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  • Giamatti, Paul Edward Valentine (American actor)

    Paul Giamatti, American actor who excelled at portraying likable idiosyncratic everyman characters. Giamatti was born into an intellectually active family; his mother, Toni, was a former actor who taught English at a preparatory school, and his father, A. Bartlett, was a professor and president of

  • Giambi ed epodi (work by Carducci)

    Giosuè Carducci: …Satana” (1863), and in his Giambi ed epodi (1867–69; “Iambics and Epodes”), inspired chiefly by contemporary politics. Its violent, bitter language reflects the virile, rebellious character of the poet.

  • Giambologna (Italian artist)

    Giambologna, preeminent Mannerist sculptor in Italy during the last quarter of the 16th century. First trained under Jacques Dubroeucq, a Flemish sculptor who worked in an Italianate style, Giambologna went to Rome about 1550, where his style was influenced by Hellenistic sculpture and the works of

  • Giambono, Michele (Italian artist)

    Michele Giambono, leading Venetian Late Gothic painter and mosaicist, the most distinguished member of a large family of artists working in Venice from 1396 to 1546. Giambono’s grandfather was a painter of Treviso called Giam Bono (also Zambono), and he himself is generally called by this name. The

  • Giammattei, Alejandro (president of Guatemala)

    Guatemala: Moving toward peace: …August 11, in which conservative Alejandro Giammattei of the Let’s Go (Vamos) party, the former head of the country’s prison system, triumphed over Torres, once again a presidential candidate, this time for the National Unity of Hope (UNE) party. Torres had finished first in the multicandidate first round of voting…

  • Gian Gastone (duke of Tuscany)

    Gian Gastone, the last Medicean grand duke of Tuscany (1723–37). His father, Cosimo III, had passed his 80th year at the time of his death, and thus Gian Gastone succeeded at a late age, 53—in bad health, worn out by dissipation, and possessing neither ambition nor aptitude for rule. The European

  • Giancana, Salvatore (American gangster)

    Sam Giancana, major American gangster, the top syndicate boss in Chicago from 1957 to 1966, who was noted for his friendships with show-business personalities and for his ruthlessness. Born and reared in Chicago’s “Little Italy” on the near southwest side, Giancana began working for Al Capone in

  • Giancana, Sam (American gangster)

    Sam Giancana, major American gangster, the top syndicate boss in Chicago from 1957 to 1966, who was noted for his friendships with show-business personalities and for his ruthlessness. Born and reared in Chicago’s “Little Italy” on the near southwest side, Giancana began working for Al Capone in

  • Gianfrancesco II (duke of Mantua)

    humanism: The 15th century: …he accepted the invitation of Gianfrancesco Gonzaga, marquis of Mantua, to become tutor to the ruling family. At this post Vittorino spent the remaining 22 years of his life. His school, held in a delightful palace that he renamed “La Giocosa,” had as its students not only the Gonzaga children…

  • Giani, Felice (Italian artist)

    Western painting: Italy: One such was Felice Giani, whose many decorations include Napoleonic palaces there and elsewhere in Italy (especially Faenza) and in France.

  • Giannetti, Alfredo (Italian screenwriter and director)
  • Gianni Schicchi (opera by Puccini)

    Gianni Schicchi, comic opera in one act by Italian composer Giacomo Puccini that premiered at New York’s Metropolitan Opera on December 14, 1918. The composer’s only comic opera, it contains the well-known soprano aria “O mio babbino caro” (“Oh My Dear Father”). (The opera’s title is pronounced

  • Gianni Versace SpA (Italian company)

    Donatella Versace: When Gianni Versace SpA was founded in Milan in 1978, Donatella assumed the role of vice president. From 1978 to 1997, Donatella acted largely as a creative hand and critic for her brother, Gianni, though she did maintain control of her own lines, specifically Young Versace…

  • Gianni, Lapo (Italian author)

    Italian literature: The new style: …together with the lesser poets Lapo Gianni, Gianni Alfani, and Dino Frescobaldi.

  • Giannini, A. P. (American financier)

    A.P. Giannini, American banker, founder of the California-based Bank of Italy—later the Bank of America—which, by the 1930s, was the world’s largest commercial bank. He was a major pioneer of branch banking. The son of Italian immigrants, Giannini left school at age 13 to work full-time in his

  • Giannini, Amadeo Peter (American financier)

    A.P. Giannini, American banker, founder of the California-based Bank of Italy—later the Bank of America—which, by the 1930s, was the world’s largest commercial bank. He was a major pioneer of branch banking. The son of Italian immigrants, Giannini left school at age 13 to work full-time in his

  • Giannini, Frida (Italian fashion designer)

    Frida Giannini, Italian fashion designer who was creative director of the world-renowned Gucci fashion house from 2006 to 2015. After studying at Rome’s Academy of Costume and Fashion (Accademia di Costume e di Moda) and holding an apprenticeship at a small fashion house, Giannini went to work in

  • Giannino (pretender to French throne)

    John I: In 1358 a man called Giannino, in Florence, persuaded Clémence’s nephew, Louis I of Hungary, that he was John I; but otherwise he met with little success and died in jail in Naples (1363).

  • Giannone, Pietro (Italian historian and jurist)

    Pietro Giannone, Italian historian whose works opposed papal interference in Naples. Giannone graduated in law (Naples, 1698), became interested in the “New Learning,” and wrote the Istoria civile del regno di Napoli (1723; The Civil History of the Kingdom of Naples)—a polemical survey of

  • Giano Della Bella (Italian leader)

    Giano della Bella, wealthy and aristocratic Florentine citizen who was the leader of a “popular” movement in the 1290s and is known as the promulgator of the Ordinances of Justice (January 1293), the basis of the constitution of Florence. A member of the powerful Calimala guild of merchants and

  • Gianotti, Pio (Brazilian monk)

    Frei Damião, Italian-born Brazilian Roman Catholic monk. He became a Capuchin friar at age 16 and later studied in Rome. In 1931 he was sent to Brazil, where he spent the rest of his life traveling in the poverty-stricken northeastern region. Soon after he arrived he developed a reputation as a

  • Giant (film by Stevens [1956])

    Giant, American film saga, released in 1956, that tracks the lives of the family members of a ranching empire in Texas. It was James Dean’s last movie; he died in a car accident shortly after filming was completed. Based on the novel by Edna Ferber, Giant follows “Bick” Benedict (played by Rock

  • Giant (musical composition by Mahler)

    Symphony No. 5 in C-Sharp Minor, symphony by Gustav Mahler. Premiering October 18, 1904, in Cologne, the work’s ultimately optimistic colors may have been influenced by the composer’s marriage in 1902 to artistically gifted Alma Schindler. Its gentle fourth movement (Adagietto), often performed

  • giant (mythology)

    Giant, in folklore, huge mythical being, usually humanlike in form. The term derives (through Latin) from the Giants (Gigantes) of Greek mythology, who were monstrous, savage creatures often depicted with men’s bodies terminating in serpentine legs. According to the Greek poet Hesiod, they were

  • Giant African land snail (gastropod)

    conservation: Pacific island birds: an African land snail, Achatina fulica, for food. It became a pest. So, like the song about the old woman who swallowed a fly, and then a spider to catch it, and so forth, a predatory snail, Euglandina rosea, was released to control the Achatina. The predatory snail preferred…

  • giant African millipede (arthropod)

    millipede: The giant African millipede (Archispirostreptus gigas), which is native to subtropical Africa, is the largest extant species, achieving lengths up to 280 mm (11 inches). The extinct invertebrate Arthropleura, a relative of centipedes and millipedes, lived during the Carboniferous Period (359.2 million to 299 million years…

  • giant anaconda (reptile)

    anaconda: The green anaconda (Eunectes murinus), also called the giant anaconda, sucuri, or water kamudi, is an olive-coloured snake with alternating oval-shaped black spots. The yellow, or southern, anaconda (E. notaeus) is much smaller and has pairs of overlapping spots.

  • giant anteater (mammal)

    anteater: The giant anteater: The giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), sometimes called the ant bear, is the largest member of the anteater family and is best known in the tropical grasslands (Llanos) of Venezuela, where it is still common. It was once found in the lowland forests of…

  • giant arborvitae (plant)

    Western red cedar, (Thuja plicata), an ornamental and timber evergreenconifer of the cypress family (Cupressaceae), native to the Pacific coast of North America. Western red cedar trees and shrubs are pyramidal in form. The trees may grow up to 60 metres (about 200 feet) tall and 6 metres in

  • giant armadillo (mammal)

    armadillo: Natural history: In contrast, the endangered giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus) can be 1.5 metres (5 feet) long and weigh 30 kg (66 pounds). It lives in the Amazon basin and adjacent grasslands.

  • Giant Asteroid Impact Scars Discovered in the Warburton Basin

    Compared with the heavily cratered surfaces of the inner terrestrial planets (Mars, Venus, and Mercury)—and the Moon, with its huge basalt-flooded impact basins, or lunar maria—Earth’s surface, with its large oceans and continental plateaus, appears relatively quiet from space. Nature, however,

  • giant axon (anatomy)

    cephalopod: Form and function: …from the study of these giant axons. The sense organs of the cephalopods are eyes, rhinophores (olfactory organs), statocysts (organs of equilibrium), and tactile organs. In Nautilus the eyes are open pits without lenses. In the Coleoidea the eyes are complex and approach those of some lower vertebrates in efficiency.

  • giant baby tears (plant)

    Pilea: Giant baby tears, or depressed clearweed (P. depressa), of similar habit, has small, smooth green leaves.

  • giant bellflower (plant)

    Campanulaceae: magnifica), the giant bellflower, which is a fleshy-rooted perennial with whorled leaves and clusters of three or four long-stalked, pale-lilac bells, 10 to 12 cm wide, topping plants, 1 12 to 2 12 metres tall. It is native in Central Asia. Symphyandra, ring bellflower, named for its…

  • giant bottlenosed whale (mammal genus)

    bottlenose whale: >Berardius arnuxii), Baird’s beaked whale (B. bairdii), and members of a third, yet unnamed, species in the genus are commonly called giant bottlenose whales. (A genetic study of the gray and black forms of Baird’s beaked whale performed in 2016 revealed that the darker form…

  • giant cactus (plant)

    Saguaro, (Carnegiea gigantea), large cactus species (family Cactaceae), native to Mexico and to Arizona and California in the United States. The fruits are an important food of American Indians, who also use the woody saguaro skeletons. Ecologically, the plants provide protective nesting sites for

  • giant Canada goose (bird)

    Canada goose: …in mature males of the giant Canada goose (B. canadensis maxima). The latter has a wingspread of up to 2 metres (6.6 feet), second in size only to that of the trumpeter swan among common waterfowl. Once a symbol of the North American wilderness, Canada geese are now common pests…

  • giant cane (plant, Arundinaria species)

    Arundinaria: Giant cane, also known as river cane and canebrake bamboo (Arundinaria gigantea), was once widely utilized as a forage plant in the southeastern United States, from eastern Texas and Oklahoma to the Atlantic coast and north to the Ohio River valley. It produces green leaves…

  • giant cane (plant)

    Giant reed, (Arundo donax), tall perennial grass of the family Poaceae. Giant reed is found in wetlands and riparian habitats and is thought to be native to eastern Asia; the plant has been widely introduced to southeastern North America, the Caribbean, and parts of the Mediterranean. The woody

  • giant cell (pathology)

    Giant cell, large cell characterized by an arc of nuclei toward the outer membrane. The cell is formed by the fusion of epithelioid cells, which are derived from immune cells called macrophages. Once fused, these cells share the same cytoplasm, and their nuclei become arranged in an arc near the

  • giant centipede (arthropod)

    centipede: …contains the largest centipedes, with Scolopendra gigantea of the American tropics reaching a length of 280 mm (11 inches). These forms are capable of inflicting severe bites. Scolopendrids, as well as the geophilids, have relatively slow and sinuous movements.

  • giant clam (mollusk)

    bivalve: Food and feeding: …the shipworms (family Teredinidae) and giant clams (family Tridacnidae). Shipworms are wood borers and are both protected and nourished by the wood they inhabit. They possess ctenidia and are capable of filtering food from the sea. When elongating the burrow, they digest the wood as well. In the Tridacnidae, symbiotic…

  • giant cloud rat (rodent)

    cloud rat: Giant cloud rats belong to the genus Phloeomys (two species), whereas bushy-tailed cloud rats are classified in the genus Crateromys (four species).

