gangster’s moll, and Harriet Craig, a solid remake of Dorothy Arzner’s Craig’s Wife (1936), about a domineering woman who tries to control those around her, including her husband (Wendell Corey). Sherman and Crawford collaborated once more on Goodbye, My Fancy (1951), an adaptation of a Broadway romantic comedy…

  • Harriet Hume (novel by West)

    Rebecca West: …novels include The Judge (1922), Harriet Hume (1929), The Thinking Reed (1936), The Fountain Overflows (1957), and The Birds Fall Down (1966). In 1937 West visited Yugoslavia and later wrote Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, 2 vol. (1942), an examination of Balkan politics, culture, and history. In 1946 she reported…

  • Harriet Said (novel by Bainbridge)

    Dame Beryl Bainbridge: Harriet Said (1972) deals with two teenage girls who seduce a man and murder his wife. Other novels in this vein are The Bottle Factory Outing (1974), Sweet William (1975), A Quiet Life (1976), and Injury Time (1977). In Young Adolf (1978), Bainbridge imagines a…

  • Harriet the Spy (work by Fitzhugh)

    children's literature: Contemporary times: Nevertheless such original works as Harriet the Spy (1964) and The Long Secret (1965), by Louise Fitzhugh, showed how a writer adequately equipped with humour and understanding could incorporate into books for 11-year-olds subjects—even menstruation—ordinarily reserved for adult fiction. Similarly trailblazing were the semidocumentary novels of Joseph Krumgold: . .…

  • Harrigan, Edward (American actor, producer, and playwright)

    Edward Harrigan, American actor, producer, and playwright, half of the comedy team of Harrigan and Hart. Harrigan—whose year of birth has been identified variously as 1843, 1844, and 1845—began his theatrical career in San Francisco, where in 1861 he was singing with Lotta Crabtree. After

  • Harrigan, Ned (American actor, producer, and playwright)

    Edward Harrigan, American actor, producer, and playwright, half of the comedy team of Harrigan and Hart. Harrigan—whose year of birth has been identified variously as 1843, 1844, and 1845—began his theatrical career in San Francisco, where in 1861 he was singing with Lotta Crabtree. After

  • Harriman (Nevada, United States)

    Sparks, city, Washoe county, in northwestern Nevada, U.S., on the Truckee River. Adjacent to Reno and part of the Reno-Sparks distribution centre, it is mainly residential. Originally named Harriman for the railroad company’s president, Sparks was founded in 1904 as a switching yard and repair

  • Harriman State Park (state park, New York, United States)
  • Harriman, Edward Henry (American financier)

    Edward Henry Harriman, American financier and railroad magnate, one of the leading builders and organizers in the era of great railroad expansion and development of the West during the late 19th century. Harriman became a broker’s clerk in New York at an early age and in 1870 was able to buy a seat

  • Harriman, Florence Jaffray (American diplomat)

    Florence Jaffray Harriman, U.S. diplomat, noted for her service as U.S. minister to Norway during World War II. Florence Hurst married J. Borden Harriman, a New York banker, in 1889, and for many years she led the life of a young society matron interested in charitable and civic activities. With

  • Harriman, Job (American lawyer)

    Los Angeles: Inventing a city: …Angeles seemed poised to elect Job Harriman, the Socialist Labor candidate for mayor, two indicted unionists, John and James McNamara, confessed to the dynamite attacks. It dealt a mortal blow to Harriman’s campaign and put unions on the defensive for a generation.

