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  • Handelius, Jacobus (German-Austrian composer)

    Jacob Handl, German-Austrian composer known for his sacred music. A Cistercian monk, Handl traveled in Bohemia, Moravia (now part of the Czech Republic), and Silesia (now southwestern Poland), was a member of the Viennese court chapel in 1574, and was choirmaster to the bishop of Olmütz (modern

  • Handful of Blackberries, A (work by Silone)

    Ignazio Silone: Una manciata di more (1952; A Handful of Blackberries, 1954) and Il segreto di Luca (1956; The Secret of Luca, 1958) show Silone’s continued concern with the needs of southern Italy and the complexities of social reform. In Uscita di sicurezza (1965; Emergency Exit, 1968), Silone describes his shifts from…

  • Handful of Dust, A (film by Sturridge [1988])

    Judi Dench: …with a View (1985) and A Handful of Dust (1988). She took the role of James Bond’s boss, M, in GoldenEye (1995)—the first of several Bond movies in which she appeared—and subsequently played two British queens, the recently widowed Queen Victoria in Mrs. Brown (1997) and Queen Elizabeth I in…

  • Handful of Dust, A (novel by Waugh)

    A Handful of Dust, satirical novel by Evelyn Waugh, published in 1934. The novel, which is often considered Waugh’s best, examines the themes of contemporary amorality and the death of spiritual values. Precipitated by the failure of Waugh’s marriage and by his conversion to Roman Catholicism, the

  • handgun (weapon)

    Handgun, any firearm small enough to be held in one hand when fired. It usually fires a single projectile or bullet, and additional ammunition may be available in a revolving mechanism or magazine. Handguns may be used for target shooting, hunting small game, or personal self-defense. Automatic

  • Handharmonika (musical instrument)

    Accordion, free-reed portable musical instrument, consisting of a treble casing with external piano-style keys or buttons and a bass casing (usually with buttons) attached to opposite sides of a hand-operated bellows. The advent of the accordion is the subject of debate among researchers. Many

  • handheld computer (handheld computer)

    PDA, a handheld organizer used to store contact information, manage calendars, communicate by e-mail, and handle documents and spreadsheets, usually in communication with the user’s personal computer. The first PDAs were developed in the early 1990s as digital improvements upon the traditional

  • handicap (sports)

    Handicap, in sports and games, method of offsetting the varying abilities or characteristics of competitors in order to equalize their chances of winning. Handicapping takes many, often complicated, forms. In horse racing, a track official known as the handicapper may assign weights to horses

  • handicap (medicine)

    biological determinism: Influence on disability: Social attitudes about what constitutes a disability, and how economic and social resources are to be allocated to deal with disabilities, change over time. In hard economic times the disabled are often written off as “too expensive,” a trend often justified on the basis…

  • handicapped (human condition)

    Ovide Decroly: …children, including those with physical disabilities. Through his work as a physician, Decroly became involved in a school for disabled children and consequently became interested in education. One outcome of this interest was his establishment in 1901 of the Institute for Abnormal Children in Uccle, Belg. Decroly credited the school’s…

  • handicraft

    Asia: Handicrafts: Traditional cottage industries and handicrafts continue to play an important role in the economies of all Asian countries. They not only constitute major manufacturing activities in themselves but are also often the only available means to provide additional employment and raise the level of…

  • Handie-Talkie (communications)

    Motorola, Inc.: Founding as Galvin Manufacturing: …Kentucky; the second was the Handie-Talkie, an AM-band, handheld device with a long antenna that ultimately was used by soldiers during World War II. Both AM-based systems were quickly superseded by FM technologies. The most notable replacement occurred in 1943, when Galvin Manufacturing invented the FM Walkie-Talkie. This device was…

  • Handke, Peter (Austrian writer)

    Peter Handke, avant-garde Austrian playwright, novelist, poet, and essayist, one of the most original German-language writers in the second half of the 20th century. He was awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize for Literature, cited for “an influential work that with linguistic ingenuity has explored the

  • handkerchief perfume (chemistry)

    perfume: …as perfumes but also called extraits, extracts, or handkerchief perfumes, contain about 10–25 percent perfume concentrates. The terms toilet water and cologne are commonly used interchangeably; such products contain about 2–6 percent perfume concentrate. Originally, eau de cologne was a mixture of citrus oils from such fruits as lemons and…

