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  • Howard, Robert E. (American writer)

    Conan the Barbarian: …was created by American writer Robert E. Howard and first appeared in short stories published in Weird Tales magazine in the early 1930s. Howard’s single extended-length Conan tale, which was serialized (1935–36) as “The Hour of the Wolf,” was published after his death as the first Conan novel, Conan the…

  • Howard, Robin (British dance patron)

    Robin Howard, British balletomane and dance company founder who promoted modern dance in England. Howard, grandson of Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin and the eldest child of Sir Arthur and Lady Lorna Howard, studied at Eton College and served in World War II as a lieutenant in the Scots Guard

  • Howard, Robin Jared Stanley (British dance patron)

    Robin Howard, British balletomane and dance company founder who promoted modern dance in England. Howard, grandson of Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin and the eldest child of Sir Arthur and Lady Lorna Howard, studied at Eton College and served in World War II as a lieutenant in the Scots Guard

  • Howard, Ron (American filmmaker and actor)

    Ron Howard, American filmmaker who first achieved fame as a child actor and later became a respected director. Howard’s parents were in show business, and he made his first screen appearance, in Frontier Woman (1955), at the age of 18 months. His first onstage appearance came at age two in a

  • Howard, Ronald William (American filmmaker and actor)

    Ron Howard, American filmmaker who first achieved fame as a child actor and later became a respected director. Howard’s parents were in show business, and he made his first screen appearance, in Frontier Woman (1955), at the age of 18 months. His first onstage appearance came at age two in a

  • Howard, Roy W. (American journalist)

    Roy W. Howard, American journalist and editor who was codirector of the Scripps-Howard newspaper chain from 1925, when the Scripps-Howard name replaced the original designation, Scripps-McRae. Howard directed Scripps-Howard as the surviving partner after the death in 1938 of Robert Scripps. By that

  • Howard, Roy Wilson (American journalist)

    Roy W. Howard, American journalist and editor who was codirector of the Scripps-Howard newspaper chain from 1925, when the Scripps-Howard name replaced the original designation, Scripps-McRae. Howard directed Scripps-Howard as the surviving partner after the death in 1938 of Robert Scripps. By that

  • Howard, Shemp (American actor)

    The Bank Dick: Future Three Stooges member Shemp Howard portrayed Sousè’s favourite bartender. The Bank Dick was the last film to feature Fields in a starring role. Poor health aggravated by excessive drinking relegated him to cameo appearances in subsequent films until his death in 1946. The film’s title uses a slang…

  • Howard, Sidney (American writer)

    Sidney Howard, American playwright who helped to bring psychological as well as theatrical realism to the American stage. Howard graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1915 and studied under George Pierce Baker at his Harvard Workshop 47. In World War I Howard served with the

  • Howard, Sidney Coe (American writer)

    Sidney Howard, American playwright who helped to bring psychological as well as theatrical realism to the American stage. Howard graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1915 and studied under George Pierce Baker at his Harvard Workshop 47. In World War I Howard served with the

  • Howard, Sir Ebenezer (British urban planner)

    Sir Ebenezer Howard, founder of the English garden-city movement, which influenced urban planning throughout the world. After starting work in a stockbroker’s office at age 15, Howard learned shorthand and held various jobs as a private secretary and stenographer before becoming a shorthand

  • Howard, Sir Robert (English dramatist)

    Sir Robert Howard, English dramatist, remembered chiefly for his dispute with John Dryden on the use of rhymed verse in drama. Howard was knighted by the royalists in 1644 and was imprisoned during the Commonwealth, but after the Restoration he was elected to Parliament and ultimately became a

  • Howard, Thomas (English noble [1443-1524])

    Thomas Howard, 2nd duke of Norfolk, noble prominent during the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII of England. Son of the 1st Duke of Norfolk, Thomas Howard early shared his father’s fortunes; he fought at Barnet for Edward IV and was made steward of the royal household and created Earl of Surrey in

