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  • Hoskyns, Henry William Furse (British fencer)

    Bill Hoskyns, (Henry William Furse Hoskyns), British fencer (born March 19, 1931, London, Eng.—died Aug. 4, 2013, North Perrott, Somerset, Eng.), won two Olympic silver medals in épée (as a member of the British team in 1960 and then as an individual in 1964) over the six Games in which he

  • Hoskyns, Sir Edwyn Clement, 13th Baronet (British theologian)

    Sir Edwyn Clement Hoskyns, 13th Baronet, Anglican biblical scholar and theologian. Educated at Jesus College, Cambridge, and Wells Theological College, Hoskyns was ordained in 1908. He was associated with Corpus Christi College from 1919 to 1932 and was canon theologian of Liverpool Cathedral from

  • Hosmer, Harriet Goodhue (American sculptor)

    Harriet Goodhue Hosmer, American sculptor, one of the leading female sculptors working in Rome in the 19th century and perhaps the only one to win complete financial independence through her artistic work. Hosmer was encouraged by the actress Fanny Kemble to pursue her natural talent in the art of

  • Hosokawa family (Japanese family)

    Japan: Trade between China and Japan: …western shugo families of the Hosokawa and Ōuchi, under whose protection trading merchants became active in the ports of Hakata, Hyōgo, and Sakai. After the Ōnin War (see below The Ōnin War [1467–77]), the Ōuchi controlled the trade—albeit in competition and often conflict with the Hosokawa—but with the destruction of…

  • Hosokawa Katsumoto (kanrei of Japan)

    Hosokawa Katsumoto, leader of a powerful military faction in medieval Japan whose dispute with Yamana Mochitoyo, the head of the powerful Yamana clan, resulted in the Ōnin War (1467–77). This conflict ravaged the area around the capital at Kyōto and destroyed central control over the country’s

  • Hosokawa Morihiro (prime minister of Japan)

    Hosokawa Morihiro, founder of the reform political party Japan New Party (Nihon Shintō) and prime minister of Japan in 1993–94. Hosokawa’s maternal grandfather, Konoe Fumimaro, was prime minister of Japan in 1937–39 and 1940–41. After graduating from Sophia University, Tokyo, Hosokawa joined the

  • Hosokawa Yoriyuki (kanrei of Japan)

    Japan: The establishment of the Muromachi bakufu: …the successive shogunal deputies (kanrei) Hosokawa Yoriyuki and Shiba Yoshimasa, gradually overcame the power of the great military governors (shugo) who had been so important in the founding of the new regime. He destroyed the Yamana family in 1391, and, in uniting the Northern and Southern courts, attacked and destroyed…

  • Hospers, John (American music theorist and politician)

    music: Referentialists and nonreferentialists: …according to the American theorists John Hospers in Meaning and Truth in the Arts (1946) and Donald Ferguson in Music as Metaphor (1960). Meyer made the observation that while most referentialists are expressionists, not all expressionists are referentialists. He made the useful distinction between absolute expressionists and referential expressionists and…

  • hospice (medicine)

    Hospice, a home or hospital established to relieve the physical and emotional suffering of the dying. The term hospice dates back to the European Middle Ages, when it denoted places of charitable refuge offering rest and refreshment to pilgrims and travelers. Such homes were often provided by

  • Hospicio Cabañas (museum, Guadalajara, Mexico)

    José Clemente Orozco: Mature work and later years: …chapel of the orphanage of Cabañas Hospice (1938–39), respectively. In these murals Orozco recapitulated the historical themes he had developed at Dartmouth and in Catharsis but with an intensity of anguish and despair he never again attempted. He portrayed history blindly careening toward Armageddon. The only hope for salvation in…

  • hospital

    Hospital, an institution that is built, staffed, and equipped for the diagnosis of disease; for the treatment, both medical and surgical, of the sick and the injured; and for their housing during this process. The modern hospital also often serves as a centre for investigation and for teaching. To

  • hospital almoner

    almoner: …in 1964 by the title medical social worker, the term also used in the United States. Medical social workers are employed by hospitals and public health departments.

  • Hospital de Clínicas (hospital, Montevideo, Uruguay)

    Uruguay: Health and welfare: The large Hospital de Clínicas in Montevideo has long been a low-cost medical service centre for the needy as well as a research centre. Life expectancy is relatively high, with averages of 73 years for males and 79 years for females.

