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  • Cattell, James McKeen (American psychologist)

    James McKeen Cattell, U.S. psychologist who oriented U.S. psychology toward use of objective experimental methods, mental testing, and application of psychology to the fields of education, business, industry, and advertising. He originated two professional directories and published five scientific

  • Cattell, Raymond B. (American psychologist)

    Raymond B. Cattell, British-born American psychologist, considered to be one of the world’s leading personality theorists. Cattell was educated at the University of London, receiving a B.S. in 1924 and a Ph.D. in 1929. He taught at the University of Exeter (1927–32), after which he served as

  • Catterji, Bankim Chandra (Indian author)

    Bankim Chandra Chatterjee, Indian author, whose novels firmly established prose as a literary vehicle for the Bengali language and helped create in India a school of fiction on the European model. Bankim Chandra was a member of an orthodox Brahman family and was educated at Hooghly College, at

  • cattle (livestock)

    Cattle, domesticated bovine farm animals that are raised for their meat, milk, or hides or for draft purposes. The animals most often included under the term are the Western or European domesticated cattle as well as the Indian and African domesticated cattle. However, certain other bovids such as

  • cattle drive (United States history)

    Chisholm Trail: cattle drovers’ trail in the western United States. Although its exact route is uncertain, it originated south of San Antonio, Texas, ran north across Oklahoma, and ended at Abilene, Kan. Little is known of its early history. It was probably named for Jesse Chisholm, a…

  • cattle egret (bird)

    egret: The cattle egret, Bubulcus (sometimes Ardeola) ibis, spends much of its time on land and associates with domestic and wild grazing animals, feeding on insects that they stir up and sometimes removing ticks from their hides. It is a compactly built heron, 50 cm long, white…

  • cattle grub (insect)

    Warble fly, (family Oestridae), any member of a family of insects in the fly order, Diptera, sometimes classified in the family Hypodermatidae. The warble, or bot, flies Hypoderma lineatum and H. bovis are large, heavy, and beelike. The females deposit their eggs on the legs of cattle. The larvae

  • Cattle Killing, The (novel by Wideman)

    John Edgar Wideman: …as well as the novels The Cattle Killing (1996) and Fanon (2008).

  • Cattle of the Sun (Greek mythology)

    Odysseus: Scylla and Charybdis, and the Cattle of the Sun, which his companions, despite warnings, plunder for food. He alone survives the ensuing storm and reaches the idyllic island of the nymph Calypso.

  • cattle plague (animal disease)

    Rinderpest, an acute, highly contagious viral disease of ruminant animals, primarily cattle, that was once common in Africa, the Indian subcontinent, and the Middle East. Rinderpest was a devastating affliction of livestock and wildlife, and for centuries it was a major threat to food production

  • Cattle Point (area, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia)

    Sydney Opera House: …Opera House is situated on Bennelong Point (originally called Cattle Point), a promontory on the south side of the harbour just east of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. It was named for Bennelong, one of two Aborigines (the other man was named Colebee) who served as liaisons between Australia’s first British…

  • Cattle Problem (mathematics)

    Archimedes: His works: …a sphere); and the “Cattle Problem” (preserved in a Greek epigram), which poses a problem in indeterminate analysis, with eight unknowns. In addition to those, there survive several works in Arabic translation ascribed to Archimedes that cannot have been composed by him in their present form, although they may…

  • Cattle Raid of Cooley, The (Gaelic literature)

    The Cattle Raid of Cooley, Old Irish epiclike tale that is the longest of the Ulster cycle of hero tales and deals with the conflict between Ulster and Connaught over possession of the brown bull of Cooley. The tale was composed in prose with verse passages in the 7th and 8th centuries. It is

  • cattley guava (plant)

    guava: Related species: The cattley, or strawberry, guava (Psidium cattleianum) is considerably more frost-resistant than the common guava. It occurs in two forms: one has fruits with a bright yellow skin, and the other has fruits with a purplish red skin. The plant is a large shrub with thick…

  • cattleya (plant)

    Cattleya, (genus Cattleya), genus of about 45 species of orchids (family Orchidaceae), several of which are commercially important as ornamentals and florists’ plants. Cattleyas are native to tropical America and are widely grown in greenhouses and other bright humid indoor environments. Cattleya

  • Cattleya (plant)

    Cattleya, (genus Cattleya), genus of about 45 species of orchids (family Orchidaceae), several of which are commercially important as ornamentals and florists’ plants. Cattleyas are native to tropical America and are widely grown in greenhouses and other bright humid indoor environments. Cattleya

  • Cattleya labiata (plant)

    cattleya: Cattleya labiata, one of the most commonly cultivated species, has been crossed with numerous other orchid genera to produce thousands of showy hybrids. The flowers are commonly used in corsages.

