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  • cardioid microphone (electroacoustic device)

    electromechanical transducer: Linearity and directivity: …common directional microphone is the cardioid microphone, so called because, when the intensity response as a function of angle is plotted on a polar graph, the curve is heart-shaped. A cardioid microphone is useful for recording live performances, where it is desirable to eliminate audience noise. A shotgun microphone has…

  • cardiology (medicine)

    Cardiology, medical specialty dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and abnormalities involving the heart and blood vessels. Cardiology is a medical, not surgical, discipline. Cardiologists provide the continuing care of patients with cardiovascular disease, performing basic studies

  • cardiomyopathy (pathology)

    Cardiomyopathy, any cardiac disease process that results in heart failure due to a decrease in the pumping power of the heart or due to an impairment in the filling of the cardiac chambers. Persons with cardiomyopathy frequently retain excess fluid, resulting in congestion of the lungs, and have

  • cardiopulmonary bypass (medicine)

    cardiovascular disease: Cardiopulmonary bypass: Cardiopulmonary bypass serves as a temporary substitute for a patient’s heart and lungs during the course of open-heartsurgery. The patient’s blood is pumped through a heart-lung machine for

  • cardiopulmonary resuscitation (medicine)

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), emergency procedure for providing artificial respiration and blood circulation when normal breathing and circulation have stopped, usually as a result of trauma such as heart attack or near drowning. CPR buys time for the trauma victim by supplying

  • cardiospasm (pathology)

    esophagus: …gastric juices in the esophagus; achalasia, an inability to swallow or to pass food from the esophagus to the stomach, caused by destruction of the nerve endings in the walls of the esophagus; scleroderma, a collagen disease; and spasms of the esophageal muscles.

  • Cardiospermum halicacabum (plant)

    Balloon vine, (species Cardiospermum halicacabum), woody perennial vine in the soapberry family (Sapindaceae) that is native to subtropical and tropical America. It is naturalized and cultivated widely as an ornamental for its white flowers and its nearly globular inflated fruits, which are about

  • cardiotonic steroid (chemistry)

    steroid: Cardiotonic steroids: ) Preparations in which cardiotonic steroids of both vegetable and animal origin are the active principles have been used as emetics, diuretics, and arrow poisons for centuries. The use of digitalis, ouabain, and strophanthin glycosides to slow the rate and strengthen the contractility of…

  • cardiovascular disease

    Cardiovascular disease, any of the diseases, whether congenital or acquired, of the heart and blood vessels. Among the most important are atherosclerosis, rheumatic heart disease, and vascular inflammation. Cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of health problems and death. Life depends on the

  • cardiovascular drug

    Cardiovascular drug, any agent that affects the function of the heart and blood vessels. Drugs that act on the cardiovascular system are among the most widely used in medicine. Examples of disorders in which such drugs may be useful include hypertension (high blood pressure), angina pectoris (chest

  • cardiovascular system disease

    Cardiovascular disease, any of the diseases, whether congenital or acquired, of the heart and blood vessels. Among the most important are atherosclerosis, rheumatic heart disease, and vascular inflammation. Cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of health problems and death. Life depends on the

  • cardiovascular system, human (anatomy)

    Human cardiovascular system, organ system that conveys blood through vessels to and from all parts of the body, carrying nutrients and oxygen to tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. It is a closed tubular system in which the blood is propelled by a muscular heart. Two circuits, the

  • Cardis, Treaty of (Sweden-Russia [1661])

    Treaty of Cardis, (1661), peace settlement between Russia and Sweden, ending the war begun in 1656 and maintaining the territorial accords of the earlier Treaty of Stolbovo. See Stolbovo, Treaty

  • Cardisoma guanhumi (crustacean)

    land crab: Cardisoma guanhumi, a land crab of Bermuda, the West Indies, and the southern United States, lives in fields, swamps, and mangrove thickets. Some penetrate inland as far as 8 km (about 5 miles). Adults weigh about 0.5 kg (18 ounces) and measure about 11 cm…

  • Cardlis (Italy)

    Cagliari, city, capital of the island regione of Sardinia, Italy. It lies at the northern extremity of the Gulf of Cagliari, on the south coast of the island. Although it was probably occupied in prehistoric times, its foundation is attributed to the Phoenicians. It was known to the Greeks as

  • cardoon (plant)

    Cardoon, (Cynara cardunculus), thistlelike perennial herb of the family Asteraceae, native to southern Europe and North Africa, where it is used as a vegetable. Its blanched inner leaves and stalk (called the chard, though not to be confused with Swiss chard, or leaf beet) and thick main roots are

  • Cardoso, Fernando Henrique (president of Brazil)

    Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Brazilian sociologist, teacher, and politician who was president of Brazil from 1995 to 2003. Cardoso became a professor of sociology at the University of São Paulo in 1958, but the military government that took power in 1964 blacklisted him from teaching in the country’s

  • Cardoso, Lúcio (Brazilian novelist)

    Brazilian literature: The novel: …with mid-20th-century novelists such as Lúcio Cardoso, whose Crônica da casa assassinada (1959; “Chronicle of the Assassinated House”) offered new introspective and psychological insights into the many dimensions of reality. Osman Lins, who began writing in the 1950s, built an oeuvre around the self-conscious process of writing in the context…

  • Cardoso, Ruth (Brazilian anthropologist and educator)

    Ruth Cardoso, (Ruth Vilaça Corrêa Leite Cardoso), Brazilian anthropologist, educator, and public figure (born Sept. 19, 1930, Araraquara, Braz.—died June 24, 2008, São Paulo, Braz.), as the prominent wife of Brazilian Pres. Fernando Henrique Cardoso, and thus Brazil’s first lady from 1995 to 2003,

  • Cardoso, Ruth Vilaça Corrêa Leite (Brazilian anthropologist and educator)

    Ruth Cardoso, (Ruth Vilaça Corrêa Leite Cardoso), Brazilian anthropologist, educator, and public figure (born Sept. 19, 1930, Araraquara, Braz.—died June 24, 2008, São Paulo, Braz.), as the prominent wife of Brazilian Pres. Fernando Henrique Cardoso, and thus Brazil’s first lady from 1995 to 2003,

  • Cardozo, Benjamin Nathan (United States jurist)

    Benjamin Nathan Cardozo, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1932 to 1938. Cardozo was a creative common-law judge and legal essayist who influenced a trend in American appellate judging toward greater involvement with public policy and a consequent modernization of legal

  • Cards of Identity (work by Dennis)

    Nigel Dennis: …most notably in his novel Cards of Identity (1955).

  • Carducci, Bartolommeo (Italian architect and sculptor)

    Bartolommeo Carducci, