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  • Gold Coast (work by McPherson)

    James Alan McPherson: …with the short story “Gold Coast,” which won a contest in The Atlantic Monthly in 1968, and the following year he became a contributing editor of the magazine. “Gold Coast” examines the race, class, and age barriers between Robert, a black Harvard student who aspires to be a writer,…

  • Gold Coast (historical region, Africa)

    Gold Coast, section of the coast of the Gulf of Guinea, in Africa. It extends approximately from Axim, Ghana, or nearby Cape Three Points, in the west to the Volta River in the east and is so called because it was an important source of gold. An area of intense colonial rivalry from the 17th

  • Gold Coast (Queensland, Australia)

    Gold Coast, city, extreme southeastern Queensland, Australia, about 20 miles (30 km) south-southeast of Brisbane. It extends for some 25 miles (40 km) along the state’s southeastern coastline, from Paradise Point along the Pacific Highway to Coolangatta at the New South Wales border. Tweed Heads,

  • Gold Cup (motorboating prize)

    Gold Cup, premier annual motorboat-racing prize in the United States, instituted by the American Power Boat Association in 1904. The first race for the cup was held on the Hudson River and was won by C.C. Riotte’s Standard with the fastest heat of 23.6 miles (38 km) per hour. The winning boats

  • Gold Diggers of 1933, The (film by LeRoy [1933])

    Busby Berkeley: The Warner Brothers period: …regarded as classics: 42nd Street, Gold Diggers of 1933, and Footlight Parade. Those three films were backstage stories, all concerned with the production of a Broadway show. The nonmusical parts of those films had the gritty urban atmosphere for which Warners was renowned, but for the musical numbers Berkeley created…

  • Gold Diggers of 1935 (film by Berekley [1935])
  • Gold Diggers of Broadway (film by Del Ruth [1929])

    Roy Del Ruth: Early films: …Desert Song, as well as Gold Diggers of Broadway, which established the studio’s cottage industry of “Gold Diggers” pictures and also unveiled the pop standard “Tiptoe Through the Tulips.”

  • gold farmer (Internet and online gaming)

    online gaming: Birth of virtual economies: …business, employing hundreds of “gold farmers,” who play games in an effort to hoard resources that can be sold to players in South Korea or the United States. Most MMOG companies sought to control this behaviour by banning the accounts of suspected gold farmers (e.g., Activision Blizzard has closed…

  • gold farming (Internet and online gaming)

    online gaming: Birth of virtual economies: …business, employing hundreds of “gold farmers,” who play games in an effort to hoard resources that can be sold to players in South Korea or the United States. Most MMOG companies sought to control this behaviour by banning the accounts of suspected gold farmers (e.g., Activision Blizzard has closed…

  • Gold Fields of South Africa Company (South African company)

    Cecil Rhodes: Early struggles and financial successes: …in 1885, and formed the Gold Fields of South Africa Company in 1887. Both Rhodes’s major companies had terms in their articles of association allowing them to finance schemes of northward expansion.

  • Gold Glove (baseball award)

    baseball: Awards: The Gold Glove is awarded to the best defensive player at each of the nine positions (three outfielders are selected, but no consideration is given as to whether those players covered right, centre, or left field) in both the American League and the National League. The…

  • gold leaf (art)

    Gold leaf, extremely thin sheet of gold (about 0.1 micrometre, or 4 millionths of an inch, thick) used for gilding. Medieval illuminated manuscripts gleam with gold leaf, and it is still widely used for gilding ornamental designs, lettering and edgings on paper, wood, ceramics, glass, textiles,

  • gold medal (award)

    Olympic Games: The medal ceremonies: Solid gold medals were last given in 1912. The obverse side of the medal awarded in 2004 at Athens was altered for the first time since 1928 to better reflect the Greek origins of both the ancient and modern Games, depicting the goddess Nike flying above…

  • Gold Medal for Distinguished Achievement (American poetry award)

    Frost Medal, annual poetry award presented by the Poetry Society of America in recognition of the lifetime achievements of an American poet. The medal was first awarded in 1930. The award was originally called the Gold Medal for Distinguished Achievement, but the name was later changed to honour

  • Gold Mind (record label)

    Missy Elliott: …the umbrella of her own Gold Mind record label.

