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  • Hanthawaddy kingdom (kingdom, Myanmar)

    Mon kingdom, kingdom of the Mon people, who were powerful in Myanmar (Burma) from the 9th to the 11th and from the 13th to the 16th century and for a brief period in the mid-18th century. The Mon migrated southward from western China and settled in the Chao Phraya River basin (of southern T

  • Hanti (people)

    Khanty and Mansi, western Siberian peoples, living mainly in the Ob River basin of central Russia. They each speak an Ob-Ugric language of the Finno-Ugric branch of the Uralic languages. Together they numbered some 30,000 in the late 20th century. They are descended from people from the south Ural

  • Hantilis (Hittite king)

    Anatolia: The Old Hittite Kingdom: The succession of his brother-in-law Hantilis marked the beginning of the catastrophic period referred to in the Edict of Telipinus, during which the Hittite kingdom came near the verge of extinction.

  • Hantsport (harbour, Nova Scotia, Canada)

    Bay of Fundy: …New Brunswick and Digby and Hantsport in Nova Scotia, all harbour towns that burgeoned during the great lumbering, shipping, and shipbuilding activity of the 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1948 an 80-square-mile section of shore and stream-riven hills in New Brunswick was set aside as Fundy National Park.

  • Hantzsch, Arthur Rudolf (German chemist)

    Arthur Rudolf Hantzsch, German chemist who won fame at the age of 25 for devising the synthesis of substituted pyridines. Hantzsch was a professor at Zürich (1885), Würzburg (1893), and Leipzig (1903). With his student Alfred Werner he investigated the stereochemistry of nitrogen compounds. He

  • Ḥanukka (Judaism)

    Hanukkah, (Hebrew: “Dedication”) Jewish festival that begins on Kislev 25 (in December, according to the Gregorian calendar) and is celebrated for eight days. Hanukkah reaffirms the ideals of Judaism and commemorates in particular the rededication of the Second Temple of Jerusalem by the lighting

  • Hanukkah (Judaism)

    Hanukkah, (Hebrew: “Dedication”) Jewish festival that begins on Kislev 25 (in December, according to the Gregorian calendar) and is celebrated for eight days. Hanukkah reaffirms the ideals of Judaism and commemorates in particular the rededication of the Second Temple of Jerusalem by the lighting

  • Hanuman (Hindu mythology)

    Hanuman, in Hindu mythology, the monkey commander of the monkey army. His exploits are narrated in the great Hindu Sanskrit poem the Ramayana (“Rama’s Journey”). While still a baby, Hanuman, the child of a nymph by the wind god, tried to fly up and grab the Sun, which he mistook for a fruit. Indra,

  • Hanuman langur (primate)

    langur: The gray, or Hanuman, langur (S. entellus) of the Indian subcontinent is almost black when newborn and gray, tan, or brown as an adult. Regarded as sacred in Hinduism, it spends a good deal of time on the ground and roams at will in villages and temples of…

  • Hanumangarh (India)

    Hanumangarh, city, northern Rajasthan state, northwestern India. It lies on the right bank of the Ghaggar River about 30 miles (48 km) southeast of Ganganagar. Previously called Bhatner (“The Fortress of the Bhatti Rajputs”), it became Hanumangarh in 1805 when it was annexed by the princely state

  • Hanyang (China)

    Hanyang, large urban and industrial area, east-central Hubei sheng (province), central China. Located on the right bank of the Han River at its confluence with the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang), opposite Hankou, it is the westernmost of the three former cities (also including Wuchang) now

  • Hanyang (national capital, South Korea)

    Seoul, city and capital of South Korea (the Republic of Korea). It is located on the Han River (Han-gang) in the northwestern part of the country, with the city centre some 37 miles (60 km) inland from the Yellow Sea (west). Seoul is the cultural, economic, and political centre of South Korea.

  • Hanyeping ironworks (Chinese company)

    Daye: …into a single concern, the Han-Ye-Ping Iron and Coal Company. This company experienced financial difficulties and by 1913 was entirely in the hands of its Japanese creditors.