  • Howard, Thomas (English noble [1538-1572])

    Thomas Howard, 4th duke of Norfolk, English nobleman executed for his intrigues against Queen Elizabeth I on behalf of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots, a Roman Catholic claimant to the English throne. He was the son of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, who was put to death for alleged treasonable

  • Howard, Thomas (English noble [1473-1554])

    Thomas Howard, 3rd duke of Norfolk, powerful English noble who held a variety of high offices under King Henry VIII. Although he was valuable to the king as a military commander, he failed in his aspiration to become the chief minister of the realm. Howard was the brother-in-law of King Henry VII

  • Howard, Thomas, 1st Earl of Suffolk (English commander)

    Thomas Howard, 1st earl of Suffolk, an English commander during the attack of the Spanish Armada and in other forays against the Spanish during the reign of Elizabeth I. He was also a councillor in the reign of James I. Howard was the second son of the 4th duke of Norfolk. He commanded the

  • Howard, Trevor (British actor)

    Trevor Howard, British actor who was best known for his portrayal of a sensitive doctor in love with a married woman in the bittersweet film Brief Encounter (1945). Howard made his professional acting debut in 1934 while still a student at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. He appeared regularly on

  • Howard, Trevor Wallace (British actor)

    Trevor Howard, British actor who was best known for his portrayal of a sensitive doctor in love with a married woman in the bittersweet film Brief Encounter (1945). Howard made his professional acting debut in 1934 while still a student at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. He appeared regularly on

  • Howard, William K. (American director)

    William K. Howard, American director who made some 50 films, notably The Power and the Glory (1933), a drama known for its narrative structure, and the historical epic Fire over England (1937). Following his graduation from the Ohio State University, Howard managed movie theatres and sold film

  • howardite (meteorite)

    achondrite: diogenites, eucrites, howardites, lodranites, nakhlites, shergottites, and ureilites. The howardites, eucrites, and diogenites (HEDs) are from the large asteroid Vesta. The shergottites, nakhlites, and chassignites almost certainly came from Mars. In addition, a small group of achondrites are believed to be derived from the

  • Howards End (film by Ivory [1992])

    Merchant and Ivory: …with a View (1986), and Howards End (1992)—all of which won awards. For the latter two films, Ivory received Academy Award nominations for best director, and both were nominated for best picture. By the time The Remains of the Day was released in 1993, the filmmaking team was well established.…

  • Howards End (novel by Forster)

    Howards End, novel by E.M. Forster, published in 1910. The narrative concerns the relationships that develop between the imaginative, life-loving Schlegel family—Margaret, Helen, and their brother Tibby—and the apparently cool, pragmatic Wilcoxes—Henry and Ruth and their children Charles, Paul, and

  • Howarth, Hedley John (New Zealand cricketer)

    Hedley John Howarth, New Zealand cricketer (born Dec. 25, 1943, Auckland, N.Z.—died Nov. 7, 2008, Auckland), was the foremost left-arm slow bowler for New Zealand in the 1970s. At the time of his death, Howarth’s 541 career first-class wickets were second only to Sir Richard Hadlee’s 1,490 among

  • Howarth, Robert (American biologist)

    shale gas: Critics and skeptics: Both Hughes and American biologist Robert Howarth of Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, dismiss claims that shale gas is “green.” They argue that, after accounting for all the energy consumed and all the pollutants emitted during all the steps from exploration to combustion, drilling and fracking actually produce a fuel…

  • howdah (carriage)

    saddle: They are usually called howdahs (Hindi: hauda).

