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  • catarrh (disease)

    rheumatism: …that a respiratory disease called catarrh, which is associated with inflammation of the upper respiratory tract, was connected to rheumatism and that rheumatism was systemic in nature, affecting many parts of the body. The rheumatic maladies as described by Galen and Baillou were later associated with Streptococcus infections.

  • catarrhal (disease)

    rheumatism: …that a respiratory disease called catarrh, which is associated with inflammation of the upper respiratory tract, was connected to rheumatism and that rheumatism was systemic in nature, affecting many parts of the body. The rheumatic maladies as described by Galen and Baillou were later associated with Streptococcus infections.

  • catarrhine (mammal)

    monkey: Old World monkeys versus New World monkeys: …together they are classified as catarrhines (meaning “downward-nosed” in Latin). The New World monkeys are the platyrrhines (“flat-nosed”), a group comprising five families. As their taxonomic names suggest, New World (platyrrhine) and Old World (catarrhine) monkeys are distinguished by the form of the nose. New World monkeys have broad noses…

  • Catarrhini (mammal)

    monkey: Old World monkeys versus New World monkeys: …together they are classified as catarrhines (meaning “downward-nosed” in Latin). The New World monkeys are the platyrrhines (“flat-nosed”), a group comprising five families. As their taxonomic names suggest, New World (platyrrhine) and Old World (catarrhine) monkeys are distinguished by the form of the nose. New World monkeys have broad noses…

  • Catasarion (Italy)

    Catanzaro, city, capital of Calabria regione (region), southern Italy, at an elevation of 1,125 feet (343 metres) overlooking the Gulf of Squillace, southeast of Cosenza. Founded about the 10th century as Catasarion, a Byzantine town, it was taken in 1059 by the Norman leader Robert Guiscard.

  • catastasis (literature)

    Catastasis, the dramatic complication that immediately precedes the climax of a play or that occurs during the climax of a play. Compare

  • catastrophe (literature)

    Catastrophe, in literature, the final action that completes the unraveling of the plot in a play, especially in a tragedy. Catastrophe is a synonym of denouement. The term is sometimes applied to a similar action in a novel or

  • catastrophe (event)

    ballad: Disaster: Sensational shipwrecks, plagues, train wrecks, mine explosions—all kinds of shocking acts of God and man—were regularly chronicled in ballads, a few of which remained in tradition, probably because of some special charm in the language or the music. The shipwreck that lies in the…

  • catastrophe coverage (insurance)

    insurance: Aviation insurance: …underwriting problem is the “catastrophic” exposure to loss. The largest passenger aircraft may incur losses of $300,000,000 or more, counting both liability and physical damage exposures. The number of aircraft of any particular type is not large enough for the accurate prediction of losses, and each type of aircraft…

  • catastrophe theory (evolution)

    Charles Bonnet: …the Earth periodically suffers universal catastrophes, destroying most life, and that the survivors move up a notch on the evolutionary scale. Bonnet was the first to use the term evolution in a biological context. His Essai de psychologie (1754) and Essai analytique sur les facultés de l’âme (1760; “Analytical Essay…

  • catastrophe theory (mathematics)

    Catastrophe theory, in mathematics, a set of methods used to study and classify the ways in which a system can undergo sudden large changes in behaviour as one or more of the variables that control it are changed continuously. Catastrophe theory is generally considered a branch of geometry because

  • catastrophic extinction (biology)

    extinction: Mass extinctions:

  • catastrophic variable star (astronomy)

    star: Explosive variables: The evolution of a member of a close double-star system can be markedly affected by the presence of its companion. As the stars age, the more massive one swells up more quickly as it moves away from the main sequence. It becomes so…

  • catastrophism (geology)

    Catastrophism, doctrine that explains the differences in fossil forms encountered in successive stratigraphic levels as being the product of repeated cataclysmic occurrences and repeated new creations. This doctrine generally is associated with the great French naturalist Baron Georges Cuvier

  • catastrophism (Polish literature)

    Czesław Miłosz: …“Poem of Frozen Time”), expressed catastrophic fears of an impending war and worldwide disaster. During the Nazi occupation he moved to Warsaw, where he was active in the resistance and edited Pieśń niepodległa (1942; “Independent Song: Polish Wartime Poetry”), a clandestine anthology of well-known contemporary poems.