  • giant condensation nucleus (meteorology)

    condensation nucleus: , sea salt) are called giant condensation nuclei.

  • giant crab (crustacean)

    Giant crab, (Macrocheira kaempferi), species of spider crab (q.v.) native to Pacific waters near Japan. It occurs at depths of 50 to 300 m (150 to 1,000 feet). The largest specimens may be up to 3.7 m or more from the tip of one outstretched claw to another. The body is about 37 cm (15 inches)

  • giant danio (fish)

    danio: …and yellow stripes, and the giant danio (D. malabaricus), a striped blue and yellow fish about 11 cm (4 inches) long.

  • giant deer (extinct mammal)

    Irish elk, (Megaloceros giganteus), extinct species of deer, characterized by immense body size and wide antlers, commonly found as fossils in Pleistocene deposits in Europe and Asia (the Pleistocene Epoch began 2.6 million years ago and ended about 11,700 years ago). Despite its distribution

  • giant devil ray (fish)

    manta ray: …(2 feet) across, but the Atlantic manta, or giant devil ray (Manta birostris), the largest of the family, may grow to more than 7 metres (23 feet) wide. The Atlantic manta is a well-known species, brown or black in colour and very powerful but inoffensive. It does not, old tales…

  • giant dioon (plant)

    Dioon: The spiny-leaved, slow-growing giant dioon (D. spinulosum) may attain a height of 15 metres (about 50 feet). It is a popular house plant and is grown outdoors as an ornamental in warmer climates. Starch like that of arrowroot is obtained from the seeds of D. edule.

  • giant eland (mammal)

    eland: The giant, or Derby, eland (Taurotragus derbianus) inhabits woodlands filled with the broad-leaved doka tree in the northern savanna from Senegal to the Nile River. The common, or Cape, eland (T. oryx) ranges over the woodlands, plains, mountains, and subdeserts of eastern and southern Africa. The…

  • giant elephant shrew (mammal)

    elephant shrew: The largest species, the giant elephant shrew (R. udzungwensis), weighs about 0.7 kg (1.5 pounds) and inhabits two forested areas within the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania.

  • giant evergreen chinquapin (plant)
  • giant fennel (herb)

    fennel: Giant fennel (Ferula communis), a member of the same family, is native to the Mediterranean region. Its stems grow to about 3 metres (10 feet) high and are used for tinder. Hog’s fennel, or sulfurweed (Peucedanum officinale), is another member of the Apiaceae family and…

  • giant fern family (fern family)

    Marattiaceae, the giant fern family (order Marattiales), comprising six genera and some 150 modern species found throughout tropical and subtropical regions. Marattiaceae is the only family in its order, and it is generally considered to be one of the most primitive extant families of ferns.

  • giant filbert (plant)

    hazelnut: …filbert (Corylus avellana) and the giant hazel, or giant filbert (C. maxima), and by hybrids of these species with two American shrubs, the American hazelnut (C. americana) and the beaked hazelnut (C. cornuta). The large cobnut is a variety of the European filbert, and Lambert’s filbert is a variety of…

  • giant foxtail (plant)

    foxtail: The name giant foxtail is applied to two weedy annuals: S. faberi and S. magna.

  • giant fulmar (bird)

    fulmar: The giant fulmar, also known as the giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus), with a length of about 90 cm (3 feet) and a wingspread in excess of 200 cm (6.5 feet), is by far the largest member of the family. This species nests on islands around the…

  • giant gas planet (astronomy)

    planet: Planets of the solar system: …Jupiter to Neptune are called giant planets or Jovian planets. Between these two main groups is a belt of numerous small bodies called asteroids. After Ceres and other larger asteroids were discovered in the early 19th century, the bodies in this class were also referred to as minor planets or…

