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  • Hustle, The (film by Addison [2019])

    Anne Hathaway: …to commit murder; the comedy The Hustle, about two rival con artists; Modern Love, an Amazon anthology series in which Hathaway appeared in an episode as a woman struggling with mental illness; and Dark Waters, a fact-based drama concerning a legal case about a chemical company’s alleged pollution of a…

  • Hustler, The (film by Rossen [1961])

    The Hustler, American film drama, released in 1961, that won both popular and critical acclaim and earned each of its four major actors (Paul Newman, Jackie Gleason, George C. Scott, and Piper Laurie) Academy Award nominations. The film sparked a resurgence of popularity in the game of pool. Newman

  • Hustlers (film by Scafaria [2019])

    Jennifer Lopez: …a largely female cast in Hustlers (2019), about strippers who scheme against their wealthy clients.

  • Hustling Hervé (Canadian harness-race driver, trainer, and owner)

    Hervé Filion, harness-race driver, trainer, and owner who was one of the most successful North American harness-racing drivers. Filion was born on his family’s farm, one of 10 children; many of his eight brothers, notably his younger brother Henri, also became harness drivers. Hervé left school

  • Huston, Anjelica (American actress)

    Anjelica Huston, American actress noted for her coolly elegant portrayals of tough-minded self-sufficient women. Huston was the second child born to film director John Huston (himself the son of actor Walter Huston) and former ballerina Enrica Soma. In 1953 the family relocated from California to

  • Huston, John (American director, writer, and actor)

    John Huston, American motion-picture director, writer, and actor whose taut dramas were among the most popular Hollywood films from the early 1940s to the mid-1980s. Many of his films were literary adaptations or tough action tales with an existential spin. Indeed, his own life—in which Huston

  • Huston, Nancy (Canadian author)

    Nancy Huston, Canadian novelist and nonfiction author who wrote in French and English and made prizewinning translations of her own works, which explore the themes of cultural dislocation and personal identity. As a child, Huston lived in Canada, Germany, and the United States. She left Sarah

  • Huston, Virginia (American actress)

    Out of the Past: …reveal to his girlfriend (Virginia Huston) that his real name is Jeff Markham and that he is, in fact, a private detective. In an extended flashback, Jeff retraces his history with Whit, who years earlier had hired him to track down Kathie Moffat (Jane Greer). According to Whit, Kathie…

  • Huston, Walter (Canadian-born American actor)

    Walter Huston, noted Canadian-born American character actor whose career in theatre and films ranged from musical comedy to high drama. Originally trained as an engineer, Huston first appeared on the stage in Toronto (1902) and made his New York City debut three years later. He worked as an

  • Husuni Kubwa (ancient palace, Tanzania)

    eastern Africa: The Shirazi migration: The great palace of Husuni Kubwa, with well over 100 rooms, was built at this time and had the distinction of being the largest single building in all sub-Saharan Africa. Husuni Ndogo, with its massive enclosure walls, was probably built at this time, too, as were the extensions to…

  • Huszár, Károly (president of Hungary)

    Hungary: Revolution, counterrevolution, and the regency, 1918–45: …government, under the presidency of Károly Huszár, was formed in November 1919. Elections (for a single house) were held in January 1920.

  • Huszárik Zoltán (Hungarian filmmaker)

    Zoltán Huszárik, Hungarian filmmaker who directed numerous poetic short films and two feature films, the best-known of which is Szindbád (1971; “Sinbad”). Huszárik studied directing at the School of Film and Dramatic Arts in Budapest from 1949 to 1952. He was expelled, however, probably because his

  • Huszárik, Zoltán (Hungarian filmmaker)

    Zoltán Huszárik, Hungarian filmmaker who directed numerous poetic short films and two feature films, the best-known of which is Szindbád (1971; “Sinbad”). Huszárik studied directing at the School of Film and Dramatic Arts in Budapest from 1949 to 1952. He was expelled, however, probably because his

  • Huszgen, Johannes (German humanist)

    Johann Oecolampadius, German humanist, preacher, and patristic scholar who, as a close friend of the Swiss Reformer Huldrych Zwingli, led the Reformation in Basel. A student at Heidelberg, Oecolampadius left in 1506 to become tutor to the sons of the Palatinate’s elector and in 1510 became preacher

  • Hut in the Valley, The (painting by Kichizan)

    Kichizan: …painting extant in Japan: “The Hut in the Valley” (dated 1413; located in the Konchi-in monastery in Kyōto). The painting reflects the influence of Chinese landscape art and is an early Japanese example of a shi-ga-jiku, hanging scroll on which poems commenting upon the painting are inscribed.

  • Hut-ka-Ptah (ancient city, Egypt)

    Memphis, city and capital of ancient Egypt and an important centre during much of Egyptian history. Memphis is located south of the Nile River delta, on the west bank of the river, and about 15 miles (24 km) south of modern Cairo. Closely associated with the ancient city’s site are the cemeteries,

  • Ḥuṭayʾah, al- (Arab poet)

    Islamic arts: Umayyad dynasty: …largely satirical poetry of al-Ḥuṭayʾah (died 674). The fact that Christians as well as Muslims were involved in composing classical Arabic poetry is proved by the case of al-Akhṭal (died c. 710), whose work preserves the pre-Islamic tradition of al-Ḥīrah in authentic form. He is particularly noted for his…

  • Hutch Crossword Book Awards (Indian literary awards)

    Crossword Book Awards, any of a series of Indian literary awards established in 1998 by Indian book retailer Crossword, its stated aim being to create a prize equivalent to Western literary accolades such as the Booker Prize and the Pulitzer Prize. The Crossword was initially conceived as a single

  • Hutchence, Michael (Australian musician)

    Michael Hutchence, Australian rock star and lead singer for INXS, one of the most popular bands of the late 1980s and early ’90s. He began his career on the Australian pub circuit in the 1970s and founded INXS in 1978. By 1990 the band was one of the top-selling acts in the world, although its

  • Hutcherson, Bobby (American musician)

    Bobby Hutcherson, (Robert Hutcherson), American jazz musician (born Jan. 17, 1941, Los Angeles, Calif.—died Aug. 15, 2016, Montara, Calif.), was an extraordinarily accomplished and innovative vibraphonist. He was fluent in both straight-ahead bebop and more-avant-garde idioms and was admired for

  • Hutcherson, Robert (American musician)

    Bobby Hutcherson, (Robert Hutcherson), American jazz musician (born Jan. 17, 1941, Los Angeles, Calif.—died Aug. 15, 2016, Montara, Calif.), was an extraordinarily accomplished and innovative vibraphonist. He was fluent in both straight-ahead bebop and more-avant-garde idioms and was admired for

  • Hutcheson, Francis (Scotch-Irish philosopher)

    Francis Hutcheson, Scots-Irish philosopher and major exponent of the theory of the existence of a moral sense through which man can achieve right action. The son of a Presbyterian minister, Hutcheson studied philosophy, classics, and theology at the University of Glasgow (1710–16) and then founded

  • Hutchings (Illinois, United States)

    Glenview, village, Cook county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. It is a suburb of Chicago, located 20 miles (30 km) north of downtown, and lies on the north branch of the Chicago River. Illinois and later Potawatomi Indians were early inhabitants of the area, which was visited by French explorers

  • Hutchins, Carleen Maley (American luthier and acoustician)

    Carleen Maley Hutchins, American luthier and acoustician (born May 24, 1911, Springfield, Mass.—died Aug. 7, 2009, Wolfeboro, N.H.), developed (1964) a new family of violins called the “violin octet,” a set that was heralded as the most acoustically perfect stringed instruments created since

  • Hutchins, Robert M. (American educator)

    Robert Maynard Hutchins, American educator and university and foundation president, who criticized overspecialization and sought to balance the college curriculum and to maintain the Western intellectual tradition. After attending Oberlin College in Ohio (1915–17), he served in the ambulance

  • Hutchins, Robert Maynard (American educator)

    Robert Maynard Hutchins, American educator and university and foundation president, who criticized overspecialization and sought to balance the college curriculum and to maintain the Western intellectual tradition. After attending Oberlin College in Ohio (1915–17), he served in the ambulance

  • Hutchinson (Kansas, United States)

    Hutchinson, city, seat (1872) of Reno county, south-central Kansas, U.S. Hutchinson lies on the Arkansas River. It was founded by C.C. Hutchinson, an Indian agent, in 1871 upon the arrival of the Santa Fe Railway. Salt beds discovered there in 1887 became the basis of a major industry. Hutchinson

  • Hutchinson Family, The (American singing group)

    The Hutchinson Family, American singing group of the mid-19th century, significant figures in the development of native popular music tradition. In contrast to the prevailing sentimental and minstrel songs of the period, their music confronted social issues and embraced causes including woman

  • Hutchinson’s triad (pathology)

    Sir Jonathan Hutchinson: He introduced “Hutchinson’s triad” for the diagnosis of the inherited, or congenital, form of the disease: notched, narrow-edged permanent incisors (Hutchinson’s teeth); interstitial keratitis, an inflammation with occlusion of the cornea of the eye; and labyrinthine disease, a disorder of the inner ear. He was knighted in…

  • Hutchinson, Abby (American musician)

    The Hutchinson Family: )—and their youngest sister, Abby, a contralto (b. Aug. 29, 1829—d. Nov. 24, 1892, New York City), formed a quartet and began giving concerts in New England in 1841. Initially their repertoire was centred around conventional melodramatic songs, but the Hutchinsons’ contacts with Frederick Douglass and with the Washingtonian…

  • Hutchinson, Alfred (South African author)

    Alfred Hutchinson, writer and teacher noted for his imaginative experiments with language. His autobiography, Road to Ghana (1960), was highly acclaimed and translated into several languages. It tells of his escape from Johannesburg (via East Africa and Ghana) to the United Kingdom after he had

  • Hutchinson, Anne (American religious leader)

    Anne Hutchinson, religious liberal who became one of the founders of Rhode Island after her banishment from Massachusetts Bay Colony. Anne Marbury was the daughter of a silenced clergyman and grew up in an atmosphere of learning. She married William Hutchinson, a merchant, in 1612, and in 1634 they

  • Hutchinson, Asa (American musician)

    The Hutchinson Family: 25, 1884, Hutchinson, Minn.)—and their youngest sister, Abby, a contralto (b. Aug. 29, 1829—d. Nov. 24, 1892, New York City), formed a quartet and began giving concerts in New England in 1841. Initially their repertoire was centred around conventional melodramatic songs, but the Hutchinsons’ contacts with Frederick…

  • Hutchinson, G. Evelyn (American biologist)

    G. Evelyn Hutchinson, English-born American zoologist known for his ecological studies of freshwater lakes. Hutchinson was educated at Greshams School in Holt, Norfolk, and at the University of Cambridge. He lectured for two years at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa and then

  • Hutchinson, George Evelyn (American biologist)

    G. Evelyn Hutchinson, English-born American zoologist known for his ecological studies of freshwater lakes. Hutchinson was educated at Greshams School in Holt, Norfolk, and at the University of Cambridge. He lectured for two years at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa and then

  • Hutchinson, John (American musician)

    The Hutchinson Family: ); John, a baritone who could sing falsetto (b. Jan. 4, 1821—d. Oct. 29, 1908, Lynn); Asa, who sang bass (b. March 14, 1823—d. Nov. 25, 1884, Hutchinson, Minn.)—and their youngest sister, Abby, a contralto (b. Aug. 29, 1829—d. Nov. 24, 1892, New York City), formed…

  • Hutchinson, Judson (American musician)

    The Hutchinson Family: , three brothers—Judson, who sang tenor (b. March 14, 1817—d. Jan. 10, 1859, Lynn, Mass.); John, a baritone who could sing falsetto (b. Jan. 4, 1821—d. Oct. 29, 1908, Lynn); Asa, who sang bass (b. March 14, 1823—d. Nov. 25, 1884, Hutchinson, Minn.)—and their youngest sister, Abby,…

  • Hutchinson, Lucy (English writer)

    English literature: The defeated republicans: ” Lucy Hutchinson composed, probably in the mid-1660s, her remarkable memoirs of the life of her husband, Colonel Hutchinson, the parliamentarian commander of Nottingham during the Civil Wars. Edmund Ludlow, like Hutchinson one of the regicides, fled to Switzerland in 1660, where he compiled his own…

  • Hutchinson, Sir Jonathan (British pathologist)

    Sir Jonathan Hutchinson, British surgeon, pathologist, pioneer in the study of congenital syphilis. As Surgeon to the London Hospital (1859–83) and professor of surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons (1879–83), he became an authority on eye and skin diseases, especially leprosy. He was best

  • Hutchinson, Thomas (British colonial governor)

    Thomas Hutchinson, royal governor of the British North American Province of Massachusetts Bay (1771–74) whose stringent measures helped precipitate colonial unrest and eventually the American Revolution (1775–83). The son of a wealthy merchant, Hutchinson devoted himself to business ventures before

  • Hutchinson, William (British inventor)

    lighthouse: Paraboloidal mirrors: In 1777 William Hutchinson of Liverpool, England, produced the first practical mirrors for lighthouses, consisting of a large number of small facets of silvered glass set in a plaster cast molded to a paraboloid form. More generally, shaped metal reflectors were used, silvered or highly polished. These…

  • Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (pathology)

    progeria: …major types of progeria are Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), which has its onset in early childhood, and Werner syndrome (adult progeria), which occurs later in life. A third condition, Hallerman-Streiff-François syndrome, is characterized by the presence of progeria in combination with dwarfism and other features of abnormal growth. Progeria is…

  • Hutchinsoniella macracantha (crustacean)

    horseshoe shrimp: Hutchinsoniella macracantha, which attains a length of 37 mm (1.5 inches), occurs on the Atlantic coast of the northeastern United States. Lightiella incisa, about 2.6 mm (0.10 inch) in length, is found in waters near Puerto Rico; L. serendipita, 3.2 mm (0.13 inch) long, occurs…

  • Hutchison Whampoa (company)

    Li Ka-shing: …purchased a controlling interest in Hutchison Whampoa. Under his leadership, Hutchison emerged as the world’s largest independent operator of ports. The company also bought out Husky Oil in Canada and set up mobile-phone operations in Australia, Europe, and the United States. Among Li’s other ventures was an Internet service, Tom.com,…

  • Ḥūthī Rebellion, al- (Yemeni history)

    Zaydiyyah: …a key role in the Houthi rebellion and the civil war in the 2010s.

  • hutia (rodent)

    Hutia, (family Capromyidae), any of 26 living and recently extinct species of Caribbean rodents. The surviving species of hutia are short-limbed and stout and have a large head, small eyes and ears, prominent claws, and long whiskers. Size ranges from the rat-sized dwarf hutia (Mesocapromys nanus),

  • Hutson, Don (American football player)

    Don Hutson, American professional gridiron football player who, in his 11-year career from 1935 to 1945 in the National Football League (NFL), defined the role of the receiver in the modern passing game and created many of the sport’s pass routes. In addition to playing wide receiver, he was a

  • Hutson, Donald Montgomery (American football player)

    Don Hutson, American professional gridiron football player who, in his 11-year career from 1935 to 1945 in the National Football League (NFL), defined the role of the receiver in the modern passing game and created many of the sport’s pass routes. In addition to playing wide receiver, he was a

  • Hutt River (river, New Zealand)

    Hutt River, river in southern North Island, New Zealand. It rises in the Tararua Range and, fed by the Pakuratahi, Mangaroa, Akatarawa, and Whakatikei rivers, flows south to enter Wellington Harbour after a course of 35 miles (56 km). It supplies much of the fresh water used in the Greater

  • Hutt, William Ian deWitt (Canadian actor and director)

    William Ian deWitt Hutt, Canadian theatrical actor and director (born May 2, 1920, Toronto, Ont.—died June 27, 2007, Stratford, Ont.), became a member of the Stratford Festival of Canada during its inaugural season (1953) and used his commanding stage presence to earn national acclaim in the title

  • Hutten, Philipp von (German administrator)

    Philipp von Hutten, last German captain general of Venezuela. A relative of the humanist poet and satirist Ulrich von Hutten, he sailed to Venezuela under Georg Hohermuth (called George of Spires) to rule on behalf of the Augsburg banking house of Welser, which had been granted a concession by the

  • Hutten, Ulrich von (German knight)

    Ulrich von Hutten, Franconian knight and humanist, famed as a German patriot, satirist, and supporter of Martin Luther’s cause. His restless, adventurous life, reflecting the turbulent Reformation period, was occupied with public and private quarrels, pursued with both pen and sword. As a supporter

  • Huttens letzte Tage (work by Meyer)

    Conrad Ferdinand Meyer: …permanent importance, the powerful poem Huttens letzte Tage (1871). The narrative poem Engelberg (1872) was followed by his 11 Novellen, or prose narratives, among which are Das Amulett (1873), Der Heilige (1880; The Saint), Das Leiden eines Knaben (1883), Die Hochzeit des Mönchs (1884; The Monk’s Wedding), Die Versuchung des…

  • Hutter, Jakob (Austrian religious leader)

    Anabaptist: …Moravia under the leadership of Jakob Hutter, stressed the common ownership of goods modeled on the primitive church in Jerusalem. The Hutterite colonies first established in Moravia survived the Reformation and are now located primarily in the western United States and Canada. Another important leader, Melchior Hofmann, established a large…

  • Hütter, Ralf (German musician)

    Kraftwerk: The original members were Ralf Hütter (b. 1946, Krefeld, West Germany) and Florian Schneider (b. 1947, Düsseldorf, West Germany—d. 2020).

  • Hutterian Brethren (religious group)

    Hutterite, member of the Hutterian Brethren, a branch of the Anabaptist movement, originally from Austria and South Germany, whose members found refuge from persecution in Moravia. It stressed community of goods on the model of the primitive church in Jerusalem. The community, which acquired the

  • Hutterites (religious group)

    Hutterite, member of the Hutterian Brethren, a branch of the Anabaptist movement, originally from Austria and South Germany, whose members found refuge from persecution in Moravia. It stressed community of goods on the model of the primitive church in Jerusalem. The community, which acquired the

  • Hutton, Alfred (English fencing master)

    Alfred Hutton, English fencing master. He organized numerous fencing exhibitions, displays, and lectures, which helped to revitalize interest in the sport in England at the end of the 19th century. He also was instrumental in organizing Britain’s Amateur Fencing Association (1895), serving as its

  • Hutton, Betty (American actress and singer)

    Betty Hutton, American actress and singer who electrified audiences with her explosive personality and high-spirited performances in musicals and comedies on the stage and screen. At the age of three Hutton began performing for audiences in her mother’s Detroit speakeasies during the Prohibition

  • Hutton, Brian G. (American director)

    Where Eagles Dare: Brian G. Hutton was praised for his expert direction, and the strong supporting cast included Derren Nesbitt and Ingrid Pitt.

  • Hutton, Charles (British mathematician)

    number game: 18th and 19th centuries: In 1775 Charles Hutton published five volumes of extracts from the Ladies’ Diary dealing with “entertaining mathematical and poetical parts.” On the Continent there appeared several writers, including: Christian Pescheck, Abat Bonaventura, the Dutch writer Paul Halcken, and Edme-Gilles Guyot’s four volumes of Nouvelles Récréations physiques et…

  • Hutton, James (Scottish geologist)

    James Hutton, Scottish geologist, chemist, naturalist, and originator of one of the fundamental principles of geology—uniformitarianism, which explains the features of the Earth’s crust by means of natural processes over geologic time. Hutton was the son of a merchant and city officeholder. Though

  • Hutton, Jim (American actor)

    Timothy Hutton: …reconnected with his father, actor Jim Hutton (whose best-known role was the title character in the 1975–76 television series Ellery Queen). He lived with his father while attending high school in Los Angeles, and acting in a high-school play awakened his desire for a career as an actor.

  • Hutton, Sir Leonard (British cricketer)

    Sir Leonard Hutton, cricketer considered one of England’s finest batsmen. Hutton made his first-class debut with Yorkshire at the age of 17 and within four years was opening batsman for England. Among his major achievements was a 1938 stand against Australia during which he scored 364 runs in 13

  • Hutton, Timothy (American actor)

    Timothy Hutton, American actor whose subtle portrayal of a young man’s psychological anguish in the film Ordinary People (1980) earned him critical acclaim and an Academy Award for best supporting actor. Hutton’s parents divorced when he was a small child, and he lived with his mother until his

  • Hutton, Timothy Tarquin (American actor)

    Timothy Hutton, American actor whose subtle portrayal of a young man’s psychological anguish in the film Ordinary People (1980) earned him critical acclaim and an Academy Award for best supporting actor. Hutton’s parents divorced when he was a small child, and he lived with his mother until his

  • Hutton, William (British writer)

    Blackpool: …to the British scientific writer William Hutton, who popularized the health-giving properties of seawater. Its proximity to the Lancashire industrial towns and the introduction of fast railway services brought about Blackpool’s rapid 19th-century growth. About 7 miles (11 km) of seafront were laid out along the famous sandy beach. Further…

  • Hutu (people)

    Hutu, Bantu-speaking people of Rwanda and Burundi. Numbering about 9,500,000 in the late 20th century, the Hutu comprise the vast majority in both countries but were traditionally subject to the Tutsi (q.v.), warrior-pastoralists of Nilotic stock. When the Hutu first entered the area, they found it

  • Hutu Emancipation, Party for (political party, Rwanda)

    Rwanda: Independence and the 1960s: …Kayibanda, Rwanda’s first president, the Party for Hutu Emancipation (Parti du Mouvement de l’Emancipation du Peuple Hutu) emerged as the spearhead of the revolution. Communal elections were held in 1960, resulting in a massive transfer of power to Hutu elements at the local level. And in the wake of the…

  • Hutu revolution (Rwandan history)

    Rwanda genocide of 1994: Background: …personnel, which led to the Hutu revolution. The revolution began with an uprising on Nov. 1, 1959, when a rumour of the death of a Hutu leader at the hands of Tutsi perpetrators led groups of Hutu to launch attacks on the Tutsi. Months of violence followed, and many Tutsi…

  • Hutuo River (river, China)

    Hai River system: …with its important tributary, the Hutuo River, rising in the Taihang Mountains west of Shijiazhuang in western Hebei. The most important of the Hai’s tributaries is the Yongding. Issuing from the Guanting Reservoir—which is itself fed by the Sanggan River—the Yongding flows into the North China Plain in the Beijing…

  • Huwawa (Mesopotamian mythology)

    Gilgamesh: …men set out together against Huwawa (Humbaba), the divinely appointed guardian of a remote cedar forest, but the rest of the engagement is not recorded in the surviving fragments. In Tablet VI Gilgamesh, who had returned to Uruk, rejected the marriage proposal of Ishtar, the goddess of love, and then,…

  • Huxley’s Line (faunal boundary)

    biogeographic region: Oriental region: Huxley’s line is considered a more appropriate delineation by some zoogeographers (e.g., G.G. Simpson) because the Philippines has a highly idiosyncratic fauna.

  • Huxley, Aldous (British author)

    Aldous Huxley, English novelist and critic gifted with an acute and far-ranging intelligence whose works are notable for their wit and pessimistic satire. He remains best known for one novel, Brave New World (1932), a model for much dystopian science fiction that followed. Aldous Huxley was a

  • Huxley, Aldous Leonard (British author)

    Aldous Huxley, English novelist and critic gifted with an acute and far-ranging intelligence whose works are notable for their wit and pessimistic satire. He remains best known for one novel, Brave New World (1932), a model for much dystopian science fiction that followed. Aldous Huxley was a

  • Huxley, Elspeth Josceline Grant (British writer)

    Elspeth Josceline Grant Huxley, British writer (born July 23, 1907, London, Eng.—died Jan. 10, 1997, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, Eng.), was the versatile, prolific author of more than 30 books and hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles. Her wit and sharp insights were evident in works that i

  • Huxley, Hugh Esmor (British biologist)

    Hugh Esmor Huxley, English molecular biologist whose study (with Jean Hanson) of muscle ultrastructure using the techniques of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy led him to propose the sliding-filament theory of muscle contraction. An explanation for the conversion of chemical energy to

  • Huxley, Sir Andrew Fielding (British physiologist)

    Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley, English physiologist, cowinner (with Sir Alan Hodgkin and Sir John Carew Eccles) of the 1963 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. His researches centred on nerve and muscle fibres and dealt particularly with the chemical phenomena involved in the transmission of nerve

  • Huxley, Sir Julian (British biologist)

    Sir Julian Huxley, English biologist, philosopher, educator, and author who greatly influenced the modern development of embryology, systematics, and studies of behaviour and evolution. Julian, a grandson of the prominent biologist T.H. Huxley, a brother of novelist Aldous Huxley, and the oldest

  • Huxley, T. H. (British biologist)

    Thomas Henry Huxley, English biologist, educator, and advocate of agnosticism (he coined the word). Huxley’s vigorous public support of Charles Darwin’s evolutionary naturalism earned him the nickname “Darwin’s bulldog,” while his organizational efforts, public lectures, and writing helped elevate

  • Huxley, Thomas Henry (British biologist)

    Thomas Henry Huxley, English biologist, educator, and advocate of agnosticism (he coined the word). Huxley’s vigorous public support of Charles Darwin’s evolutionary naturalism earned him the nickname “Darwin’s bulldog,” while his organizational efforts, public lectures, and writing helped elevate

  • Huxtable, Ada Louise (American architecture critic)

    Ada Louise Huxtable, (Ada Louise Landman), American architecture critic (born March 14, 1921, New York, N.Y.—died Jan. 7, 2013, New York City), praised the construction and preservation of Manhattan buildings that complied with her vision of respecting societal needs and maintaining civic history

  • Huy (Belgium)

    history of the Low Countries: Frankish rule: , Dinant, Namur, Huy, and Liège) developed. The more or less independent area on the North Sea coast, however, found itself threatened during the 7th century by the rise of the Frankish nobles. In particular, the family of the Pippins, who came from the centre of Austrasia (the…

  • Huyām fī jinān al-shām, Al- (novel by al-Bustānī)

    Arabic literature: The novel: …Syria by Fransīs Marrāsh, and Al-Huyām fī jinān al-shām (1870; “Passion in Syrian Gardens”), a work set during the 7th-century Islamic conquest of Syria, by Salīm al-Bustānī. The latter work appeared in serial form in the Bustānī family’s journal, Al-Jinān, and this publication mode established a pattern that was to…

  • Huyen Phu So (Vietnamese philosopher)

    Huynh Phu So, Vietnamese philosopher, Buddhist reformer, and founder (1939) of the religion Phat Giao Hoa Hao, more simply known as Hoa Hao (q.v.), and an anti-French, anticommunist military and political activist. Frail and sickly in his youth, he was educated by a Buddhist monk and at the age o

  • Huygens (European Space Agency space probe)

    Cassini-Huygens: …and the European Space Agency’s Huygens probe, which landed on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. Cassini was named for the French astronomer Gian Domenico Cassini, who discovered four of Saturn’s moons and the Cassini division, a large gap in Saturn’s rings. Huygens was named for the Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens, who…

  • Huygens gap (astronomy)

    Saturn: The ring system: …within the C ring; the Huygens gap (1.95 Saturn radii), at the outer edge of the B ring; the Encke gap (2.21 Saturn radii), a gap in the outer part of the A ring; and the Keeler gap (2.26 Saturn radii), almost at the outer edge of the A ring.…

  • Huygens’ construction (optics)

    Huygens’ principle, in optics, a statement that all points of a wave front of light in a vacuum or transparent medium may be regarded as new sources of wavelets that expand in every direction at a rate depending on their velocities. Proposed by the Dutch mathematician, physicist, and astronomer,

  • Huygens’ principle (optics)

    Huygens’ principle, in optics, a statement that all points of a wave front of light in a vacuum or transparent medium may be regarded as new sources of wavelets that expand in every direction at a rate depending on their velocities. Proposed by the Dutch mathematician, physicist, and astronomer,

  • Huygens’ wavelet (physics)

    sound: Circular and spherical waves: The result is a Huygens’ wavelet construction, illustrated in Figure 2A and 2B for a two-dimensional plane wave and circular wave. The insightful point suggested by the Dutch physicist Christiaan Huygens is that all the wavelets of Figure 2A and 2B, including those not shown but originating between those…

  • Huygens, Christiaan (Dutch scientist and mathematician)

    Christiaan Huygens, Dutch mathematician, astronomer, and physicist, who founded the wave theory of light, discovered the true shape of the rings of Saturn, and made original contributions to the science of dynamics—the study of the action of forces on bodies. Huygens was from a wealthy and

  • Huygens, Constantijn (Dutch diplomat and poet)

    Constantijn Huygens, the most versatile and the last of the true Dutch Renaissance virtuosos, who made notable contributions in the fields of diplomacy, scholarship, music, poetry, and science. His diplomatic service took him several times to England, where he met and was greatly influenced by John

  • Huyghens, Christian (Dutch scientist and mathematician)

    Christiaan Huygens, Dutch mathematician, astronomer, and physicist, who founded the wave theory of light, discovered the true shape of the rings of Saturn, and made original contributions to the science of dynamics—the study of the action of forces on bodies. Huygens was from a wealthy and

  • Huyghensz, Lucas (Dutch artist)

    Lucas van Leyden, northern Renaissance painter and one of the greatest engravers of his time. Lucas was first trained by his father, Huygh Jacobszoon; later, he entered the workshop of Cornelis Engelbrechtsz(oon), a painter of Leiden. His paintings, as well as his prints, reveal his unique approach

  • Huyghenszoon, Lucas (Dutch artist)

    Lucas van Leyden, northern Renaissance painter and one of the greatest engravers of his time. Lucas was first trained by his father, Huygh Jacobszoon; later, he entered the workshop of Cornelis Engelbrechtsz(oon), a painter of Leiden. His paintings, as well as his prints, reveal his unique approach

  • Huynh Phu So (Vietnamese philosopher)

    Huynh Phu So, Vietnamese philosopher, Buddhist reformer, and founder (1939) of the religion Phat Giao Hoa Hao, more simply known as Hoa Hao (q.v.), and an anti-French, anticommunist military and political activist. Frail and sickly in his youth, he was educated by a Buddhist monk and at the age o

  • Huynh Tan Phat (Vietnamese leader)

    Huynh Tan Phat, one of the leading theoreticians of the National Liberation Front (NLF), the Vietnamese guerrilla organization formed in 1960 to oppose the U.S.-backed Saigon government and to reunite the country. From 1969 he was president of the South Vietnamese Provisional Revolutionary

  • Huynh Tinh Cua (Vietnamese scholar)

    Paulus Cua, Vietnamese scholar who contributed to the popular usage of Quoc-ngu, a romanized system of transcribing the Vietnamese language devised by mid-17th-century Portuguese missionaries and further modified by Alexandre de Rhodes, a 17th-century French missionary. Cua helped make Quoc-ngu

  • Huysman, Roelof (Dutch humanist)

    Rodolphus Agricola, Dutch humanist who, basing his philosophy on Renaissance ideas, placed special emphasis on the freedom of the individual and the complete development of the self, from both an intellectual and a physical standpoint. His ideas influenced Desiderius Erasmus, another Dutch

  • Huysmans, Camille (Belgian writer and statesman)

    Camille Huysmans, socialist writer and statesman, a leader of the moderate wing of the Flemish nationalist movement during the first decades of the 20th century, and prime minister of Belgium from 1946 to 1947. Trained as a philologist, Huysmans taught at the collège at Ieper, Belg., the Athenaeum

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