  • handkerchief tree (plant)

    Dove tree, (species Davidia involucrata), small flowering tree, in the family Nyssaceae, with showy creamy bracts (modified leaves) surrounding the flowers. Native to southwestern China, it has been introduced elsewhere. Pyramidal in shape, with large bright-green leaves, it is especially

  • Handl, Jacob (German-Austrian composer)

    Jacob Handl, German-Austrian composer known for his sacred music. A Cistercian monk, Handl traveled in Bohemia, Moravia (now part of the Czech Republic), and Silesia (now southwestern Poland), was a member of the Viennese court chapel in 1574, and was choirmaster to the bishop of Olmütz (modern

  • Handle With Care (film by Demme [1977])

    Jonathan Demme: …films for Corman before directing Handle with Care (1977; originally titled Citizens Band), a raucous ensemble comedy centred on the citizens band (CB) radio fad that swept the United States in the 1970s. Although the film was not a blockbuster, Demme’s directing was noticed, and he continued to work on…

  • handlebar (vehicle part)

    bicycle: …steers by leaning and turning handlebars that are attached to the fork. The feet turn pedals attached to cranks and a chainwheel. Power is transmitted by a loop of chain connecting the chainwheel to a sprocket on the rear wheel. Riding is easily mastered, and bikes can be ridden with…

  • Handler, Chelsea (American comedian and author)

    Chelsea Handler, American comedian and author known for her earthy, bawdy style and her late-night talk show, Chelsea Lately (2007–14). Handler grew up in New Jersey, the youngest of six siblings. As a teen, she competed in the Miss New Jersey pageant, but she did not pursue work in performing

  • Handler, Chelsea Joy (American comedian and author)

    Chelsea Handler, American comedian and author known for her earthy, bawdy style and her late-night talk show, Chelsea Lately (2007–14). Handler grew up in New Jersey, the youngest of six siblings. As a teen, she competed in the Miss New Jersey pageant, but she did not pursue work in performing

  • Handler, Daniel (American author)

    Daniel Handler, American author best known for his A Series of Unfortunate Events, a 13-book collection of unhappy morality tales for older children that was published between 1999 and 2006. Handler wrote the series under the pen name Lemony Snicket. After earning a B.A. in 1992 from Wesleyan

  • Handler, Elliot (American entrepreneur)

    Elliot Handler, American entrepreneur (born April 9, 1916, Chicago, Ill.—died July 21, 2011, Los Angeles, Calif.), cofounded Mattel, Inc. (1945), with his wife, Ruth Mosko Handler, and created the collectible Hot Wheels toy cars (1968). Although it was originally established as a picture-frame

  • Handler, Milton (American lawyer)

    Milton Handler, American lawyer and teacher who helped draft a number of well-known laws, among them the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938, the National Labor Relations Act, and the GI Bill of Rights; he later was a noted antitrust litigator (b. Oct. 8, 1903, Bronx, N.Y.--d. Nov. 10,

  • Handler, Ruth Mosko (American businesswoman)

    Ruth Mosko Handler, American entrepreneur and businesswoman (born Nov. 4, 1916, Denver, Colo.—died April 27, 2002, Los Angeles, Calif.), was a cofounder of Mattel and created the Barbie doll, which in 1959 became the first mass-produced toy doll in the U.S. with adult features. Barbie, joined by s

  • Handley Page 0/400 (aircraft)

    Sir Frederick Handley Page: …aircraft designer who built the Handley Page 0/400, one of the largest heavy bomber planes used in World War I.

