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  • Hardin, Lil (American musician)

    Louis Armstrong: King Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band: and Baby Dodds and pianist Lil Hardin, who married Armstrong in 1924. The young Armstrong became popular through his ingenious ensemble lead and second cornet lines, his cornet duet passages (called “breaks”) with Oliver, and his solos. He recorded his first solos as a member of the Oliver band in…

  • Harding Commission (British-South African history)

    South Africa: The British in Natal: The Harding Commission (1852) set aside reserves for Africans, and missionaries and pliant chiefs were brought in to persuade Africans to work. After 1849 Africans became subject to a hut tax intended to raise revenue and drive them into labour. Roads were built, using forced labour,…

  • Harding fiddle (musical instrument)

    Hardanger fiddle, regional fiddle of western Norway, invented in the late 17th century. It has four bowed strings positioned above four or five metal sympathetic strings. Although slightly smaller than the concert violin, the instrument is held and played in the same manner. It is used to perform

  • Harding Icefield (icefield, Alaska, United States)

    Alaskan mountains: Physiography of the southern ranges: …resulting in the Sargent and Harding ice fields in the Kenai Mountains (on the Kenai Peninsula) and the Bagley Ice Field in the eastern Chugach Mountains. Numerous long and spectacular glaciers descend from the crests of those mountains. The St. Elias Mountains and the Kenai-Chugach mountain system have the most-extensive…

  • Harding, Allan Francis (British military officer)

    John Harding, Baron Harding of Petherton, British army officer, noted as the leader of the North African “Desert Rats” in World War II. After graduating from Ilminster Grammar School (1912), Harding joined the Territorial Army as a part-time reservist. Called to the regular army at the beginning of

  • Harding, Chester (American painter)

    Chester Harding, American painter of Romantic portraits of prominent American and English figures from the early 19th century. Early in his life, Harding worked as a chair maker, peddler, innkeeper, and house painter. He eventually began to paint signs in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and became a

  • Harding, Daniel (British conductor)

    Orchestre de Paris: Daniel Harding became music director in 2016.

  • Harding, Florence (American first lady)

    Florence Harding, American first lady (1921–23), the wife of Warren G. Harding, 29th president of the United States. Energetic, strong-willed, and popular, she was an important influence on her husband’s business and political careers. Daughter of Amos and Louisa Bouton Kling, Florence Kling grew

  • Harding, John, Baron Harding of Petherton (British military officer)

    John Harding, Baron Harding of Petherton, British army officer, noted as the leader of the North African “Desert Rats” in World War II. After graduating from Ilminster Grammar School (1912), Harding joined the Territorial Army as a part-time reservist. Called to the regular army at the beginning of

  • Harding, Karl Ludwig (German astronomer)

    Karl Ludwig Harding, astronomer, discovered (1804) and named Juno, third minor planet to be detected. He studied at the University of Göttingen under Georg Lichtenberg and later served as assistant to J.H. Schröter at Schröter’s Lilienthal Observatory. In 1805 Harding returned as a professor to

  • Harding, Rebecca Blaine (American author)

    Rebecca Blaine Harding Davis, American essayist and writer, remembered primarily for her story “Life in the Iron Mills,” which is considered a transitional work of American realism. Rebecca Harding graduated from the Washington Female Seminary in 1848. An avid reader, she had begun dabbling in the

  • Harding, Sandra (American philosopher)

    philosophical feminism: Feminist epistemology and philosophy of science: …this point, the feminist philosophers Sandra Harding, Lorraine Code, and Helen Longino noted that “communities of knowers”—those recognized as experts in some field of inquiry—were remarkably homogeneous, not only with respect to sex but also with respect to race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Most such knowers, in other words, were…

  • Harding, St. Stephen (Roman Catholic abbot)

    St. Stephen Harding, ; canonized 1623; feast day July 16), third abbot of Cîteaux (Latin: Cistercium) and a founder of the Cistercian Order. Educated at Sherborne Abbey, he fled to Scotland sometime after the Norman Conquest. He studied in Paris, may have been a soldier, and made a pilgrimage to

  • Harding, Thomas (English theologian and controversialist)

    John Jewel: ” After Thomas Harding, who had been deprived of the title of prebendary (honorary canon) of Salisbury, published his Answer to Jewel in 1564, Jewel wrote his Reply in 1565, which evoked a Confutation from Harding the next year. Jewel responded with his Defense of the Apology…