  • hospital disease (disease)

    Joseph Lister: Education: …hospital disease (now known as operative sepsis—infection of the blood by disease-producing microorganisms) would be greatly decreased in their new building. The hope proved vain, however. Lister reported that, in his Male Accident Ward, between 45 and 50 percent of his amputation cases died from sepsis between 1861 and 1865.

  • Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem, Order of the (religious order)

    Hospitallers, a religious military order that was founded at Jerusalem in the 11th century and that, headquartered in Rome, continues its humanitarian tasks in most parts of the modern world under several slightly different names and jurisdictions. The origin of the Hospitallers was an 11th-century

  • Hospital Sisters of Hôtel-Dieu and Malestroit (religious order)

    Augustinian: A distinct group is the Hospital Sisters of Hôtel-Dieu and Malestroit. Sisters following the Rule of St. Augustine were staffing the Hôtel-Dieu in Paris at least from about 1217. They not only survived the French Revolution but were even allowed to continue their work. Though expelled in 1907, they managed…

  • Hospital, Janette Turner (Australian author)

    Janette Turner Hospital, Australian novelist and short-story writer who explored the political, cultural, and interpersonal boundaries that separate different peoples. Hospital graduated from the University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia (B.A., 1965), and Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario,

  • Hospital, Michel de L’ (French statesman and lawyer)

    Michel de L’Hospital, statesman, lawyer, and humanist who, as chancellor of France from 1560 to 1568, was instrumental in the adoption by the French government of a policy of toleration toward the Huguenots. L’Hospital studied law at Toulouse but was forced into exile because of his father’s

  • Hospital, The (film by Hiller [1971])

    Arthur Hiller: Films of the 1970s: The Hospital (1971) was more ambitious, a bleak satire featuring an Oscar-winning script by Chayefsky. George C. Scott was outstanding as the suicidal chief of surgery who falls in love with a patient’s daughter (Diana Rigg). Hiller’s string of successes ended, however, with Man of…

  • Hospitalers (religious order)

    Hospitallers, a religious military order that was founded at Jerusalem in the 11th century and that, headquartered in Rome, continues its humanitarian tasks in most parts of the modern world under several slightly different names and jurisdictions. The origin of the Hospitallers was an 11th-century

  • Hospitalers of Saint Mary of the Teutons in Jerusalem, House of the (religious order)

    Teutonic Order, religious order that played a major role in eastern Europe in the late Middle Ages and that underwent various changes in organization and residence from its founding in 1189/90 to the present. Its major residences, marking its major states of development, were: (1) Acre, Palestine

  • Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain)

    L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, city, Barcelona provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Catalonia, northeastern Spain. It is a southwestern industrial suburb of Barcelona city and extends from the Marina Mountains to the coastal delta of the Llobregat River. First known

  • Hospitalet de Llobregat, L’ (Spain)

    L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, city, Barcelona provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Catalonia, northeastern Spain. It is a southwestern industrial suburb of Barcelona city and extends from the Marina Mountains to the coastal delta of the Llobregat River. First known

  • hospitalization insurance

    insurance: Types of policies: Hospitalization insurance indemnifies for room and board in the hospital, laboratory fees, use of special facilities, nursing care, and certain medicines and supplies. The contracts contain specific limitations on coverage, such as a maximum number of days in the hospital and maximum allowances for room…

  • Hospitaller Order of St. John of God (Roman Catholic order)

    Saint John of God: …March 8), founder of the Hospitaller Order of St. John of God (Brothers Hospitallers), a Roman Catholic religious order of nursing brothers. In 1886 Pope Leo XIII declared him patron of hospitals and the sick.

  • Hospitallers (religious order)

    Hospitallers, a religious military order that was founded at Jerusalem in the 11th century and that, headquartered in Rome, continues its humanitarian tasks in most parts of the modern world under several slightly different names and jurisdictions. The origin of the Hospitallers was an 11th-century

  • Hospitallers of St. Anthony, Order of (Roman Catholic order)

    St. Anthony of Egypt: The Order of Hospitallers of St. Anthony was founded near Grenoble, France (c. 1100), and this institution became a pilgrimage centre for persons suffering from the disease known as St. Anthony’s fire (or ergotism). The black-robed Hospitallers, ringing small bells as they collected alms, were a…

  • hospodar (Ottoman official)

