• 0-9
  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g
  • h
  • i
  • j
  • k
  • l
  • m
  • n
  • o
  • p
  • q
  • r
  • s
  • t
  • u
  • v
  • w
  • x
  • y
  • z
  • Homes, A. M. (American author)

    A.M. Homes, American novelist and short-story writer known for her transgressive and darkly humorous explorations of American suburbia. Homes, who was adopted, was raised in Chevy Chase, Maryland, by an artist father and guidance counselor mother. Encouraged by her parents and by her own social

  • Homes, Amy Michael (American author)

    A.M. Homes, American novelist and short-story writer known for her transgressive and darkly humorous explorations of American suburbia. Homes, who was adopted, was raised in Chevy Chase, Maryland, by an artist father and guidance counselor mother. Encouraged by her parents and by her own social

  • homeschooling (education)

    Homeschooling, educational method situated in the home rather than in an institution designed for that purpose. It is representative of a broad social movement of families, largely in Western societies, who believe that the education of children is, ultimately, the right of parents rather than a

  • Homesman, The (film by Jones [2014])

    Tommy Lee Jones: …cowrote, directed, and starred in The Homesman (2014), a western about a pioneer woman (played by Hilary Swank) and a claim jumper (Jones) who must shepherd three mentally unstable women from the Nebraska Territory to Iowa in the late 19th century. He later played a doctor who transfers the consciousness…

  • Homestake Gold Mine (mine, Lead, South Dakota, United States)

    Black Hills: …1877, by which time the Homestake Mine had become the largest gold mine in the United States.

  • Homestead (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Homestead, borough (town), Allegheny county, southwestern Pennsylvania, U.S. It lies across the Monongahela River from the southeastern edge of Pittsburgh and is adjacent to West Homestead and Munhall boroughs. Laid out as Amity Homestead in 1871, the borough developed with the growth of Andrew

  • Homestead (Florida, United States)

    Homestead, city, Miami-Dade county, southern Florida, U.S., in the fertile Redland district, about 30 miles (50 km) southwest of Miami. The region was inhabited by Tequesta and then Calusa Indians before their disappearance by the early 19th century. Established in 1904 after the arrival of the

  • Homestead Act (United States [1862])

    Homestead Act of 1862, in U.S. history, significant legislative action that promoted the settlement and development of the American West. It was also notable for the opportunity it gave African Americans to own land. Pres. Abraham Lincoln signed the Homestead Act into law on May 20, 1862. From

  • Homestead Grays (American baseball team)

    Cool Papa Bell: …American Giants (1942–43), and the Homestead Grays (1943–45). He was also player-manager of the Kansas City Monarchs (1948–50). In addition, Bell competed in the Mexican and California Winter leagues and in Cuba and the Dominican Republic. A right-handed batter who later became a switch hitter, he maintained an average that…

  • homestead law

    common law: Property and succession: …some Canadian provinces, there are homestead laws, which protect the family house or a certain minimum sum of money from the claims of creditors.

  • Homestead Movement

    Homestead Movement, in U.S. history, movement that promoted the free ownership of land in the Midwest, Great Plains, and the West by people willing to settle on and cultivate it. The movement culminated in the Homestead Act of 1862. From the beginning of the republic, the dominant view of the

  • Homestead National Monument of America (national monument, Nebraska, United States)

    Homestead National Monument of America, historic site, southeastern Nebraska, U.S., located about 4 miles (6 km) west of Beatrice. Established in 1936 on the site of one of the first claims under the Homestead Act of 1862, entered by Daniel Freeman, it commemorates the Homestead Movement and the

  • Homestead riot (United States history)

    Homestead Strike, violent labour dispute between the Carnegie Steel Company and many of its workers that occurred on July 6, 1892, in Homestead, Pennsylvania. The strike pitted the company’s management (which included owner American industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie and American

  • Homestead Strike (United States history)

    Homestead Strike, violent labour dispute between the Carnegie Steel Company and many of its workers that occurred on July 6, 1892, in Homestead, Pennsylvania. The strike pitted the company’s management (which included owner American industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie and American

  • Homewood Trilogy (novels by Wideman)

    John Edgar Wideman: The so-called Homewood Trilogy, an historical exploration of family and community, comprised two novels, Hiding Place (1981) and Sent for You Yesterday (1983), and a collection of short stories, Damballah (1981). In Brothers and Keepers (1984), his first nonfiction book, he contemplated the role of the black…

  • Homework (album by Daft Punk [1997])

    Daft Punk: Their debut album, Homework (1997), won them further acclaim within the dance music scene, and the buoyant single “Around the World”—which featured a looped, electronically processed vocal—helped introduce the act to a wider audience.

