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  • Hyatt, Alpheus (American zoologist and paleontologist)

    Alpheus Hyatt, American zoologist and paleontologist who achieved eminence in the study of invertebrate fossil records, contributing to the understanding of the evolution of the cephalopods (a class of mollusks including squids and octopuses) and of the development of primitive organisms. Hyatt

  • Hyatt, Anna Vaughn (American sculptor)

    Anna Hyatt Huntington, American sculptor who brought great subtlety and vividness to equestrian and animal subjects. Anna Hyatt Huntington was the daughter of noted Harvard paleontologist Alpheus Hyatt. She was educated privately and began her study of sculpture with Henry Hudson Kitson in Boston.

  • Hyatt, Dave (American software developer)

    Firefox: …team, led by American developers Dave Hyatt and Blake Ross, sought to create a light, fast-loading browser that would appeal to users in its efficiency. In 2002 they released their first browser, Phoenix, which soon included features such as bookmarking (for saving Web site addresses) and the ability to add…

  • Hyatt, John Wesley (American inventor)

    John Wesley Hyatt, American inventor and industrialist who discovered the process for making celluloid, the first practical artificial plastic. As a young man, Hyatt trained as a printer in Illinois and then in Albany, New York. In 1863 he was attracted by a reward of $10,000 offered by a New York

  • Hyattsville (Maryland, United States)

    Hyattsville, city, Prince George’s county, central Maryland, U.S., a northeastern residential suburb of Washington, D.C., at the head of the Anacostia River. Settled about the time of the American Civil War as Hart, it was renamed at its incorporation (1886) for its founder, Christopher Clarke

  • Hybla Heraea (ancient city, Italy)

    Ragusa: …the site of the ancient Hybla Heraea) is separated from the upper (modern) town by a declivity. Ragusa was the centre of an independent county from 1091 until it was united with that of Modica in 1296. The old town was destroyed by an earthquake of 1693, after which the…

  • hybodont (fossil fish)

    chondrichthyan: Evolution: …to modern sharks, the order Hybodontii. They probably represent an intermediate state in selachian evolution and are classified by some authorities in the order Selachii. Although the jaws had the primitive double articulation, the skeletal support of the pectoral and pelvic fins was close to that of modern selachians, with…

  • Hybodontii (fossil fish)

    chondrichthyan: Evolution: …to modern sharks, the order Hybodontii. They probably represent an intermediate state in selachian evolution and are classified by some authorities in the order Selachii. Although the jaws had the primitive double articulation, the skeletal support of the pectoral and pelvic fins was close to that of modern selachians, with…

  • Hybopsis biguttata (fish)

    chub: The hornyhead chub is blue-backed with greenish sides and a light belly. It lives in clear streams and is about 15–24 cm (6–9 inches) long. Some chubs will take a fisherman’s artificial fly. Other cyprinid chubs include the western North American fishes of the genera Gila…

  • hybrid (genetics)

    Hybrid, offspring of parents that differ in genetically determined traits. The parents may be of different species, genera, or (rarely) families. The term hybrid, therefore, has a wider application than the terms mongrel or crossbreed, which usually refer to animals or plants resulting from a

  • hybrid (mythology)

    myth: Relationships of mixture: …readiness to be fascinated by monsters. Monsters are chaos beasts, lurking at the interstices of order, be they conceived as mythical creatures who preceded creation, survivals from an archaic era, creatures who dwell in dangerous lands remote from human habitation, or beings who appear in nightmares. Though the forms and…

  • hybrid bicycle (vehicle)

    bicycle: Basic types: Hybrid bicycles combine the features of road bicycles and mountain bikes. They have become very popular and are generally used for light recreation and urban commuting. Most have flat handlebars and medium-width tires designed for paved roads.

  • hybrid breakdown (biology)

    evolution: Hybrid breakdown: In plants more than in animals, hybrids between closely related species are sometimes partially fertile. Gene exchange may nevertheless be inhibited because the offspring are poorly viable or sterile. Hybrids between the cotton species Gossypium barbadense, G. hirsutum, and G. tomentosum appear

  • hybrid car

    automobile: Electric and hybrid vehicles: Modern electric cars and trucks have been manufactured in small numbers in Europe, Japan, and the United States since the 1980s. However, electric propulsion is only possible for relatively short-range vehicles, using power from batteries or fuel cells. In a typical system, a…

  • Hybrid Cars Hit the Road

    Hybrid cars began grabbing headlines in 2004, especially after movie stars were seen arriving at the Academy Awards in these environmentally friendly vehicles. With worries over air pollution and with gasoline prices topping $2 a gallon, the public imagination has seized on hybrid cars as a

  • hybrid cooker

    solar oven: Types of solar ovens: A hybrid cooker is a box cooker equipped with a supplementary electrical heating system, which can be used at night and when it is overcast or cloudy. Those tend to be larger, fixed installations for use by a community or group. Parabolic cookers—which use a parabolic…

  • hybrid cypress (tree)

    cypress: The hybrid or Leyland cypress (Cupressocyparis leylandii) is an ornamental windbreak developed by crossing the Monterey cypress with the yellow cypress (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis).

  • hybrid electric automobile

    automobile: Electric and hybrid vehicles: Modern electric cars and trucks have been manufactured in small numbers in Europe, Japan, and the United States since the 1980s. However, electric propulsion is only possible for relatively short-range vehicles, using power from batteries or fuel cells. In a typical system, a…

  • hybrid inviability (biology)

    evolution: Hybrid inviability: Occasionally, prezygotic mechanisms are absent or break down so that interspecific zygotes (fertilized eggs) are formed. These zygotes, however, often fail to develop into mature individuals. The hybrid embryos of sheep and goats, for example, die in the early developmental stages before birth.…

  • hybrid lens (optometry)

    contact lens: In 2005 hybrid lenses were developed that are gas-permeable and rigid and surrounded by a soft ring. These lenses provide the comfort of a soft lens with the visual sharpness of a hard lens.

  • hybrid orbital (chemistry)

    Linus Pauling: Elucidation of molecular structures: …was a resonance combination (or hybrid) of other structures. His book The Nature of the Chemical Bond, and the Structure of Molecules and Crystals (1939) provided a unified summary of his vision of structural chemistry.

  • hybrid perpetual rose (plant)

    rose: Major species and hybrids: …fragile tea roses with vigorous hybrid perpetual roses. The hybrid perpetuals achieved great popularity until they were supplanted by the hybrid teas in the early 20th century. Polyantha roses are a class of very hardy roses that produce dense bunches of tiny blossoms. Floribunda roses are hardy hybrids that resulted…

  • hybrid presidential-parliamentary system (government)

    political system: Constitutional government: …constitutional democracy is the hybrid presidential-parliamentary system, exemplified by the government of France. In such systems there is both a directly elected president with substantial executive powers and a presidentially appointed prime minister, who must retain majority support in the legislature. If the president’s party or coalition also controls a…

  • hybrid sterility (biology)

    evolution: Hybrid sterility: Hybrid zygotes sometimes develop into adults, such as mules (hybrids between female horses and male donkeys), but the adults fail to develop functional gametes and are sterile.

  • hybrid tea rose (plant)

    rose: Major species and hybrids: …rose is that of the hybrid tea roses, which accounts for the majority of roses grown in greenhouses and gardens and sold in florist shops. Hybrid teas come in the complete range of rose colours and have large symmetrical blossoms. Hybrid teas resulted from the crossbreeding of frequently blooming but…

  • hybrid vigour (genetics)

    Heterosis, the increase in such characteristics as size, growth rate, fertility, and yield of a hybrid organism over those of its parents. Plant and animal breeders exploit heterosis by mating two different pure-bred lines that have certain desirable traits. The first-generation offspring generally

  • hybridity (anthropology)

    anthropology: The study of ethnicity, minority groups, and identity: …to the growth of “hybridity”—the dissolution of rigid cultural boundaries between groups hitherto perceived as separate, the intermixture of various identities, in effect the dissolution of identities themselves. Much anthropology in this field demonstrates how identities have been and are invented and reinvented for political and other purposes, out…

  • hybridization (genetics)

    conservation: Introduced species: As briefly mentioned above, hybridization is another mechanism by which introduced species can cause extinction. In general, species are considered to be genetically isolated from one another—they cannot interbreed to produce fertile young. In practice, however, the introduction of a species into an area outside its range sometimes leads…

  • hybridization (chemistry)

    boron group element: Salts of M2+ ions: The boron orbitals are hybridized to either the sp2 (when boron forms bonds with three other atoms, for example, in borazine) or the sp3 (when boron forms bonds with four atoms, as in metal borohydrides) configuration (see chemical bonding: Valence bond theory: Hybridization).

  • hybridoma (biology)

    human genetics: The genetics of antibody formation: …hybrid cell, known as a hybridoma, multiplies rapidly in culture. Since the antibodies obtained from hybridomas are produced by clones derived from a single lymphocyte, they are called monoclonal antibodies.

  • hybris

    Hubris, in ancient Athens, the intentional use of violence to humiliate or degrade. The word’s connotation changed over time, and hubris came to be defined as overweening presumption that leads a person to disregard the divinely fixed limits on human action in an ordered cosmos. The most-famous

  • Hydaspes River (river, Asia)

    Jhelum River, river of northwestern India and northern and eastern Pakistan. It constitutes the westernmost of the five rivers of the Punjab region that merge with the Indus River in eastern Pakistan. The Jhelum rises from a deep spring at Vernag, in western Jammu and Kashmir state, in the

  • Hydaspes, Battle of the (326 bce)

    Battle of the Hydaspes, (326 bce), fourth and last pitched battle fought by Alexander the Great during his campaign of conquest in Asia. The fight on the banks of the Hydaspes River in India was the closest Alexander the Great came to defeat. His feared Companion cavalry was unable to subdue fully

  • hydatid disease (pathology)

    Echinococcosis, formation of cysts, or hydatids, at the site of infestation by the larval form of Echinococcus granulosus, a tapeworm common in sheep, cattle, camels, dogs, and many other mammals. The disease can develop in humans upon ingestion of the eggs, which may be present in the tissues of

  • hydatidiform mole (pathology)

    Hydatidiform mole, in human pregnancy, abnormal growth of the chorion, the outermost vascular membrane that in a normal pregnancy would enclose the embryo and ultimately give rise to the placenta. In the situation in which the hydatidiform mole develops, the embryo is usually either absent or

  • hydatidosis (pathology)

    Echinococcosis, formation of cysts, or hydatids, at the site of infestation by the larval form of Echinococcus granulosus, a tapeworm common in sheep, cattle, camels, dogs, and many other mammals. The disease can develop in humans upon ingestion of the eggs, which may be present in the tissues of

  • Hydatius (Portuguese bishop)

    eclipse: Medieval European: Hydatius, bishop of Chaves (in Portugal), was one of the few known chroniclers of the early Middle Ages. He seems to have had an unusual interest in eclipses, and he recounted the occurrence of five such events (involving both the Sun and the Moon) between…

  • Hyde de Neuville, Jean-Guillaume, Baron (French diplomat)

    Jean-Guillaume, Baron Hyde de Neuville, diplomat and one of the most consistent defenders of Bourbon Legitimism. Devoted to Louis XVI, Hyde de Neuville remained a royalist agent after the outbreak of the Revolution. After taking part in a royalist insurrection in Berry (1796), he attempted first to

  • Hyde of Hindon, Baron (English statesman)

    Edward Hyde, 1st earl of Clarendon, English statesman and historian, minister to Charles I and Charles II and author of the History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England. Edward Hyde was the eldest surviving son of Henry Hyde of Dinton, Wiltshire. He was educated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford, and

  • Hyde Park (New York, United States)

    Hyde Park, town (township) and unincorporated village, Dutchess county, eastern New York, U.S. It lies on the east side of the Hudson River, 8 miles (13 km) north of Poughkeepsie and about 75 miles (121 km) north of New York City. Both the village (settled as Stoutenburgh in 1741) and town (formed

  • Hyde Park (park, London, United Kingdom)

    Hyde Park, park in the borough of Westminster, London. It covers more than 340 acres (138 hectares) and is bordered on the east by Mayfair and on the west by Kensington Gardens. The park shares a large curved lake with its western neighbour; the portion of the lake in Kensington Gardens is known as

  • Hyde Park on Hudson (film by Michell [2012])

    Laura Linney: Roosevelt (Bill Murray) in Hyde Park on Hudson (2012) and the housekeeper of an aged Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen) in Mr. Holmes (2015). Her credits from 2016 included the action spectacle Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows; Sully, about US Airways flight 1549, which crash-landed in the…

  • Hyde, Charles Cheney (American lawyer)

    Charles Cheney Hyde, U.S. attorney and authority on international law who was an early advocate of vesting all military power in an international security organization. Hyde taught at the law school of Northwestern University, Chicago (1907–25), and then became professor of international law and

  • Hyde, Douglas (president of Ireland)

    Douglas Hyde, distinguished Gaelic scholar and writer and first president of the Republic of Ireland (Éire). He was the outstanding figure in the struggle for the preservation and extension of the Irish language from 1893, when he founded the Gaelic League (a nationalistic organization of Roman

  • Hyde, Edward (fictional character)

    Mr. Hyde, the evil alter ego of Dr. Jekyll, a fictional character in Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). John Barrymore (1920), Fredric March (1931), and Spencer Tracy (1941) gave notable film performances as Jekyll and

  • Hyde, Henry (English statesman)

    Henry Hyde, 2nd earl of Clarendon, English statesman, eldest son of the 1st Earl of Clarendon and a Royalist who opposed the accession of William and Mary. As Viscount Cornbury he became a member of Parliament in 1661 and, in 1674, succeeded to the earldom on his father’s death. James II made him

  • Hyde, Henry Baldwin (American businessman)

    Henry Baldwin Hyde, American capitalist who was the founder of the Equitable Life Assurance Society. In 1852 Hyde became a clerk at the Mutual Life Insurance Co. and, in the next seven years, learned the business, advancing to the post of cashier. In 1859 Hyde left Mutual Life, announcing his

  • Hyde, Henry John (American politician)

    Henry John Hyde, American politician (born April 18, 1924, Chicago, Ill.—died Nov. 29, 2007, Chicago), served (1975–2007) in the U.S. House of Representatives, where during his freshman term he won support in 1976 for a law that prohibited federal funds for abortions (the Hyde Amendment) and was at

  • Hyde, Lawrence (English statesman)

    Lawrence Hyde, 1st earl of Rochester, influential English statesman who served under Charles II, James II, William III, and Queen Anne. The second son of the renowned statesman and historian Edward Hyde, 1st earl of Clarendon, he entered Parliament in 1660 and was master of the robes from 1662 to

  • Hyde, Mr. (fictional character)

    Mr. Hyde, the evil alter ego of Dr. Jekyll, a fictional character in Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). John Barrymore (1920), Fredric March (1931), and Spencer Tracy (1941) gave notable film performances as Jekyll and

  • Hyde, Philip Jean (American photographer)

    Philip Jean Hyde, American photographer (born Aug. 15, 1921, San Francisco, Calif.—died March 30, 2006, Reno, Nev.), captured images of environmentally imperiled deserts, canyons, forests, and mountains, which were published by the Sierra Club in such books as The Last Redwoods (1963), Navajo W

  • Hyde, R. (American film critic)

    Roger Ebert, American film critic, perhaps the best known of his profession, who became the first person to receive a Pulitzer Prize for film criticism (1975). Ebert’s journalism career began at the Champaign-Urbana News-Gazette, where he worked as a sportswriter from age 15. He was on the staff

  • Hyde, Sir Edward (English statesman)

    Edward Hyde, 1st earl of Clarendon, English statesman and historian, minister to Charles I and Charles II and author of the History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England. Edward Hyde was the eldest surviving son of Henry Hyde of Dinton, Wiltshire. He was educated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford, and

  • Hyde, Sir Nicholas (chief justice of England)

    Sir Nicholas Hyde, chief justice of England during the reign of Charles I. Hyde entered Parliament in 1601 and soon became prominent as an opponent of the court of James I, though he does not appear to have distinguished himself in the law. Before long, however, he deserted the popular party, and

  • Hyde, Thomas (English Assyriologist)

    history of Mesopotamia: The classical and medieval views of Mesopotamia; its rediscovery in modern times: In 1700 an Englishman, Thomas Hyde, coined the term “cuneiform” for these inscriptions, and by the middle of the 18th century it was known that the Persepolis inscriptions were related to those of Babylon. Niebuhr distinguished three separate alphabets (Babylonian, Elamite, and Old Persian cuneiform). The first promising attempt…

  • Hyder Ali (emperor of India)

    Hyder Ali, Muslim ruler of Mysore princely state and military commander who played an important part in the wars in southern India in the mid-18th century. After studying the military tactics of the Frenchman Joseph-François Dupleix, Hyder induced his older brother, a brigade commander in the

  • Hyder, Qurratulain (Indian writer)

    Qurratulain Hyder, Indian writer, editor, scholar, and translator who helped the novel become a serious genre of hitherto poetry-oriented Urdu literature. Her masterwork, Aag ka darya (1959; River of Fire), has been compared to those of Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez and Czech novelist

  • Hyderabad (Pakistan)

    Hyderabad, city, south-central Sind province, southeastern Pakistan. It lies on the most northerly hill of the Ganjo Takkar ridge, just east of the Indus River. One of the largest cities in Pakistan, it is a communications centre, connected by rail with Peshawar and Karachi and with Indian railways

  • Hyderabad (India)

    Hyderabad, city, Telangana state, south-central India. It is Telangana’s largest and most-populous city and is the major urban centre for all of south-central interior India. From 1956 to 2014 Hyderabad was the capital of Andhra Pradesh state, but, with the creation of Telangana from Andhra Pradesh

  • Hyderabad (historical state, India)

    Hyderabad, former princely state of south-central India that was centred on the city of Hyderabad. It was founded by Nizam al-Mulk (Āṣaf Jāh), who was intermittently viceroy of the Deccan (peninsular India) under the Mughal emperors from 1713 to 1721 and who resumed the post again under the title

  • Hydnocarpus (plant genus)

    Malpighiales: Achariaceae: The Indo-Malesian Hydnocarpus (40 species) is the largest genus in the family. Ryparosa (18 species) is Malesian, and Lindackeria (14 species) grows in the Americas and Africa. Most species of Achariaceae were previously included in Flacourtiaceae, while Achariaceae in the original sense was a small and little-known…

  • hydnocarpus oil

    Malpighiales: Achariaceae: …Hydnocarpus are a source of chaulmoogra oil, at one time important in the treatment of leprosy. The presumed active agent in the oil, hydnocarpic acid, is believed to have antibiotic properties. The seeds of Caloncoba echinata, from west-central Africa, are the source of gorli oil, also used in the treatment…

  • Hydnora (plant genus)

    Aristolochiaceae: …Central and South America, and Hydnora occurs in Africa, Madagascar, and the Arabian Peninsula. The southern African H. triceps grows exclusively on succulent species of Euphorbia.

  • Hydnoraceae (former plant family)

    Piperales: Families: …Hydnoraceae is now a small subfamily of Aristolochiaceae, with seven species in two genera. They are terrestrial parasitic plants that lack leaves and chlorophyll. The large flowers have a single three-parted perianth whorl and an inferior ovary; they are foul-smelling and are pollinated by flies and beetles. Prosopanche occurs in…

  • Hydnoroideae (plant subfamily)

    Aristolochiaceae: …family Hydnoraceae (now the subfamily Hydnoroideae) are terrestrial parasitic plants that lack leaves and chlorophyll. The large flowers have a single three-parted perianth whorl and an inferior ovary; they are foul-smelling and are pollinated by flies and beetles. The genus Prosopanche occurs in Central

  • Hydra (hydrozoan genus)

    Hydra, genus of invertebrate freshwater animals of the class Hydrozoa (phylum Cnidaria). The body of such an organism consists of a thin, usually translucent tube that measures up to about 30 millimetres (1.2 inches) long but is capable of great contraction. The body wall is comprised of two

  • Hydra (island, Greece)

    Hydra, dímos (municipality) and island of the Saronic group in the Aegean Sea, Attika (Modern Greek: Attikí) periféreia (region), central Greece. It lies just off the eastern tip of the Argolís peninsula of the Peloponnese and has a maximum length, northeast-southwest, of 13 miles (21 km). The

  • Hydra (Greek mythology)

    Hydra, in Greek legend, the offspring of Typhon and Echidna (according to the early Greek poet Hesiod’s Theogony), a gigantic water-snake-like monster with nine heads (the number varies), one of which was immortal. The monster’s haunt was the marshes of Lerna, near Árgos, from which he periodically

  • Hydra (constellation)

    Hydra, (Latin: “Water Snake”) constellation in the southern sky that stretches from 8 to 15 hours right ascension and from about 5° north to 30° south in declination. It is the largest of the constellations. Its brightest star is Alphard (from the Arabic for “the solitary one”), with a magnitude of

  • Hydra (moon of Pluto)

    Pluto: Pluto’s moons: Pluto’s other four moons—Hydra, Nix, Kerberos, and Styx—are much smaller than Charon. All four are elongated. They revolve around Pluto outside Charon’s path in nearly circular orbits (like Charon) and in the same orbital plane as Charon. The orbital radius of Hydra is about 64,721 km (40,216 miles);…

  • Hydra Head, The (novel by Fuentes)

    The Hydra Head, novel of international intrigue by Carlos Fuentes, published in 1978 as La cabeza de la hidra. The book is set in Mexico and features the Mexican secret service. It concerns the attempt by the Mexican government to retain control of a recently discovered oil field. Secret agents

  • Hydractinia (invertebrate genus)

    Hydractinia, genus of marine hydrozoan polyps (phylum Cnidaria), a group of invertebrate animals with a thin tubelike body that attaches to a surface. Species of the Hydractinia are colonial and usually live on snail shells inhabitated by hermit crabs. The basal stolon (stemlike structure) of a

  • Hydraenidae (insect family)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Hydraenidae (minute moss beetles) Small, 1.2–2.5 mm; found in brackish or intertidal pools and along streams. Family Leiodidae (mammal-nest beetles, round fungus beetles, small carrion beetles) Small, shiny. wingless; feed on eggs and young of small arthropods in small-mammal nests; widely

  • hydralazine (drug)

    lupus erythematosus: …such an autoimmune response are hydralazine, which is used to counteract high blood pressure, and procainamide, which is a medication for irregular heart rhythms. Only a very small number of people taking these drugs develop the disease, and the symptoms usually abate when use of the drug is stopped.

  • hydramnios (pathology)

    Hydramnios, excess of amniotic fluid, the liquid that surrounds the fetus in the uterus. Chronic hydramnios, in which fluid accumulates slowly, is fairly common, occurring as often as once in 200 or 300 deliveries. Acute hydramnios, in which fluids collect quickly and cause rapid distention of t

  • Hydranassa ardesiaca (bird)

    heron: …typical herons also include the black heron, Hydranassa (or Melanophoyx) ardesiaca, of Africa, and several species of the genus Egretta (egrets), such as the tricoloured heron (E. tricolor), of the southeastern United States and Central and South America, and the little blue heron (E. caerulea). The green heron (Butorides

  • Hydranassa rufescens (bird)

    egret: The reddish egret, Hydranassa (or Dichromanassa) rufescens, of warm coastal regions of North America, has two colour phases: white and dark. The snowy egret, E. (or Leucophoyx) thula, ranging from the United States to Chile and Argentina, is white, about 60 cm long, with filmy recurved…

  • hydranencephaly (birth defect)

    cephalic disorder: Hydranencephaly: Hydranencephaly is a form of porencephaly in which the brain lacks cerebral hemispheres and instead is occupied by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-filled sacs. The condition develops after the 12th week of pregnancy and is caused by a stroke or other vascular event, by an injury,…

  • Hydrangea (plant)

    Hydrangea, (genus Hydrangea), any of a genus of erect or climbing woody shrubs, in the family Hydrangeaceae, native to the Western Hemisphere and eastern Asia. About 23 species are known. Several species are grown in greenhouses and gardens for their showy, usually ball-like flower clusters.

  • hydrangea (plant)

    Hydrangea, (genus Hydrangea), any of a genus of erect or climbing woody shrubs, in the family Hydrangeaceae, native to the Western Hemisphere and eastern Asia. About 23 species are known. Several species are grown in greenhouses and gardens for their showy, usually ball-like flower clusters.

  • Hydrangea anomala petiolaris (plant)

    hydrangea: The climbing hydrangea (H. anomala petiolaris, or H. petiolaris), can reach up to 15 metres, clinging to any solid support by means of aerial rootlets.

  • Hydrangea arborescens (plant)

    hydrangea: Hills-of-snow, or wild hydrangea (H. arborescens), a shrub slightly more than 1 metre (4 feet) tall, has rounded clusters of white flowers. The French hydrangea, or hortensia (H. macrophylla), is widely cultivated in many varieties for its large globular flower clusters in colours of rose,…

  • hydrangea family (plant family)

    Hydrangeaceae, the hydrangea family of flowering plants, in the order Cornales, comprising 19 genera and about 260 species of woody ornamental trees, shrubs, vines, and herbs, native primarily to tropical, subtropical, and north temperate regions. Shrubs of the genera Deutzia, Hydrangea

  • Hydrangea macrophylla (plant)

    Cornales: Hydrangeaceae: The common hydrangea, or hortensia (H. macrophylla), is popular with horticulturists and is sold as a potted plant in cool areas. Hydrangea flowers are produced in large, showy white, blue, or pink clusters, with the flower colour of some species being related to soil acidity. The…

  • Hydrangea paniculata (plant)

    hydrangea: Peegee hydrangea (H. paniculata ‘Grandiflora’), growing to a height of 9 metres, is a common landscape hydrangea, with tapering flower clusters, opening white and fading to pink, then to bronze. Oakleaf hydrangea (H. quercifolia), up to 2 metres high, has white flower clusters and deep…

  • Hydrangea petiolaris (plant)

    hydrangea: The climbing hydrangea (H. anomala petiolaris, or H. petiolaris), can reach up to 15 metres, clinging to any solid support by means of aerial rootlets.

  • Hydrangea quercifolia (plant)

    hydrangea: Oakleaf hydrangea (H. quercifolia), up to 2 metres high, has white flower clusters and deep wine-red fall foliage. The climbing hydrangea (H. anomala petiolaris, or H. petiolaris), can reach up to 15 metres, clinging to any solid support by means of aerial rootlets.

  • Hydrangeaceae (plant family)

    Hydrangeaceae, the hydrangea family of flowering plants, in the order Cornales, comprising 19 genera and about 260 species of woody ornamental trees, shrubs, vines, and herbs, native primarily to tropical, subtropical, and north temperate regions. Shrubs of the genera Deutzia, Hydrangea

  • hydrant lift (ice skating)

    figure skating: Lifts: Another lift is the hydrant lift, in which the man tosses his partner over his head while skating backward; he then rotates one half-turn and catches his partner facing him. In the toe overhead lift the couple skates down the ice with the man facing forward and the woman…

  • Hydrastis canadensis (plant)

    Goldenseal, (species Hydrastis canadensis), perennial herb native to woods of the eastern United States. Its rootstocks have medicinal properties. The plant has a single greenish white flower, the sepals of which fall as they open, followed by a cluster of small red berries. Goldenseal is

  • hydrate (chemical compound)

    Hydrate, any compound containing water in the form of H2O molecules, usually, but not always, with a definite content of water by weight. The best-known hydrates are crystalline solids that lose their fundamental structures upon removal of the bound water. Exceptions to this are the zeolites

  • hydrated aluminum chloride (chemical compound)

    aluminum: Compounds: …aluminum chloride, commonly known as aluminum chlorohydrate, AlCl3∙H2O, is used as a topical antiperspirant or body deodorant, which acts by constricting the pores. It is one of several aluminum salts employed by the cosmetics industry.

  • hydration (chemistry)

    acid–base reaction: Hydrolysis of salts: …the ions involved are strongly hydrated in solution. In a solution of an aluminum salt, for instance, a proton is transferred from one of the water molecules in the hydration shell to a molecule of solvent water. The resulting hydronium ion (H3O+) accounts for the acidity of the solution:

  • hydraulic brake (technology)

    automobile: Brakes: Mechanical brakes were replaced by hydraulic systems, in which the brake pedal is connected to pistons in master cylinders and thence by steel tubing with flexible sections to individual cylinders at the wheels. Front and rear hydraulic circuits are separated. The wheel cylinders are located between the movable ends of…

  • hydraulic capsule pipeline (technology)

    pipeline: Capsule pipelines: …is used, it is termed hydraulic capsule pipeline (HCP). Owing to the low density of air, capsules in PCP cannot be suspended by air at ordinary speeds. Instead, the capsules are wheeled vehicles rolling through pipelines. In contrast, because water is heavy, the capsules in HCP do not require wheels.…

  • hydraulic cement (construction)

    cement: …under water, are often called hydraulic cements. The most important of these is portland cement.

  • hydraulic civilization

    Hydraulic civilization, according to the theories of the German-American historian Karl A. Wittfogel, any culture having an agricultural system that is dependent upon large-scale government-managed waterworks—productive (for irrigation) and protective (for flood control). Wittfogel advanced the

  • hydraulic conductivity (geology)

    artesian well: …drilled wherever a gently dipping, permeable rock layer (such as sandstone) receives water along its outcrop at a level higher than the level of the surface of the ground at the well site. At the outcrop the water moves down into the aquifer (water-bearing layer) but is prevented from leaving…

  • hydraulic coupling (technology)

    hydraulic transmission: …systems: hydrokinetic, such as the hydraulic coupling and the hydraulic torque converter, which use the kinetic energy of the liquid; and hydrostatic, which use the pressure energy of the liquid.

  • hydraulic dredging

    mining: Dredging: In pure hydraulic dredging systems, the digging and lifting force is either pure suction, suction with hydrojet assistance, or entirely hydrojet. They are best suited to digging relatively small-sized loose material such as sand and gravel, marine shell deposits, mill tailings, and unconsolidated overburden. Hydraulic dredging has…

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