  • Harding, Tonya (American figure skater)

    Olympic Games: Lillehammer, Norway, 1994: …on Americans Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding. About a month before the Games were to begin, Harding was implicated in an attempt to injure Kerrigan. Harding filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Olympic Committee, seeking an injunction against being barred from the Olympics. However, the legal dispute temporarily abated, and…

  • Harding, Vincent Gordon (American civil rights activist and historian)

    Vincent Gordon Harding, American civil rights activist and historian (born July 25, 1931, New York, N.Y.—died May 19, 2014, Philadelphia, Pa.), was the author of one of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s most-powerful speeches (variously known as “Beyond Vietnam” and “A Time to Break Silence”), given on

  • Harding, Warren (American rock climber)

    Warren Harding, American rock climber (born June 18, 1924, Oakland, Calif.—died Feb. 27, 2002, Happy Valley, Calif.), was the first climber to scale El Capitan, the 1,098-m (3,604-ft) granite monolith in Yosemite National Park. Daring and charismatic, Harding brought unprecedented attention to r

  • Harding, Warren G. (president of United States)

    Warren G. Harding, 29th president of the United States (1921–23). Pledging a nostalgic “return to normalcy” following World War I, Harding won the presidency by the greatest popular vote margin to that time. He died during his third year in office and was succeeded by Vice Pres. Calvin Coolidge.

  • Harding, Warren Gamaliel (president of United States)

    Warren G. Harding, 29th president of the United States (1921–23). Pledging a nostalgic “return to normalcy” following World War I, Harding won the presidency by the greatest popular vote margin to that time. He died during his third year in office and was succeeded by Vice Pres. Calvin Coolidge.

  • Hardinge of Lahore and Kings Newton, Henry Hardinge, 1st Viscount (governor general of India)

    Henry Hardinge, 1st Viscount Hardinge, British soldier and statesman who was governor-general of India in 1844–48. Hardinge entered the army in 1799 and, during the Napoleonic Wars, served with distinction as a staff officer in the Peninsular War (1808–14). In the Hundred Days (1815), he was a

  • Hardinge of Penshurst, Charles Hardinge, 1st Baron (viceroy of India)

    Charles Hardinge, 1st Baron Hardinge, British diplomat and viceroy of India who improved British relations in India and was instrumental in securing India’s support for Great Britain in World War I. A grandson of Lord Hardinge, governor-general of India in 1844–48, Charles Hardinge entered the

  • Hardinge, Charles Hardinge, 1st Baron (viceroy of India)

    Charles Hardinge, 1st Baron Hardinge, British diplomat and viceroy of India who improved British relations in India and was instrumental in securing India’s support for Great Britain in World War I. A grandson of Lord Hardinge, governor-general of India in 1844–48, Charles Hardinge entered the

  • Hardinge, Henry Hardinge, 1st Viscount (governor general of India)

    Henry Hardinge, 1st Viscount Hardinge, British soldier and statesman who was governor-general of India in 1844–48. Hardinge entered the army in 1799 and, during the Napoleonic Wars, served with distinction as a staff officer in the Peninsular War (1808–14). In the Hundred Days (1815), he was a

  • Hardinge, Sir Arthur (commissioner of East Africa)

    Kenya: The British East Africa Company: …Protectorate was then proclaimed, with Sir Arthur Hardinge as the first commissioner. Initially the British government did not attach much importance to the new protectorate because Hardinge continued to reside in Zanzibar, where he already functioned as the consul general.

  • hardingfela (musical instrument)

    Hardanger fiddle, regional fiddle of western Norway, invented in the late 17th century. It has four bowed strings positioned above four or five metal sympathetic strings. Although slightly smaller than the concert violin, the instrument is held and played in the same manner. It is used to perform

  • hardingfele (musical instrument)

    Hardanger fiddle, regional fiddle of western Norway, invented in the late 17th century. It has four bowed strings positioned above four or five metal sympathetic strings. Although slightly smaller than the concert violin, the instrument is held and played in the same manner. It is used to perform

  • Hardiwar (city, Uttar Pradesh, India)

    tirtha: …a yantra, or sacred diagram; Hardiwar (in Uttar Pradesh), the spot where the Ganges River came to earth; and Ujjain (in Madhya Pradesh), site of a famous Shaivite lingam (sign of Shiva).