  • Howdy Doody (puppet character)

    National Broadcasting Co., Inc.: Television and beyond: …of such programs as The Howdy Doody Show (1947–60) and Kraft Television Theatre (1947–58; another version appeared on ABC in 1953–55) and such stars as Milton Berle and Sid Caesar, NBC television perennially ran second in the ratings to CBS. Even so, NBC remained a leader in the field of…

  • Howe Caverns (caves, New York, United States)

    Howe Caverns, series of underground caves in Schoharie county, east-central New York, U.S. The site is located 38 miles (61 km) west of Albany. Named for Lester Howe, who is credited with their discovery in 1842, the limestone caves are 160–200 feet (50–60 metres) below the surface. They contain

  • Howe Hill (hill, Australia)

    Cape Howe: …to the conspicuous landmark of Howe Hill (1,297 feet [395 m]). Sighted in 1770 by the British navigator Captain James Cook, the cape was named after Richard, Lord Howe, then treasurer of the Royal Navy.

  • Howe of Aberavon, Richard Edward Geoffrey Howe, Baron (Welsh-born British politician)

    Geoffrey Howe, (Richard Edward Geoffrey Howe, Baron Howe of Aberavon), Welsh-born British politician (born Dec. 20, 1926, Port Talbot, Wales—died Oct. 9, 2015, Idlicote, Warwickshire, Eng.), precipitated the downfall of Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher when on Nov. 13, 1990, he

  • Howe of Langar, Viscount (British admiral)

    Richard Howe, Earl Howe, British admiral who commanded the Channel fleet at the Battle of the First of June (1794) during the French Revolutionary Wars. Howe entered the navy in 1740, saw much active service, especially in North America, and was rapidly promoted. By the death of his elder brother,

  • Howe truss (engineering)

    William Howe: …received two patents for the Howe truss. After he built a bridge over the Connecticut River at Springfield, his truss proved so successful that henceforth he was primarily a bridge builder. His truss, with wooden diagonal members and iron vertical ties, was the most popular bridge design in the U.S.…

  • Howe, Cape (region, Australia)

    Cape Howe, southeastern point of mainland Australia, at the Victoria–New South Wales border, 300 miles (560 km) southwest of Sydney. It is the southern portal of Disaster Bay, an inlet of the Tasman Sea. The cape rises to the conspicuous landmark of Howe Hill (1,297 feet [395 m]). Sighted in 1770

  • Howe, Clarence Decatur (Canadian statesman)

    Canada: Postwar prosperity: …minister of trade and commerce, Clarence Decatur Howe, who argued that increased U.S. investment was beneficial for Canada. But others were uneasy over the growth of U.S. control over Canadian businesses and over the obvious partnership between Howe and American enterprises. Never was this unease more apparent than in May…

  • Howe, E. W. (American writer)

    E.W. Howe, American editor, novelist, and essayist known for his iconoclasm and pessimism. Howe went to work at age seven on his father’s homestead near Bethany, Mo. An apprentice printer at 12, he worked at the trade in Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, and Utah (1867–72). At 19 he was publisher of the

  • Howe, Edgar Watson (American writer)

    E.W. Howe, American editor, novelist, and essayist known for his iconoclasm and pessimism. Howe went to work at age seven on his father’s homestead near Bethany, Mo. An apprentice printer at 12, he worked at the trade in Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, and Utah (1867–72). At 19 he was publisher of the

  • Howe, Elias (American inventor)

    Elias Howe, American inventor whose sewing machine helped revolutionize garment manufacture in the factory and in the home. Interested in machinery since childhood, Howe learned the machinist trade and worked in a cotton machinery factory in Lowell, Mass., and later in Cambridge. During this time

  • Howe, Frederick Webster (American inventor and manufacturer)

    Frederick Webster Howe, American inventor and manufacturer. He was the son of a blacksmith. He produced classic designs of several machine tools while still in his 20s: a profiling machine, a barrel-drilling and -rifling machine, and the first commercially viable universal milling machine. Howe

  • Howe, Geoffrey (Welsh-born British politician)

    Geoffrey Howe, (Richard Edward Geoffrey Howe, Baron Howe of Aberavon), Welsh-born British politician (born Dec. 20, 1926, Port Talbot, Wales—died Oct. 9, 2015, Idlicote, Warwickshire, Eng.), precipitated the downfall of Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher when on Nov. 13, 1990, he