  • homework (industrial relations)

    sweatshop: …the sweatshop has depended on homework (literally, work done in the home) and the development of contracting. In the homework system, members of a family receive payment for piecework done in their own home or in a residence that has been converted into a small factory. In contracting, individual workers…

  • Homicidal (film by Castle [1961])

    William Castle: King of the Gimmick: Homicidal (1961) was a knockoff of Psycho (1960), with the added fillip of a “Fright Break,” which offered audiences a refund if they left during the film’s final minutes. In 1961 Castle returned to period movies with Mr. Sardonicus (1961), in which a disfigured, evil…

  • homicide (law)

    Homicide, the killing of one human being by another. Homicide is a general term and may refer to a noncriminal act as well as the criminal act of murder. Some homicides are considered justifiable, such as the killing of a person to prevent the commission of a serious felony or to aid a

  • Homicide (film by Mamet [1991])

    David Mamet: …pictures House of Games (1987), Homicide (1991), and The Spanish Prisoner (1998). In 1999 he directed The Winslow Boy, which he had adapted from a play by Terence Rattigan. State and Main (2000), a well-received ensemble piece written and directed by Mamet, depicts the trials and tribulations of a film…

  • Homicide Acts (United Kingdom)

    criminal law: Responsibility: The English Homicide Act of 1957 also recognizes diminished responsibility, though to less effect. The act provides that a person who kills another shall not be guilty of murder “if he was suffering from such abnormality of mind…as substantially impaired his mental responsibility for his acts or…

  • Homicide: Life on the Street (American television series)

    David Simon: …source of the television series Homicide: Life on the Street (1993–99). Simon’s first foray into television came when he began contributing scripts to the series; he was also a producer on the show for its final two seasons. His career at the Sun ended in 1995 when he accepted a…

  • Homilies (early Christian writings)

    Clementine literature: …bishop of Alexandria; (3) the Homilies and Recognitions, along with an introductory letter supposed to have been written by Clement to James “the Lord’s brother”; (4) the Apostolic Constitutions, a collection of early Christian ecclesiastical law; and (5) five letters that are part of the False Decretals, a 9th-century collection…

  • Homilies d’Organyà (Catalan manuscript)

    Catalan literature: Prose: Literary prose emerged with the Homilies d’Organyà (12th- or 13th-century homilies found in the parish of Organyà in the county of Urgell) but did not flourish until the end of the 13th century. Four great chronicles, together with the works of Ramon Llull, represent the peak of medieval Catalan prose.…

  • Homilies of St. Gregory of Nazianzus (Byzantine manuscript)
  • Homilies on Ezechiel (work by Gregory the Great)

    St. Gregory the Great: Writings and influence: …offered practical wisdom, and his Homilies on Ezechiel (591–593) explained the mysterious symbolism of the Temple of Jerusalem to monastic audiences. Gregory’s other surviving works include fragments of his exegesis of the Song of Songs (594–598), as redacted by Claude of Ravenna, and nearly 900 letters that document his papacy.…

  • Homilies on the Gospel (work by Gregory the Great)

    St. Gregory the Great: Writings and influence: Gregory’s Homilies on the Gospel (593) were preached to the people and offered practical wisdom, and his Homilies on Ezechiel (591–593) explained the mysterious symbolism of the Temple of Jerusalem to monastic audiences. Gregory’s other surviving works include fragments of his exegesis of the Song of…

  • homilies on the statues (sermons by Chrysostom)

    St. John Chrysostom: Early life: …of sermons known as “the homilies on the statues.” His brilliant exposition and moral teaching have the note of universality; his words remain forceful, and his humorous sallies are still as pungent as when they provoked laughter in the congregations of Antioch and Constantinople. He was concerned, above all,…

  • homily (religious literature)

    liturgy of the Word: The priest then delivers the homily (a short sermon), which usually focuses on one of the readings or on that day’s special occasion. Then follows the public profession of faith, consisting of a recitation of either the Nicene Creed or the shorter Apostles’ Creed. The Nicene Creed is a succinct…

  • Homily of Opatoviz, The (Slavic history)