  • Catton, Bruce (American historian and journalist)

    Bruce Catton, American journalist and historian noted for his books on the American Civil War. As a child living in a small town in Michigan, Catton was stimulated by the reminiscences of the Civil War that he heard from local veterans. His education at Oberlin College, Ohio, was interrupted by two

  • Catton, Charles Bruce (American historian and journalist)

    Bruce Catton, American journalist and historian noted for his books on the American Civil War. As a child living in a small town in Michigan, Catton was stimulated by the reminiscences of the Civil War that he heard from local veterans. His education at Oberlin College, Ohio, was interrupted by two

  • Caṭṭopādhyāy, Baṇkim Candra (Indian author)

    Bankim Chandra Chatterjee, Indian author, whose novels firmly established prose as a literary vehicle for the Bengali language and helped create in India a school of fiction on the European model. Bankim Chandra was a member of an orthodox Brahman family and was educated at Hooghly College, at

  • Cattrall, Kim (actress)

    Sex and the City: …and sexually adventurous Samantha (Kim Cattrall), the cynical and headstrong Miranda (Cynthia Nixon), and the idealistic and naive Charlotte (Kristin Davis). The dynamics of their relationships are revealed with wit and playful irreverence as the four friends experience love, loss, and betrayal. Carrie’s tumultuous relationship with the charismatic yet…

  • Catullus (Roman poet)

    Catullus, Roman poet whose expressions of love and hatred are generally considered the finest lyric poetry of ancient Rome. In 25 of his poems he speaks of his love for a woman he calls Lesbia, whose identity is uncertain. Other poems by Catullus are scurrilous outbursts of contempt or hatred for

  • Catullus, Gaius Valerius (Roman poet)

    Catullus, Roman poet whose expressions of love and hatred are generally considered the finest lyric poetry of ancient Rome. In 25 of his poems he speaks of his love for a woman he calls Lesbia, whose identity is uncertain. Other poems by Catullus are scurrilous outbursts of contempt or hatred for

  • Catulus, Gaius Lutatius (Roman commander)

    Gaius Lutatius Catulus, Roman commander, victor in the final battle of the First Punic War between Rome and Carthage (264–241). As consul in 242, he blockaded the Sicilian cities of Lilybaeum and Drepanum with a fleet of 200 ships. On March 10, 241, the Carthaginian relieving fleet was totally

  • Catulus, Quintus Lutatius (Roman politician [died 61/60 BC])

    Quintus Lutatius Catulus, Roman politician, a leader of the Optimates, the conservative faction in the Senate. Catulus’ father, Quintus Lutatius Catulus, had been forced to commit suicide after Gaius Marius’ capture of Rome. The younger Catulus therefore became an adherent of Marius’ opponent, the

  • Catulus, Quintus Lutatius (Roman general [died 86 BC])

    Quintus Lutatius Catulus, Roman general, at first a colleague and later a bitter enemy of the politically powerful commander Gaius Marius. As consul with Marius in 102, Catulus was sent to hold the passage of the Alps from the invading Cimbri and Teutoni tribes, but he was forced back to the Po

  • cāturvarṇya (Hinduism)

    Varna, any one of the four traditional social classes of India. Although the literal meaning of the word varna (Sanskrit: “colour”) once invited speculation that class distinctions were originally based on differences in degree of skin pigmentation between an alleged group of lighter-skinned

  • Catuvellauni (ancient tribe of Britain)

    Catuvellauni, probably the most powerful Belgic tribe in ancient Britain; it occupied the area directly north of the River Thames. The first capital of the Catuvellauni was located near Wheathampstead, but after their defeat by Julius Caesar in 54 bc, they expanded to the north and northwest,

  • CATV (communications)

    cable television: Commonly known as community antenna television (CATV), these cable systems use a “community antenna” to receive broadcast signals (often from communications satellites), which they then retransmit via cables to homes and establishments in the local area subscribing to the service. Subscribers pay a specified monthly service charge in…

  • Catwoman (film by Pitof [2004])

    Catwoman: …Berry in the 2004 film Catwoman, and Anne Hathaway in the 2012 movie The Dark Knight Rises. Catwoman has appeared in numerous animated Batman television episodes and in hundreds of comic book stories.