  • Howe, Gordie (Canadian hockey player)

    Gordie Howe, Canadian professional ice hockey player who led the Detroit Red Wings to four Stanley Cup championships (1950, 1952, 1954, and 1955) and to seven consecutive first-place regular-season finishes (1949–55) in a career that encompassed a record 1,767 NHL games played over 32 seasons (25

  • Howe, Gordon (Canadian hockey player)

    Gordie Howe, Canadian professional ice hockey player who led the Detroit Red Wings to four Stanley Cup championships (1950, 1952, 1954, and 1955) and to seven consecutive first-place regular-season finishes (1949–55) in a career that encompassed a record 1,767 NHL games played over 32 seasons (25

  • Howe, Irving (American literary critic)

    Irving Howe, American literary and social critic and educator noted for his probing into the social and political viewpoint in literary criticism. Howe was educated at the City College of New York and served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He taught at Brandeis and Stanford universities from

  • Howe, James Wong (American cinematographer)

    James Wong Howe, one of the greatest cinematographers of the American film industry. Howe started work in 1917 as assistant cameraman to Cecil B. deMille and in 1922 became chief cameraman for Famous Players. He later worked at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Warner Brothers, Columbia, and RKO, then

  • Howe, Joseph (Canadian statesman and publisher)

    Joseph Howe, Canadian statesman and newspaper publisher, premier of Nova Scotia in 1860–63, agitator for responsible, or cabinet, government for Nova Scotia, and opponent of Confederation of the British North American provinces. In 1827 Howe started a weekly nonpolitical journal, the Acadian. The

  • Howe, Julia Ward (American writer)

    Julia Ward Howe, American author and lecturer best known for her “Battle Hymn of the Republic.” Julia Ward came of a well-to-do family and was educated privately. In 1843 she married educator Samuel Gridley Howe and took up residence in Boston. Always of a literary bent, she published her first

  • Howe, Louis McHenry (American reporter)

    Raymond Moley: …to the attention of Louis Howe, a close associate of Franklin Roosevelt.

  • Howe, Oscar (American artist)

    South Dakota: The arts: …book and magazine illustrations, and Oscar Howe (1915–83), a Yanktonai Sioux who incorporated tribal motifs and symbolism in his paintings. A collection of Howe’s works is housed at the University of South Dakota. Traditional Native American crafts, many of which include intricate beadwork, are displayed and sold throughout the state.

  • Howe, Richard Howe, Earl, Baron Howe of Langar (British admiral)

    Richard Howe, Earl Howe, British admiral who commanded the Channel fleet at the Battle of the First of June (1794) during the French Revolutionary Wars. Howe entered the navy in 1740, saw much active service, especially in North America, and was rapidly promoted. By the death of his elder brother,

  • Howe, Robert (United States general)

    Capture of Savannah: …of Continentals and militia under Major General Robert Howe could muster only 850 effective men. Howe positioned his men around the southern edge of Savannah with the untrained local militia on his far right, farthest from the point of expected British arrival. He then waited, thinking the surrounding swamps would…

  • Howe, Samuel Gridley (American educator)

    Samuel Gridley Howe, American physician, educator, and abolitionist as well as the founding director of the New-England Institution for the Education of the Blind (later known as the Perkins School for the Blind) and the Massachusetts School for Idiotic and Feeble-Minded Youth. Howe was known

  • Howe, Steve (British musician)

    art rock: ), Steve Howe (Yes and Asia), Greg Lake (King Crimson and ELP), and John Wetton (King Crimson, U.K., and Asia). Some of the experimental rock by such American and British artists as Laurie Anderson, David Bowie, Brian Eno, the Velvet Underground, and Frank Zappa is also…

  • Howe, William (British military commander)

    William Howe, commander in chief of the British army in North America (1776–78) who, despite several military successes, failed to destroy the Continental Army and stem the American Revolution. Brother of Adm. Richard Lord Howe, William Howe had been active in North America during the last French