  • giant golden mole (mammal)

    golden mole: Natural history: The largest is the giant golden mole (Chrysospalax trevelyani) of South Africa, with a body 20 to 24 cm (7.9 to 9.4 inches) long; it is a forest dweller that dens in burrows but travels and forages along the surface. The smallest is Grant’s golden mole, weighing less than…

  • giant gourami (fish, Colisa species)

    gourami: Common species include the giant gourami (Osphronemus goramy), a blue-green and reddish brown fish 12 cm (4.75 inches) long; the dwarf gourami (Colisa lalia), 6 cm long, brightly striped in red and blue; the kissing gourami (Helostoma temmincki), a greenish or pinkish white fish noted for its “kissing” activities;…

  • giant gourami (fish, Osphronemus species)

    gourami: …labyrinth fishes (order Perciformes), especially Osphronemus goramy, an East Indian fish that is caught or raised for food; it has been introduced elsewhere. This species is a compact, oval fish with a long, filamentous ray extending from each pelvic fin. It attains a weight of about 9 kg (20 pounds).…

  • giant granadilla (plant)

    passion-flower: …delicate dessert fruits, as the giant granadilla (P. quadrangularis). The purple granadilla (P. edulis) and the yellow granadilla (P. laurifolia), as well as the wild passion-flower, are widely grown in tropical America for their fruit. Passiflora maliformis is the sweet calabash of the West Indies. The size of these fruits…

  • giant ground pangolin (mammal)

    pangolin: …arboreal; others, such as the giant ground pangolin (M. gigantea, also classified as Smutsia gigantea) of Africa, are terrestrial. All are nocturnal and able to swim a little. Terrestrial forms live in burrows. Pangolins feed mainly on termites but also eat ants and other insects. They locate prey by smell…

  • giant ground sloth (extinct mammal)

    sloth: Classification and paleontology: …were small, but one, the giant ground sloth (Megatherium americanum), was the size of an elephant; others were as tall as present-day giraffes. The period of the ground sloths’ extinction coincides approximately with the end of the last Ice Age and the arrival of humans in North America. Sloths are…

  • giant grouper (fish)

    goliath grouper: The related giant grouper (E. lanceolatus) found in the Pacific and Indian ocean basins may reach 2.7 metres (8.8 feet) in length.

  • giant gum tree (tree)

    eucalyptus: Physical description: The giant gum tree, or mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans), of Victoria and Tasmania, is one of the largest species and attains a height of about 90 metres (300 feet) and a circumference of 7.5 metres (24.5 feet). Many species continually shed the dead outermost layer of…

  • giant hazel (plant)

    hazelnut: …filbert (Corylus avellana) and the giant hazel, or giant filbert (C. maxima), and by hybrids of these species with two American shrubs, the American hazelnut (C. americana) and the beaked hazelnut (C. cornuta). The large cobnut is a variety of the European filbert, and Lambert’s filbert is a variety of…

  • giant hogweed (plant)

    cow parsnip: Giant hogweed (H. mantegazzianum) is native to the Caucasus but is considered an invasive species in many areas outside its native range. That striking plant can attain a height of 4 metres (about 13 feet) and has a stout red-spotted stem and a white inflorescence…

  • giant honeybee (insect)

    honeybee: Apis species: dorsata, the giant honeybee, also occurs in southeastern Asia and sometimes builds combs nearly three metres (more than nine feet) in diameter. A. cerana, the Eastern honeybee, is native to southern and southeastern Asia, where it has become domesticated in some areas. It is very closely related…

  • giant horsetail (plant)

    horsetail: Giant horsetail (E. praealtum) of North America and Asia, which reaches 3.5 metres (11.5 feet), also is evergreen. Each shoot has as many as 48 ridges. The giant horsetail of Europe (E. telmateia) is about the same height as common scouring rush. The tallest of…

  • giant hummingbird (bird)

    hummingbird: Even the largest, the giant hummingbird (Patagona gigas) of western South America, is only about 20 cm (8 inches) long, with a body weight of about 20 g (0.7 ounce), less than that of most sparrows. The smallest species, the bee hummingbird (Mellisuga, sometimes Calypte, helenae) of Cuba and…

  • giant kelp (brown algae)

    Pelagophycus: …at the outer fringe of giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) forests, which occur at comparatively shallow depths. Elk kelp, however, can hybridize naturally with giant kelp, and certain hybrid gametophytes produced from this crossing may be fertile. Both elk and giant kelp provide important habitats for other marine life, including other…

  • giant land tortoise (reptile)

    migration: Reptiles and amphibians: In the Galápagos Islands, giant land tortoises (Testudo elephantopus) stay chiefly in the upper humid zone, where food is abundant, but go down to the dry zone to lay their eggs. Despite their great body weight and slow pace, they travel some 50 kilometres (30 miles) across rough country.