  • catatonia (mental disorder)

    catatonic schizophrenia: …is described by the term catatonia.

  • catatonic schizophrenia (mental disorder)

    Catatonic schizophrenia, rare severe mental disorder characterized by striking motor behaviour, typically involving either significant reductions in voluntary movement or hyperactivity and agitation. In some cases, the patient may remain in a state of almost complete immobility, often assuming

  • Catatumbo River (river, South America)

    Catatumbo River, river rising in northern Colombia. It flows northeast across the Venezuelan border, crosses rich oil-bearing regions in the Maracaibo Lowland, and empties into Lake Maracaibo after a course of about 210 miles (338 km). It is navigable in its lower course and receives Zulia River 4

  • catauro de cubanismos, Un (work by Ortiz)

    Fernando Ortiz: His Un catauro de cubanismos (1923; “A Load of Cubanisms”) identifies the African origins of many words used in Cuba, as well as the different origins of other words. Ortiz followed this with the Glosario de Afronegrismos, estudio de lingüística, lexicología, etimología y semántica (1924; “A…

  • Catawba (people)

    Catawba, North American Indian tribe of Siouan language stock who inhabited the territory around the Catawba River in what are now the U.S. states of North and South Carolina. Their principal village was on the west side of the river in north-central South Carolina. They were known among English

  • Catawba language

    Siouan languages: The Catawban branch (formerly spoken in North and South Carolina) is the most divergent—i.e., the first to break off. Several of the languages are extinct (marked in the classification below with an asterisk [*]), and the rest are endangered.

  • catawba rhododendron (plant)

    rhododendron: The catawba rhododendron, or mountain rosebay (R. catawbiense), of the southeastern United States, is plentiful and a great flowering attraction in June in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The hardy catawba hybrids are derived from R. catawbiense and allied species. The great laurel rhododendron (R.…

  • Catawba River (river, United States)

    Catawba River, River, southeastern U.S. Rising in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge, it flows south into South Carolina, where it becomes the Wateree River. It is 220 mi (350 km) long. With the Wateree, it forms an important source of hydroelectric power for South

  • Catawba-Siouan languages

    Siouan languages, family of languages in North America spread primarily across the Great Plains, extending from Canada to Mississippi to North Carolina. The languages belonging to this family are classified as follows. The Catawban branch (formerly spoken in North and South Carolina) is the most

  • Catazaro, Zachary (dancer)

    Amar Ramasar: In August 2018 Ramasar and Zachary Catazaro, another principal dancer at the NYCB, were suspended by the company over their purported involvement in the sharing of explicit photographs and videos of women; Chase Finlay, also implicated in the scandal, had resigned. The following month Ramasar and Catazaro were fired. However,…

  • catbird (bird)

    Catbird, any of five bird species named for their mewing calls, which are used in addition to song. The North American catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), of the family Mimidae (order Passeriformes), is 23 cm (9 inches) long and is gray, with a black cap. It frequents gardens and thickets. The black

  • catbrier (plant)

    Smilax: …herbaceous vines, variously known as catbriers and greenbriers, native to tropical and temperate parts of the world. The stems of many species are covered with prickles; the lower leaves are scalelike; and the leathery upper leaves have untoothed blades with three to nine large veins. The white or yellow-green male…

  • catch (phonetics)

    stop: …usually has three stages: the catch (implosion), or beginning of the blockage; the hold (occlusion); and the release (explosion), or opening of the air passage again. A stop differs from a fricative (q.v.) in that, with a stop, occlusion is total, rather than partial. Occlusion may occur at various places…

  • catch (music)

    Catch, perpetual canon designed to be sung by three or more unaccompanied male voices, especially popular in 17th- and 18th-century England. Like all rounds, catches are indefinitely repeatable pieces in which all voices begin the same melody on the same pitch but enter at different time intervals.