  • Howe, William (American inventor)

    William Howe, U.S. inventor who pioneered in the development of truss bridges in the U.S. An uncle of Elias Howe, the sewing-machine inventor, William Howe farmed until 1838, the year he was engaged to build a bridge for the Boston and Albany Railroad at Warren, Mass. He made major alterations in

  • Howe, William Howe, 5th Viscount (British military commander)

    William Howe, commander in chief of the British army in North America (1776–78) who, despite several military successes, failed to destroy the Continental Army and stem the American Revolution. Brother of Adm. Richard Lord Howe, William Howe had been active in North America during the last French

  • Howea (plant)

    houseplant: Trees: …the feather palms is the paradise palm (Howea, or Kentia), which combines grace with sturdiness; its thick, leathery leaves can stand much abuse. The parlour palms and bamboo palms of the genus Chamaedorea have dainty fronds on slender stalks; they keep well even in fairly dark places. Similar in appearance…

  • Howel the Good (Welsh ruler)

    Hywel Dda, chieftain called in the prologues to the Welsh lawbooks “king of all Wales.” This epithet was indeed appropriate for Hywel, particularly during the last years of his reign. Hywel became ruler of Seisyllwg (roughly the area of Dyfed and the Towy Valley) jointly with his brother Clydog

  • Howel, Law of

    Welsh law, the native law of Wales. Although increasingly superseded by English law after the 13th century, Welsh law has been preserved in lawbooks that represent important documents of medieval Welsh prose. The traditional name given to Welsh law is Cyfraith Hywel, or Law of Howel. Howel Dda

  • Howelcke, Johann (Polish astronomer)

    Johannes Hevelius, astronomer who compiled an atlas of the Moon (Selenographia, published 1647) containing one of the earliest detailed maps of its surface as well as names for many of its features. A few of his names for lunar mountains (e.g., the Alps) are still in use, and a lunar crater is

  • Howell, Clark (American journalist)

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution: …did, under the editorship of Clark Howell, support American intervention in Cuba before the Spanish-American War of 1898. Howell was the son of Evan P. Howell, president and editor in chief from 1876 to 1897, and was in turn succeeded by his son, Clark Howell, Jr., in 1938. In the…

  • Howell, Francis Clark (American anthropologist)

    F. Clark Howell, American anthropologist (born Nov. 27, 1925 , Kansas City, Mo.—died March 10, 2007, Berkeley, Calif.), utilized experts in several areas of study, including biology, ecology, geology, and primatology, to establish paleoanthropology as a multidisciplinary science in the study of

  • Howell, James (English writer)

    James Howell, Anglo-Welsh writer known for his Epistolae Ho-Elianae, 4 vol. (1645–55), early and lively essays in letter form. Though vividly recording contemporary phenomena, they lack historical reliability because of plagiarizing and the addition of fictitious dates—despite the author’s position

  • Howell, Varina (first lady of the Confederate States)

    Richmond Bread Riot: …four, and Minerva Meredith, whom Varina Davis (the wife of President Davis) described as “tall, daring, Amazonian-looking,” the crowd of more than 100 women armed with axes, knives, and other weapons took their grievances to Letcher on April 2. Letcher listened, but his words failed to pacify the crowd, and…

  • Howell, Vernon (American religious leader)

    new religious movement: Apocalyptic and millenarian movements: …who later assumed the name David Koresh, took control of the group in 1987. Koresh taught a highly apocalyptic Christianity and identified himself with the Lamb of Revelation 5, which is traditionally associated with Christ. Allegations of child abuse and the launching of a retail gun business attracted the attention…

  • Howells, William Dean (American author and critic)

    William Dean Howells, U.S. novelist and critic, the dean of late 19th-century American letters, the champion of literary realism, and the close friend and adviser of Mark Twain and Henry James. The son of an itinerant printer and newspaper editor, Howells grew up in various Ohio towns and began