  • hardness (water quality)

    water supply system: Hardness: Another parameter of water quality is hardness. This is a term used to describe the effect of dissolved minerals (mostly calcium and magnesium). Minerals cause deposits of scale in hot water pipes, and they also interfere with the lathering action of soap. Hard water…

  • hardness (physics)

    Hardness, resistance of a mineral to scratching, described relative to a standard such as the Mohs hardness scale. Hardness is an important diagnostic property in mineral identification. There is a general link between hardness and chemical composition (via crystal structure); thus, most hydrous

  • hardness tester (device)

    Hardness tester, device that indicates the hardness of a material, usually by measuring the effect on its surface of a localized penetration by a standardized rounded or pointed indenter of diamond, carbide, or hard steel. Brinell hardness is determined by forcing a hardened steel or carbide ball

  • Hardoi (India)

    Hardoi, city, central Uttar Pradesh state, northern India. It lies on the Ganges-Yamuna Doab, about 25 miles (40 km) east of the Ganges (Ganga) River and 60 miles (95 km) northwest of Lucknow. Hardoi is on a main rail line through central Uttar Pradesh at a major road junction. The city is a market

  • Hardouin, Jean (French scholar)

    Jean Hardouin, French Jesuit scholar who edited numerous secular and ecclesiastical works, most notably the texts of the councils of the Christian church. Hardouin entered the Society of Jesus in 1666 and was professor of positive theology in the Jesuit Collège Louis-le-Grand at Paris (1683–1718)

  • Hardouin-Mansart, Jules (French architect)

    Jules Hardouin-Mansart, French architect and city planner to King Louis XIV who completed the design of Versailles. Mansart in 1668 adopted the surname of his granduncle by marriage, the distinguished architect François Mansart. By 1674, when he was commissioned to rebuild the château of Clagny for

  • hardpan (geology)

    Calcrete, calcium-rich duricrust, a hardened layer in or on a soil. It is formed on calcareous materials as a result of climatic fluctuations in arid and semiarid regions. Calcite is dissolved in groundwater and, under drying conditions, is precipitated as the water evaporates at the surface.

  • hardpan (pedology)

    agricultural technology: Tilling: …may create a hardpan, or plow sole; that is, a compacted layer just below the zone disturbed by tillage. Such layers are more prevalent with increasing levels of mechanization; they reduce crop yields and must be shattered, allowing water to be stored in and below the shattered zone for later…

  • Hardrada, Harald (king of Norway)
  • Hardscrabble (Illinois, United States)

    Streator, city, La Salle county, north-central Illinois, U.S. It lies on the Vermilion (locally Vermillion) River, about 90 miles (145 km) southwest of Chicago. The first permanent settlement in the area, established in the mid-19th century, was called Hardscrabble, for the difficult climb up from

  • hardstone

    jewelry: The properties of gems: Among the semiprecious stones used in jewelry are amethyst, garnet, aquamarine, amber, jade, turquoise, opal, lapis lazuli, and malachite. Matrix jewelry is cut from a stone such as opal or turquoise and the surrounding natural material,

  • Hardt Mountains (mountains, Germany)

    Haardt Mountains, mountain range in Rheinland-Pfalz Land (state), southwestern Germany. They comprise the eastern part of the Pfälzer Forest Mountains and lie west of the Rhine River basin, extending from the French border to a point about 20 miles (30 km) south of Mainz. Their densely forested

  • Hardt, Michael (American literary theorist and political philosopher)

    antiglobalization: The antiglobalization movement: Michael Hardt and Toni Negri used the term multitude to describe the antiglobalization movement as a whole of singularities that act in common, a decentred authority, a polyphonic dialogue, a constituent cooperative power of a global democracy from below, an open-source society, and a direct…

  • hardun (lizard)

    agama: The hardun (A. stellio), which is common in northern Egypt, has a tail ringed with spiked scales, giving it a ferocious appearance.

  • Hardwar (India)

    Haridwar, city, northwestern Uttarakhand state, northern India. Haridwar lies along the Ganges (Ganga) River, at the boundary between the Indo-Gangetic Plain (south) and the Himalayan foothills (north). It is the site of the headworks of the Ganges Canal system. Haridwar is one of the seven sacred

  • hardware (building)

    lock: …be opened except by a key or by a series of manipulations that can be carried out only by a person knowing the secret or code.