  • Hanyu pinyin wenzi (Chinese writing system)

    Pinyin romanization, system of romanization for the Chinese written language based on the pronunciation of the Beijing dialect of Mandarin Chinese. The gradual acceptance of Pinyin as the official transcription used in the People’s Republic of China signaled a commitment to promote the use of the

  • Hanyu, Yuzuru (Japanese figure skater)

    Hanyu Yuzuru, Japanese figure skater who at the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, became the first Japanese man to win an Olympic gold medal in figure skating. He added a second Olympic gold four years later at the 2018 Winter Games in P’yŏngch’ang, South Korea. Hanyu began figure skating when he

  • hanzei (Japanese tax)

    Japan: Muromachi government structure: This was called the equal tax division, or hanzei. Many shugo succeeded to their domains by inheritance, and in cases such as that of the Yamana family a single shugo sometimes held a number of provinces. If the primary agent of the Kamakura bakufu had been the jitō, the…

  • Hanzhong (China)

    Hanzhong, city, southwestern Shaanxi sheng (province), central China. It is situated in a long, narrow, and fertile basin along the Han River, between the Qin (Tsinling) and Micang mountain ranges. To the north one of the few routes across the Qin Mountains joins it to Baoji in Shaanxi, while

  • Hao Ran (Chinese writer)

    Chinese literature: 1949–76: …and the revolutionary-romantic novels of Hao Ran. After the death of Mao and the fall of the Gang of Four, literature made a comeback and most surviving writers were rehabilitated, although the progress was as rocky as the political scene Chinese literature continued to reflect.

  • Hao-pi (China)

    Hebi, prefecture-level city, northern Henan sheng (province), China. Once a county seat in Anyang prefecture, Hebi is situated in the foothills of the southern Taihang Mountains, some 16 miles (25 km) southwest of Anyang. Until the early 1950s Hebi was little more than a local market town, but the

  • haofang school (Chinese literature)

    Su Shi: …as the founder of the haofang (“heroic abandon”) school of writing. The optimism Su demonstrated in his private and political life can be seen also in his poems, many of which vividly describe his own experiences.

  • haoma (Zoroastrianism)

    Haoma, in Zoroastrianism, sacred plant and the drink made from it. The preparation of the drink from the plant by pounding and the drinking of it are central features of Zoroastrian ritual. Haoma is also personified as a divinity. It bestows essential vital qualities—health, fertility, husbands

  • Haora (India)

    Haora, city, east-central West Bengal state, northeastern India. It lies along the west bank of the Hugli (Hooghly) River directly opposite Kolkata (Calcutta). Haora is Kolkata’s largest satellite city and is the second largest city in West Bengal state. Haora has major Grand Trunk Road connections

  • haori (clothing)

    dress: Japan: …together with the short black haori coat, was until fairly recently the approved formal attire for Japanese men.

  • Hap (Egyptian god)

    Apis, in ancient Egyptian religion, sacred bull deity worshipped at Memphis. The cult of Apis originated at least as early as the 1st dynasty (c. 2925–c. 2775 bce). Like other bull deities, Apis was probably at first a fertility god concerned with the propagation of grain and herds, but he became

  • Hapalemur (primate)

    lemur: Lemur diversity: The gentle lemurs, or lesser bamboo lemurs (genus Hapalemur), and the highly endangered greater bamboo lemurs (Prolemur simus) feed on bamboo stems in the eastern and northwestern rainforests of the island.

  • Hapalocarcinidae (crustacean)

    crab: Distribution and variety: …food; another example is the coral-gall crab (Hapalocarcinidae), which irritates the growing tips of certain corals so that they grow to enclose the female in a stony prison. Many of the sluggish spider crabs (Majidae) cover their shells with growing seaweeds, zoophytes, and sponges, which afford them a very effective…

  • Hapanzi (folklore character)

    Ananse, name given to an Akan character who has become famous throughout Africa, the countries in the Caribbean region, and beyond because of his insight, intelligence, and wisdom. He is one of the most-important figures in the pantheon of cultural icons among West Africans. Along with his wife,

  • HAPE (pathology)

    altitude sickness: …serious type of altitude sickness, high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), occurs rarely among newcomers to altitude but more often affects those who have already become acclimated to high elevations and are returning after several days at sea level. In pulmonary edema, fluid accumulates in the lungs and prevents the victim…

  • Hape (Egyptian god)

    Apis, in ancient Egyptian religion, sacred bull deity worshipped at Memphis. The cult of Apis originated at least as early as the 1st dynasty (c. 2925–c. 2775 bce). Like other bull deities, Apis was probably at first a fertility god concerned with the propagation of grain and herds, but he became