  • Catch a Fire (film by Noyce [2006])

    Tim Robbins: …Words (2005), the political drama Catch a Fire (2006), the war comedy The Lucky Ones (2008), the superhero movie Green Lantern (2011), the romance mystery Marjorie Prime (2017), and the legal thriller Dark Waters (2019). His television credits from this period included the HBO series The Brink

  • Catch Me If You Can (film by Spielberg [2002])

    Amy Adams: …DiCaprio in the crime comedy Catch Me If You Can (2002). Her performance as the naive wife Ashley in the independent film Junebug (2005), about the troubled relationships hidden in a Southern family, earned her an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actress. That charismatic innocence led to Adams’s later…

  • Catch That Catch Can (work by Hilton)

    catch: …such publications was John Hilton’s Catch That Catch Can (1652).

  • Catch Us If You Can (film by Boorman [1965])

    John Boorman: Boorman’s first feature film, Catch Us If You Can (1965; also known as Having a Wild Weekend), followed the British rock group the Dave Clark Five through Bristol, using the cityscape as backdrop. Although inspired by the Beatles’ A Hard Day’s Night (1964), it highlighted the director’s innovative style.…

  • Catch-22 (television miniseries)

    George Clooney: Clooney appeared as Scheisskopf in Catch-22 (2019), a TV miniseries adaptation of Joseph Heller’s novel.

  • Catch-22 (novel by Heller)

    Catch-22, satirical novel by American writer Joseph Heller, published in 1961. The work centres on Captain John Yossarian, an American bombardier stationed on a Mediterranean island during World War II, and chronicles his desperate attempts to stay alive. Yossarian interprets the entire war as a

  • Catch-22 (film by Nichols [1970])

    Catch-22: Analysis: A 1970 film version, directed by Mike Nichols and starring Alan Arkin as Yossarian, contributed to the novel’s growing fame.

  • catch-22 (linguistic expression)

    Catch-22: The term catch-22 entered the English language meaning “a problematic situation for which the only solution is denied by a circumstance inherent in the problem.”

  • catch-and-release angling (fishing)

    fishing: Recent trends in fishing: For example, catch-and-release angling became increasingly popular since the late 20th century. In many areas of the United States and Canada, individual lakes and streams are increasingly managed for lower catch limits and for habitat quality. Owing to angler demand, fisheries management emphasis continues to shift from…

  • catch-and-release fly-fishing

    fly-fishing: Modern fly-fishing: Catch-and-release fly-fishing, which originated in the United States among trout anglers and was popularized by Wulff and her famous fly-fishing husband, Lee Wulff, continues to gain favour worldwide and is increasingly applied to numerous other species and angling methods. Through their participation in conservation groups,…

  • catch-as-catch-can wrestling (sport)

    Catch-as-catch-can wrestling, basic wrestling style in which nearly all holds and tactics are permitted in both upright and ground wrestling. Rules usually forbid only actions that may injure an opponent, such as strangling, kicking, gouging, and hitting with a closed fist. The object is to force

  • catch-hold wrestling (sport)

    wrestling: Catch-hold styles require the contestants to take a prescribed hold before the contest begins; often this grip must be maintained throughout the struggle. Loose styles of wrestling, which are used in modern international competition, commence with the wrestlers separated and free to seize any grip…

  • catcher (sports)

    baseball: Gloves: Beginning in 1860, catchers, who attempt to catch every pitch not hit, became the first to adopt gloves. First basemen, who take many throws for putouts from the infielders, soon followed, and finally all players adopted gloves. All gloves are constructed of leather with some padding. The catcher’s…

  • catcher cavity (electronics)

    electron tube: Klystrons: …resonators (the buncher and the catcher, which serve as reservoirs of electromagnetic oscillations) is the accelerating potential and is commonly referred to as the beam voltage. This voltage accelerates the DC electron beam to a high velocity before injecting it into the grids of the buncher cavity. The grids of…

  • Catcher in the Rye, The (novel by Salinger)