    Slavic religion: Communal banquets and related practices: The Homily of Opatoviz (attributed to Herman, bishop of Prague) of the 10th–11th centuries emphatically condemns the love feasts as well as the veneration of statues and Slavic worship of the dead and veneration of saints as if they were gods. As in the Christian…

  • homing (animal behaviour)

    Homing, ability of certain animals to return to a given place when displaced from it, often over great distances. The major navigational clues used by homing animals seem to be the same as those used in migration (Sun angle, star patterns, Earth’s magnetic field, etc.), but homing may occur in any

  • homing bomb (munition)

    Smart bomb, type of precision-guided munition. Like a regular bomb, a smart bomb falls to the target solely by the force of gravity, but its fins or wings have control surfaces that move in response to guidance commands, enabling adjustments to be made to the angle of the bomb’s descent or the

  • homing phenomenon (cancer pathology)

    metastasis: Preferential spread: This homing phenomenon may be related to tumour cell recognition of specific “exit sites” from the circulation or to awareness of a particularly favourable—or forbidding—“soil” of another tissue. This may occur because of an affinity that exists between receptor proteins on the surface of cancer cells…

  • homing pigeon (bird)

    pigeon: Homing pigeons (Colomba livia) possess a group of neurons that are used to help the birds process changes in the direction, intensity, and polarity of magnetic fields around them. The sensitivity of the pigeons to these physical properties allows them to determine their directional heading…

  • hominid (primate family)

    Hominidae, in zoology, one of the two living families of the ape superfamily Hominoidea, the other being the Hylobatidae (gibbons). Hominidae includes the great apes—that is, the orangutans (genus Pongo), gorillas (Gorilla), and chimpanzees and bonobos (Pan)—as well as human beings (Homo).

  • Hominidae (primate family)

    Hominidae, in zoology, one of the two living families of the ape superfamily Hominoidea, the other being the Hylobatidae (gibbons). Hominidae includes the great apes—that is, the orangutans (genus Pongo), gorillas (Gorilla), and chimpanzees and bonobos (Pan)—as well as human beings (Homo).

  • hominin (primate)

    Hominin, Any member of the zoological “tribe” Hominini (family Hominidae, order Primates), of which only one species exists today—Homo sapiens, or human beings. The term is used most often to refer to extinct members of the human lineage, some of which are now quite well known from fossil remains:

  • Homininae (primate subfamily)

    primate: Classification: Subfamily Homininae (African apes and humans) 3 genera, 4 living species. Traditionally, zoologists divided subfamily Homininae into 2 “tribes”: Gorillini, containing the gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos and their extinct ancestors, and Hominini, containing the “hominins,” or humans and their extinct ancestors. Most

  • Hominini (primate)

    Hominin, Any member of the zoological “tribe” Hominini (family Hominidae, order Primates), of which only one species exists today—Homo sapiens, or human beings. The term is used most often to refer to extinct members of the human lineage, some of which are now quite well known from fossil remains:

  • hominium (feudalism)

    Homage and fealty, in European society, solemn acts of ritual by which a person became a vassal of a lord in feudal society. Homage was essentially the acknowledgment of the bond of tenure that existed between the two. It consisted of the vassal surrendering himself to the lord, symbolized by his

  • Hominoidea (mammal)

    Ape, (superfamily Hominoidea), any tailless primate of the families Hylobatidae (gibbons) and Hominidae (chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, gorillas, and human beings). Apes are found in the tropical forests of western and central Africa and Southeast Asia. Apes are distinguished from monkeys by the

  • hominy (corn)

    Hominy, kernels of corn, either whole or ground, from which the hull and germ have been removed by a process usually involving a caustic agent. Hominy was traditionally prepared by boiling the corn in a dilute lye solution made from wood-ash leachings until the hulls could be easily removed by

  • hominy feed (agriculture)

    corn oil: …an animal fodder known as hominy feed.