  • Hapgood, Isabel Florence (American translator)

    Isabel Florence Hapgood, American translator and writer, noted for making many classic Russian works available to an English-language audience for the first time. Hapgood studied foreign languages independently when her formal education ended in 1868, after three years at Miss Porter’s School in

  • Haphṭarah (Judaism)

    Hafṭarah, selective reading from Old Testament prophets recited in Jewish synagogues during the morning service on the sabbath and on festivals (but during the afternoon service on fast days). Though Haftarot vary with various rites and no longer follow recommendations of the Mishna (the lawbook

  • Haphṭorah (Judaism)

    Hafṭarah, selective reading from Old Testament prophets recited in Jewish synagogues during the morning service on the sabbath and on festivals (but during the afternoon service on fast days). Though Haftarot vary with various rites and no longer follow recommendations of the Mishna (the lawbook

  • Hapi (Egyptian god)

    Apis, in ancient Egyptian religion, sacred bull deity worshipped at Memphis. The cult of Apis originated at least as early as the 1st dynasty (c. 2925–c. 2775 bce). Like other bull deities, Apis was probably at first a fertility god concerned with the propagation of grain and herds, but he became

  • Hapi (Egyptian god of the inundation)

    Hapi, in ancient Egyptian religion, personification of the annual inundation of the Nile River. Hapi was the most important among numerous personifications of aspects of natural fertility, and his dominance increased during Egyptian history. Hymns were composed in his honour, but he had no temples

  • Hapiru (people)

    Moses: The date of Moses: …Habiru, a variant spelling of Ḫapiru (Apiru), a designation of a class of people who made their living by hiring themselves out for various services. The biblical Hebrews had been in Egypt for generations, but apparently they became a threat, so one of the pharaohs enslaved them. Unfortunately, the personal…

  • hapkido (martial art)

    Hapkido, (Korean: “way of coordinated energy”) a Korean form of unarmed self-defense based on the circular foot sweeps and kicks of traditional Korean tae kyon but incorporating punches and circular throws and a yielding principle similar to that of aikido. The emphasis on circular motion allows

  • Haplochromis (fish genus)

    mimicry: Mimicry within species: …cichlid fish of the genus Haplochromis. The female takes the eggs into her mouth immediately after they are laid, even before the male can fertilize them. The male, however, carries conspicuous yellow or orange spots near the base of the anal fin, which closely resemble the eggs of the particular…

  • haplodiploidy (genetics)

    animal social behaviour: Social interactions involving cooperative breeding and eusociality: …a bizarre genetic system called haplodiploidy.

  • haplography (writing)

    biblical literature: Problems visual in origin: Haplography, the accidental omission of a letter or word that occurs twice in close proximity, can be found, for example, in the Dead Sea Scroll text of Isaiah.

  • haploid genotype (biology)

    International HapMap Project: … through the development of a haplotype (haploid genotype) map of the human genome. A haplotype is a set of alleles (differing forms of genes) that occur close together on a single chromosome and tend to be inherited together. By identifying haplotypes and mapping their chromosomal locations, scientists are able to…

  • haploid parthenogenesis (biology)

    animal reproductive system: Parthenogenesis: …develop into haploid males (haploid parthenogenesis), which then participate in bisexual reproduction. Bisexually produced eggs are often referred to as winter eggs since they have a thick covering that protects the embryo during adverse environmental conditions. Summer eggs, produced parthenogenetically, are thin shelled. Bisexual reproduction occurs, therefore, only often…

  • haploid phase (biology)

    algae: Reproduction and life histories: …of chromosomes and is called haploid, whereas in the second stage each cell has two sets of chromosomes and is called diploid. When one haploid gamete fuses with another haploid gamete during fertilization, the resulting combination, with two sets of chromosomes, is called a zygote. Either immediately or at some…

  • haploidy (genetics)

    life cycle: …of organisms whose cells are haploid (i.e., contain one set of chromosomes). The one-generational life cycle of the higher animals is diplontic; it involves only organisms whose body cells are diploid (i.e., contain two sets of chromosomes). Organisms with diplontic cycles produce sex cells that are haploid, and each of…

  • haplology (linguistics)

    linguistics: Sound change: …special case of dissimilation is haplology, in which the second of the two identical or similar syllables is dropped. Examples include the standard modern British pronunciations of “Worcester” and “Gloucester” with two syllables rather than three and the common pronunciation of “library” as if it were written “libry.” Both assimilation…