  • Catwoman (fictional character)

    Catwoman, cartoon character, a wily and agile professional thief and sometime love interest of superhero Batman. Clad in a skintight bodysuit and stylized mask and carrying a whip, Selina Kyle, also known as Catwoman, has frequently crossed and recrossed the line between villain and antiheroine. In

  • Cauca River (river, Colombia)

    Cauca River, river, western and northwestern Colombia, rising in the Andes near Popayán and flowing northward between the Cordilleras (mountains) Occidental and Oriental for 838 mi (1,349 km) to join the Río Magdalena north of Mompós. In its middle reaches, the Cauca flows through the broad,

  • Cauca Valley Corporation (industrial organization, Colombia)

    Cali: …have been improved by the Cauca Valley Corporation (CVC), an autonomous public body modeled after the Tennessee Valley Authority in the United States. The CVC drained the upper Cauca River, Colombia’s second major waterway, to generate electrical power, prevent flooding, and make marginal farmland more suitable for large-scale cultivation by…

  • Caucasia (region and mountains, Eurasia)

    Caucasus, mountain system and region lying between the Black Sea (west) and the Caspian Sea (east) and occupied by Russia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Armenia. The great historic barrier of the Caucasus Mountains rises up across the wide isthmus separating the Black and Caspian seas in the region

  • Caucasian (racial theory)

    race: Scientific classifications of race: (He chose the term Caucasian to represent the Europeans because a skull from the Caucasus Mountains of Russia was in his opinion the most beautiful.) These terms were still commonly used by many scientists in the early 20th century, and most continue today as major designations of the world’s…

  • Caucasian carpet

    rug and carpet: Oriental carpets: …centuries, Asia Minor and the Caucasus produced coarse, vividly coloured rugs with stars, polygons, and often patterns of stylized Kūfic writing. A special group with simple, highly conventionalized animal forms was also woven; the most important of these carpets are represented by seven fragments of strong, repeating geometric patterns in…

  • Caucasian Chalk Circle, The (play by Brecht)

    The Caucasian Chalk Circle, a play consisting of a prologue and five scenes by Bertolt Brecht, first produced in English in 1948 and in German as Der kaukasische Kreidekreis in 1949. The work is based on the German writer Klabund’s play Der Kreidekreis (1924), itself a translation and adaptation of

  • Caucasian languages

    Caucasian languages, group of languages indigenous to Transcaucasia and adjacent areas of the Caucasus region, between the Black and Caspian seas. As used in this article, the term excludes the Indo-European (Armenian, Ossetic, Talysh, Kurdish, Tat) and Turkic languages (Azerbaijani, Kumyk, Noghay,

  • Caucasian peoples

    Caucasian peoples, various ethnic groups living in the Caucasus, a geographically complex area of mountain ranges, plateaus, foothills, plains, rivers, and lakes, with grasslands, forests, marshes, and dry steppes. The complex of regions harbours more than 50 separate peoples, ranging from language

  • Caucasian rug

    rug and carpet: Oriental carpets: …centuries, Asia Minor and the Caucasus produced coarse, vividly coloured rugs with stars, polygons, and often patterns of stylized Kūfic writing. A special group with simple, highly conventionalized animal forms was also woven; the most important of these carpets are represented by seven fragments of strong, repeating geometric patterns in…

  • Caucasian wine grape (fruit and plant)

    grape: Domestication and history: Vitis vinifera, the species most commonly used in wine making, was successfully cultivated in the Old World for thousands of years. Fossilized grape leaves, stem pieces, and seeds unearthed from Neogene and Paleogene deposits (about 2.58–66 million years old) in the Northern Hemisphere indicate the…

  • Caucasus (region and mountains, Eurasia)

    Caucasus, mountain system and region lying between the Black Sea (west) and the Caspian Sea (east) and occupied by Russia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Armenia. The great historic barrier of the Caucasus Mountains rises up across the wide isthmus separating the Black and Caspian seas in the region

  • Caucasus Mountains (region and mountains, Eurasia)

    Caucasus, mountain system and region lying between the Black Sea (west) and the Caspian Sea (east) and occupied by Russia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Armenia. The great historic barrier of the Caucasus Mountains rises up across the wide isthmus separating the Black and Caspian seas in the region