  • Homma (novel by Mishima)

    The Sea of Fertility: …yuki (Spring Snow), Homma (Runaway Horses), Akatsuki no tera (The Temple of Dawn), and Tennin gosui (The Decay of the Angel)—is set in Japan, and together they cover the period from roughly 1912 to the 1960s. Each of them depicts a different reincarnation of the same being: as a…

  • Homma Masaharu (Japanese general)

    Homma Masaharu, Japanese army general and commander of the Japanese invasion force of the Philippine Islands in World War II. Homma was a graduate of the Military Academy of the Japanese Imperial Army (1907) and of the Army General Staff College (1915). During World War I he was an observer with

  • Homme armé, L’  (mass by Palestrina)

    Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina: Music: …masses as Ecce sacerdos magnus; L’Homme armé; Ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la; Ave Maria; Tu es Petrus; and Veni Creator Spiritus. These titles refer to the source of the particular cantus firmus. Palestrina’s mastery of contrapuntal ingenuity may be appreciated to the fullest extent in some of his canonic…

  • homme armé, L’  (work by Dufay)

    Guillaume Dufay: …secular songs, such as L’Homme armé (used by many composers up to Palestrina) and his own ballade Se la face ay pale, and sacred melodies such as Ave Regina celorum.

  • Homme aux sandales de caoutchouc, L’  (work by Kateb Yacine)

    Kateb Yacine: …is the hero of Kateb’s L’Homme aux sandales de caoutchouc (1970; “The Man in the Rubber Sandals”). A major theme of his later works is the struggle of the working class against capitalism. His Le poète comme un boxeur: Entretiens 1958–1989 (“The Poet As a Boxer”) was published in 1994.…

  • Homme du hasard, L’  (play by Reza)

    Yasmina Reza: …hit, L’Homme du hasard (1995; The Unexpected Man), was a two-character play set on a train traveling from Paris to Frankfurt. Following long monologues by a self-absorbed male author and his female seatmate and fan, the play ends with a brief dialogue between the two that centres on people’s need…

  • Homme du midi et l’homme du nord; ou l’influence des climats, L’  (work by Bonstetten)

    Karl Viktor von Bonstetten: …best of them is L’Homme du midi et l’homme du nord; ou, l’influence des climats (1824; “The Man of the Midi and the Man of the North; or, The Influence of Climates”). He also wrote philosophical works and autobiographical sketches.

  • Homme enchaîné, L’  (work by Bourdet)

    Édouard Bourdet: …plays, Le Rubicon (1910) and L’Homme enchaîné (1923; “The Man Enchained”), were not successful. His reputation was secured, however, by La Prisonnière (1926; The Captive), a psychological study of the sufferings of a troubled woman. With Vient de paraître (1928; “Just Appeared”), a satire on the literary world, Bourdet established…

  • Homme et de l’Industrie, Musée de l’ (museum, Le Creusot-Montceau-les-mines, France)

    museum: Museums and the environment: …the ecomuseum, such as the Ecomuseum of the Urban Community at Le Creusot–Montceau-les-Mines in France. There a bold experiment involves the community as a whole, rather than specialists, in interpreting the human and natural environment, thereby generating a better understanding among its inhabitants of the reasons for cultural, social, and…

  • Homme et une femme, Un (film by Lelouch [1966])

    Claude Lelouch: …Homme et une femme (A Man and a Woman), which shared the Grand Prize at the Cannes film festival and won two Academy Awards (for best foreign film and for best original story and screenplay).

  • Homme Libre, L’  (French newspaper)

    Georges Clemenceau: Leadership during World War I: …1913 a new daily paper, L’Homme Libre, with himself as editor.

  • Homme rapaillé, L’  (work by Miron)

    Canadian literature: The Quiet Revolution: …was Miron’s L’Homme rapaillé (1970; Embers and Earth: Selected Poems), a poetic record of the search for a Quebec identity. Michèle Lalonde’s ironic “Speak White” condemned the Anglo-American economic exploitation embedded in the racist jeer “Speak white,” often hurled at Québécois who chose not to speak English; the poem was…

  • Homme révolté, L’  (essay by Camus)

    The Rebel, essay by French writer Albert Camus, originally published in French as L’Homme révolté in 1951. The essay, a treatise against political revolution, was disliked by both Marxists and existentialists and provoked a critical response from French writer Jean-Paul Sartre in the review Les

  • Homme, Musée de l’ (museum, Paris, France)

    Musée de l’Homme, (French: “Museum of Man”) in Paris, museum and library of ethnography and anthropology. It was founded in 1878 and is supported by the state. The institution is attached to the National Museum of Natural History and has a professional staff that engages in postgraduate instruction

  • Homme, Robert (Canadian actor)

    Robert Homme, American-born Canadian television personality (born 1919?, Stoughton, Wis.—died May 2, 2000, Grafton, Ont.), delighted children and adults alike as the star of the long-running Canadian television show The Friendly Giant(1958–85), which first aired in the U.S. Homme’s brainchild o