    Greece: The Phanariotes: …by Phanariotes were those of hospodar, or prince, of the Danubian principalities of Moldavia and Wallachia. Phanariotes ruled those potentially rich provinces as the viceroys of the sultans, and their luxurious courts in Jassy (now Iași, Romania) and Bucharest copied on a lesser scale the splendour of the imperial court…

  • Höss, Rudolf Franz (German Nazi commandant)

    Rudolf Franz Höss, German soldier and Nazi partisan who served as commandant of the Auschwitz concentration and extermination camp complex (1940–45) during a period when as many as 1,000,000 to 2,500,000 inmates perished there. After serving in World War I, Höss joined conservative cliques, was

  • Hoss, Salim al- (Lebanese politician)

    Michel Aoun: Military career and role in the civil war: The interim government of Salim al-Hoss, who had been appointed as caretaker after Karami’s assassination, insisted that it remained in charge. Lebanon was left with two governments, Aoun’s government in East Beirut and Hoss’s government in West Beirut.

  • Hossain, Tanjim (economist)

    John A. List: …in his joint work with Tanjim Hossain, in which they gathered data from manufacturing plants in China, List demonstrated that incentives designed to trigger loss aversion were surprisingly effective in improving worker productivity. As he discovered, workers who are paid a bonus at the beginning of a project and are…

  • Hosseini, Khaled (American author)

    Khaled Hosseini, Afghan-born American novelist who was known for his vivid depictions of Afghanistan, most notably in The Kite Runner (2003). Hosseini grew up in Kabul; his father was a diplomat and his mother a secondary-school teacher. In 1976 he and his parents moved to Paris, where his father

  • Hossō (Buddhist school)

    Yogachara: Transmitted to Japan, as Hossō, sometime after 654, the Yogachara school split into two branches, the Northern and the Southern. During the 8th century it enjoyed a period of political influence and produced such celebrated priests as Gembō and Dōkyō. In modern times the school retained the important temples…

  • Hosszu, Katinka (Hungarian swimmer)

    Katinka Hosszu, Hungarian swimmer Katinka Hosszu lived up to her “Iron Lady” nickname in 2016. She won four medals at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics and had a record-breaking year in the FINA Swimming World Cup events. She capped off the year by winning the FINA Swimming World Cup for the fifth

  • host (computing)

    Internet: Early networks: …(called host computers or simply hosts) over an entire network. Host-to-host interactions were envisioned, along with access to specialized resources (such as supercomputers and mass storage systems) and interactive access by remote users to the computational powers of time-sharing systems located elsewhere. These ideas were first realized in ARPANET, which…

  • host (biology)

    community ecology: Parasite-host interactions: Parasites and their hosts engage in a similar evolutionary arms race, although in the past parasitologists believed this not to be the case. Instead, parasites were thought to evolve gradually toward reduced antagonism—having a less detrimental effect on their hosts. The degree of…

  • Host (Eucharist)

    idolatry: …Holy Trinity) and the consecrated Host in the Eucharist (which may properly be adored because it has been changed into the very body of Christ). Although the accusation of idolatry is thus a part of the polemic of Christian against Christian, so that Protestants are accused of bibliolatry and Roman…

  • host computer (computing)

    Internet: Early networks: …(called host computers or simply hosts) over an entire network. Host-to-host interactions were envisioned, along with access to specialized resources (such as supercomputers and mass storage systems) and interactive access by remote users to the computational powers of time-sharing systems located elsewhere. These ideas were first realized in ARPANET, which…

  • host index (botany)

    plant disease: Classification of plant diseases by causal agent: Host indexes (lists of diseases known to occur on certain hosts in regions, countries, or continents) are valuable in diagnosis. When an apparently new disease is found on a known host, a check into the index for the specific host often leads to identification of…

  • host processor (computing)

    Internet: Early networks: …(called host computers or simply hosts) over an entire network. Host-to-host interactions were envisioned, along with access to specialized resources (such as supercomputers and mass storage systems) and interactive access by remote users to the computational powers of time-sharing systems located elsewhere. These ideas were first realized in ARPANET, which…

  • host rock (geology)

    igneous rock: …have cross-cutting contacts with the country rocks that they have invaded, and in many cases the country rocks show evidence of having been baked and thermally metamorphosed at these contacts. The exposed intrusive rocks are found in a variety of sizes, from small veinlike injections to massive dome-shaped batholiths, which…

  • host system (computing)