  • Haplomitriales (plant order)

    bryophyte: Annotated classification: Order Haplomitriales (formerly Calobryales) Leaves flattened and in three rows on an erect shoot arising from a colourless, subterranean, rootlike system that lacks rhizoids; sex organs lateral but near shoot apices; sporophytes with elongate seta; sporangium elongate, with elaters and thickenings on the jacket cell walls;…

  • Haplomitrium (plant genus)

    bryophyte: Annotated classification: …Indo-Malayan region; 1 extant genus, Haplomitrium. Order Metzgeriales Thallose, with the thallus mainly of uniformly thickened cell walls, usually reclining but sometimes erect; branching varies from forked to regularly pinnate or irregular; smooth rhizoids on the undersurface; sex organs lateral; sporophytes with elongate seta; sporangia spherical to elongate, with elaters…

  • Haplophyllum (plant genus)

    Sapindales: Distribution and abundance: Haplophyllum (about 70 species) occurs from the Mediterranean region to eastern Siberia.

  • Haplopoda (crustacean)

    branchiopod: Annotated classification: Infraorder Haplopoda Contains only 1 genus, Leptodora, a plankton feeder; carapace reduced to a dorsal brood pouch; large antennae with more than 20 swimming setae; 6 pairs of grasping trunk limbs; head elongated with small, complex eye; transparent except for eye; young develop into miniatures of…

  • Haplorrhini (primate suborder)

    primate: Classification: Suborder Haplorrhini 2 infraorders of 9 living families containing 41 living genera; 8 fossil families contain about 50 fossil genera dating to the Eocene. Infraorder Tarsiiformes 1 living family; included here are the Eocene to Early Miocene families Anaptomorphidae and Omomyidae. Family Tarsiidae

  • Haplosporea (protozoan)

    Haplosporidian, any protozoan of the sporozoan subclass Haplosporea. They are internal parasites of invertebrates and lower vertebrates. Representative genera are Ichthyosporidium in fish, Coelosporidium in cockroaches, and the type genus Haplosporidium in annelids and other invertebrates.

  • haplosporidia (protist)
  • haplosporidian (protozoan)

    Haplosporidian, any protozoan of the sporozoan subclass Haplosporea. They are internal parasites of invertebrates and lower vertebrates. Representative genera are Ichthyosporidium in fish, Coelosporidium in cockroaches, and the type genus Haplosporidium in annelids and other invertebrates.

  • Haplotaxida (oligochaete order)

    annelid: Annotated classification: Order Haplotaxida Chiefly aquatic worms; male gonopores in segment immediately behind testes; seminal receptacle at or near segment containing testes; size, minute to 1–3 cm; examples of genera: Nais, Tubifex (sludge worm). Class Hirudinea (leeches)

  • Haplotaxis (oligochaete genus)

    annelid: Annotated classification: …30–40 cm; examples of genera: Haplotaxis, Eisenia, Lumbricus (earthworm), Megascolides. Order Moniligastrida Male gonopores, 1 or 2 pairs on segment posterior to testes; clitellum 1 cell thick; 4 pairs of setae per segment; size, minute to 3 m; examples of genera:

  • haplotype (biology)

    International HapMap Project: … through the development of a haplotype (haploid genotype) map of the human genome. A haplotype is a set of alleles (differing forms of genes) that occur close together on a single chromosome and tend to be inherited together. By identifying haplotypes and mapping their chromosomal locations, scientists are able to…

  • Haploxylon (pine subgenus)

    pine: …Pinus to contain two subgenera: Haploxylon, or soft pines, which have one fibrovascular bundle, and Diploxylon, or hard pines, which have two.

  • Happe-Chair (work by Lemonnier)

    Camille Lemonnier: Happe-Chair (1886), composed before but published after Zola’s Germinal, deals with the life of drudgery led by mill workers. Later, in the work of his middle period, Lemonnier turned to psychological analysis, condemning the conservative tendencies of the bourgeoisie. He then developed a mystical naturalism,…

  • Happening (art event)

    Happening, event that combined elements of painting, poetry, music, dance, and theatre and staged them as a live action. The term Happening was coined by the American artist Allan Kaprow in the 1950s. The nature of Happenings was influenced by Italian Futurist performance, where the convention of

  • Happening, The (film by Silverstein [1967])

    Faye Dunaway: …as her first two movies, The Happening and Hurry Sundown, were released early in 1967.