  • Homme-machine, L’  (work by La Mettrie)

    materialism: Modern materialism: …appropriately titled L’Homme machine (1747; Man a Machine, applied Descartes’s view about animals to human beings. Denis Diderot, chief editor of the 18th-century Encyclopédie, supported a broadly materialist outlook by considerations drawn from physiology, embryology, and the study of heredity; and his friend

  • Hommes d’aujourd’hui, Les (work by Verlaine)

    Paul Verlaine: Life.: …them Mallarmé and Rimbaud; Les Hommes d’aujourd’hui, brief biographies of contemporary writers, most of which appeared in 1886; Mes Hôpitaux, accounts of Verlaine’s stays in hospitals; Mes Prisons, accounts of his incarcerations, including the story of his “conversion” in 1874; and Confessions, notes autobiographiques helped attract notice to ill-recognized contemporaries…

  • Hommes de bonne volonté, Les (novel cycle by Romain)

    Men of Good Will, epic novel cycle by Jules Romains, published in French in 27 volumes as Les Hommes de bonne volonté between 1932 and 1946. The work was an attempt to re-create the spirit of a whole era of French society from Oct. 6, 1908, to Oct. 7, 1933. There is no central figure or family to

  • Homo (hominin genus)

    Homo, genus of the family Hominidae (order Primates) characterized by a relatively large cranial capacity, limb structure adapted to a habitual erect posture and a bipedal gait, well-developed and fully opposable thumbs, hands capable of power and precision grips, and the ability to make

  • HOMO

    chemical bonding: Organometallic compounds: One is that the highest occupied molecular orbital, the HOMO, is largely confined to the carbon atom and can be interpreted as being a lone pair occupying an orbital with σ symmetry. This lone pair enables CO to act as a Lewis base and to link to the metal…

  • Homo antecessor (extinct hominin)

    Atapuerca: …them to a new species, H. antecessor, which they proposed as the ancestor of modern humans (H. sapiens) owing to certain distinctly modern facial features. Other researchers, however, hesitate to accept this assertion and group the fossils with similar remains classified as H. heidelbergensis.

  • Homo erectus (extinct hominin)

    Homo erectus, (Latin: “upright man”) extinct species of the human genus (Homo), perhaps an ancestor of modern humans (Homo sapiens). H. erectus most likely originated in Africa, though Eurasia cannot be ruled out. Regardless of where it first evolved, the species seems to have dispersed quickly,

  • Homo erectus pekinensis (anthropology)

    Peking man, extinct hominin of the species Homo erectus, known from fossils found at Zhoukoudian near Beijing. Peking man was identified as a member of the human lineage by Davidson Black in 1927 on the basis of a single tooth. Later excavations yielded several skullcaps and mandibles, facial and

  • Homo erectus soloensis (extinct hominid)

    Solo man, prehistoric human known from 11 fossil skulls (without facial skeletons) and 2 leg-bone fragments that were recovered from terraces of the Solo River at Ngandong, Java, in 1931–32. Cranial capacity (1,150–1,300 cubic centimetres) overlaps that of modern man (average 1,350 cu cm). The

  • Homo ergaster (extinct hominin)

    Homo erectus, (Latin: “upright man”) extinct species of the human genus (Homo), perhaps an ancestor of modern humans (Homo sapiens). H. erectus most likely originated in Africa, though Eurasia cannot be ruled out. Regardless of where it first evolved, the species seems to have dispersed quickly,

  • Homo Faber (novel by Frisch)

    Max Frisch: …Stiller (1954; I’m Not Stiller), Homo Faber (1957), and Mein Name sei Gantenbein (1964; A Wilderness of Mirrors) portray aspects of modern intellectual life and examine the theme of identity. His autobiographical works included two noteworthy diaries, Tagebuch 1946–1949 (1950; Sketchbook 1946–1949) and Tagebuch 1966–1971 (1972; Sketchbook 1966–1971). His later…

  • Homo floresiensis (extinct hominin)

    Homo floresiensis, taxonomic name given to an extinct hominin (member of the human lineage) that is presumed to have lived on the Indonesian island of Flores as recently as 12,000 years ago). The origins of the species are not fully understood. Some evidence suggests that Homo floresiensis

  • Homo habilis (fossil hominin)