    Internet: Early networks: …(called host computers or simply hosts) over an entire network. Host-to-host interactions were envisioned, along with access to specialized resources (such as supercomputers and mass storage systems) and interactive access by remote users to the computational powers of time-sharing systems located elsewhere. These ideas were first realized in ARPANET, which…

  • hosta (plant)

    Plantain lily, (genus Hosta), any of about 40 species of hardy herbaceous perennials in the asparagus family (Asparagaceae), native to eastern Asia. Several species are ornamental plants grown for their conspicuous foliage, which may be light-to-dark green, yellow, blue, or variegated. The plants

  • Hosta (plant)

    Plantain lily, (genus Hosta), any of about 40 species of hardy herbaceous perennials in the asparagus family (Asparagaceae), native to eastern Asia. Several species are ornamental plants grown for their conspicuous foliage, which may be light-to-dark green, yellow, blue, or variegated. The plants

  • Hostaflon (chemical compound)

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), a strong, tough, waxy, nonflammable synthetic resin produced by the polymerization of tetrafluoroethylene. Known by such trademarks as Teflon, Fluon, Hostaflon, and Polyflon, PTFE is distinguished by its slippery surface, high melting point, and resistance to attack

  • hostage (warfare)

    Hostage, in war, a person handed over by one of two belligerents to the other or seized as security for the carrying out of an agreement or for preventing violation of the law of war. The practice of taking hostages is very ancient and has been used in cases of conquest, surrender, and armistice.

  • Hostage Crisis (United States history)

    Iran hostage crisis, international crisis (1979–81) in which militants in Iran seized 66 American citizens at the U.S. embassy in Tehrān and held 52 of them hostage for more than a year. The crisis, which took place during the chaotic aftermath of Iran’s Islamic revolution (1978–79) and its

  • Hostage to History: Cyprus from the Ottomans to Kissinger (work by Hitchens)

    Christopher Hitchens: …wrote Cyprus (1984; reissued as Hostage to History: Cyprus from the Ottomans to Kissinger, 1989), an analysis of the role of imperial powers in the 1974 conflicts in Cyprus, and The Elgin Marbles: Should They Be Returned to Greece? (1987).

  • Hostage, The (play by Behan)

    The Hostage, play in three acts by Brendan Behan, produced in 1958 and published in 1962. The play, which is considered Behan’s masterwork, employs ballads, slapstick, and fantasies to satirize social conditions and warfare. In the play, an English soldier is held hostage in a brothel by members of

  • Hostages (American television series)

    Toni Collette: …television with the drama series Hostages, in which she played a doctor whose family will be killed unless she assassinates the president of the United States. The show ended after one season, and Collette was cast in 2018 as a wife navigating an open marriage in Wanderlust. She appeared as…

  • Hostak, Al (American boxer)

    Tony Zale: …a 13th-round knockout of American Al Hostak on July 19, 1940, Zale defended that championship twice. On Nov. 28, 1941, Zale won a 15-round decision (a fight whose outcome is determined by judges’ scoring) over American Georgie Abrams for the vacant world middleweight title. Zale lost a 12-round decision in…

  • hostel

    Hotel, building that provides lodging, meals, and other services to the traveling public on a commercial basis. A motel performs the same functions as a hotel but in a format designed for travelers using automobiles. Inns have existed since very ancient times to serve merchants and other travelers.

  • hostel, youth (hotel)

    Youth hostel, supervised shelter providing inexpensive overnight lodging, particularly for young people. Hostels range from simple accommodations in a farm house to hotels able to house several hundred guests for days at a time. They are located in many parts of the world, usually in scenic areas,

  • Hostess House (American organization)

    Lugenia Burns Hope: …coordinate a nationwide network of Hostess Houses that eventually provided both black and Jewish soldiers, and their families, with a wide variety of services from recreation to relocation counseling.

  • hostile embargo (international law)

    embargo: …from reaching a particular country, hostile embargoes involve the detention of the vessels or other property of a foreign country.