  • Howells, William W. (American anthropologist)

    William W. Howells, American physical anthropologist, who specialized in the establishment of population relationships through physical measurement. He is also known for his work in developing anthropological curricula and his popular books in the field, which have been widely translated and are

  • Howells, William White (American anthropologist)

    William W. Howells, American physical anthropologist, who specialized in the establishment of population relationships through physical measurement. He is also known for his work in developing anthropological curricula and his popular books in the field, which have been widely translated and are

  • Howes v. Fields (law case)

    confession: Confession in contemporary U.S. law: …than 30 years later, in Howes v. Fields (2012), the court ruled that a prisoner who had been removed from his cell and questioned by police about events that occurred before he was imprisoned did not need to be advised of his Miranda rights because, although he was in prison,…

  • Howes, Seth B. (American circus manager)

    circus: The parade: …in the United States when Seth B. Howes imported several English wagons in 1864. The American circus parade, which subsequently became a national institution, became the climax of a highly systematized publicity campaign to arouse interest in the circus during its brief appearance at any one place.

  • Howick, Charles Grey, Viscount (British general)

    Charles Grey, 1st Earl Grey, British general in the American Revolution who commanded in victories in several battles, notably against the American general Anthony Wayne and at the Battle of Germantown (1777–78). The member of an old Northumberland family and son of Sir Henry Grey, Baronet, Grey

  • Howick, Charles Grey, Viscount (prime minister of United Kingdom)

    Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, British politician, leader of the Whig (liberal) Party, and prime minister (1830–34), who presided over the passage of the Reform Act of 1832, modernizing the franchise and the electoral system. Grey received a conventional aristocratic education at Eton and Cambridge.

  • Howick, Henry George Grey, Viscount (British statesman)

    Henry George Grey, 3rd Earl Grey, British statesman who, as secretary of state for war and the colonies (1846–52), became the first British minister to pursue a policy of self-government for the colonies, so far as it then seemed possible. A member of the House of Commons from 1826 to 1845, Grey

  • Howick, Viscount (prime minister of United Kingdom)

    Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, British politician, leader of the Whig (liberal) Party, and prime minister (1830–34), who presided over the passage of the Reform Act of 1832, modernizing the franchise and the electoral system. Grey received a conventional aristocratic education at Eton and Cambridge.

  • Howick, Viscount (British statesman)

    Henry George Grey, 3rd Earl Grey, British statesman who, as secretary of state for war and the colonies (1846–52), became the first British minister to pursue a policy of self-government for the colonies, so far as it then seemed possible. A member of the House of Commons from 1826 to 1845, Grey

  • Howieson’s Poort industry (archaeology)

    Klasies: …ago a blade-based industry called Howieson’s Poort begins; this industry is a precursor of Upper Paleolithic technology. Analysis of animal remains found at the site reveals some of the earliest evidence of humans’ making use of marine resources such as shellfish.

  • Howison, George Holmes (American philosopher)

    personalism: George Holmes Howison, for example, stressed the autonomy of the free moral person to the point of making him uncreated and eternal and hence free from an infinite person. Borden Parker Bowne, who made Boston University the citadel of personalism, was explicitly theistic, holding that…

  • howitzer (gunnery)

    gun: …to cannon larger than a howitzer or mortar, although these latter two types, like all tube-fired artillery pieces, also fall within the general definition of a gun. Guns also include such military small arms as the musket, rifle, machine gun, and pistol, as well as such nonmilitary sport firearms as…

  • Howl (poem by Ginsberg)

    Howl, poem in three sections by Allen Ginsberg, first published in Howl and Other Poems in 1956. A “footnote” was added later. It is considered the foremost poetic expression of the Beat generation of the 1950s. A denunciation of the weaknesses and failings of American society, Howl is a

  • Howl (film by Epstein and Friedman [2010])