  • Gold Museum (museum, Bogotá, Colombia)

    Colombia: Cultural institutions: The Gold Museum in Bogotá possesses the world’s finest and largest collection of worked gold, the product of extraordinarily skilled craftsmen, whereas the Bogotá Museum of Colonial Art has a rich collection of criollo (Creole) religious sculpture and painting. The National Museum displays treasures and relics…

  • gold points (economics)

    money: The gold standard: …limits were known as the gold points.

  • gold processing

    Gold processing, preparation of the ore for use in various products. For thousands of years the word gold has connoted something of beauty or value. These images are derived from two properties of gold, its colour and its chemical stability. The colour of gold is due to the electronic structure of

  • Gold Range (mountain range, Canada)

    Monashee Mountains, southwesternmost range of the Columbia Mountain system, in southeastern British Columbia, Canada, extending for 200 miles (320 km) north from the Washington (U.S.) boundary between the Interior Plateau (west) and the Selkirk Trench (east), in which flows the Columbia River.

  • Gold Regions of South-Eastern Africa, The (work by Baines)

    Thomas Baines: …people were published posthumously in The Gold Regions of South-Eastern Africa (1877).

  • gold reserve (economics)

    Gold reserve, a fund of gold bullion or coin held by a government or bank, as distinguished from a private hoard of gold held by an individual or nonfinancial institution. In the past, reserves were accumulated by rulers and governments primarily to meet the costs of waging war, and in most eras

  • gold rush

    Gold rush, rapid influx of fortune seekers to the site of newly discovered gold deposits. Major gold rushes occurred in the United States, Australia, Canada, and South Africa in the 19th century. The first major gold strike in North America occurred near Dahlonega, Georgia, in the late 1820s. It

  • Gold Rush, The (film by Chaplin [1925])

    The Gold Rush, American silent film comedy, released in 1925, that starred Charlie Chaplin and was set amid the Alaskan gold rush of the late 1890s. The tale follows the adventures of Chaplin’s legendary Tramp character as he prospects for gold, fighting off wild animals and greedy competitors. As

  • gold standard (monetary system)

    Gold standard, monetary system in which the standard unit of currency is a fixed quantity of gold or is kept at the value of a fixed quantity of gold. The currency is freely convertible at home or abroad into a fixed amount of gold per unit of currency. In an international gold-standard system,

  • Gold Standard Act (United States [1900])

    Free Silver Movement: …majority in Congress enacted the Gold Standard Act, which made gold the sole standard for all currency.

  • Gold Standards Framework (medicine)

    palliative care: Developments in palliative care: …the Dying Patient and the Gold Standards Framework in the United Kingdom and by groups such as the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization in the United States, Palliative Care Australia, and the Indian Association of Palliative Care in India. The Liverpool Care Pathway is used by health care professionals…

  • Gold Star Families for Peace (American organization)

    Cindy Sheehan: …lost children in Iraq established Gold Star Families for Peace, an antiwar group for the families of fallen service men and women.

  • Gold Star Studios (recording studios, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Gold Star Studios and the “Wall of Sound”: Phil Spector brought the role of producer to public attention for the first time with a string of hits by the Ronettes, the Crystals, and the Righteous Brothers featuring his signature wall of sound, all recorded from 1962 through 1965 for his Philles label at…

  • Gold Star Studios and the Wall of Sound

    Phil Spector brought the role of producer to public attention for the first time with a string of hits by the Ronettes, the Crystals, and the Righteous Brothers featuring his signature wall of sound, all recorded from 1962 through 1965 for his Philles label at Gold Star. Opened in 1950 at 6252

  • Gold’s Gym (American company)

    physical culture: Aerobics and health clubs: Setting the trend was Gold’s Gym, the most famous fitness franchise in the world. It was opened in 1965 by Joe Gold, an original member of Mae West’s troupe, in Venice, California. It attracted Schwarzenegger and other Weider stars and eventually spread to more than 500 facilities in more…

  • Gold, Ernest (American composer)

    On the Beach: Ernest Gold’s score, which offered frequent nods to the Australian ballad “Waltzing Matilda,” earned an Academy Award nomination and is integral to the emotional impact of the film’s final scenes.