  • Caucasus Nature Reserve (research area, Russia)

    Kavkazsky Nature Reserve, natural area set aside for research in the natural sciences, at the western end of the Caucasus Mountains, in southwestern Russia. It includes the upper reaches of the Malaya Laba, Bolshaya Laba, Mzymta, and Shakhe rivers. The Kavkazsky Nature Reserve was established in

  • Cauchon, Pierre (French bishop)

    Pierre Cauchon, French bishop of Beauvais, an ecclesiastic memorable chiefly because he presided over the trial of Joan of Arc. Cauchon was educated at the University of Paris, of which he became rector in 1403. He became associated with the Burgundian party and took part in the riots of the

  • Cauchy distribution (mathematics)

    Cauchy distribution, in statistics, continuous distribution function with two parameters, first studied early in the 19th century by French mathematician Augustin-Louis Cauchy. It was later applied by the 19th-century Dutch physicist Hendrik Lorentz to explain forced resonance, or vibrations. At a

  • Cauchy sequence (mathematics)

    analysis: Properties of the real numbers: …is said to be a Cauchy sequence if it behaves in this manner. Specifically, (an) is Cauchy if, for every ε > 0, there exists some N such that, whenever r, s > N, |ar − as| < ε. Convergent sequences are always Cauchy, but is every Cauchy sequence convergent?…

  • Cauchy, Augustin-Louis (French mathematician)

    Augustin-Louis Cauchy, French mathematician who pioneered in analysis and the theory of substitution groups (groups whose elements are ordered sequences of a set of things). He was one of the greatest of modern mathematicians. At the onset of the Reign of Terror (1793–94) during the French

  • Cauchy, Augustin-Louis, Baron (French mathematician)

    Augustin-Louis Cauchy, French mathematician who pioneered in analysis and the theory of substitution groups (groups whose elements are ordered sequences of a set of things). He was one of the greatest of modern mathematicians. At the onset of the Reign of Terror (1793–94) during the French

  • Cauchy-Goursat theorem (mathematics)

    Édouard-Jean-Baptiste Goursat: …Cauchy’s work led to the Cauchy-Goursat theorem, which eliminated the redundant requirement of the derivative’s continuity in Cauchy’s integral theorem. Goursat became a member of the French Academy of Science in 1919 and was the author of Leçons sur l’intégration des équations aux dérivées partielles du premier ordre (1891) and…

  • Cauchy-Kovalevskaya theorem (mathematics)

    Sofya Vasilyevna Kovalevskaya: …now commonly known as the Cauchy-Kovalevskaya theorem, which gives conditions for the existence of solutions to a certain class of partial differential equations. Having gained her degree, she returned to Russia, where her daughter was born in 1878. She separated permanently from her husband in 1881.

  • Cauchy-Lorentz distribution (mathematics)

    Cauchy distribution, in statistics, continuous distribution function with two parameters, first studied early in the 19th century by French mathematician Augustin-Louis Cauchy. It was later applied by the 19th-century Dutch physicist Hendrik Lorentz to explain forced resonance, or vibrations. At a

  • Cauchy-Schwarz inequality (mathematics)

    Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, Any of several related inequalities developed by Augustin-Louis Cauchy and, later, Herman Schwarz (1843–1921). The inequalities arise from assigning a real number measurement, or norm, to the functions, vectors, or integrals within a particular space in order to analyze

  • Caucus (American organization)

    caucus: …name of a political club, the Caucus, or Caucus Club. The club hosted public discussions and the election of candidates for public office. In its subsequent and current usage in the United States, the term came to denote a meeting of either party managers or duty voters, as in “nominating…

  • caucus (politics)

    Caucus, any political group or meeting organized to further a special interest or cause. The word caucus originated in Boston in the early part of the 18th century, when it was used as the name of a political club, the Caucus, or Caucus Club. The club hosted public discussions and the election of

  • Caucus Club (American organization)

    caucus: …name of a political club, the Caucus, or Caucus Club. The club hosted public discussions and the election of candidates for public office. In its subsequent and current usage in the United States, the term came to denote a meeting of either party managers or duty voters, as in “nominating…

  • cauda equina (anatomy)

    prenatal development: Spinal nerves: …nerve roots are named the cauda equina, the Latin term for horse’s tail.

  • caudal vertebra (anatomy)

    vertebral column: …with the pelvic girdle, (5) caudal, in the tail. The atlas and axis vertebrae, the top two cervicals, form a freely movable joint with the skull.