    The Catcher in the Rye, novel by J.D. Salinger published in 1951. The novel details two days in the life of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield after he has been expelled from prep school. Confused and disillusioned, Holden searches for truth and rails against the “phoniness” of the adult world. He ends

  • Catcher Was a Spy, The (film by Lewin [2018])

    Paul Giamatti: …to appear in movies, including The Catcher Was a Spy, the real life story of a MLB player who worked for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II; I Think We’re Alone Now, a disquieting postapocalyptic drama; and Private Life, a dramedy about the tribulations of fertility treatment…

  • catcher’s glove

    baseball: Gloves: The catcher’s glove, or mitt, presents a solid face except for a cleft between the thumb and index finger and is thickly padded except at the centre, where the pitched ball is caught. The glove cannot exceed 38 inches (96.5 cm) in circumference and 15.5 inches…

  • catcher’s mitt

    baseball: Gloves: The catcher’s glove, or mitt, presents a solid face except for a cleft between the thumb and index finger and is thickly padded except at the centre, where the pitched ball is caught. The glove cannot exceed 38 inches (96.5 cm) in circumference and 15.5 inches…

  • catchfly (plant, genus Silene)

    Campion, common name for ornamental rock-garden or border plants constituting the genus Silene, of the pink, or carnation, family (Caryophyllaceae), consisting of about 720 species of herbaceous plants distributed throughout the world. Members of the genus Lychnis are included in Silene. Some

  • Catching a Catfish with a Gourd (painting by Taiko Josetsu)

    Taikō Josetsu: …is an ink landscape painting, “Catching a Catfish with a Gourd.” It was painted c. 1413, commissioned by Ashikaga Yoshimochi, the 4th Muromachi shogun and a disciple of Zen. It is one of the earliest suiboku paintings in Japan. The subject is Zen inspired; the soft ink-wash technique reflects the…

  • catchment area (geology)

    Drainage basin, area from which all precipitation flows to a single stream or set of streams. For example, the total area drained by the Mississippi River constitutes its drainage basin, whereas that part of the Mississippi River drained by the Ohio River is the Ohio’s drainage basin. The boundary

  • catchment basin (geology)

    Drainage basin, area from which all precipitation flows to a single stream or set of streams. For example, the total area drained by the Mississippi River constitutes its drainage basin, whereas that part of the Mississippi River drained by the Ohio River is the Ohio’s drainage basin. The boundary

  • catchup (condiment)

    Ketchup, seasoned pureed condiment widely used in the United States and Great Britain. American ketchup is a sweet puree of tomatoes, onions, and green peppers flavoured with vinegar and pickling spice that is eaten with meats, especially beef, and frequently with french fried potatoes (British

  • Cateau-Cambrésis, Peace of (European history)

    Peace of Cateau-Cambrésis, (April 3, 1559), agreement marking the end of the 65-year (1494–1559) struggle between France and Spain for the control of Italy, leaving Habsburg Spain the dominant power there for the next 150 years. In the last phase of the war, fought mostly outside of Italy, France

  • Catecheses (work by Saint Cyril)

    Saint Cyril of Jerusalem: …of 23 catechetical lectures (Catecheses) delivered to candidates for Baptism. The first 18, based on the Jerusalem baptismal creed, were given during Lent, and the concluding 5 instructed the newly baptized during the week after Easter. Cyril was declared a doctor of the church in 1883.

  • catechesis (Christian theology)

    kerygma and catechesis: catechesis, in Christian theology, respectively, the initial proclamation of the gospel message and the oral instruction given before baptism to those who have accepted the message. Kerygma refers primarily to the preaching of the Apostles as recorded in the New Testament. Their message was that…

  • Catechesis (work by Diadochus)

    Diadochus Of Photice: …his Horasis (“The Vision”) and Catechesis (“Instruction”). The Greek text of the Catechesis, probably an 11th-century redaction of Diadochus’ thought, was discovered and edited in 1952 by Édouard Des Places, who also produced a new critical edition of “The Hundred Chapters” (Oeuvres spirituelles, 1955).