  • Handley Page H.P.42 (aircraft)

    history of flight: The first airlines: …these routes was the stately Handley Page H.P.42, a biplane having a wingspan of 130 feet (40 metres) and four 490-horsepower Bristol Jupiter engines. Depending on seating arrangements, 24 to 38 passengers cruised along at about 100 miles (160 km) per hour over the plane’s 500-mile (800-km) range. The airline…

  • Handley Page Halifax (aircraft)

    Halifax, British heavy bomber used during World War II. The Halifax was designed by Handley Page, Ltd., in response to a 1936 Royal Air Force (RAF) requirement for a bomber powered by two 24-cylinder Rolls-Royce Vulture engines. However, the Vulture encountered problems in development, and the

  • Handley Page Transport, Ltd. (British company)

    Halifax: The Halifax was designed by Handley Page, Ltd., in response to a 1936 Royal Air Force (RAF) requirement for a bomber powered by two 24-cylinder Rolls-Royce Vulture engines. However, the Vulture encountered problems in development, and the bomber design was reworked in 1937 to take four Rolls-Royce Merlins. The result…

  • Handley, Tod (British conductor)

    Vernon George Handley, (“Tod”), British conductor (born Nov. 11, 1930, Enfield, Middlesex, Eng.—died Sept. 10, 2008, Monmouthshire, Wales), championed British composers, both in concert and in the studio; he made more than 150 recordings (nearly 90 of which included British music that had not

  • Handley, Vernon George (British conductor)

    Vernon George Handley, (“Tod”), British conductor (born Nov. 11, 1930, Enfield, Middlesex, Eng.—died Sept. 10, 2008, Monmouthshire, Wales), championed British composers, both in concert and in the studio; he made more than 150 recordings (nearly 90 of which included British music that had not

  • Handlin, Oscar (American historian)

    Oscar Handlin, American historian and educator noted for his examinations of immigration and other social topics in American history. The son of Jewish immigrant parents, Handlin graduated from Brooklyn College in 1934 and earned his M.A. degree from Harvard University in 1935. He then taught

  • handling (painting)

    Western painting: Origins in the 19th century: …palette knife; this combined a handling (a technical term in painting meaning the individual’s manipulation of materials in the execution of a work; it has been likened to a person’s signature in handwriting) derived from Courbet with the gray tonality of Manet; its rough-hewn crudity has a consistency that was…

  • Handling Sin (work by Mannyng)

    Robert Mannyng: …English poet and author of Handlyng Synne, a confessional manual, and of the chronicle Story of England. The works are preserved independently in several manuscripts, none of certain provenance.

  • handling, materials

    Materials handling, the movement of raw goods from their native site to the point of use in manufacturing, their subsequent manipulation in production processes, and the transfer of finished products from factories and their distribution to users or sales outlets. In early systems of handling

  • Handlyng Synne (work by Mannyng)

    Robert Mannyng: …English poet and author of Handlyng Synne, a confessional manual, and of the chronicle Story of England. The works are preserved independently in several manuscripts, none of certain provenance.

  • Handmade Films (British company)

    George Harrison: …production as a founder of Handmade Films. Among the company’s efforts were the Monty Python film Life of Brian (1979), Time Bandits (1981), and Mona Lisa (1986). Harrison was a frequent collaborator and often appeared on the albums of his former bandmates and other musicians. In the late 1980s he…

  • Handmaid’s Tale, The (film by Schlöndorff [1990])

    Volker Schlöndorff: …1984) and Margaret Atwood (The Handmaid’s Tale, 1990).

  • Handmaid’s Tale, The (novel by Atwood)

    The Handmaid’s Tale, acclaimed dystopian novel by Canadian author Margaret Atwood, published in 1985. The book, set in New England in the near future, posits a Christian fundamentalist theocratic regime in the former United States that arose as a response to a fertility crisis. The novel, narrated

  • handrub (cleansing agent)

    Hand sanitizer, agent applied to the hands for the purpose of removing common pathogens (disease-causing organisms).1,2 Hand sanitizers typically come in foam, gel, or liquid form.1,3 Their use is recommended when soap and water are not available for hand washing or when repeated hand washing

  • Hands Across the Table (film by Leisen [1935])

    Mitchell Leisen: Films of the 1930s: Hands Across the Table (1935) established a template Leisen would use repeatedly in other romantic comedies: a strong independent woman cannot prevent herself from falling in love with a man who is undeniably charming but does not bring much else to the table. This time…

  • Hands of Stone (film by Jakubowicz [2016])

    Usher: …appeared in such films as Hands of Stone (2016), in which he portrayed Sugar Ray Leonard, and Burden (2018), based on a true story.