  • hostile work environment (law)

    Harris v. Forklift Systems: …president, Charles Hardy, created a hostile work environment through his abusive, vulgar, and offensive sexual comments and actions. His conduct reportedly included calling Harris “a dumb ass woman” and suggesting they “go to the Holiday Inn to negotiate [Harris’s] raise.” In addition, he also allegedly requested that Harris and other…

  • Hostilian (Roman emperor)

    Hostilian, Roman emperor in 251. He was the younger son of the emperor Decius, who made him caesar in 250. After Decius’ death in 251, Hostilian was adopted by Vibius Trebonianus Gallus and made joint emperor with the title augustus, but he died of plague shortly

  • Hostilities (film by Cooper [2017])

    Christian Bale: …Bale starred in the western Hostilities, portraying a U.S. military officer who reluctantly agrees to escort a Native American prisoner and his family to their homeland. For the biopic Vice (2018), he undertook a major transformation to portray Dick Cheney, vice president in the administration of U.S. Pres. George W.…

  • hostilities, cessation of (military)

    law of war: Cessation of hostilities: Hostilities may be suspended pending negotiation between the parties. Negotiation may, or may not, be preceded by the display of a white flag, which merely means that one side wishes to enter into communication with the other. The parties may then enter…

  • Höstonaten (film by Ingmar Bergman [1978])

    Ingrid Bergman: Scandal and later films: …the Swedish film Höstsonaten (1978; Autumn Sonata), directed by Ingmar Bergman; she received her seventh and final Academy Award nomination for the drama. Her last role was that of Golda Meir, the Israeli prime minister, in the television play A Woman Called Golda (1981). For this role she was posthumously…

  • Hostos y Bonilla, Eugenio María de (Puerto Rican author)

    Eugenio María de Hostos, educator and writer who was an early advocate of self-government for the island of Puerto Rico. Hostos was educated in Spain and became active in republican politics as a university student there. He left Spain when that country’s new constitution (1869) refused to grant

  • Hostos, Eugenio María de (Puerto Rican author)

    Eugenio María de Hostos, educator and writer who was an early advocate of self-government for the island of Puerto Rico. Hostos was educated in Spain and became active in republican politics as a university student there. He left Spain when that country’s new constitution (1869) refused to grant

  • Hosui (Japanese musician)

    Japanese music: Schools and genres: …idioms and scales, named himself Yatsuhashi Kengyō, and founded the Yatsuhashi school of koto. The title Yatsuhashi was adopted later by another apparently unrelated school to the far south in the Ryukyu Islands.

  • Hosyo (ship)

    aircraft carrier: A Japanese carrier, the Hosyo, which entered service in December 1922, was the first carrier designed as such from the keel up.

  • HOT (philosophy)

    philosophy of mind: Executives, buffers, and HOTs: …that it involves an explicit higher-order thought (HOT)—i.e., a thought that one is in a specific mental state. Thus, the thought that one wants a glass of beer is conscious only if one thinks that one wants a glass of beer. This does not mean that the HOT itself is…

  • hot big-bang model (cosmology)

    cosmology: The hot big bang: Given the measured radiation temperature of 2.735 kelvins (K), the energy density of the cosmic microwave background can be shown to be about 1,000 times smaller than the average rest-energy density of ordinary matter in the universe. Thus, the current universe is…

  • Hot Blood (film by Ray [1956])

    Nicholas Ray: Films of the late 1950s: Ray’s next film, Hot Blood (1956), was a comparatively forgettable tale about Roma (Gypsy) life in Los Angeles, but its follow-up, Bigger than Life (1956), a fevered depiction of the American dream gone wrong, came to be regarded by many film historians as another of the director’s masterworks.…

  • hot break (protein)

    beer: Heating and cooling: …(known as hot break, or trub). Trub and spent hops are then removed in a separator where the hop cones form the filter bed. In modern practice a more rapid whirlpool separator is also used. This device is a cylindrical vessel into which wort is pumped at a tangent, the…

  • hot cap (horticulture)

    horticulture: Temperature control: …the field, including application of hot caps, cloches, plastic tunnels, and mulches of various types. Hot caps are cones of translucent paper or plastic that are placed over the tops of plants in the spring. These act as miniature greenhouses. In the past small glass sash called cloches were placed…

  • Hot Chick, The (film by Brady [2002])

    Rachel McAdams: …cast as a lead in The Hot Chick (2002), in which she played a shallow high school girl who switches bodies with a male career criminal (played by Rob Schneider). She next made headlines as the malicious popular girl Regina George in Mean Girls (2004), a comedy written by Tina…

  • hot dipping (industrial process)

    galvanizing: …applied by two general methods: hot dipping and electrolytic deposition.