  • Happenstance (novel by Shields)

    Carol Shields: In Happenstance (1980) and A Fairly Conventional Woman (1982), Shields used overlapping narratives to escape the strictures of straightforward narrative told from a single perspective. Marketed in Canada as a crime drama, Swann: A Mystery (1987) is both a sly comedy of manners and a psychological…

  • Happiness (film by Varda [1964])

    Agnès Varda: …Varda directed Le Bonheur (Happiness), an abstract picture of happiness and fidelity that was to be her most controversial film. Les Creatures (The Creatures) was released in 1966, and her most popular films of the next two decades were L’Une chante, l’autre pas (1977; One Sings, the Other Doesn’t)…

  • happiness

    Happiness, in psychology, a state of emotional well-being that a person experiences either in a narrow sense, when good things happen in a specific moment, or more broadly, as a positive evaluation of one’s life and accomplishments overall—that is, subjective well-being. Happiness can be

  • Happiness, Sea of (lake, Japan)

    Lake Chūzenji, lake, lying within Nikkō National Park, Tochigi ken (prefecture), north-central Honshu, Japan. It is situated at an elevation of 4,163 feet (1,269 metres) and has a surface area of about 4.6 square miles (11.8 square km). Lake Chūzenji is a resort site noted for its shrines,

  • Happy (recording by Williams)

    Pharrell Williams: …had further success with “Happy,” an effervescent and infectious song that he had written for the animated film Despicable Me 2 (2013). It received an Academy Award nomination for best original song, and Williams performed it at the Oscar ceremony in 2014. His second solo album, G I R…

  • Happy Birthday of Death, The (poem by Corso)

    Gregory Corso: In The Happy Birthday of Death (1960) he returned to an easier, conversational tone. Long Live Man (1962), Selected Poems (1962), The Mutation of the Spirit (1964), Elegiac Feelings American (1970), Herald of the Autochthonic Spirit (1981), and other books of poetry followed. In 1989 Corso…

  • Happy Birthday to You (song)

    Patty Smith Hill: …became the melody for “Happy Birthday to You.”

  • Happy Birthday, Wanda June (film by Robson [1971])

    Mark Robson: Later films: …flawed adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut’s play, with Steiger as a big-game hunter who returns home after having been missing in the Amazon for eight years. The low-budget Limbo (1972) was notable for being among the first films about the Vietnam War to explore its impact on the home front.

  • Happy Birthday, Wanda June (play by Vonnegut)

    Kurt Vonnegut: …also wrote several plays, including Happy Birthday, Wanda June (1970; film 1971); several works of nonfiction, such as the collection Wampeters, Foma & Granfalloons (1974); and several collections of short stories, chief among which was Welcome to the Monkey House (1968). In 2005 he published A Man Without a Country:…

  • Happy Christmas (film by Swanberg [2014])

    Lena Dunham: …to mature in the comedy Happy Christmas (2014). In 2017 she joined the anthology series American Horror Story for its seventh season (Cult); she portrayed Valerie Solanas, who shot Andy Warhol in 1968. Dunham later appeared in Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood (2019).

  • Happy Days (American television series)

    Happy Days, American television situation comedy that aired on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) network for 11 seasons (1974–84). The popular show achieved the number one Nielsen rating in its third season. Set in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, during the 1950s and ’60s, Happy Days presented an

  • Happy Days (work by Beckett)

    Samuel Beckett: Continuity of his philosophical explorations: …the same human being? In Happy Days (1961), a woman, literally sinking continually deeper into the ground, nonetheless continues to prattle about the trivialities of life. In other words, perhaps, as one gets nearer and nearer death, one still pretends that life will go on normally forever.

  • Happy End (film by Haneke [2017])

    Michael Haneke: …to the big screen with Happy End (2017), which he also wrote. The drama centres on a wealthy dysfunctional family in France.

  • Happy Feet (film by Miller [2006])

    George Miller: … as his main characters in Happy Feet (2006), which he codirected. A huge success at the box office, it received an Oscar for best animated film. Less popular was Happy Feet Two (2011).