  • Hands of the Cause of God (Bahāʾī Faith)

    Bahāʾī Faith: Organization: …appointive institutions, such as the Hands of the Cause of God and the continental counselors. The members of the Hands of the Cause of God were appointed by Bahāʾ Allāh and Shoghi Effendi. The continental counselors are appointed by the Universal House of Justice. The primary functions of both groups…

  • hands, imposition of (Judaism and Christianity)

    Imposition of hands, ritual act in which a priest or other religious functionary places one or both hands palms down on the top of another person’s head, usually while saying a prayer or blessing. The imposition of hands was first practiced in Judaism and was adopted by Christianity. In the Hebrew

  • hands, laying on of (Judaism and Christianity)

    Imposition of hands, ritual act in which a priest or other religious functionary places one or both hands palms down on the top of another person’s head, usually while saying a prayer or blessing. The imposition of hands was first practiced in Judaism and was adopted by Christianity. In the Hebrew

  • hands-only CPR (medicine)

    cardiopulmonary resuscitation: …modern form, known as “hands-only” CPR, may be performed by individuals who have not received formal training. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), hands-only CPR, which is recommended solely for use on adults who have suddenly collapsed, requires just “two steps to save a life.” First, the person…

  • handsaw (tool)

    hand tool: Saw: The familiar modern handsaw, with its thin but wide steel blade, cuts on the push stroke; this permits downhand sawing on wood laid across the knee or on a stool, and the sawing pressure helps to hold the wood still. Operator control is superior, and, because the line…

  • handske, En (work by Bjornsson)

    Norwegian literature: Toward the modern breakthrough: …New System), En handske (A Gauntlet), and Over ævne (Beyond Human Power I) and his novel Det flager i byen og på havnen (The Heritage of the Kurts); Lie’s novels Gaa paa! (“Go Ahead!”), Livsslaven (“The Life Convict”; Eng. trans. One of Life’s Slaves), and Familjen paa Gilje (The…

  • handsome fungus beetle (insect)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Endomychidae (handsome fungus beetles) Shiny, usually brightly coloured; feed on fungi (mold); about 600 species; mostly in tropical forests; examples Endomychus, Mycetaea. Family Erotylidae (pleasing fungus beetles) Shiny; found with fungi; more than 3,500 species; many in South America.

  • Handsome Lake (Seneca chief)

    Ganioda’yo, Seneca chief and prophet who founded the religious movement known as Gai’wiio (“Good Message”) among the Iroquois Indians of North America in the early 19th century. His name in the Seneca language meant “Handsome Lake.” Little is known of Ganioda’yo’s life before he became a prophet of

  • handwriting

    Handwriting, writing with the hand as distinguished from print. The term handwriting has come to be more or less restricted to mean the form of writing peculiar to each person. Before the introduction of the typewriter for general use, when handwriting had a greater utilitarian value, schools

  • handwriting identification

    handwriting: Handwriting identification: Identification of handwriting assumes great importance in courts of law when the authenticity of signature is contested. Even when the handwriting itself is not to be doubted, the conditions under which it was written sometimes become of great moment. Such questions as whether…

  • Handwriting: Poems (poetry by Ondaatje)

    Canadian literature: Poetry and poetics: In Handwriting (1998) Ondaatje returned to his birthplace, Sri Lanka. Fascination with place and history also permeates Al Purdy’s poems about the country north of Belleville, Ont., and about his travels west and to the Arctic (Being Alive, 1978) and to the Soviet Union (Piling Blood,…

  • Handy Tables (work by Ptolemy)

    astronomy: Ptolemy: …composed the Procheiroi kanones (Handy Tables), in which the astronomical tables of the Almagest were expanded and accompanied by directions for using them but were stripped of the theoretical discussion.