  • Harriman, Pamela Beryl Digby Churchill Hayward (American socialite)

    Pamela Beryl Digby Churchill Hayward Harriman, British-born socialite and American political figure (born March 20, 1920, Farnborough, Hampshire, Eng.—died Feb. 5, 1997, Paris, France), made a name for herself first as the wife or lover of a succession of prominent wealthy and powerful men and l

  • Harriman, W. Averell (American diplomat)

    W. Averell Harriman, statesman who was a leading U.S. diplomat in relations with the Soviet Union during World War II and the Cold War period following World War II. The son of the railroad magnate Edward Henry Harriman, he began his employment with the Union Pacific Railroad Company in 1915; he

  • Harriman, William Averell (American diplomat)

    W. Averell Harriman, statesman who was a leading U.S. diplomat in relations with the Soviet Union during World War II and the Cold War period following World War II. The son of the railroad magnate Edward Henry Harriman, he began his employment with the Union Pacific Railroad Company in 1915; he

  • Harrington (Maine, United States)

    Augusta, capital (1831) of Maine, U.S., seat (1799) of Kennebec county, at the head of navigation on the Kennebec River, 57 miles (92 km) northeast of Portland. The city’s establishment and early prosperity, which began with the arrival of traders from the Plymouth colony of Massachusetts in 1628,

  • Harrington farthing (English coin)

    coin: Gold coinage: …English copper coins, the “Harrington” farthings, which were struck under contract. From 1649, copper tokens, mainly of farthing value, were produced in large numbers by many municipalities and private traders. The coinage of the Commonwealth (1649–60) is remarkable for the simplicity of its types, and this is the only…

  • Harrington, Baron (British diplomat)

    William Stanhope, 1st earl of Harrington, British diplomat and statesman in the Walpole-Pelham era. Educated at Eton College, Harrington was elected a member of Parliament for Derby in 1715, became envoy to Turin (1718–20), and was then ambassador to Spain (1720–27). As a reward for his

  • Harrington, Carey Bell (American musician)

    Carey Bell, (Carey Bell Harrington), American blues harmonica player (born Nov. 14, 1936, Macon, Miss.—died May 6, 2007, Chicago, Ill.), became a fixture on the Chicago blues scene soon after his arrival in the city in 1956. After perfecting his playing under the tutelage of such masters as “Little

  • Harrington, James (British philosopher)

    James Harrington, English political philosopher whose major work, The Common-wealth of Oceana (1656), was a restatement of Aristotle’s theory of constitutional stability and revolution. Although Harrington was sympathetic to republicanism, he was a devoted friend of King Charles I and was briefly

  • Harrington, Michael (American politician)

    Barney Frank: Michael Harrington, a Democrat representing the Massachusetts Sixth District.

  • Harrington, Michael (American activist and author)

    Michael Harrington, American socialist activist and author, best known for his book The Other America (1962), about poverty. He was also chairman of the Socialist Party of America from 1968 to 1972. Harrington was known as the “man who discovered poverty,” and much of his work was an ethical

  • Harrington, Oliver Wendell (American artist)

    Oliver Wendell Harrington, African-American cartoonist and illustrator who used humour and satire to criticize racism and other social problems in the U.S.; he immigrated to France in the late 1940s and settled in East Berlin in 1961 (b. Feb. 14, 1912--d. Nov. 2,

  • Harrington, Padraig (Irish golfer)

    Padraig Harrington, Irish professional golfer who won two British Open championships (2007 and 2008) and a Professional Golfers’ Association of America (PGA) Championship (2008). He wrote the Encyclopædia Britannica entry on the PGA Championship. Harrington began golfing with his family at age

  • Harrington, Robert S. (American astronomer)

    Charon: Christy and Robert S. Harrington at the U.S. Naval Observatory station in Flagstaff, Arizona. Its diameter—1,208 km (751 miles)—is a little more than half that of Pluto, and its mass is more than one-tenth of Pluto’s mass. Charon is so large and massive with respect to Pluto…

  • Harrington, William Stanhope, 1st Earl of (British diplomat)

    William Stanhope, 1st earl of Harrington, British diplomat and statesman in the Walpole-Pelham era. Educated at Eton College, Harrington was elected a member of Parliament for Derby in 1715, became envoy to Turin (1718–20), and was then ambassador to Spain (1720–27). As a reward for his

  • Harrington, William Stanhope, 1st Earl of, Viscount Petersham of Petersham (British diplomat)