  • giant magnetocaloric effect (chemistry)

    rare-earth element: Giant magnetocaloric effect: Magnetic materials that undergo a magnetic transition will usually heat up (though a few substances will cool down) when subjected to an increasing magnetic field, and when the field is removed the opposite occurs. This phenomenon is known as the magnetocaloric effect…

  • giant magnetoresistance (physics)

    Albert Fert: …for his independent codiscovery of giant magnetoresistance.

  • Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (telescope, Pune, India)

    radio telescope: Radio telescope arrays: Indian radio astronomers built the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), located near Pune, India. The GMRT contains 30 antennas extending some 25 km (16 miles) in diameter. Each antenna element is 45 metres (148 feet) in diameter and is constructed using a novel, inexpensive system of wire trusses to replace…

  • Giant Metrewave Wavelength Telescope (telescope, Pune, India)

    radio telescope: Radio telescope arrays: Indian radio astronomers built the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), located near Pune, India. The GMRT contains 30 antennas extending some 25 km (16 miles) in diameter. Each antenna element is 45 metres (148 feet) in diameter and is constructed using a novel, inexpensive system of wire trusses to replace…

  • giant miscanthus (plant)

    silvergrass: Giant miscanthus (M. ×giganteus) is a potential biofuel and biomass crop.

  • giant molecular cloud (astronomy)

    molecular cloud: Composition: …of this type, the so-called giant molecular clouds, are a million times more massive than the Sun. They contain much of the mass of the interstellar medium, are some 150 light-years across, and have an average density of 100 to 300 molecules per cubic centimetre and an internal temperature of…

  • Giant Mountains (mountains, Europe)

    Giant Mountains, mountains, major segment of the Sudeten in northeastern Bohemia and part of the western Czech-Polish frontier. The highest peak in both the mountains and Bohemia is Sněžka (5,256 feet [1,602 m]). The Elbe (Czech: Labe) River rises in Bohemia on the southern slope, and tributaries

  • giant muntjac (mammal)

    muntjac: It was named the giant, or large-antlered, muntjac (M. vuquangensis) because it appears to be larger than other muntjacs, with an estimated weight of 40–50 kg (88–110 pounds). The second species, which has the distinction of being the smallest deer in the world, was discovered near the town of…

  • giant nerve fibre (anatomy)

    cephalopod: Form and function: …from the study of these giant axons. The sense organs of the cephalopods are eyes, rhinophores (olfactory organs), statocysts (organs of equilibrium), and tactile organs. In Nautilus the eyes are open pits without lenses. In the Coleoidea the eyes are complex and approach those of some lower vertebrates in efficiency.

  • giant oarfish (fish)

    Oarfish, (Regalecus glesne), large, long, sinuous fish of the family Regalecidae (order Lampridiformes), found throughout the tropics and subtropics in rather deep water. A ribbon-shaped fish, very thin from side to side, the oarfish may grow to a length of about 9 metres (30.5 feet) and a weight

  • giant order (architecture)

    Colossal order, architectural order extending beyond one interior story, often extending through several stories. Though giant columns were used in antiquity, they were first applied to building facades in Renaissance Italy. Any of the orders (the major types being Tuscan, Doric, Ionic,

  • giant otter (mammal)

    Saro, rare South American species of otter

  • giant otter shrew (mammal)

    otter shrew: The giant otter shrew (Potamogale velox) has the body form, fur texture, and coloration of a river otter but is smaller. It weighs less than 400 grams (0.9 pound) and has a body 27 to 33 cm (11 to 13 inches) long and a slightly shorter…

  • giant Pacific octopus (mollusk)

    cephalopod: General features and importance to humans: …feet) have been reported in Octopus dofleini. The shell of the fossil ammonite Pachydiscus seppenradensis from the Cretaceous measures 205 centimetres (6 feet 8 inches) in diameter; it is considered to have been the largest shelled mollusk.