    Mary-Louise Parker: …film The Spiderwick Chronicles (2008); Howl (2010), a dramatization of the poet Allen Ginsberg’s landmark censorship trial; and the action comedy RED (2010). In 2013 she turned up in the sequel RED 2 and the supernatural action caper R.I.P.D. Her later notable film credits included the spy thriller Red Sparrow…

  • Howl and Other Poems (poetry by Ginsberg)

    Lawrence Ferlinghetti: Allen Ginsberg’s Howl and Other Poems (1956) was originally published as the fourth volume in the series. City Lights Books printed other works by Ginsberg as well as books by Jack Kerouac, Gregory Corso, Denise Levertov, William Burroughs, William Carlos Williams, and foreign authors.

  • Howl’s Moving Castle (film by Miyazaki [2004])

    Miyazaki Hayao: …Hauru no ugoku shiro (2004; Howl’s Moving Castle), the story of a young girl cursed with the body of an old woman and the quest that leads her to a legendary moving castle; it was nominated for an Academy Award in 2006. In 2005 Disney unveiled a restored version of…

  • Howl’s Moving Castle (novel by Jones)

    Diana Wynne Jones: …Chronicles of Chrestomanci series and Howl’s Moving Castle (1986)—the latter of which was made into a successful animated film by Japanese director Miyazaki Hayao in 2004. Another of her works, The Tough Guide to Fantasyland (1996; revised 2006), serves as a humorous exploration of the clichés of her favoured genre.…

  • Howland Island (island, Pacific Ocean)

    Howland Island, coral atoll, unincorporated territory of the United States. It lies in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, about 1,650 miles (2,650 km) southwest of Honolulu. The atoll rises to 20 feet (6 metres), is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) long by 0.5 mile (0.8 km) wide, and has a land area of less than

  • howler (primate)

    Howler monkey, (genus Alouatta), any of several tropical American monkeys noted for their roaring cries. Several species of howlers are widely distributed through Central and South America. These are the largest New World monkeys and generally attain lengths of about 40–70 cm (16–28 inches),

  • howler monkey (primate)

    Howler monkey, (genus Alouatta), any of several tropical American monkeys noted for their roaring cries. Several species of howlers are widely distributed through Central and South America. These are the largest New World monkeys and generally attain lengths of about 40–70 cm (16–28 inches),

  • Howlin’ Wolf (American musician)

    Howlin’ Wolf, American blues singer and composer who was one of the principal exponents of the urban blues style of Chicago. Burnett was brought up on a cotton plantation, and the music he heard was the traditional tunes of the region. He started singing professionally when quite young and in the

  • howling (animal behaviour)

    coyote: …and it is believed that howling may serve to indicate occupancy of a territory. The size of coyote territories varies among habitats and also depends on its abundance of prey. Most territories, however, range from 10 to 40 square km (4 to 15 square miles).

  • Howling at the Moon (work by Hagiwara)

    Hagiwara Sakutarō: …poetry, Tsuki ni hoeru (Howling at the Moon), which irreversibly transformed modern Japanese verse. Hagiwara contended that “psychic terror” distinguished his work, and the first poem of the collection describes the nightmare of being buried alive. In his second poetry collection, Aoneko (1923; “Blue Cat”), Hagiwara presented himself as…

  • howling dervish order (Ṣūfī order)

    Rifāʿīyah, fraternity of Muslim mystics (Ṣūfīs), known in the West as howling dervishes, found primarily in Egypt and Syria and in Turkey until outlawed in 1925. An offshoot of the Qādirīyah established in Basra, Iraq, by Aḥmad ar-Rifāʿī (d. 1187), the order preserved his stress on poverty,

  • Howman, John (English priest)

    John de Feckenham, English priest and the last abbot of Westminster. Feckenham was a monk at Evesham until that monastery was dissolved in 1540. He then returned for a time to Oxford, where he had formerly been educated, becoming in 1543 chaplain to Bishop Edmund Bonner of London. He shared