  • Handy, W. C. (American composer)

    W.C. Handy, African American composer who changed the course of popular music by integrating the blues idiom into then-fashionable ragtime music. Among his best-known works is the classic “St. Louis Blues.” Handy was a son and grandson of Methodist ministers, and he was educated at Teachers

  • Handy, William Christopher (American composer)

    W.C. Handy, African American composer who changed the course of popular music by integrating the blues idiom into then-fashionable ragtime music. Among his best-known works is the classic “St. Louis Blues.” Handy was a son and grandson of Methodist ministers, and he was educated at Teachers

  • Handymax (ship)

    tanker: Tankers of 100,000 dwt and less can be crude-oil (“dirty”) carriers or product (“clean”) carriers. The Aframax tankers are often referred to…

  • Handysize (ship)

    tanker: Tankers of 100,000 dwt and less can be crude-oil (“dirty”) carriers or product (“clean”) carriers. The Aframax tankers are often referred to as…

  • Haneke, Michael (Austrian director and screenwriter)

    Michael Haneke, Austrian director and screenwriter whose stark and provocative films made him a leading figure in European cinema in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Much of his work examines tendencies toward social alienation and brutality within contemporary middle-class milieus. Haneke,

  • Hanert Electrical Orchestra (musical instrument)

    electronic instrument: Post-World War II electronic instruments: One example, the Hanert Electrical Orchestra, built in 1944–45 by John Hanert at the Hammond Instrument Co. in Chicago, consisted of a roomful of electronic tone-generating equipment controlled by an elaborate, motor-driven scanner. The scanner, which was mounted on a carriage that rolled along a 60-foot table, read…

  • Hanert, John (American inventor)

    electronic instrument: Post-World War II electronic instruments: …Orchestra, built in 1944–45 by John Hanert at the Hammond Instrument Co. in Chicago, consisted of a roomful of electronic tone-generating equipment controlled by an elaborate, motor-driven scanner. The scanner, which was mounted on a carriage that rolled along a 60-foot table, read an encoded score that was drawn on…

  • Hanf, William (American logician)

    metalogic: Nonelementary logic and future developments: From studies on infinitary logics, William Hanf, an American logician, was able to define certain cardinals, some of which have been studied in connection with the large cardinals in set theory. In yet another direction, logicians are developing model theories for modal logics—those dealing with such modalities as necessity and…

  • Hanfeizi (Chinese philosopher)

    Han Feizi, the greatest of China’s Legalist philosophers. His essays on autocratic government so impressed King Zheng of Qin that the future emperor adopted their principles after seizing power in 221 bce. The Hanfeizi, the book named after him, comprises a synthesis of legal theories up to his

  • Hanford Engineer Works (nuclear site, Washington, United States)

    Hanford Site, large U.S. nuclear site established during World War II for the production of plutonium, some of which was used in the first atomic bomb. It is located in south-central Washington, northwest of Richland, and was originally operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as a unit of the

  • Hanford Nuclear Reservation (nuclear site, Washington, United States)

    Hanford Site, large U.S. nuclear site established during World War II for the production of plutonium, some of which was used in the first atomic bomb. It is located in south-central Washington, northwest of Richland, and was originally operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as a unit of the

  • Hanford Site (nuclear site, Washington, United States)

    Hanford Site, large U.S. nuclear site established during World War II for the production of plutonium, some of which was used in the first atomic bomb. It is located in south-central Washington, northwest of Richland, and was originally operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as a unit of the

  • Hanford, Elizabeth (United States senator)

    Elizabeth Dole, U.S. senator and candidate for the 2000 Republican presidential nomination. Dole worked under six different presidents, and her career included many “firsts” for women. She was the first female secretary of transportation; the first female executive of the American Red Cross since

  • Hang (China)

    Hangzhou, city and capital of Zhejiang sheng (province), China. The city is located in the northern part of the province on the north bank of the Qiantang River estuary at the head of Hangzhou Bay. It has water communications with the interior of Zhejiang to the south, is the southern terminus of

  • hang glider (aircraft)

    airplane: Heavier-than-air: These include hang gliders, gliders, and sailplanes.