  • Caudata (amphibian order)

    Caudata, one of the major extant orders of the class Amphibia. It includes salamanders and newts. The relatively small and inconspicuous salamanders are important members of north temperate and some tropical ecosystems, in which they are locally abundant and play important roles. They are important

  • caudate nucleus (anatomy)

    attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: Causes: …brain structures known as the caudate nuclei. In boys without ADHD, the right caudate nucleus was normally about 3 percent larger than the left caudate nucleus; this asymmetry was absent in boys with ADHD.

  • caudicle (plant anatomy)

    orchid: Characteristic morphological features: …advanced orchids in which the caudicles of the pollinia are already attached to the rostellum and a portion of it comes off as a sticky pad called a viscidium. In the most advanced genera a strap of nonsticky tissue from the column connects the pollinia to the viscidium. This band…

  • caudillismo (Latin American politics)

    Caudillismo, a system of political-social domination, based on the leadership of a strongman, that arose after the wars of independence from Spain in 19th-century Latin America. The Spanish word caudillo (“leader,” from the Latin capitellum [“small head”]) was used to describe the head of irregular

  • caudillo (military dictator)

    Caudillo, Latin American military dictator. In the wake of the Latin American independence movement in the early 19th century, politically unstable conditions and the long experience of armed conflict led to the emergence in many of the new countries of strongmen who were often charismatic and

  • Caudillo, El (ruler of Spain)

    Francisco Franco, general and leader of the Nationalist forces that overthrew the Spanish democratic republic in the Spanish Civil War (1936–39); thereafter he was the head of the government of Spain until 1973 and head of state until his death in 1975. Franco was born at the coastal city and naval

  • Caudine Forks (mountain pass, Italy)

    Caudine Forks, narrow mountain pass near Beneventum in ancient Samnium (near modern Montesarchio, Campania, southern Italy). In the Battle of Caudine Forks the Samnites under Gavius Pontius defeated and captured a Roman army in 321 bc, during the Second Samnite War. The Roman army surrendered, and

  • Caudine Forks, Battle of (Roman history)

    Caudine Forks: In the Battle of Caudine Forks the Samnites under Gavius Pontius defeated and captured a Roman army in 321 bc, during the Second Samnite War. The Roman army surrendered, and acknowledged that they had been defeated by passing under a “yoke” of Samnite spears, a unique disgrace.

  • Caudipteryx (dinosaur)

    Caudipteryx, genus of small feathered theropod dinosaurs known from rock deposits of western Liaoning province, China, that date from about 125 million years ago, during the Early Cretaceous (146 million to 100 million years ago). Caudipteryx was one of the first-known feathered dinosaurs; fossil

  • caudle cup

    Caudle cup, small, two-handled silver cup, usually with a cover, originally made in England during the second half of the 17th century and possibly used for caudle—warm ale or wine mixed with bread or gruel, eggs, sugar, and spices—which was administered to women after childbirth and to

  • Caudofoveata (mollusk subclass)

    mollusk: Annotated classification: Subclass Chaetodermomorpha (Caudofoveata) Worm-shaped; covered by cuticle and aragonitic scales; ventral gliding area reduced; mantle cavity terminal with 1 pair of ctenidia; midgut with ventrally separated sac; adapted to burrowing habits in mud; marine in 10–7,000 m; 2 mm to 14 cm; about 100 species in 3…

  • caudofoveate (mollusk subclass)

    mollusk: Annotated classification: Subclass Chaetodermomorpha (Caudofoveata) Worm-shaped; covered by cuticle and aragonitic scales; ventral gliding area reduced; mantle cavity terminal with 1 pair of ctenidia; midgut with ventrally separated sac; adapted to burrowing habits in mud; marine in 10–7,000 m; 2 mm to 14 cm; about 100 species in 3…

  • Caughley ware (pottery)

    Caughley ware, porcelain produced by the Caughley China Works, a factory in Caughley, Shropshire, England. A local earthenware pottery was extended in 1772 by Thomas Turner to make soaprock (steatitic) porcelain; a close connection existed with the Worcester porcelain factory, and from there Robert

  • Caught in Micro Debt (documentary film)

    Muhammad Yunus: …release of the documentary film Caught in Micro Debt. In addition to being critical of microloans, the film alleged that Yunus and the bank had misappropriated funds donated by Norway. Although both were later cleared by Norwegian officials, the Bangladesh government began an investigation. In 2011 the country’s central bank…