  • Gold, Harry (American spy)

    Julius Rosenberg and Ethel Rosenberg: …turned over this information to Harry Gold, a Swiss-born courier for the espionage ring, who then passed it to Anatoly A. Yakovlev, the Soviet Union’s vice-consul in New York City.

  • Gold, Horace L. (American editor and author)

    Horace L. Gold, Canadian-born American science fiction editor and author who, as founder and editor of the magazine Galaxy Science Fiction, published many of the most prominent science fiction stories of the 1950s. Gold sold his first short story, “Inflexure,” to Astounding Stories in 1934 under

  • Gold, Horace Leonard (American editor and author)

    Horace L. Gold, Canadian-born American science fiction editor and author who, as founder and editor of the magazine Galaxy Science Fiction, published many of the most prominent science fiction stories of the 1950s. Gold sold his first short story, “Inflexure,” to Astounding Stories in 1934 under

  • Gold, Joe (American fitness promoter)

    physical culture: Aerobics and health clubs: …was opened in 1965 by Joe Gold, an original member of Mae West’s troupe, in Venice, California. It attracted Schwarzenegger and other Weider stars and eventually spread to more than 500 facilities in more than 25 countries. In 1977, after selling his business, Gold established World Gym International in Santa…

  • Gold, Michael (American author)

    American literature: Lyric fictionists: …Side before World War I: Michael Gold’s harsh Jews Without Money (1930) and Henry Roth’s Proustian Call It Sleep (1934), one of the greatest novels of the decade. They followed in the footsteps of Anzia Yezierska, a prolific writer of the 1920s whose passionate books about immigrant Jews, especially

  • Gold, Thomas (British astronomer)

    Thomas Gold, Austrian-born British astronomer who promulgated the steady-state theory of the universe, holding that, although the universe is expanding, a continuous creation of matter in intergalactic space is gradually forming new galaxies, so that the average number of galaxies in any part of

  • gold-anchor period (pottery)

    pottery: Porcelain: …Sèvres superseding it in the gold-anchor period. Wares marked with either the raised or the red anchor are the most highly valued; the painting of these is excellent in quality. Some of the best wares were painted by an Irish miniaturist, Jeffrey Hamet O’Neal. The gold-anchor-marked wares are noted for…

  • gold-bluegreen landscape (Chinese art)

    Jinbi shanshui, (Chinese: “gold-bluegreen landscape”) style of Chinese landscape painting during the Sui (581–618) and Tang (618–907) dynasties. In this style, a rich decorative effect was achieved by the application of two mineral colours, azurite blue and malachite green, together with gold, to a

  • gold-exchange standard (monetary system)

    Gold-exchange standard, monetary system under which a nation’s currency may be converted into bills of exchange drawn on a country whose currency is convertible into gold at a stable rate of exchange. A nation on the gold-exchange standard is thus able to keep its currency at parity with gold

  • gold-export point (economics)

    international payment and exchange: The function of gold: …was known as the “gold-export point.” There was also a “gold-import point” determined on similar lines.

  • gold-fronted leafbird (bird)

    leafbird: The golden-fronted leafbird (C. aurifrons) is a popular cage bird.

  • gold-glass medallion (Roman art)

    Western painting: Pagan Roman paintings: …are the portraits done on gold-glass medallions, which in the exquisite refinement of their treatment may be compared to 16th-century European miniatures. A medallion in the Museum of Christian Antiquities, Brescia, dating from the 3rd century and carrying a portrait group, is a veritable masterpiece.

  • gold-group metal (mineralogy)

    mineral: Metals: … are members of the same group (column) in the periodic table of elements and therefore have similar chemical properties. In the uncombined state, their atoms are joined by the fairly weak metallic bond. These minerals share a common structure type, and their atoms are positioned in a simple cubic closest-packed…

  • gold-import point (economics)

    international payment and exchange: The function of gold: …There was also a “gold-import point” determined on similar lines.