  • Catechetical Homilies (work by Theodore of Mopsuestia)

    patristic literature: The school of Antioch: John and his Catechetical Homilies), as well as the reconstruction of the greater part of his Commentary on the Psalms. This fresh evidence confirms that Theodore was not only the most acute of the Antiochene exegetes, deploying the hermeneutics (critical interpretive principles) of his school in a thoroughly…

  • catechetical school (education)

    Catechetical school, in early Christianity, a type of educational institution with a curriculum directed toward inquirers (especially those trained in the Greek paideia, or educational system) whose aim was to gain a greater knowledge of Christianity and eventually, perhaps, baptism into the

  • catechism (religious manual)

    Catechism, a manual of religious instruction usually arranged in the form of questions and answers used to instruct the young, to win converts, and to testify to the faith. Although many religions give instruction in the faith by means of oral questions and answers, the written catechism is

  • Catechism of Parliamentary Reform, A (work by Bentham)

    Jeremy Bentham: Mature works: …he had written a tract—A Catechism of Parliamentary Reform, which was, however, not published until 1817—advocating annual elections; equal electoral districts; a wide suffrage, including woman suffrage; and the secret ballot. He supported in principle the participation of women in government and argued for the reform of marriage law…

  • Catechism of the Catholic Church (religious manual)

    catechism: …Vatican issued a new universal Catechism of the Catholic Church that summarized the church’s doctrinal positions and teachings since the second Vatican Council (1962–65). The new catechism abandoned the question-and-answer form and used modern language in its prescriptions on faith, the sacraments, sin, and prayer.

  • catechol-O-methyltransferase (enzyme)

    antiparkinson drug: COMT and MAO-B inhibitors: COMT inhibitors, such as tolcapone and entacapone, block the enzymatic breakdown of dopamine by the catechol-O-methyltransferase enzyme. These drugs commonly are given in conjunction with the combination of levodopa and carbidopa, since they inhibit COMT degradation of levodopa in peripheral tissues, thereby increasing levodopa’s half-life…

  • catecholamine (chemical compound)

    Catecholamine, any of various naturally occurring amines that function as neurotransmitters and hormones within the body. Catecholamines are characterized by a catechol group (a benzene ring with two hydroxyl groups) to which is attached an amine (nitrogen-containing) group. Among the

  • catechu (plant extract)

    Sir Humphry Davy: Early life: …study of tanning: he found catechu, the extract of a tropical plant, as effective as and cheaper than the usual oak extracts, and his published account was long used as a tanner’s guide. In 1803 he was admitted a fellow of the Royal Society and an honorary member of the…

  • catechumen (Christianity)

    Catechumen, a person who receives instruction in the Christian religion in order to be baptized. According to the New Testament, the apostles instructed converts after baptism (Acts 2:41–42), and Christian instruction was evidently given to all converts (Luke 1:4, Acts 18:25, Galatians 6:6). As

  • Catechumens, Liturgy of the (Christianity)

    Liturgy of the Catechumens, the instructional part of the Christian worship service, consisting of hymns, prayers, scriptural readings, and homilies, which precedes the Eucharist (i.e., the Liturgy of the Faithful). In the early church the catechumens, or hearers who had not yet been baptized, were

  • Categoriae (work by Aristotle)

    history of logic: Aristotle: …but not chronological order, are:

  • categorical conclusion (logic)

    Venn diagram: …two categorical premises and a categorical conclusion. A common practice is to label the circles with capital (and, if necessary, also lowercase) letters corresponding to the subject term of the conclusion, the predicate term of the conclusion, and the middle term, which appears once in each premise. If, after both…

  • categorical imperative (philosophy)

    Categorical imperative, in the ethics of the 18th-century German philosopher Immanuel Kant, founder of critical philosophy, a moral law that is unconditional or absolute for all agents, the validity or claim of which does not depend on any ulterior motive or end. “Thou shalt not steal,” for

  • categorical inference (reason)

    thought: Induction: In a categorical inference, one makes a judgment about whether something is, or is likely to be, a member of a certain category. For example, upon seeing an animal one has never seen before, a person with a limited knowledge of dogs may be confident that what…

  • categorical proposition (logic)