  • hot dog (sausage)

    Frankfurter, highly seasoned sausage, traditionally of mixed pork and beef. Frankfurters are named for Frankfurt am Main, Ger., the city of their origin, where they were sold and eaten at beer gardens. Frankfurters were introduced in the United States in about 1900 and quickly came to be considered

  • hot drawing (fibre manufacturing)

    man-made fibre: Drawing techniques: …as PET, require that a hot-drawing step follow the spinning process fairly soon, or they will become brittle. Avoiding such brittleness is part of the reason for preparing partially oriented yarns. Acrylics may receive a hot-drawing (known as plastic stretch) following drying, but a portion of the molecular orientation is…

  • Hot Five (American jazz group)

    jazz: The cornetist breaks away: Louis Armstrong and the invention of swing: …even more clearly on Armstrong’s Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings of 1926–27—e.g., “Potato Head Blues,” “Big Butter and Egg Man,” “S.O.L. Blues,” “Hotter than That,” and “Muggles.” In effect, Armstrong taught the whole Henderson band, including the redoubtable tenor saxophonist Coleman Hawkins, how to swing.

  • hot flash

    Hot flash, symptom of declining estrogen levels associated with menopause that is characterized by a sensation of warmth of the face and upper body, flushing of the skin, sweating, tachycardia (accelerated heart rate), irritability, and headache. A hot flash typically lasts for a few minutes and

  • hot flush

    Hot flash, symptom of declining estrogen levels associated with menopause that is characterized by a sensation of warmth of the face and upper body, flushing of the skin, sweating, tachycardia (accelerated heart rate), irritability, and headache. A hot flash typically lasts for a few minutes and

  • Hot House (album by Corea [2012])

    Chick Corea: Hot House (2012), one of several albums since the 1970s that paired him with vibraphonist Gary Burton, earned Corea his 20th Grammy Award. He also won multiple Latin Grammy Awards.

  • Hot in Cleveland (American television program)

    Betty White: In June Hot in Cleveland debuted on the cable channel TV Land. The sitcom starred White as Elka, the quick-witted caretaker of a home rented by three women. The show ran until 2015. She also hosted and served as an executive producer for Betty White’s Off Their…

  • hot isostatic pressing (metallurgy)

    advanced ceramics: Pressure-assisted sintering: …methods are followed—hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing (HIP).

  • hot launch (military technology)

    rocket and missile system: Design principles: silos are designed for one-time “hot-launch” use, the rocket engines igniting within the silo and essentially destroying it as the missile departs. The Soviets pioneered the “cold-launch” method, in which the missile is expelled by gas and the rocket engine ignited after the missile clears the silo. This method, essentially…

  • HOT missile (weapon)

    rocket and missile system: Antitank and guided assault: …“light infantry antitank missile”) and HOT (haut subsonique optiquement téléguidé tiré d’un tube, or “high-subsonic, optically teleguided, tube-fired”) were similar in concept and capability to TOW.

  • hot money (economics)

    Tobin tax: …deter only speculative flows of hot money—money that moves regularly between financial markets in search of high short-term interest rates. It is not meant to impact long-term investments. The shorter the investment cycle (i.e., the time between buying and selling a currency), the higher the effective rate of tax—thus providing…

  • hot pepper (plant and fruit)

    Chili pepper, any of several species and cultivars of very hot, pungent peppers in the nightshade family (Solanaceae). Chili peppers are native to the Americas and are cultivated in warm climates around the world. Many of the most-common chili peppers are cultivars of Capsicum annuum, including the

  • hot pressing (metallurgy)

    advanced ceramics: Pressure-assisted sintering: In hot pressing a heated single-action or dual-action die press is employed. The material composing or lining the rams and die walls is extremely important, since it must not react with the ceramic being hot-pressed. Unfortunately, complex shapes cannot be processed by hot pressing. Hot isostatic…

  • hot pursuit (law)

    international law: High seas and seabed: …is a right of “hot pursuit,” provided that the pursuit itself is continuous, onto the high seas from the territorial sea or economic zone of the pursuing state in order to detain a vessel suspected of violating the laws of the coastal state in question.