  • hardware (computing)

    Hardware, Computer machinery and equipment, including memory, cabling, power supply, peripheral devices, and circuit boards. Computer operation requires both hardware and software. Hardware design specifies a computer’s capability; software instructs the computer on what to do. The advent of

  • Hardwick, Billy (American bowler)

    Billy Hardwick, (William Bruce Hardwick), American bowler (born July 25, 1941, Florence, Ala.—died Nov. 16, 2013, near Bradenton, Fla.), captured 18 Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) titles during his tenure (1962–76) on the pro tour and became the first of only six bowlers to win the

  • Hardwick, Elizabeth (American writer)

    Elizabeth Hardwick, American novelist, short-story writer, and essayist known for her eloquent literary and social criticism. Hardwick was one of 11 children. She attended the University of Kentucky (B.A., 1938; M.A., 1939). Finding that Lexington and its environs did not engage her, she left for

  • Hardwick, Elizabeth Bruce (American writer)

    Elizabeth Hardwick, American novelist, short-story writer, and essayist known for her eloquent literary and social criticism. Hardwick was one of 11 children. She attended the University of Kentucky (B.A., 1938; M.A., 1939). Finding that Lexington and its environs did not engage her, she left for

  • Hardwick, Michael (American bartender)

    Bowers v. Hardwick: Background: …admitted to the home of Michael Hardwick in Atlanta witnessed him and a male companion in a bedroom engaging in sex. The officer had been executing a warrant for Hardwick’s arrest for failing to appear in court on a charge of public drinking (it was later determined that the warrant…

  • Hardwick, Thomas W. (American politician)

    Rebecca Ann Felton: In 1922 Governor Thomas W. Hardwick of Georgia, in a symbolic gesture, appointed Felton to fill the U.S. Senate seat left vacant by the death of Senator Thomas E. Watson, whose antagonism to former President Woodrow Wilson and all of his policies she heartily shared. She served only…

  • Hardwick, William Bruce (American bowler)

    Billy Hardwick, (William Bruce Hardwick), American bowler (born July 25, 1941, Florence, Ala.—died Nov. 16, 2013, near Bradenton, Fla.), captured 18 Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) titles during his tenure (1962–76) on the pro tour and became the first of only six bowlers to win the

  • Hardwicke of Hardwicke, Baron (English lawyer)

    Philip Yorke, 1st earl of Hardwicke, English lord chancellor, whose grasp of legal principle and study of the historical foundations of equity, combined with his knowledge of Roman civil law, enabled him to establish the principles and limits of the English system of equity. Called to the bar at

  • Hardwicke, Cedric Webster (English actor)

    The Hunchback of Notre Dame: Cast: Assorted References

  • Hardwicke, Edward Cedric (British actor)

    Edward Cedric Hardwicke, British actor (born Aug. 7, 1932, London, Eng.—died May 16, 2011, Chichester, West Sussex, Eng.), brought amiable dignity to his portrayal of the stalwart Dr. John Watson opposite Jeremy Brett’s quintessential Sherlock Holmes on British television in the 1980s and ’90s. He

  • Hardwicke, Philip Yorke, 1st Earl of (English lawyer)

    Philip Yorke, 1st earl of Hardwicke, English lord chancellor, whose grasp of legal principle and study of the historical foundations of equity, combined with his knowledge of Roman civil law, enabled him to establish the principles and limits of the English system of equity. Called to the bar at

  • Hardwicke, Philip Yorke, 1st Earl of, Viscount Royston (English lawyer)

    Philip Yorke, 1st earl of Hardwicke, English lord chancellor, whose grasp of legal principle and study of the historical foundations of equity, combined with his knowledge of Roman civil law, enabled him to establish the principles and limits of the English system of equity. Called to the bar at

  • Hardwired…to Self-Destruct (album by Metallica)

    Metallica: Hardwired…to Self-Destruct (2016), another two-disc release, was a return to form that won over many critics. In 2009 the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

  • hardwood (timber)

    construction: Interior finishes: Hardwoods—primarily oak, birch, and maple—are also used for floors, both in the traditional narrow planks nailed to plywood decks and as prefabricated parquet elements, which are applied with adhesives. In wet or hard-use areas vinyl-composition tiles or ceramic tiles are used.