  • Caught in the Draft (film by Butler [1941])

    David Butler: … for the first time in Caught in the Draft (1941). The film was so successful that they rejoined forces for Road to Morocco (1942)—one of the best in the “Road” series, which also starred Crosby—and They Got Me Covered (1943), a lesser espionage farce with Otto Preminger as one of…

  • Cauhan (Indian dynasty)

    India: The Rajputs: Inscriptional records associate the Cauhans with Lake Shakambhari and its environs (Sambhar Salt Lake, Rajasthan). Cauhan politics were largely campaigns against the Caulukyas and the Turks. In the 11th century the Cauhans founded the city of Ajayameru (Ajmer) in the southern part of their kingdom, and in the 12th…

  • caul (embryology)

    Caul, a portion of the amnion, or bag of waters, which is sometimes found remaining around the head of a child after birth. The term also is applied occasionally to the serous membrane covering the heart, brain, or intestines. It is derived from the original meaning of a close-fitting woman’s cap,

  • Caulaincourt, Armand-Augustin-Louis, marquis de, duc de Vicence (French general)

    Armand, marquis de Caulaincourt, French general, diplomat, and ultimately foreign minister under Napoleon. As the Emperor’s loyal master of horse from 1804, Caulaincourt was at Napoleon’s side in his great battles, and his Mémoires provide an important source for the period 1812 to 1814. In 1795 he

  • Caulfield, Holden (fictional character)

    Holden Caulfield, fictional character, the teenaged protagonist and narrator of J.D. Salinger’s novel The Catcher in the Rye (1951). A sensitive, rebellious 16-year-old, Caulfield is expelled from prep school. Afraid to go home to his parents in New York City, he spends a few days alone in

  • Caulfield, Jack (American government official)

    Jack Caulfield, (John James Caulfield), American government official (born March 12, 1929, Bronx, N.Y.—died June 17, 2012, Vero Beach, Fla.), was involved in various “dirty tricks” and other dubious activities during U.S. Pres. Richard Nixon’s first term and 1972 reelection campaign; Caulfield’s

  • Caulfield, John James (American government official)

    Jack Caulfield, (John James Caulfield), American government official (born March 12, 1929, Bronx, N.Y.—died June 17, 2012, Vero Beach, Fla.), was involved in various “dirty tricks” and other dubious activities during U.S. Pres. Richard Nixon’s first term and 1972 reelection campaign; Caulfield’s

  • Caulfield, Patrick Joseph (British artist)

    Patrick Joseph Caulfield, British artist (born Jan. 29, 1936, London, Eng.—died Sept. 29, 2005, London), was a member of the “New Generation” of 1960s British Pop and abstract artists. Caulfield’s bold paintings incorporated everyday objects in still lifes and ordinary domestic interiors and were d

  • Cauliaco, Guido de (French physician)

    Guy de Chauliac, the most eminent surgeon of the European Middle Ages, whose Chirurgia magna (1363) was a standard work on surgery until at least the 17th century. In this work he describes a narcotic inhalation used as a soporific for surgical patients, as well as numerous surgical procedures,

  • cauliflory (plant)

    Connaraceae: …larger branches, a condition called cauliflory.

  • cauliflower (plant)

    Cauliflower, (Brassica oleracea, variety botrytis), highly modified form of cabbage in the mustard family (Brassicaceae), grown for its edible masses of partially developed flower structures and fleshy stalks. Cauliflower is high in vitamins C and K and is frequently served as a cooked vegetable or

  • cauliflower ear (pathology)

    Cauliflower ear, distortion of the cartilage of the outer ear as the result of an injury. If the injury causes bleeding between the cartilage and the skin, it produces a smooth and rounded purplish swelling. Accumulated clotted blood, if not removed, is transformed into scar tissue, causing

  • cauliflower fungus (Polyporales species)

    mushroom: One club fungus, the cauliflower fungus (Sparassis crispa), has flattened clustered branches that lie close together, giving the appearance of the vegetable cauliflower. The cantharelloid fungi (Cantharellus and its relatives) are club-, cone-, or trumpet-shaped mushroomlike forms with an expanded top bearing coarsely folded ridges along the underside and…

  • cauliflower ware (pottery)

    Cauliflower ware, in pottery, creamware modelled and glazed in green and yellow to simulate a cauliflower, the term also applying to other fruit or vegetable forms. About 1760, William Greatbach undertook the potting and modelling, jobbed out to him by Josiah Wedgwood, of cauliflower tureens and