  • hang gliding (sport)

    Hang gliding, sport of flying in lightweight unpowered aircraft which can be carried by the pilot. Takeoff is usually achieved by launching into the air from a cliff or hill. Hang gliders were developed by the pioneers of practical flight. In Germany, starting in 1891, Otto Lilienthal made several

  • Hang-chou (China)

    Hangzhou, city and capital of Zhejiang sheng (province), China. The city is located in the northern part of the province on the north bank of the Qiantang River estuary at the head of Hangzhou Bay. It has water communications with the interior of Zhejiang to the south, is the southern terminus of

  • Hanga Roa (Easter Island)

    Hanga Roa, village on the west coast of Easter Island, in the eastern Pacific Ocean. It is the home of most of the island population as well as of the Chilean administrative personnel. Its main economic activities are fishing and

  • Hanga, Abdulla Kassim, Sheikh (prime minister of Zanzibar)

    Tanzania: Independence: Sheikh Abdulla Kassim Hanga was appointed prime minister, and Abdul Raḥman Mohammed (“Babu”), leader of the new left-wing Umma (The Masses) Party (formed by defectors from the ZNP), became minister for defense and external affairs. Pending the establishment of a new constitution, the cabinet and all…

  • Hangal, Gandhari (Indian vocalist)

    Gangubai Hangal, Indian vocalist in the Hindustani (North Indian) classical tradition and doyenne of the Kirana gharana (community of performers who share a distinctive musical style). She was especially admired for her performances of songs of the khayal genre over the course of a career that

  • Hangal, Gangu Bai (Indian vocalist)

    Gangubai Hangal, Indian vocalist in the Hindustani (North Indian) classical tradition and doyenne of the Kirana gharana (community of performers who share a distinctive musical style). She was especially admired for her performances of songs of the khayal genre over the course of a career that

  • Hangal, Gangubai (Indian vocalist)

    Gangubai Hangal, Indian vocalist in the Hindustani (North Indian) classical tradition and doyenne of the Kirana gharana (community of performers who share a distinctive musical style). She was especially admired for her performances of songs of the khayal genre over the course of a career that

  • hangar (airport)

    construction: Steel long-span construction: …examples being two great airship hangars for the U.S. Navy in New Jersey—the first built in 1922 with a span of 79 metres (262 feet), the second in 1942 with a span of 100 metres (328 feet). The flat truss was used also, reaching a maximum span of 91 metres…

  • Hangawi (Korean holiday)

    Ch’usŏk, Korean holiday celebrated on the 15th day of the 8th lunar month to commemorate the fall harvest and to honour one’s ancestors. Similar to Thanksgiving Day in the United States, the Harvest Moon Festival, as it is also known, is one of the most popular holidays in Korea. The day begins

  • Hangayn Mountains (mountains, Mongolia)

    Hangayn Mountains, range in central Mongolia. It extends northwest-southeast for about 500 miles (805 km), parallels the Mongolian Altai Mountains (south), and rises to a height of 12,812 feet (3,905 m) in Otgon Tenger Peak. Most of its northern drainage flows into the Selenge River, which, with

  • Hangayn Nuruu (mountains, Mongolia)

    Hangayn Mountains, range in central Mongolia. It extends northwest-southeast for about 500 miles (805 km), parallels the Mongolian Altai Mountains (south), and rises to a height of 12,812 feet (3,905 m) in Otgon Tenger Peak. Most of its northern drainage flows into the Selenge River, which, with

  • Hangchow (China)

    Hangzhou, city and capital of Zhejiang sheng (province), China. The city is located in the northern part of the province on the north bank of the Qiantang River estuary at the head of Hangzhou Bay. It has water communications with the interior of Zhejiang to the south, is the southern terminus of

  • Hangenberg Event (paleontology)

    Devonian Period: Extinction events: …the Frasnian-Famennian boundary; and the Hangenberg Event saw the extinction of phacopid trilobites, several groups of goniatites, and the unusual late Devonian coiled cephalopods, the clymeniids, at the end of the Famennian Stage.

  • Hangeul (Korean alphabet)

    Hangul, (Korean: “Great Script”) alphabetic system used for writing the Korean language. The system, known as Chosŏn muntcha in North Korea, consists of 24 letters (originally 28), including 14 consonants and 10 vowels. The consonant characters are formed with curved or angled lines. The vowels are

  • hangi (food)

    New Zealand: Daily life and social customs: A traditional Maori meal is hangi, a feast of meat, seafood, and vegetables steamed for hours in an earthen oven (umu).

  • hanging (capital punishment)

    Hanging, execution by strangling or breaking the neck by a suspended noose. The traditional method, still in use on the continent of Europe, involves suspending the victim from a gallows or crossbeam until he has died of asphyxiation. Elsewhere, the condemned person stands on a trapdoor, and when

  • hanging buttress (architecture)

    buttress: …a wall at regular intervals; hanging buttresses, freestanding piers connected to a wall by corbels; and various types of corner buttresses—diagonal, angle, clasping, and setback—that support intersecting walls.