    Categorical proposition, in syllogistic or traditional logic, a proposition or statement, in which the predicate is, without qualification, affirmed or denied of all or part of the subject. Thus, categorical propositions are of four basic forms: “Every S is P,” “No S is P,” “Some S is P,” and “Some

  • categorical syllogism (logic)

    syllogism: The traditional type is the categorical syllogism in which both premises and the conclusion are simple declarative statements that are constructed using only three simple terms between them, each term appearing twice (as a subject and as a predicate): “All men are mortal; no gods are mortal; therefore no men…

  • categorical system (logic)

    metalogic: The axiomatic method: …question whether a system is categorical—that is, whether it determines essentially a unique interpretation in the sense that any two interpretations are isomorphic—may be explored. This semantic question can to some extent be replaced by a related syntactic question, that of completeness: whether there is in the system any sentence…

  • categorical theory (logic)

    metalogic: The axiomatic method: …question whether a system is categorical—that is, whether it determines essentially a unique interpretation in the sense that any two interpretations are isomorphic—may be explored. This semantic question can to some extent be replaced by a related syntactic question, that of completeness: whether there is in the system any sentence…

  • categoricity in cardinality (logic)

    metalogic: Generalizations and extensions of the Löwenheim-Skolem theorem: …β, the theory has a model of cardinality α.

  • Categories (work by Aristotle)

    history of logic: Aristotle: …but not chronological order, are:

  • category (logic)

    Category, in logic, a term used to denote the several most general or highest types of thought forms or entities, or to denote any distinction such that, if a form or entity belonging to one category is substituted into a statement in place of one belonging to another, a nonsensical assertion must

  • category (mathematics)

    mathematics: Developments in pure mathematics: Hence there was a category consisting of all groups and all maps between them that preserve multiplication, and there was another category of all topological spaces and all continuous maps between them. To do algebraic topology was to transfer a problem posed in one category (that of topological spaces)…

  • category mistake (philosophy)

    Western philosophy: Ordinary-language philosophy: …what he called a “category mistake.” The mistake is to interpret the term mind as though it were analogous to the term body and thus to assume that both terms denote entities, one visible (body) and the other invisible (mind). His diagnosis of this error involved an elaborate description…

  • category of sets (mathematics)

    foundations of mathematics: Abstraction in mathematics: For example, in the category of sets, elements of a set A may be represented by arrows from a typical one-element set into A. Similarly, in the category of small categories, if 1 is the category with one object and no nonidentity arrows, the objects of a category A…

  • category of sets and functions (mathematics)

    foundations of mathematics: Abstraction in mathematics: For example, in the category of sets, elements of a set A may be represented by arrows from a typical one-element set into A. Similarly, in the category of small categories, if 1 is the category with one object and no nonidentity arrows, the objects of a category A…

  • category theory (mathematics)

    foundations of mathematics: Category theory: One recent tendency in the development of mathematics has been the gradual process of abstraction. The Norwegian mathematician Niels Henrik Abel (1802–29) proved that equations of the fifth degree cannot, in general, be solved by radicals. The French mathematician

  • category, perceptual (psychology)

    human behaviour: Judgment: Finally, infants create perceptual categories by which to organize experience, a category being defined as a representation of the dimensions or qualities shared by a set of similar but not identical events. Infants will treat the different colours of the spectrum, for example, according to the same categories…

  • Catelin, Prosper (French architect)

    Latin American architecture: Architecture of the new independent republics, c. 1810–70: …architects from France—including Pierre Benoit, Prosper Catelin, Charles Enrique Pellegrini, and José Pons—implemented new cultural policies. Englishmen James Bevans and Charles Rann also went to the New World, along with the Italians Carlos Zucchi and Paolo Caccianiga. These architects all were essential in creating a new cosmopolitan city in the…

  • Catelinus (pope)

    John III, pope from 561 to 574. Records of John’s pontificate were destroyed during an invasion of Italy by the Lombards, whose kingdom was in northern Italy. John fled to the safety of Naples and in 571 persuaded the Byzantine general Narses to defend Rome. The Romans opposed Narses because he

  • catenaccio system (sports)

    football: Strategy and tactics: Subsequently, the catenaccio system developed by Helenio Herrera at Internazionale copied the verrou system, playing a libero (free man) in defense. The system was highly effective but made for highly tactical football centred on defense that was often tedious to watch.