  • giant pangolin (mammal)

    pangolin: …arboreal; others, such as the giant ground pangolin (M. gigantea, also classified as Smutsia gigantea) of Africa, are terrestrial. All are nocturnal and able to swim a little. Terrestrial forms live in burrows. Pangolins feed mainly on termites but also eat ants and other insects. They locate prey by smell…

  • giant peacock moth (insect)

    caterpillar: Caterpillars of the giant peacock moth (Saturnia pyri) send out ultrasonic warning chirps to deter predators. In some cases, those chirps occur just prior to or in conjunction with the release of pungent chemical deterrents. The masked birch caterpillar (Drepana arcuata) produces vibratory signals in order to defend…

  • giant penguin (fossil bird)

    Icadyptes: …represented by only one species, I. salasi.

  • giant petrel (bird)

    fulmar: The giant fulmar, also known as the giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus), with a length of about 90 cm (3 feet) and a wingspread in excess of 200 cm (6.5 feet), is by far the largest member of the family. This species nests on islands around the…

  • giant pitcher plant (botany)

    Nepenthes: Attenborough’s pitcher plant (N. attenboroughii), is the largest carnivorous plant, reaching up to 1.5 metres (4.9 feet) tall. Its pitchers are 30 cm (11.8 inches) in diameter and are able to capture and digest rodents and other small animals. A number of species, such as…

  • giant planet (astronomy)

    planet: Planets of the solar system: …Jupiter to Neptune are called giant planets or Jovian planets. Between these two main groups is a belt of numerous small bodies called asteroids. After Ceres and other larger asteroids were discovered in the early 19th century, the bodies in this class were also referred to as minor planets or…

  • giant pouched rat (mammal genus)

    African pouched rat: Natural history: The two species of giant pouched rat (genus Cricetomys) are hunted in the wild and eaten by native peoples. Gentle animals, they are easily tamed and raised in captivity and thus have been studied to determine their marketability as a reliable source of food. Both species (C. gambianus and…

  • giant puffball (fungus)

    basidiocarp: The largest basidiocarps include giant puffballs (Calvatia gigantea), which can be 1.6 m (5.25 feet) long, 1.35 m broad, and 24 cm (9.5 inches) high, and those of bracket fungi (Polyporus squamosus)—2 m in diameter. The smallest are single cells of the yeastlike Sporobolomyces.

  • giant purple sea urchin (echinoderm)

    evolution: Gametic isolation: For example, the sea urchins Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and S. franciscanus can be induced to release their eggs and sperm simultaneously, but most of the fertilizations that result are between eggs and sperm of the same species. In animals with internal fertilization, sperm cells may be unable to function in the…

  • giant purple urchin (echinoderm)

    evolution: Gametic isolation: Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and S. franciscanus can be induced to release their eggs and sperm simultaneously, but most of the fertilizations that result are between eggs and sperm of the same species. In animals with internal fertilization, sperm cells may be unable to function in the sexual ducts of…

  • giant ragweed (plant)

    ragweed: …Roman wormwood, hogweed, hogbrake, and bitterweed, is found across the North American continent. It typically grows about 1 metre (3.5 feet) high and has thin, alternate or opposite, much-divided leaves. The great, or giant, ragweed (A. trifida), also called bitterweed, or horse cane, is native from Quebec to British Columbia…

  • giant red urchin (echinoderm)

    evolution: Gametic isolation: Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and S. franciscanus can be induced to release their eggs and sperm simultaneously, but most of the fertilizations that result are between eggs and sperm of the same species. In animals with internal fertilization, sperm cells may be unable to function in the sexual ducts of…

  • giant reed (plant)

    Giant reed, (Arundo donax), tall perennial grass of the family Poaceae. Giant reed is found in wetlands and riparian habitats and is thought to be native to eastern Asia; the plant has been widely introduced to southeastern North America, the Caribbean, and parts of the Mediterranean. The woody

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