    William Stanhope, 1st earl of Harrington, British diplomat and statesman in the Walpole-Pelham era. Educated at Eton College, Harrington was elected a member of Parliament for Derby in 1715, became envoy to Turin (1718–20), and was then ambassador to Spain (1720–27). As a reward for his

  • Harriot, Thomas (English mathematician and astronomer)

    Thomas Harriot, mathematician, astronomer, and investigator of the natural world. Little is known of him before he received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Oxford in 1580. Throughout his working life, he was supported by the patronage, at different times, of Sir Walter Raleigh and

  • Harris (island, Outer Hebrides, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Lewis and Harris: Harris, largest and most northerly of Scotland’s Outer Hebrides islands, lying 24 miles (39 km) from the west coast of the Scottish mainland and separated from it by the Minch channel. Although the island forms one continuous unit, it is usually referred to as two…

  • Harris Corners (Florida, United States)

    Winter Haven, city, Polk county, central Florida, U.S., situated amid a large cluster of small lakes, about 15 miles (25 km) east of Lakeland. The area was settled in the 1860s. The city was laid out in 1884 and originally called Harris Corners (for the family who owned a local store) but was later

  • Harris County Stadium (stadium, Houston, Texas, United States)

    Astrodome, the world’s first domed air-conditioned indoor stadium, built in Houston, Texas, in 1965 and arguably the city’s most important architectural structure. Conceived by Roy Mark Hofheinz (a former county judge and mayor of Houston, 1953–55) and designed by architects Hermon Lloyd and W.B.

  • Harris Interactive, Inc. (American company)

    Louis Harris: …Louis Harris and Associates (now Harris Interactive, Inc.), in New York City, where he remained until his retirement in 1992. By 1962 Harris was the chief polling analyst for CBS News, though he later (1969) switched to ABC News. He was concurrently a columnist for the Washington Post and Newsweek…

  • Harris movement (religious movement)

    Harris movement, largest mass movement toward Christianity in West Africa, named for the prophet William Wadé Harris (c. 1850–1929), a Grebo of Liberia and a teacher-catechist in the American Episcopal mission. While in prison for a political offense in 1910, Harris was commissioned in a vision to

  • Harris Treaty (Japanese-United States history)

    Harris Treaty, (July 29, 1858), agreement that secured commercial and diplomatic privileges for the United States in Japan and constituted the basis for Western economic penetration of Japan. Negotiated by Townsend Harris, first U.S. consul to Japan, it provided for the opening of five ports to

  • Harris v. Forklift Systems (law case)

    Harris v. Forklift Systems, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on November 9, 1993, ruled (9–0) that plaintiffs in Title VII workplace-harassment suits need not prove psychological injury. However, the court acknowledged that an offensive joke or comment is unlikely to be grounds for

  • Harris v. Quinn (law case)

    Harris v. Quinn, legal case in which the U.S. Supreme Court, on June 30, 2014, held (5–4) that workers who are paid by the state of Illinois to provide in-home personal assistance to adults unable to care for themselves (because of age, disability, or injury) cannot be required to pay service fees

  • Harris’ Ferry (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Harrisburg, capital (1812) of Pennsylvania, U.S., and seat (1785) of Dauphin county, on the east bank of the Susquehanna River, 105 miles (169 km) west of Philadelphia. It is the hub of an urbanized area that includes Steelton, Paxtang, Penbrook, Colonial Park, Linglestown, Hershey, Middletown (in

  • Harris’ hawk (bird)

    hawk: …other buteos are the following: Harris’s, or the bay-winged, hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus), a large black bird with inconspicuous brown shoulders and flashing white rump, is found in South America and northward into the southwestern United States. The broad-winged hawk (B. platypterus), a crow-sized hawk, gray-brown with a black-and-white-banded tail, is…