  • Caulkins, Tracy (American swimmer)

    Tracy Caulkins, American athlete, considered one of the most versatile swimmers ever. She is the only swimmer to set U.S. records in every stroke, and she won a record 48 U.S. national swimming titles. Caulkins began swimming when she was eight years old and won her first titles at the 1977 Amateur

  • Caullery, Maurice-Jules-Gaston-Corneille (French biologist)

    Maurice Caullery, French biologist famous for his research on parasitic protozoans and marine invertebrates. Caullery taught at the University of Marseille (1900) and the University of Paris (1903) and succeeded Alfred Giard as director of the zoological station at Wimereux (1909). He was

  • Caulonia (ancient city, Italy)

    Caulonia, ancient Greek city in southern Italy, southernmost of the colonies founded in Italy by the Achaeans. Established perhaps in the first half of the 7th century bc, Caulonia was an outpost of Croton. Judging from its copious and beautiful coinage from the second half of the 6th century, it

  • Caulukya (Indian dynasty)

    India: The Rajputs: The Caulukyas of Gujarat had three branches: one ruling Mattamayura (the Malava-Cedi region), one established on the former kingdom of the Capas at Anahilapataka (present-day Patan), and the third at Bhrigukaccha (present-day Bharuch) and Lata in the coastal area. By the 11th century they were using…

  • Caunt, Benjamin (English boxer)

    Benjamin Caunt, British bare-knuckle prizefighter, one of the first to aspire to a world championship in addition to national honours. Caunt held the English heavyweight championship from 1838 to 1845, losing the title briefly in 1841 to Nick Ward. Caunt claimed the English title after winning from

  • Caupolicán (Araucanian chief)

    Caupolicán, Mapuche chief and a leader of the Indian resistance to the Spanish invaders of Chile. With the assistance of Lautaro, another Mapuche, Caupolicán and his men captured the Spaniards’ leader, Pedro de Valdivia, after a battle at Tucapel in December 1553. Reportedly, Caupolicán attempted

  • Caura River (river, Venezuela)

    Orinoco River: Physiography of the Orinoco: …bank, and the Cuchivero and Caura rivers, which join the main stream on the right. So much sediment is carried by these rivers that islands often form at the mouths. The Caroní River, one of the Orinoco’s largest tributaries, joins the river on its right bank after passing through the…

  • Caurapañcāśikā (work by Bilhaṇa)

    South Asian arts: Transition to the Mughal and Rajasthani styles: …illustrating the Bhāgavata-Purāṇa and the Caurapañcāśikā of Bilhaṇa, scattered in collections all over the world. A technically more refined variant of this style, preferring the pale, cool colours of Persian derivation, a fine line, and meticulous ornamentation, exists contemporaneously and is best illustrated by a manuscript of the ballad Candāmyana…

  • causal inference (reason)

    thought: Induction: In a causal inference, one reasons to the conclusion that something is, or is likely to be, the cause of something else. For example, from the fact that one hears the sound of piano music, one may infer that someone is (or was) playing a piano. But…

  • causal theory (philosophy)

    epistemology: Realism: …direct (or “naive”) realism and representative realism, also called the “causal theory.”

  • causalgia (pathology)

    pain: Theories of pain: …Civil War soldiers afflicted with causalgia (constant burning pain; later known as complex regional pain syndrome), phantom limb pain, and other painful conditions long after their original wounds had healed. Despite the odd and often hostile behaviour of his patients, Mitchell was convinced of the reality of their physical suffering.

  • causality (philosophy)

    Causation, Relation that holds between two temporally simultaneous or successive events when the first event (the cause) brings about the other (the effect). According to David Hume, when we say of two types of object or event that “X causes Y” (e.g., fire causes smoke), we mean that (i) Xs are

  • causation (philosophy)

    Causation, Relation that holds between two temporally simultaneous or successive events when the first event (the cause) brings about the other (the effect). According to David Hume, when we say of two types of object or event that “X causes Y” (e.g., fire causes smoke), we mean that (i) Xs are

  • cause group

    interest group: Types of interests and interest groups: Cause groups are those that represent a segment of society but whose primary purpose is noneconomic and usually focused on promoting a particular cause or value. This category is wide-ranging, including churches and religious organizations (e.g., Catholic Action in Italy), veterans’ groups (e.g., the Union…

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