  • Happy Gilmore (film by Dugan [1996])

    Adam Sandler: In Happy Gilmore (1996), Sandler featured as an aggressive hockey player who turns to professional golf out of financial necessity, and in The Waterboy (1998) he played the emotionally stunted water boy of a college football team who becomes its unlikely saviour. In The Wedding Singer…

  • Happy Haven, The (work by Arden)

    John Arden: The Happy Haven, produced in 1960 in London, is a sardonic farce about an old people’s home. The Workhouse Donkey is a crowded, exuberant, and comic drama of municipal politics. Armstrong’s Last Goodnight (1964) is a drama set in the Borders region of Scotland in…

  • Happy Land (Buddhist belief)

    Sukhavati, (Sanskrit: literally “Land of Bliss” or “Pure Land of Bliss”; often translated as “Pure Land”) in the Pure Land schools of Mahayana Buddhism, the Western Paradise of the Buddha Amitabha, described in the Pure Land sutras (Sukhavati-vyuha-sutras). According to followers of the Pure Land

  • Happy Land (film by Pichel [1943])

    Irving Pichel: Directing: Happy Land (1943) starred Don Ameche in a sentimental yarn about a home-front tragedy during World War II, whereas And Now Tomorrow (1944) was sentiment sans patriotism, with Alan Ladd and Loretta Young playing would-be lovers whom society keeps apart.

  • Happy Mondays, the (British rock group)

    Factory Records: Manchester's 24-Hour Party People: …arty mélange came Simply Red, the Happy Mondays, the Stone Roses, and the manic-depressive rants of the Smiths, though only the Happy Mondays recorded on Factory.

  • Happy Prince, The (film by Everett [2018])

    Colin Firth: …friend of Oscar Wilde in The Happy Prince, and starred as an imperiled amateur sailor in The Mercy. Also that year he assumed the role of William Weatherall Wilkins, president of the Fidelity Fiduciary Bank, in Mary Poppins Returns. Firth then appeared in the World War I drama 1917, which…

  • Happy Rabbit (cartoon character)

    Bugs Bunny, cartoon rabbit created by Warner Brothers as part of its Looney Tunes animated short film series. Emerging as one of the biggest stars of the so-called golden age of American animation (1928–c. 1960), Bugs Bunny has endured as one of the world’s most popular cartoon characters. Bugs

  • Happy Return, The (novel by Forester)

    Horatio Hornblower: The Hornblower novels begin with The Happy Return (1937; also published as Beat to Quarters) and conclude with the unfinished novel Hornblower and the Crisis (1967; also published as Hornblower During the Crisis and Two Stories: Hornblower’s Temptation and The Last Encounter). Other novels in the series include A Ship…

  • Happy Road, The (film)

    Jean-Pierre Cassel: …Gene Kelly discovered him for The Happy Road (1956). Later Cassel, a tall man with an expressive, mobile face, achieved fame as the comic protagonist in a series of films directed by Philippe de Broca. These included Les Jeux de l’amour (1960; The Love Game), Le Farceur (1960; The Joker),…

  • Happy Together (film by Wong Kar-Wai [1997])

    Wong Kar-Wai: Chungwong chasit (1997; Happy Together) was filmed in Buenos Aires and was initially conceived as an adaptation of Manuel Puig’s detective novel The Buenos Aires Affair (1973). Happy Together chronicles the disintegrating love affair between two Hong Kong expatriates. Wong’s work on the film won him the award…

  • Happy Valley (novel by White)

    Patrick White: White’s first novel, Happy Valley (1939), was set in New South Wales and showed the influence of D.H. Lawrence and Thomas Hardy. The material of White’s later novels is distinctly Australian, but his treatment of it has a largeness of vision not limited to any one country or…

  • Happy Valley-Goose Bay (Labrador, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Happy Valley–Goose Bay, town, south-central Labrador, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, on the western end of Lake Melville and near the mouth of the Churchill River. Goose Bay was established in 1941 as a military and air ferrying base operated by the United States and Canada. By the Goose Bay

  • Happy-Go-Lucky (film by Leigh [2008])

    Mike Leigh: Happy-Go-Lucky (2008) presents the story of a free-spirited woman navigating the world around her, while Another Year (2010) follows a happily married couple and their less-sanguine family and friends. Both films earned Academy Award nominations for best original screenplay. In 2011 Leigh directed the Royal…

  • Happytime Murders, The (film by Henson [2018])