  • hardwood fibre (fibre)

    papermaking: Wood: 16 inch) in length, and hardwood fibres range from about 0.5 to 1.5 millimetres (0.02 to 0.06 inch). The greater length of softwood fibres contributes strength to paper; the shorter hardwood fibres fill in the sheet and give it opacity and a smooth surface.

  • Hardy Boys (fictional characters)

    Hardy Boys, fictional brothers Frank and Joe Hardy, the teenage protagonists of a series of American juvenile mystery novels first published in 1927. Frank and Joe are trained in the art of criminal detection by their father, Fenton, a former police detective. The boys solve crimes together, often

  • Hardy Cross method (engineering)

    Hardy Cross: …distribution method, or simply the Hardy Cross method, calculation can be carried to any required degree of accuracy by successive approximations, thus avoiding the immense labour of solving simultaneous equations that contain as many variables as there are rigid joints in a frame. He also successfully applied his mathematical methods…

  • hardy rubber tree (plant species)

    Eucommiaceae: …plants comprising the single species Eucommia ulmoides in the order Garryales. It is an elmlike tree native to temperate regions of central and eastern China that is notable for its milky latex from which rubber can be produced.

  • Hardy, Albert (British photojournalist)

    Albert Hardy, ("BERT"), British photojournalist who covered the world as chief photographer for Picture Post magazine, 1941-57 (b. May 19, 1913--d. July 3,

  • Hardy, Alexandre (French dramatist)

    Alexandre Hardy, playwright, the first Frenchman known to have made his living as a dramatist, who claimed authorship of some 600 plays. Hardy was a hired poet for troupes of actors both in the provinces and in Paris. His works were widely admired in court circles, where he wrote for royal

  • Hardy, Bert (British photojournalist)

    Albert Hardy, ("BERT"), British photojournalist who covered the world as chief photographer for Picture Post magazine, 1941-57 (b. May 19, 1913--d. July 3,

  • Hardy, Edward Thomas (British actor)

    Tom Hardy, British actor who was known for his striking good looks, idiosyncratic personality, and cerebral performances in both cult films and mainstream blockbusters. Hardy’s childhood and early adulthood gave little indication that he would one day become a movie star. He was expelled from

  • Hardy, Fannie Pearson (American author)

    Fannie Pearson Hardy Eckstorm, American writer and ornithologist whose extensive personal knowledge of her native Maine informed her authoritative publications on the history, wildlife, cultures, and lore of the region. Fannie Hardy was the daughter of a well-known fur trader, outdoorsman,

  • Hardy, G. H. (English mathematician)

    G.H. Hardy, leading English pure mathematician whose work was mainly in analysis and number theory. Hardy graduated from Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1899, became a fellow at Trinity in 1900, and lectured there in mathematics from 1906 to 1919. In 1912 Hardy published, with John E. Littlewood,

  • Hardy, Gathorne (British politician)

    Gathorne Gathorne-Hardy, 1st earl of Cranbrook, English Conservative politician who was a strong proponent of British intervention in the Russo-Turkish conflict of 1877–78. Called to the bar in 1840, Hardy entered Parliament in 1856, earning a reputation as a skilled debater and a staunch

  • Hardy, Godfrey Harold (English mathematician)

    G.H. Hardy, leading English pure mathematician whose work was mainly in analysis and number theory. Hardy graduated from Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1899, became a fellow at Trinity in 1900, and lectured there in mathematics from 1906 to 1919. In 1912 Hardy published, with John E. Littlewood,

  • Hardy, James D. (American surgeon)

    James D. Hardy, American surgeon who pioneered transplant operations with three landmark cases: the first human lung transplant, in 1963; the first animal-to-human heart transplant, in 1964, which caused a heated debate on its ethical and moral consequences; and a double-lung transplant leaving the

  • Hardy, James Daniel (American surgeon)

    James D. Hardy, American surgeon who pioneered transplant operations with three landmark cases: the first human lung transplant, in 1963; the first animal-to-human heart transplant, in 1964, which caused a heated debate on its ethical and moral consequences; and a double-lung transplant leaving the

  • Hardy, Norvell (American actor)

    Laurel and Hardy: …innocent foil to the pompous Hardy.