  • gold-lip pearl shell (oyster)

    cultured pearl: …Pteria penguin in Japan and Pinctada maxima in Australia) are reserved in barrels until maturation (2 to 3 years) and, when the shells reach certain size, are implanted with a tiny polished sphere of mother-of-pearl. The implanted oysters are suspended in wire nets from floating rafts or contained in some…

  • gold-ringed cat snake

    cat snake: …most spectacular species is the black-and-yellow mangrove snake, or gold-ringed cat snake (B. dendrophila), a shiny black snake with a yellow crossbar pattern on its body. It ranges from the Malay Peninsula to the Philippines and can reach 2.5 metres (about 8 feet) in length.

  • gold-silicon alloy (chemistry)

    amorphous solid: Melt quenching: …for a binary (two-component) system, gold-silicon. Here x specifies the fraction of atoms that are silicon atoms, and Au1 - xSix denotes a particular material in this family of materials. (Au is the chemical symbol for gold, Si is the symbol for silicon, and, for example, Au0.8Si0.2 denotes a material…

  • Goldast, Melchior (German historian)

    history of Europe: The term and concept before the 18th century: The political theorist and historian Melchior Goldast appears to have coined the variation medium aevum (“a middle age”) in 1604; shortly after, in a Latin work of 1610, the English jurist and legal historian John Selden repeated medium aevum, Anglicizing the term in 1614 to middle times and in 1618…

  • Goldbach conjecture (mathematics)

    Goldbach conjecture, in number theory, assertion (here stated in modern terms) that every even counting number greater than 2 is equal to the sum of two prime numbers. The Russian mathematician Christian Goldbach first proposed this conjecture in a letter to the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler

  • Goldbach, Christian (Russian mathematician)

    Christian Goldbach, Russian mathematician whose contributions to number theory include Goldbach’s conjecture. In 1725 Goldbach became professor of mathematics and historian of the Imperial Academy at St. Petersburg. Three years later he went to Moscow as tutor to Tsar Peter II, and from 1742 he

  • Goldbarth, Albert (American poet)

    Albert Goldbarth, American poet whose erudition and wit found expression in compulsively wordy but dazzling compositions. Educated at the University of Illinois at Chicago (B.A., 1969), the University of Iowa (M.F.A., 1971), and the University of Utah (graduate study, 1973–74), Goldbarth taught at

  • goldbeating (art)

    mask: Funerary and commemorative uses: …tombs of about 1400 bce, beaten gold portrait masks were found. Gold masks also were placed on the faces of the dead kings of Cambodia and Siam (now Thailand).

  • Goldberg Variations (work by Bach)

    Glenn Gould: Bach’s Goldberg Variations (released 1956) enjoyed an unusual popular success.

  • Goldberg Variations for Harpsichord (work by Bach)

    Glenn Gould: Bach’s Goldberg Variations (released 1956) enjoyed an unusual popular success.

  • Goldberg Variations, The (novel by Huston)

    Nancy Huston: …novel, Les Variations Goldberg (1981; The Goldberg Variations), was short-listed for the Prix Femina. The ease with which Huston moved between French and English characterized much of her career, and in 1993 she was awarded the Governor General’s Award for best French-language novel for Cantique des plaines (1993). However, her…

  • Goldberg, Adele (American engineer)

    computer: The graphical user interface: …at PARC, Alan Kay and Adele Goldberg, published a paper in the early 1970s describing a vision of a powerful and portable computer they dubbed the Dynabook. The prototypes of this machine were expensive and resembled sewing machines, but the vision of the two researchers greatly influenced the evolution of…

  • Goldberg, Arthur J. (United States jurist)

    Arthur J. Goldberg, labour lawyer who served as associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1962–65) and U.S. representative to the United Nations (1965–68). The son of Russian immigrants, Goldberg passed the Illinois bar examination at the age of 20, practiced law in Chicago from 1929 to 1948,

  • Goldberg, Arthur Joseph (United States jurist)

    Arthur J. Goldberg, labour lawyer who served as associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1962–65) and U.S. representative to the United Nations (1965–68). The son of Russian immigrants, Goldberg passed the Illinois bar examination at the age of 20, practiced law in Chicago from 1929 to 1948,

  • Goldberg, Bertrand (American architect)

    Bertrand Goldberg, American architect (born July 17, 1913, Chicago, Ill.—died Oct. 8, 1997, Chicago), changed the shape of Chicago’s modern skyline with his pioneering design for Marina City, the twin concrete corncob-shaped cylindrical towers built in the mid-1960s. Conceived as a mixed-use

  • Goldberg, David (American technology executive)

    David Bruce Goldberg, American technology executive (born Oct. 2, 1967, Minneapolis, Minn.—died May 1, 2015, Nuevo Vallarta, Mex.), was from 2009 the CEO of the rapidly growing online survey company SurveyMonkey but was perhaps more widely known as the husband of Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg.