  • Harris’s hawk (bird)

    hawk: …other buteos are the following: Harris’s, or the bay-winged, hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus), a large black bird with inconspicuous brown shoulders and flashing white rump, is found in South America and northward into the southwestern United States. The broad-winged hawk (B. platypterus), a crow-sized hawk, gray-brown with a black-and-white-banded tail, is…

  • Harris’s Requiem (novel by Middleton)

    Stanley Middleton: His prolific output includes Harris’s Requiem (1960), about a composer who takes great joy in his creativity; A Serious Woman (1961) and Two’s Company (1963), both of which explore compelling sexual attraction as the sole basis for a relationship; and Holiday (1974; cowinner of a Booker Prize), which concerns…

  • Harris, Alexander (British author)

    Alexander Harris, English author whose Settlers and Convicts; or, Recollections of Sixteen Years’ Labour in the Australian Backwoods (1847) is an outstanding fictional account of life in Australia. Harris was well educated by his clergyman father in London, and at age 21 he shipped out for

  • Harris, Barbara (American bishop)

    Barbara Harris, American clergywoman and social activist who was the first female bishop in the Anglican Communion. During her childhood Harris regularly attended services at a local Episcopal church with her parents, and she played piano for the church school. She graduated from the Philadelphia

  • Harris, Barbara Clementine (American bishop)

    Barbara Harris, American clergywoman and social activist who was the first female bishop in the Anglican Communion. During her childhood Harris regularly attended services at a local Episcopal church with her parents, and she played piano for the church school. She graduated from the Philadelphia

  • Harris, Barry (American musician)

    Barry Harris , American jazz pianist, composer, and educator who, as a musician, became known for his virtuosity, marked by complex chord structures and speed of play. An exponent of the bebop style that became popular after World War II, he played with Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, Yusuf Lateef,

  • Harris, Benjamin (British journalist)

    Benjamin Harris, English bookseller and writer who was the first journalist in the British-American colonies. An ardent Anabaptist and Whig, Harris published argumentative pamphlets in London, especially ones attacking Roman Catholics and Quakers, and in 1679 he joined Titus Oates in exposing the

  • Harris, Christopher (British author)

    Christopher Fry, British writer of verse plays. Fry adopted his mother’s surname after he became a schoolteacher at age 18, his father having died many years earlier. He was an actor, director, and writer of revues and plays before he gained fame as a playwright for The Lady’s Not for Burning

  • Harris, Damon (American singer)

    Damon Harris, (Otis Robert Harris, Jr.), American singer (born July 17, 1950, Baltimore, Md.—died Feb. 18, 2013, Baltimore), seemlessly replaced falsetto singer Eddie Kendricks as the lead vocalist (1971–75) of the Temptations vocal group and was especially remembered for his rendition of “Papa Was

  • Harris, David (American political activist)

    Joan Baez: The following year she married David Harris, a leader in the national movement to oppose the draft who served nearly two years in prison for refusing to comply with his draft summons (they divorced in 1973). Baez was in Hanoi in December 1972, delivering Christmas presents and mail to American…

  • Harris, Derek (American actor and director)

    John Derek, American actor and director who, despite a number of notable film roles, became better known for his succession of beautiful wives--especially his fourth, Bo Derek--and the role he took in shaping their careers (b. Aug. 12, 1926, Hollywood, Calif.--d. May 22, 1998, Santa Maria,

  • Harris, E. Lynn (American author)

    E. Lynn Harris, American author, who in a series of novels drew on his personal familiarity with the gay community to chronicle the struggles faced by African American men with sexual identity concerns. He used his own unhappy childhood and his experiences as a gay man who was closeted for a time

  • Harris, Ed (American actor)

    Ed Harris, American actor acclaimed for the intensity of his performances, most notably his portrayal of American painter Jackson Pollock in Pollock (2000), a film he also directed. Harris attended Columbia University, where he played football for two years until he became interested in acting. He

  • Harris, Eddie (American musician)