    Homo habilis, (Latin: “able man” or “handy man”) extinct species of human, the most ancient representative of the human genus, Homo. Homo habilis inhabited parts of sub-Saharan Africa from roughly 2.4 to 1.5 million years ago (mya). In 1959 and 1960 the first fossils were discovered at Olduvai

  • Homo heidelbergensis (fossil hominin)

    Homo heidelbergensis, extinct species of archaic human (genus Homo) known from fossils dating from 600,000 to 200,000 years ago in Africa, Europe, and possibly Asia. The name first appeared in print in 1908 to accommodate an ancient human jaw discovered in 1907 near the town of Mauer, 16 km (10

  • Homo Ludens (work by Huizinga)

    Johan Huizinga: …distemper of our time,” and Homo Ludens (1938), a study of the play element in culture.

  • Homo naledi (fossil hominin)

    Homo naledi, (Latin and Sesotho mix: “star man”) extinct species of human, initially thought to have evolved about the same time as the emergence of the genus Homo, some 2.8 million to 2.5 million years ago, during the Pliocene (5.3 million to about 2.6 million years ago) and Pleistocene (about 2.6

  • Homo neanderthalensis (archaic human)

    Neanderthal, (Homo neanderthalensis, Homo sapiens neanderthalensis), member of a group of archaic humans who emerged at least 200,000 years ago during the Pleistocene Epoch (about 2.6 million to 11,700 years ago) and were replaced or assimilated by early modern human populations (Homo sapiens)

  • Homo rhodesiensis (anthropology)

    Kabwe cranium, fossilized skull of an extinct human species (genus Homo) found near the town of Kabwe, Zambia (formerly Broken Hill, Northern Rhodesia), in 1921. It was the first discovered remains of premodern Homo in Africa and until the early 1970s was considered to be 30,000 to 40,000 years

  • Homo rudolfensis (extinct hominin)

    Koobi Fora: habilis, H. rudolfensis, and African H. erectus, which is also called H. ergaster). Stone tools dating to 2 mya resemble certain Oldowan industry artifacts from Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania. Koobi Fora’s archaeological record dates to as recently as 1.4 mya, but there are very few Acheulean…

  • Homo sapiens (hominin)

    Homo sapiens, (Latin: “wise man”) the species to which all modern human beings belong. Homo sapiens is one of several species grouped into the genus Homo, but it is the only one that is not extinct. See also human evolution. The name Homo sapiens was applied in 1758 by the father of modern

  • Homo sapiens daliensis (hominin fossil)

    Dali: …1978 discovery of a well-preserved cranium that is about 200,000 years old. It resembles that of Homo erectus in having prominent browridges, a receding forehead, a ridge along the rear of the skull, and thick cranial walls. Its cranial capacity is 1,120 cc (68 cubic inches), which is intermediate between…

  • Homo sapiens neanderthalensis (archaic human)

    Neanderthal, (Homo neanderthalensis, Homo sapiens neanderthalensis), member of a group of archaic humans who emerged at least 200,000 years ago during the Pleistocene Epoch (about 2.6 million to 11,700 years ago) and were replaced or assimilated by early modern human populations (Homo sapiens)

  • Homo sapiens sapiens (hominid subspecies)

    Spain: Prehistory: …appearance of modern humans (H. sapiens) in Spain after 35,000 bce opened a new era, during which material culture acquired an innovating velocity it never lost. Flint tools became more varied and smaller, and bone and antler were used for harpoons, spears, and ornaments. Needles from El Pendo Cave…

  • Homo universalis (philosophical concept)

    Renaissance man, an ideal that developed in Renaissance Italy from the notion expressed by one of its most-accomplished representatives, Leon Battista Alberti (1404–72), that “a man can do all things if he will.” The ideal embodied the basic tenets of Renaissance humanism, which considered man the

  • Homo Viator (work by Marcel)

    Gabriel Marcel: Religious belief: …human existence, Marcel observed (in Homo Viator):

  • homocentric spheres, theory of (astronomy)

    physical science: Ancient Middle Eastern and Greek astronomy: He developed a theory of homocentric spheres, a model that represented the universe by sets of nesting concentric spheres the motions of which combined to produce the planetary and other celestial motions. Using only uniform circular motions, Eudoxus was able to “save” the rather complex planetary motions with…

  • homocercal tail (anatomy)

    teleost: …by the presence of a homocercal tail, a tail in which the upper and lower halves are about equal. The teleosts comprise some 30,000 species (about equal to all other vertebrate groups combined), with new species being discovered each year.