  • Hot Pursuit (film by Fletcher [2015])

    Sofía Vergara: …movies as Machete Kills (2013), Hot Pursuit (2015), and Bottom of the 9th (2019); the latter starred her husband, Joe Manganiello (married 2015). In addition, Vergara lent her voice to the animated comedy The Emoji Movie (2017). Moreover, she became a prevalent subject of celebrity blogs and tabloids as the…

  • Hot Rats (album by Zappa)

    Frank Zappa: …enormously influential jazz-rock fusion album Hot Rats (1969), which featured a memorable vocal from his old friend Don Van Vliet, better known as Captain Beefheart. Throughout the 1970s Zappa released instrumental albums that featured orchestral music, jazz, his own guitar improvisations, and, later, synthesizers and sequencers. He also released rock-oriented…

  • hot rod (car)

    Hot rod, privately designed and built automobile constructed along individualistic lines to provide maximum starting acceleration; it is most popular in the United States. Hot-rod competition is largely confined to acceleration contests (see drag racing), but hot rods may also compete in various

  • hot salsa (music)

    salsa: …not always up-tempo, or “hot,” salsa grew to incorporate increasingly diverse influences and performers—from Panamanian activist-singer-songwriter Rubén Blades to Mexican American rocker Carlos Santana. Although its international popularity crested in the 1970s, salsa retained an audience into the 21st century.

  • Hot Sauce Committee Part Two (album by Beastie Boys)

    Beastie Boys: …and in May 2011 released Hot Sauce Committee Part Two (with the exception of one song, the track list was virtually identical to the unreleased Part One). Stylistically, it was similar to Ill Communication, and the star-studded video for the debut single “Make Some Noise” demonstrated that the group had…

  • Hot Spell (film by Mann [1958])

    Daniel Mann: Hot Spell (1958) was a turgid soap opera, with Booth, Shirley MacLaine, and Anthony Quinn, and The Last Angry Man (1959) was an intermittently effective version of a Gerald Green novel, starring Paul Muni and David Wayne.

  • hot spot (ecology)

    conservation: Terrestrial hot spots: …Myers identified 25 terrestrial “hot spots” of the world—25 areas on land where species with small geographic ranges coincide with high levels of modern human activity (see the map). Originally, these hot spots encompassed about 17 million square km (6.6 million square miles) of the roughly 130 million square…

  • hot spring (geology)

    Hot spring, spring with water at temperatures substantially higher than the air temperature of the surrounding region. Most hot springs discharge groundwater that is heated by shallow intrusions of magma (molten rock) in volcanic areas. Some thermal springs, however, are not related to volcanic

  • Hot Springs (Arkansas, United States)

    Hot Springs, resort, spa, city, and seat (1874) of Garland county, central Arkansas, U.S. It lies just north of the Ouachita River at the eastern edge of the Ouachita Mountains and the Ouachita National Forest. Hot Springs National Park is intertwined with the northern portion of the city. The area

  • Hot Springs (New Mexico, United States)

    Truth or Consequences, city, seat (1937) of Sierra county, southwestern New Mexico, U.S. It lies along the Rio Grande, east of the Black Range in Gila National Forest, 60 miles (97 km) north-northwest of Las Cruces. The locality was first settled in the mid-19th century near the Palomas Springs,

  • Hot Springs (South Dakota, United States)

    Hot Springs, city, seat (1882) of Fall River county, southwestern South Dakota, U.S. It lies along the Fall River in a canyon walled by red rocks, in the southern Black Hills, about 50 miles (80 km) south of Rapid City. Sioux and Cheyenne Indians were once frequent visitors to the area’s warm

  • Hot Springs National Park (national park, Arkansas, United States)

    Hot Springs National Park, National park, central Arkansas, U.S. Established in 1921, it occupies an area of 9 square mi (23 sq km). It is centred on 47 thermal springs, from which more than 850,000 gallons (3,200,000 litres) of water, with an average temperature of 143 °F (62 °C), flow daily. The

  • Hot Springs State Park (park, Wyoming, United States)

    Thermopolis: …Horn Hot Springs (within present-day Hot Springs State Park), which are among the world’s largest, with an outflow of 18,600,000 gallons (70,400,000 litres) a day and a water temperature of 135 °F (57 °C). Gottsche Rehabilitation Center for hot-water treatment of disease is there. A centre for livestock, grain, and…

  • hot top enamel (photochemical processes)

    photoengraving: Plate coating and printing: “Hot top” enamels nearly always contain fish glue as well as some egg albumin, to which is added a dichromate sensitizer. Mixtures of glue and albumin are used when it is necessary to control the etch resistance and the ease with which the edges of…

  • hot wings (food)

    Buffalo wings, deep-fried, unbreaded chicken wings or drums coated with a vinegar-and-cayenne-pepper hot sauce mixed with butter. They are commonly served with celery and a blue cheese dipping sauce, which acts as a cooling agent for the mouth. A popular bar food and appetizer, wings can be ordered

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