  • Goldberg, David Bruce (American technology executive)

    David Bruce Goldberg, American technology executive (born Oct. 2, 1967, Minneapolis, Minn.—died May 1, 2015, Nuevo Vallarta, Mex.), was from 2009 the CEO of the rapidly growing online survey company SurveyMonkey but was perhaps more widely known as the husband of Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg.

  • Goldberg, Dora (American singer)

    Nora Bayes, American singer in vogue in the early 1900s in musical revues, notably the Ziegfeld Follies. Bayes began her career in Chicago in 1899 and made her Broadway debut in 1901. She was identified with the songs “Down Where the Wurzburger Flows” (1902) and “Shine on, Harvest Moon” (1908),

  • Goldberg, Ephraim Owen (Canadian American architect)

    Frank Gehry, Canadian American architect and designer whose original, sculptural, often audacious work won him worldwide renown. Gehry’s family immigrated to Los Angeles in 1947. He studied architecture at the University of Southern California (1949–51; 1954) and city planning at Harvard University

  • Goldberg, Ida (Russian social activist)

    Tillie Olsen: Early life and influences: …was the second child of Ida Goldberg and Sam Lerner, who had been members of the Bund, a largely Jewish and socialist self-defense league founded in 1897 that sought to end injustice and the brutal pogroms of tsarist Russia. Both lived in what is today Minsk voblasts (province), Belarus, and…

  • Goldberg, Lois Ada (American-born Canadian children’s entertainer)

    Lois Lilienstein, (Lois Ada Goldberg), American-born Canadian children’s entertainer (born July 10, 1936, Chicago, Ill.—died April 22, 2015, Toronto, Ont.), was, with Sharon Hampson and Bram Morrison, a member of the much-loved children’s musical group Sharon, Lois & Bram. The band formed in 1978

  • Goldberg, Reuben Lucius (American cartoonist)

    Rube Goldberg, American cartoonist who satirized the American preoccupation with technology. His name became synonymous with any simple process made outlandishly complicated. Rube Goldberg was born the son of a San Francisco police and fire commissioner, who guided him into engineering at the

  • Goldberg, Rube (American cartoonist)

    Rube Goldberg, American cartoonist who satirized the American preoccupation with technology. His name became synonymous with any simple process made outlandishly complicated. Rube Goldberg was born the son of a San Francisco police and fire commissioner, who guided him into engineering at the

  • Goldberg, Whoopi (American actress)

    Whoopi Goldberg, American comedian, actress, and producer known for her work in theatre, film, television, and recordings. An accomplished performer with a wide repertoire, her work ranged from dramatic leading roles to controversial comedic performances. She also garnered attention as a cohost of

  • Goldbergs, The (American television series)

    Television in the United States: Sitcoms: …The Aldrich Family (NBC, 1949–53), The Goldbergs (CBS/NBC/DuMont, 1949–56), Amos ’n’ Andy (CBS, 1951–53), and The Life of Riley (NBC, 1949–50 and 1953–58). (It is noteworthy that these last three shows featured—if not always respectfully—Jewish, African American, and lower-income characters, respectively. These groups would see little representation in the sitcom…

  • Goldblatt, David (South African photographer)

    Okwui Enwezor: …work of South African photographer David Goldblatt in 2000. A frequent lecturer and member of many art juries, Enwezor also coedited, along with Olu Oguibe, Reading the Contemporary: African Art from Theory to the Marketplace (1999).