  • homoclinal ridge (geology)

    Cuesta, (Spanish: “slope”, ) physical feature that has a steep cliff or escarpment on one side and a gentle dip or back slope on the other. This landform occurs in areas of tilted strata and is caused by the differential weathering and erosion of the hard capping layer and the soft underlying cliff

  • homocysteine (amino acid)

    Alzheimer disease: Lifestyle factors and prevention: …an amino acid known as homocysteine. Unusually high levels of homocysteine have been associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer disease. In studies of Alzheimer mice, intake of caffeine at concentrations equivalent to five cups of coffee in humans resulted in decreased levels of amyloid-beta proteins in the brain and…

  • homocystinuria (pathology)

    Homocystinuria, hereditary metabolic disorder involving methionine, a sulfur-containing essential amino acid. The metabolic sequence of methionine normally begins with its stepwise conversion to homocysteine, cystathionine, and cysteine, successively, each step being carried out by a specific

  • homocytotropic antibody (biochemistry)

    Reagin, type of antibody found in the serum and skin of allergically hypersensitive persons and in smaller amounts in the serum of normally sensitive persons. Most reaginic antibodies are the immunoglobulin E (IgE) fraction in the blood. Reagins are easily destroyed by heating, do not pass the

  • Homoean (Christianity)

    Homoean, in the Trinitarian controversies of the 4th-century Christian Church, a follower of Acacius, bishop of Caesarea. The Homoeans taught a form of Arianism that asserted that the Son was distinct from, but like (Greek homoios), the Father, as opposed to the Nicene Creed, which stated that the

  • homoeomerous thallus (lichen)

    lichen: The homoeomerous type of thallus consists of numerous algal cells distributed among a lesser number of fungal cells, while the heteromerous thallus has a predominance of fungal cells.

  • homoeopathy (medicine)

    Homeopathy, a system of therapeutics, notably popular in the 19th century, which was founded on the stated principle that “like cures like,” similia similibus curantur, and which prescribed for patients drugs or other treatments that would produce in healthy persons symptoms of the diseases being

  • homoeoteleuton (paleography)

    paleography: Textual corruptions: …type of error known as homoioteleuton (“like ending”).

  • homoepitaxy (crystallography)

    crystal: Growth from the melt: In homoepitaxy a crystal is grown on a substrate of the same material. Silicon layers of different impurity content, for example, are grown on silicon substrates in the manufacture of computer chips. Heteroepitaxy, on the other hand, is the growth of one crystal on the substrate…

  • homogamy (genetics)

    assortative mating: Positive assortative mating, or homogamy, exists when people choose to mate with persons similar to themselves (e.g., when a tall person mates with a tall person); this type of selection is very common. Negative assortative mating is the opposite case, when people avoid mating with…

  • homogenate (chemical compound)

    metabolism: The study of metabolic pathways: Homogenates of tissue are useful in studying metabolic processes because permeability barriers that may prevent ready access of external materials to cell components are destroyed. The tissue is usually minced, blended, or otherwise disrupted in a medium that is suitably buffered to maintain the normal…

  • homogeneity (chemistry and physics)

    rock: Texture: …are the rock’s extent of homogeneity (i.e., uniformity of composition throughout) and the degree of isotropy. The latter is the extent to which the bulk structure and composition are the same in all directions in the rock.

  • homogeneity, principle of (mathematics)

    mathematics: Analytic geometry: Viète retained the classical principle of homogeneity, according to which terms added together must all be of the same dimension. In the above equation, for example, each of the terms has the dimension of a solid or cube; thus, the constant C, which denotes a plane, is combined with…

  • homogeneous catalysis (chemistry)

    catalysis: Homogeneous catalysis: When the catalyst and the reacting substances are present together in a single state of matter, usually as a gas or a liquid, it is customary to classify the reactions as cases of homogeneous catalysis. Oxides of nitrogen serve as catalysts for the…

  • homogeneous coordinates (mathematics)

    August Ferdinand Möbius: In this work he introduced homogeneous coordinates (essentially, the extension of coordinates to include a “point at infinity”) into analytic geometry and also dealt with geometric transformations, in particular projective transformations that later played an essential part in the systematic development of projective geometry. In the Lehrbuch der Statik (1837;…

  • Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
    Subscribe Today!