    Melissa McCarthy: …puppets in the screwball comedy The Happytime Murders. McCarthy also garnered critical acclaim—and her second Oscar nomination—for her sympathetic portrayal of disgraced celebrity biographer Lee Israel in Can You Ever Forgive Me? (2018). In The Kitchen (2019) McCarthy joined an all-star female cast playing a trio of mob wives who…

  • Hapsburg, House of (European dynasty)

    House of Habsburg, royal German family, one of the principal sovereign dynasties of Europe from the 15th to the 20th century. The name Habsburg is derived from the castle of Habsburg, or Habichtsburg (“Hawk’s Castle”), built in 1020 by Werner, bishop of Strasbourg, and his brother-in-law, Count

  • Haptanthaceae (plant family)

    Buxales: …single species of the family Haptanthaceae, Haptanthus hazlettii, is a small tree native to Honduras; it is thought to be one of the rarest plants in the world. In 2010, after more than 20 years of unsuccessful attempts to relocate the plant based on two herbarium vouchers, the species was…

  • Haptanthus hazlettii (plant)

    Buxales: …species of the family Haptanthaceae, Haptanthus hazlettii, is a small tree native to Honduras; it is thought to be one of the rarest plants in the world. In 2010, after more than 20 years of unsuccessful attempts to relocate the plant based on two herbarium vouchers, the species was rediscovered…

  • hapten (biochemistry)

    Hapten, small molecule that stimulates the production of antibody molecules only when conjugated to a larger molecule, called a carrier molecule. The term hapten is derived from the Greek haptein, meaning “to fasten.” Haptens can become tightly fastened to a carrier molecule, most often a protein,

  • haptene (biochemistry)

    Hapten, small molecule that stimulates the production of antibody molecules only when conjugated to a larger molecule, called a carrier molecule. The term hapten is derived from the Greek haptein, meaning “to fasten.” Haptens can become tightly fastened to a carrier molecule, most often a protein,

  • hapto nomenclature

    organometallic compound: s- and p-block organometallic compounds: This convention is known as hapto nomenclature. A single point of attachment, η1, is usually not explicitly indicated, as in the above formula for dimethylmercury, a monohapto species. The compound with the common name ferrocene has the systematic name bis(η5-cyclopentadienyl)iron, where the number of cyclopentadienyl ligands (two) is indicated by…

  • haptoglobin (protein)

    Haptoglobin, a colourless protein of the α-globulin fraction of human serum (liquid portion of blood plasma after the clotting factor fibrinogen has been removed) that transports hemoglobin freed from destroyed red blood cells to the reticuloendothelial system, where it is broken down. Three

  • Haptoglossales (chromist order)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Haptoglossales Parasitic on algae or plant roots, including roots of sugar beets; may be non-mycelial-forming; sporangia develop inside host cells; example genera include Haptoglossa, Lagena, and Pontisma. Fungi were once considered plants. However, nearly all fungal cell walls

  • Haptophyceae (class of algae)

    algae: Annotated classification: Class Prymnesiophyceae (Haptophyceae) Many with haptonema, a hairlike appendage between two flagella; no tubular hairs; many with organic scales; some deposit calcium carbonate on scales to form coccoliths; coccolithophorids may play a role in global warming because they can remove large amounts of carbon from the…

  • Haptophyta (protist)

    protozoan: Annotated classification: Haptophyta Photosynthetic. Possess a unique flagellar structure called a haptonema, a “3rd flagellum,” located between the 2 regular flagella, that is thought to function in feeding (usually mixotrophic); haptonema is missing or reduced in some taxa. Organic scales are Golgi-derived and made partly of cellulose;…

  • hapu (Maori kinship group)

    Maori: Traditional history and first contact: …important social groups were the hapuu (subtribe), which was the primary landholding group and the one within which marriage was preferred, and the whaanau, or extended family.

  • hapuu (Maori kinship group)

    Maori: Traditional history and first contact: …important social groups were the hapuu (subtribe), which was the primary landholding group and the one within which marriage was preferred, and the whaanau, or extended family.

  • Hapworth 16, 1924 (novella by Salinger)

    J.D. Salinger: …lifetime was a novella titled Hapworth 16, 1924, which appeared in The New Yorker in 1965. In 1974 The Complete Uncollected Short Stories of J.D. Salinger, an unauthorized two-volume work of his early pieces, was briefly released to the public, but sales were halted when Salinger filed a lawsuit for…

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