  • Goldbogen, Avrom Hirsch (American showman)

    Michael Todd, American showman with a flair for the flamboyant who is remembered as a film producer for Around the World in Eighty Days (1956). Todd made his first mark as a showman with a dancing revue at the Century of Progress exhibition in Chicago in 1933. He later wrote for the slapstick

  • goldcrest (bird)

    Goldcrest, European species of kinglet

  • Golden (Colorado, United States)

    Golden, city, seat (1861) of Jefferson county, north-central Colorado, U.S. It lies on Clear Creek at an elevation of 5,675 feet (1,730 metres) at the foot of Lookout Mountain, just west of Denver, and it is separated from the metropolitan area by the Table Mountains plateau. Founded as a mining

  • Golden Age (Spanish literature)

    Golden Age, the period of Spanish literature extending from the early 16th century to the late 17th century, generally considered the high point in Spain’s literary history. The Golden Age began with the partial political unification of Spain about 1500. Its literature is characterized by p

  • Golden Age (Dutch history)

    Netherlands: Dutch civilization in the Golden Age (1609–1713): The century from the conclusion of the Twelve Years’ Truce in 1609 until either the death of Prince William III in 1702 or the conclusion of the Peace of Utrecht in 1713 is known in Dutch history as the “Golden Age.” It…

  • Golden Age (Latin literature)

    Golden Age, in Latin literature, the period, from approximately 70 bc to ad 18, during which the Latin language was brought to perfection as a literary medium and many Latin classical masterpieces were composed. The Golden Age can be subdivided into two major sections, the Ciceronian period (q.v.;

  • Golden Age of American radio (American radio industry)

    Golden Age of American radio, period lasting roughly from 1930 through the 1940s, when the medium of commercial broadcast radio grew into the fabric of daily life in the United States, providing news and entertainment to a country struggling with economic depression and war. During American radio’s

  • Golden Age of Television, The (American television industry)

    Franklin J. Schaffner: …became known as TV’s “golden age.” He made his directorial debut in 1949, helming episodes for the TV show Wesley. He later directed more than 150 live dramas for such notable anthology series as The Ford Theatre Hour, Playhouse 90, and Studio One in Hollywood. For the latter program,…

  • Golden Age, The (film by Buñuel and Dalí [1930])

    Luis Buñuel: Life and work: …second film, L’Age d’or (1930; The Golden Age), an assault on the repression of sex by organized religion. In one of its most-controversial scenes, Christ is seen leaving an orgy orchestrated by the Marquis de Sade. Before its release, MGM put both Buñuel and the film’s star, Lya Lys, under…

  • golden algae (class of algae)

    Golden algae, (class Chrysophyceae), class of about 33 genera and some 1,200 species of algae (division Chromophyta) found in both marine and fresh waters. The group is fairly diverse in form, and its taxonomy is contentious. Most golden algae are single-celled biflagellates with two specialized

  • golden angel’s trumpet (plant)

    angel's trumpet: The species Brugmansia arborea, golden angel’s trumpet (B. aurea), B. insignis, red angel’s trumpet (B. sanguinea), B. versicolor, and B. vulcanicola were variously distributed in the Andes region of South America, ranging from Colombia to northern Chile.

  • Golden Apple, The (opera by Cesti)

    Pietro Antonio Cesti: …opera, Il pomo d’oro (1667; The Golden Apple); his masterpiece, Dori (1661); and his most popular opera, Orontea, appear in modern editions. He is said to have written about 100 operas, but only 15 are extant. Christ Church, Oxford, Eng., possesses an important manuscript collection of 18 secular and three…

  • Golden Apples, The (work by Welty)

    The Golden Apples, collection of short stories by Eudora Welty, published in 1949 and considered one of her finest works. The stories had all been published previously, and Welty added one novella-length story, “Main Families in Morgana.” Symbolism from Greek mythology unifies the stories, all of

  • Golden Arrowhead

    national flag consisting of a green field incorporating a red hoist triangle and a central yellow arrowhead, separated by black and white borders. The width-to-length ratio of the flag is 1 to 2 at sea and 3 to 5 on land.When independence was being planned by British Guiana in the early 1960s, a

  • Golden Ass, The (work by Apuleius)

    The Golden Ass, prose narrative of the 2nd century ce by Lucius Apuleius, who called it Metamorphoses. In all probability Apuleius used material from a lost Metamorphoses by Lucius of Patrae, which is cited by some as the source for an extant Greek work on a similar theme, the brief Lucius, or the

  • golden ball cactus (plant)

    ball cactus: …ball cactus (Parodia scopa) and golden ball cactus (P. leninghausii), which are especially valued for their woolly appearance.