  • Hardy, Oliver (American actor)

    Laurel and Hardy: …innocent foil to the pompous Hardy.

  • Hardy, Sir Thomas Masterman, Baronet (British naval officer)

    Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy, Baronet, British naval officer closely associated with Adm. Horatio (afterward Viscount) Nelson, two of whose flagships he commanded during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars. A sailor from 1781, he met Nelson in the mid-1790s, while the future hero of

  • Hardy, Thomas (British writer)

    Thomas Hardy, English novelist and poet who set much of his work in Wessex, his name for the counties of southwestern England. Hardy was the eldest of the four children of Thomas Hardy, a stonemason and jobbing builder, and his wife, Jemima (née Hand). He grew up in an isolated cottage on the edge

  • Hardy, Thomas (British shoemaker)

    United Kingdom: Britain during the French Revolution: …artisans led by a shoemaker, Thomas Hardy, formed a society to press for manhood suffrage. It cost only a shilling to join, and the weekly subscription was set at a penny so as to attract as many members as possible. These plebeian reformers, making use of Britain’s growing communications network,…

  • Hardy, Tom (British actor)

    Tom Hardy, British actor who was known for his striking good looks, idiosyncratic personality, and cerebral performances in both cult films and mainstream blockbusters. Hardy’s childhood and early adulthood gave little indication that he would one day become a movie star. He was expelled from

  • Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (genetics)

    Hardy-Weinberg law, an algebraic equation that describes the genetic equilibrium within a population. It was discovered independently in 1908 by Wilhelm Weinberg, a German physician, and Godfrey Harold Hardy, a British mathematician. The science of population genetics is based on this principle,

  • Hardy-Weinberg law (genetics)

    Hardy-Weinberg law, an algebraic equation that describes the genetic equilibrium within a population. It was discovered independently in 1908 by Wilhelm Weinberg, a German physician, and Godfrey Harold Hardy, a British mathematician. The science of population genetics is based on this principle,

  • Hardyal, Lala (Indian revolutionary)

    Lala Har Dayal, Indian revolutionary and scholar who was dedicated to the removal of British influence in India. Har Dayal graduated from the Government College, Lahore (University of the Punjab). On a Government of India scholarship to St. John’s College at Oxford, he became a supporter of the

  • Hardyknute (ballad by Wardlaw)

    ballad: Literary ballads: Lady Wardlaw’s “Hardyknute” (1719), perhaps the earliest literary attempt at a folk ballad, was dishonestly passed off as a genuine product of tradition. After the publication of Thomas Percy’s ballad compilation Reliques of Ancient English Poetry in 1765, ballad imitation enjoyed a considerable vogue, which properly belongs…

  • Hare (people)

    Hare, group of Athabaskan-speaking North American Indians originally living northwest of what is now Great Bear Lake in far northwestern Canada. Their name for themselves, Kawchottine, means “People of Great Hares”; it was used because Arctic hares were an important source of food in traditional

  • hare (mammal)

    Hare, (genus Lepus), any of about 30 species of mammals related to rabbits and belonging to the same family (Leporidae). In general, hares have longer ears and longer hind feet than rabbits. While the tail is relatively short, it is longer than that of rabbits. The vernacular names hare and rabbit

  • Hare (constellation)

    Lepus, (Latin: “Hare”) constellation in the southern sky at about 6 hours right ascension and 20° south in declination. Its brightest star is Arneb (from the Arabic for “the hare”), with a magnitude of 2.6. To the ancient Greeks this constellation represented the quarry of the hunter (and

  • hare and hounds (sport)

    cross-country: …early 19th century was called paper chasing, or hare and hounds—the “hares” started a few minutes before the others and left a trail of paper scraps to be followed by the “hounds.” Cross-country runners came to be known as harriers, after a small hound used to chase genuine hares. A…

  • Hare Krishna (religious sect)

    Hare Krishna, popular name of a semimonastic Vaishnava Hindu organization founded in the United States in 1965 by A.C. Bhaktivedanta (Swami Prabhupada; 1896–1977). This movement is a Western outgrowth of the popular Bengali bhakti (devotional) yoga tradition, or Krishna Consciousness, which began

  • Hare system (politics)