  • catenae (anthologies)

    Origen: Writings: …survive in writings known as catenae (“chains”; i.e., anthologies of comments by early Church Fathers on biblical books). Commentaries on the Song of Solomon and on Romans survive in a drastically abbreviated Latin paraphrase by the Christian writer Tyrannius Rufinus (c. 365–410/411). The homilies on Genesis through the Book of…

  • catenane (chemistry)

    Jean-Pierre Sauvage: …created a molecular chain, [2]catenane. They found that a copper ion would attract a ring-shaped and a crescent-shaped part of a phenanthroline molecule. They added another crescent phenanthroline to the first crescent to make two linked rings with the copper ion in the middle and then removed the ion.

  • catenary (mathematics)

    Catenary, in mathematics, a curve that describes the shape of a flexible hanging chain or cable—the name derives from the Latin catenaria (“chain”). Any freely hanging cable or string assumes this shape, also called a chainette, if the body is of uniform mass per unit of length and is acted upon

  • catenation (chemistry)

    Catenation, chemical linkage into chains of atoms of the same element, occurring only among the atoms of an element that has a valence of at least two and that forms relatively strong bonds with itself. The property is predominant among carbon atoms, significant among sulfur and silicon atoms, and

  • Catenna (Algeria)

    Ténès, town, northern Algeria. A small Mediterranean Sea port, it is built on the site of the ancient Phoenician and Roman colonies of Catenna. Ruins of the Roman colony’s ramparts and tombs remain, and the Roman cisterns are still in use. Old Ténès, probably founded in 875 ce by Spanish colonists,

  • catenoid (mathematics)

    catenary: …horizontal axis is called a catenoid. The catenoid was discovered in 1744 by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler and it is the only minimal surface, other than the plane, that can be obtained as a surface of revolution.

  • catepan (Byzantine administrator)

    Italy: The south, 774–1000: …through a local ruler, or catepan, who headed an administrative and fiscal system that was apparently more complex and stable than that of the exarchs had been. Culturally, the Byzantines were by now entirely Greek, and southern Calabria was, as already noted, Greek-speaking; in Puglia, however, the Italian-speaking Lombards dominated,…

  • caterpillar (lepidopteran larva)

    Caterpillar, larva of a butterfly or moth (Lepidoptera). Most caterpillars have cylindrical bodies consisting of multiple segments, with three pairs of true legs on the thorax and several pairs of short, fleshy prolegs on the abdomen. The head has six small eyes (stemmata) on each side that

  • caterpillar fungus (biology)

    Ascomycota: …Hypocreales, are commonly known as vegetable caterpillars, or caterpillar fungi. C. militaris parasitizes insects. It forms a small, 3- or 4-centimetre (about 1.3-inch) mushroomlike fruiting structure with a bright orange head, or cap. A related genus, Claviceps, includes C. purpurea, the cause of ergot of

  • caterpillar hunter (insect)

    ground beetle: The searcher, or caterpillar hunter (Calosoma scrutator), is a common, brightly coloured North American ground beetle about 35 mm (1.5 inches) long. Its green or violet wings are edged in red, and its body has violet-blue, gold, and green markings. This and related species of ground beetles are…

  • Caterpillar Inc. (American manufacturing company)

    Caterpillar Inc., major American manufacturer of earth-moving, construction, agricultural, and materials-handling equipment. Its headquarters are in Peoria, Illinois. The Caterpillar Tractor Company had its origins in two California-based agricultural-equipment companies headed respectively by

  • caterpillar locomotion (biology)

    locomotion: Rectilinear locomotion: Unlike the three preceding patterns of movement, in which the body is thrown into a series of curves, in rectilinear locomotion in snakes the body is held relatively straight and glides forward in a manner analogous to the pedal locomotion of snails. The…

  • caterpillar tractor (vehicle)

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