  • golden barrel cactus (plant)

    barrel cactus: The golden barrel cactus (E. grusonii) is a common desert ornamental, noted for its striking golden spines; the plant is an endangered species in the wild.

  • Golden Bay (bay, New Zealand)

    Tasman: …west of Separation Point in Golden Bay. His encounter there with the Maori was a tragic one, and Tasman sailed away naming the area Murderers’ Bay. In 1770 Capt. James Cook sailed past Golden Bay beyond Separation Point into Tasman Bay; the latter appeared landlocked, and Cook named it Blind…

  • Golden Bear (film award)

    Berlin International Film Festival: Martay was awarded a Golden Bear (Goldener Bär), the festival’s top prize, for his work in bringing the Berlinale to reality. Other prizes awarded at the first Berlinale included a Golden Bear for best music film to Cinderella (1951), which also won the festival’s audience-choice prize, the Big Bronze…

  • Golden Bear, the (American golfer)

    Jack Nicklaus, American professional golfer, a dominating figure in world golf from the 1960s to the ’80s. While a student at Ohio State University, Nicklaus won the U.S. Amateur Championship in 1959 and again in 1961. Also in 1961 Nicklaus set a scoring record of 282 for an amateur in the U.S.

  • golden bell (plant)

    Forsythia, any member of a genus (Forsythia) of plants in the olive family (Oleaceae), containing seven species of ornamental shrubs native to eastern Europe and East Asia. In some species the yellow flowers borne along the stems appear before the leaves in early spring. The narrow leaves

  • Golden Boke of Marcus Aurelius, The (work by Guevara)

    Antonio de Guevara: by Lord Berners, The Golden Boke of Marcus Aurelius, 1535, and by Sir Thomas North, The Diall of Princes, 1557, frequently reprinted through the 20th century), an attempt to invent a model for rulers, became one of the most influential books of the 16th century. Well received outside…

  • Golden Bough, The (work by Frazer)

    The Golden Bough, a study of comparative religion by Sir James Frazer. It was originally published in two volumes in 1890 with the subtitle A Study in Comparative Religion and was enlarged and republished with the subtitle A Study in Magic and Religion (12 volumes, 1911–15). Aftermath, a Supplement

  • Golden Bough: A Study in Comparative Religion, The (work by Frazer)

    The Golden Bough, a study of comparative religion by Sir James Frazer. It was originally published in two volumes in 1890 with the subtitle A Study in Comparative Religion and was enlarged and republished with the subtitle A Study in Magic and Religion (12 volumes, 1911–15). Aftermath, a Supplement

  • Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion, The (work by Frazer)

    The Golden Bough, a study of comparative religion by Sir James Frazer. It was originally published in two volumes in 1890 with the subtitle A Study in Comparative Religion and was enlarged and republished with the subtitle A Study in Magic and Religion (12 volumes, 1911–15). Aftermath, a Supplement

  • golden bowerbird (bird)

    bowerbird: The golden bowerbird (Prionodura newtoniana) makes a rooflike bridge from tower to tower. Male gardeners, any of the four species of the genus Amblyornis, plant a lawn of tree moss around the maypole and embellish it with flowers, berries, and other objects. The brown, or crestless,…

  • Golden Bowl, The (novel by James)

    The Golden Bowl, novel by Henry James, published in 1904. Wealthy American widower Adam Verver and his daughter Maggie live in Europe, where they collect art and relish each other’s company. Through the efforts of the manipulative Fanny Assingham, Maggie becomes engaged to Amerigo, an Italian

  • Golden Boy (film by Mamoulian [1939])

    Rouben Mamoulian: Films of the 1930s: …very well received, nor was Golden Boy (1939), Mamoulian’s adaptation of Clifford Odets’s proletarian drama of the same name, which had been a smash for the Group Theatre in 1937. William Holden (in his screen debut) starred in it as a boxing violinist torn between the inimical demands of his…

  • Golden Boy (play by Odets)

    Golden Boy, drama in three acts by Clifford Odets, produced and published in 1937. It traces the downfall of Joe Bonaparte, a gifted young musician who becomes corrupted by money and brutality when he chooses to become a prizefighter rather than a classical

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