  • hanging chad (voting and elections)

    Bush v. Gore: …through a cloud of “hanging chads” (incompletely punched paper ballots) and “pregnant chads” (paper ballots that were dimpled, but not pierced, during the voting process), as well as “overvotes” (ballots that recorded multiple votes for the same office) and “undervotes” (ballots that recorded no vote for a given office).…

  • hanging dam (ice formation)

    ice in lakes and rivers: Ice buildups: …large accumulations that are called hanging dams. Such deposits may be of great depth and may actually block large portions of the river’s flow. In smaller, shallower streams, similar ice formations may be combinations of shore ice, anchor ice deposits, small hanging-dam-like accumulations, and (over slower-flowing areas) sheet ice.

  • hanging fern family (plant family)

    Davalliaceae, the hanging fern family (order Polypodiales), containing 4–5 genera and 65 species. The family is mostly restricted to tropical regions, especially in the Old World. A few species of Davallia, known as rabbit’s foot ferns, are cultivated as ornamentals in greenhouses, conservatories,

  • Hanging Gardens of Babylon (ancient garden, Babylon, Mesopotamia)

    Hanging Gardens of Babylon, ancient gardens considered one of the Seven Wonders of the World and thought to have been located near the royal palace in Babylon. By the beginning of the 21st century, the site of the Hanging Gardens had not yet been conclusively established. Nevertheless, many

  • hanging geranium (plant)

    geranium: Ivy, or hanging, geraniums (P. peltatum) are grown as basket plants indoors and out; they are also used as ground covers in warm areas. The aromatic, or scented-leaved, geraniums are found in several species, including P. abrotanifolium, P. capitatum, P. citrosum, P. crispum, P.

  • hanging moss (lichen)

    beard lichen: Hanging moss (U. longissima) looks like gray threads about 1.5 m (5 feet) long hanging from tree branches in humid, mountainous regions. Some species of Usnea also produce an orange dye. It is the “beard moss,” or “tree moss,” of the poets and Shakespeare’s “idle…

  • hanging parakeet (bird)

    parakeet: …short, blunt tails, as the hanging parrots, or bat parrotlets, Loriculus species, popular cage birds in their native area, India to Malaya and the Philippines.

  • hanging parrot (bird)

    parakeet: …short, blunt tails, as the hanging parrots, or bat parrotlets, Loriculus species, popular cage birds in their native area, India to Malaya and the Philippines.

  • Hanging Tree, The (film by Daves [1959])

    Delmer Daves: Westerns: …year he directed the popular The Hanging Tree, with Cooper well cast as a frontier doctor who falls in love with one of his patients (Maria Schell). It was Daves’s last western, and there was some speculation that health problems prevented him from continuing to film in the genre, which…

  • Hanging Up (film by Keaton [2000])

    Walter Matthau: …octogenarian in his last film, Hanging Up (2000), directed by Diane Keaton.

  • hanging valley (geological feature)

    glacial valley: …tributary troughs are left as hanging valleys high on the walls of the main glacial valley. Postglacial streams may form waterfalls from the mouths of the hanging valleys, a well-known example being Yosemite Falls, California.

  • hanging wall (geology)

    glacial landform: Cirques, tarns, U-shaped valleys, arêtes, and horns: …an arcuate cliff called the headwall. In an ideal cirque, the headwall is semicircular in plan view. This situation, however, is generally found only in cirques cut into flat plateaus. More common are headwalls angular in map view due to irregularities in height along their perimeter. The bottom of many…

  • Hanging, A (work by Orwell)

    George Orwell: Early life: …“Shooting an Elephant” and “A Hanging,” classics of expository prose.

  • Hangman, The (German Nazi official)

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  • Hangmatana (ancient city, Iran)

    Ecbatana, ancient city on the site of which stands the modern city of Hamadān (q.v.), Iran. Ecbatana was the capital of Media and was subsequently the summer residence of the Achaemenian kings and one of the residences of the Parthian kings. According to ancient Greek writers, the city was founded

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