    Single transferable vote (STV), multimember district proportional representation method of election in which a voter ranks candidates in order of preference. As candidates pass a specified electoral quota, they are elected and their surplus votes apportioned to the remaining candidates, until all

  • hare wallaby (marsupial)

    wallaby: …species of hare wallabies (Lagorchestes) are small animals that have the movements and some of the habits of hares. Often called pademelons, the three species of scrub wallabies (Thylogale) of New Guinea, the Bismarck Archipelago, and Tasmania are small and stocky, with short hind limbs and pointy noses. They…

  • hare’s-foot fern (fern genus)

    plant: Annotated classification: representative genera include Pteridium, Polypodium, Polystichum, Adiantum, and Cyathea. Class Equisetopsida (horsetails, scouring rushes) Vascular plants; sporophyte differentiated into stem, leaf, and root; stems ribbed and jointed,

  • hare’s-tail grass (plant)

    Hare’s-tail grass, (Lagurus ovatus), annual grass of the family Poaceae, native to shores of the Mediterranean region. Hare’s-tail grass is cultivated as an ornamental and is commonly used in dried bouquets. The plant has naturalized in parts of Australia and the United Kingdom and is considered an

  • Hare, R. M. (British philosopher)

    R.M. Hare, British moral philosopher (born March 21, 1919, Backwell, Somerset, Eng.—died Jan. 29, 2002, Ewelme, Oxfordshire, Eng.), attempted to provide a rational understanding of moral beliefs. His moral theory, called prescriptivism, drew on Immanuel Kant’s moral philosophy and the linguistic a

  • Hare, Richard Mervyn (British philosopher)

    R.M. Hare, British moral philosopher (born March 21, 1919, Backwell, Somerset, Eng.—died Jan. 29, 2002, Ewelme, Oxfordshire, Eng.), attempted to provide a rational understanding of moral beliefs. His moral theory, called prescriptivism, drew on Immanuel Kant’s moral philosophy and the linguistic a

  • Hare, Sir David (British playwright and director)

    Sir David Hare, British playwright and director, noted for his deftly crafted satires examining British society in the post-World War II era. Hare graduated from Jesus College, Cambridge, in 1968 and founded an experimental touring theatre group that same year. He directed some of its productions

  • Hare, Sir John (British actor)

    Sir John Hare, English actor-manager of London’s Garrick Theatre from 1889 to 1895, excelling in old men’s parts and recognized as the greatest character actor of his day. He spent his childhood in London, where his father, Thomas Fairs, was an architect. Hare eventually developed an interest in

  • Hare, Thomas (British political reformer)

    proportional representation: Development and debates: …Andrae and in Britain by Thomas Hare and John Stuart Mill. Methods currently in use include the single-transferable-vote method (STV), the party-list system, and the additional-member system.

  • Hare, William (Irish criminal)

    William Burke and William Hare: Hare immigrated to Scotland from Ireland and wandered through several occupations before becoming keeper of a lodging house in Edinburgh, where Burke, also Irish-born, arrived in 1827. On November 29 an old pensioner died in the house, and Hare, angry that the deceased still owed…

  • Hare–Hawes–Cutting Act (United States history)

    Hare–Hawes–Cutting Act, (1933), the first law setting a specific date for Philippine independence from the United States. It was passed by Congress as a result of pressure from two sources: American farmers, who, during the Great Depression, feared competition from Filipino sugar and coconut oils;

  • hare-lipped bat (mammal, family Noctilionidae)

    Bulldog bat, (family Noctilionidae), either of two tropical Central and South American bats that are among the few bats that routinely forage low over water. They have full lips and a flat, squarish muzzle very similar to that of a bulldog. Bulldog bats have long, narrow wings and long, pointed

  • harebell (plant)

    Harebell, (Campanula rotundifolia), widespread, slender-stemmed perennial of the family Campanulaceae. The harebell bears nodding blue bell-like flowers. It is native to woods, meadows, and cliffsides of northern Eurasia and North America and of mountains farther south. There are more than 30 named

  • Haredim (religious movement)

    fundamentalism: The Haredim: The ultra-Orthodox are often referred to in Hebrew as Haredim, or “those who tremble” in the presence of God (because they are God-fearing). Unlike the Orthodox, the ultra-Orthodox continue to reject Zionism—at least in principle—as blasphemous. In practice, the rejection of Zionism has led…

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