    Eddie Harris, U.S. jazz musician who played tenor saxophone with a high, pure sound, as exemplified in his 1961 hit recording of the theme from the film Exodus. He also experimented with electronic saxophone attachments, altered saxophones (using brass mouthpieces), and fusion music. Harris

  • Harris, Edward Allen (American actor)

    Ed Harris, American actor acclaimed for the intensity of his performances, most notably his portrayal of American painter Jackson Pollock in Pollock (2000), a film he also directed. Harris attended Columbia University, where he played football for two years until he became interested in acting. He

  • Harris, Eleanora (American jazz singer)

    Billie Holiday, American jazz singer, one of the greatest from the 1930s to the ’50s. Eleanora (her preferred spelling) Harris was the daughter of Clarence Holiday, a professional musician who for a time played guitar with the Fletcher Henderson band. She and her mother used her maternal

  • Harris, Elinore (American jazz singer)

    Billie Holiday, American jazz singer, one of the greatest from the 1930s to the ’50s. Eleanora (her preferred spelling) Harris was the daughter of Clarence Holiday, a professional musician who for a time played guitar with the Fletcher Henderson band. She and her mother used her maternal

  • Harris, Emmylou (American singer and songwriter)

    Emmylou Harris, American singer and songwriter who ranged effortlessly among folk, pop, rock, and country-and-western styles, added old-time sensibilities to popular music and sophistication to country music, and established herself as “the queen of country rock.” After being discovered while

  • Harris, Estella (American musician)

    Jimmy Yancey: …he married Estella Harris (Mama Yancey), who sang with him at house parties throughout the 1920s, ’30s, and ’40s. They had three recording sessions together and performed on network radio in 1939 and at Carnegie Hall in New York City in 1948. From 1925 until shortly before his death,…

  • Harris, Everette Lynn (American author)

    E. Lynn Harris, American author, who in a series of novels drew on his personal familiarity with the gay community to chronicle the struggles faced by African American men with sexual identity concerns. He used his own unhappy childhood and his experiences as a gay man who was closeted for a time

  • Harris, Franco (American football player)

    Franco Harris, American gridiron football running back who was a member of four Super Bowl-winning teams (1975, 1976, 1979, 1980) as a Pittsburgh Steeler and who is best known for having taken part in arguably the most famous play in National Football League (NFL) history, “the Immaculate

  • Harris, Frank (American journalist)

    Frank Harris, Irish-born American journalist and man of letters best known for his unreliable autobiography, My Life and Loves, 3 vol. (1923–27), the sexual frankness of which was new for its day and created trouble with censors in Great Britain and the United States. He was also an editor of

  • Harris, Fred (American politician, educator, and writer)

    Fred Harris, American politician, educator, and writer who served as a U.S. senator from 1964 to early 1973. From a young age Harris helped out on the farm with wheat and cotton harvests. By his own account, those experiences taught him the value of hard work and helped him understand the plight of

  • Harris, Fred Roy (American politician, educator, and writer)

    Fred Harris, American politician, educator, and writer who served as a U.S. senator from 1964 to early 1973. From a young age Harris helped out on the farm with wheat and cotton harvests. By his own account, those experiences taught him the value of hard work and helped him understand the plight of

  • Harris, George Washington (American humorist)

    George Washington Harris, American humorist who combined the skill of an oral storyteller with a dramatic imagination. Harris was a steamboat captain from an early age. From 1843 until his death, he wrote humorous tales for the New York Spirit of the Times and other publications that were reprinted

  • Harris, Howel (British religious leader)

    Presbyterian Church of Wales: The early leaders were Howel Harris, a layman who became an itinerant preacher after a religious experience of conversion in 1735, and Daniel Rowlands, an Anglican curate in Cardiganshire who experienced a similar conversion. After the two men met in 1737, they began cooperating in their work and were…