  • Howrah (India)

    Haora, city, east-central West Bengal state, northeastern India. It lies along the west bank of the Hugli (Hooghly) River directly opposite Kolkata (Calcutta). Haora is Kolkata’s largest satellite city and is the second largest city in West Bengal state. Haora has major Grand Trunk Road connections

  • Howship lacunae (anatomy)

    osteoclast: …on the bone’s surface, called Howship lacunae; the lacunae are thought to be caused by erosion of the bone by the osteoclasts’ enzymes. Osteoclasts are formed by the fusion of many cells derived from circulating monocytes in the blood. These in turn are derived from the bone marrow. Osteoclasts may…

  • HOX gene (biochemistry)

    evolution: Evolution and development: All animals have Hox genes, which may be as few as 1, as in sponges, or as many as 38, as in humans and other mammals. Hox genes are clustered in the genome. Invertebrates have only one cluster with a variable number of genes, typically fewer than 13.…

  • Hoxha, Enver (prime minister of Albania)

    Enver Hoxha, the first communist chief of state of Albania. As that country’s ruler for 40 years after World War II, he forced its transformation from a semifeudal relic of the Ottoman Empire into an industrialized economy with the most tightly controlled society in Europe. Hoxha, the son of a

  • Hoy (island, Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Hoy, second largest of the Orkney Islands of northern Scotland, located 2 miles (3 km) west of the island of Mainland, across the Sound of Hoy. Hoy is a lofty island—its name means “High Island”—with a spectacularly indented coastline of red sandstone cliffs that reach heights of more than 1,000

  • Hoy, Chris (British cyclist)

    Chris Hoy, British cyclist whose six career Olympic gold medals are the most won by any Briton and more than any other cyclist has won. Hoy took up cycling at age seven. He competed in bicycle motocross racing until 1991, when he turned briefly to mountain biking. He also rowed for Scotland at the

  • Hoy, Sir Christopher Andrew (British cyclist)

    Chris Hoy, British cyclist whose six career Olympic gold medals are the most won by any Briton and more than any other cyclist has won. Hoy took up cycling at age seven. He competed in bicycle motocross racing until 1991, when he turned briefly to mountain biking. He also rowed for Scotland at the

  • Hoya (plant genus)

    houseplant: Climbers and trailers: Intriguing is the slow-growing Hoya, or wax plant, with leathery foliage and waxy, wheel-shaped blooms. By contrast, the inch plants and wandering jew, species of Tradescantia and Zebrina, are rapid growers with watery stems and varicoloured leaves; these long-beloved houseplants are used widely in window shelves or hanging baskets.…

  • Hoya bella (plant)

    waxplant: Major species: The miniature waxplant (H. lanceolata bella) is more compact and has smaller leaves and purple-centred white flowers. Common wax flower (H. australis) is native to Australia and has fragrant flowers. Another species, H. bilobata, is endemic to the Philippines and has some of the smallest flowers…

  • Hoya carnosa (plant)

    Asclepiadoideae: Hoya carnosa, which is commonly called wax plant because of its waxy white flowers, is often grown indoors as a pot plant. Several succulent plants—such as Hoodia, Huernia, and carrion flower (Stapelia)—produce odours that humans find offensive but which attract flies to pollinate the plants.…

  • Hoydal, Karsten (Faroese writer)

    Faroese literature: Development during the 20th century: Karsten Hoydal was the first Faroese writer to compose verse directly influenced by modern foreign poets; he also translated many of their works, especially those of American poet and novelist Edgar Lee Masters. Regin Dahl and Steinbjørn B. Jacobsen have gone much farther in their…

  • Hoyer, Steny (American politician)

    Steny Hoyer, American Democratic politician, a representative from Maryland in the U.S. House of Representatives (1981– ), where he served as majority leader (2007–11; 2019– ) and minority whip (2011–19). In 2007 he became the longest-serving member of the House from Maryland. Hoyer first became

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