  • Harris, James (British philosopher)

    aesthetics: Major concerns of 18th-century aesthetics: …arts was put forward by James Harris in Three Treatises (1744) and subsequently made famous by Charles Batteux in a book entitled Les Beaux Arts réduits à un même principe (1746; “The Fine Arts Reduced to a Single Principle”). This diffuse and ill-argued work contains the first modern attempt to…

  • Harris, James Thomas (American journalist)

    Frank Harris, Irish-born American journalist and man of letters best known for his unreliable autobiography, My Life and Loves, 3 vol. (1923–27), the sexual frankness of which was new for its day and created trouble with censors in Great Britain and the United States. He was also an editor of

  • Harris, James, III (American musician)

    Jam and Lewis: Jam and Lewis’s emergence as major record producers was kick-started by Prince’s pique. Keyboard player Jimmy Jam (James Harris III) and bassist Terry Lewis played together in local Minneapolis bands while in high school, graduating to Flyte Tyme, which evolved into Prince’s backing band, the…

  • Harris, Jean (American tabloid personality)

    Jean Harris, (Jean Witte Struven), American tabloid personality (born April 27, 1923, Chicago, Ill.—died Dec. 23, 2012, New Haven, Conn.), shocked the country when in 1980 she shot and killed her longtime lover, physician Herman Tarnower (then 70), the best-selling author of The Complete Scarsdale

  • Harris, Jessie Redmon (American author)

    Jessie Redmon Fauset, African American novelist, critic, poet, and editor known for her discovery and encouragement of several writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Fauset graduated from Cornell University (B.A., 1905), and she later earned a master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania (1919).

  • Harris, Jet (British musician)

    the Shadows: …1941, Bognor Regis, Sussex), bassist Jet Harris (byname of Terence Harris; b. July 6, 1939, London—d. March 18, 2011, Winchester, Hampshire), and drummer Tony Meehan (byname of Daniel Meehan; b. March 2, 1943, London—d. November 28, 2005, London). Later members included drummer Brian Bennett (b. February 9, 1940, London) and…

  • Harris, Joel Chandler (American author)

    Joel Chandler Harris, American author, creator of the folk character Uncle Remus. As apprentice on a weekly paper, The Countryman, he became familiar with the lore and dialects of the plantation slave. He established a reputation as a brilliant humorist and writer of dialect while employed on

  • Harris, John (English scientist and theologian)

    encyclopaedia: Authorship: John Harris, an English theologian and scientist, may have been one of the first to enlist the aid of experts, such as the naturalist John Ray and Sir Isaac Newton, in compiling his Lexicon Technicum (1704; “Technical Lexicon”). Johann Heinrich Zedler, in his Universal-Lexicon (1732–50),…

  • Harris, John (South African freedom fighter)

    South Africa: Resistance to apartheid: …of acts of sabotage, including John Harris (who was white), were hanged. Hundreds of others fled the country, and Tambo presided over the ANC’s executive headquarters in Zambia.

  • Harris, John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon (British writer)

    John Wyndham, English science-fiction writer who examined the human struggle for survival when catastrophic natural phenomena suddenly invade a comfortable English setting. Educated in Derbyshire, Wyndham tried his hand at various jobs, from farming to advertising. During the mid-1920s he wrote

  • Harris, Julie (American actress)

    Julie Harris, American actress who was perhaps best known for her stage work, receiving six Tony Awards, including one for lifetime achievement. Harris made her Broadway debut in 1945 and five years later won acclaim as Frankie in The Member of the Wedding. In 1952 she made her film debut in the

  • Harris, Julie Ann (American actress)

    Julie Harris, American actress who was perhaps best known for her stage work, receiving six Tony Awards, including one for lifetime achievement. Harris made her Broadway debut in 1945 and five years later won acclaim as Frankie in The Member of the Wedding. In 1952 she made her film debut in the

  • Harris, Kamala (United States senator)

    Kamala Harris, American politician who was elected to the U.S. Senate as a Democrat in 2016 and began her first term representing California in that body the following year. She was the first Indian American to serve as a U.S. senator as well as the second African American woman. Harris previously

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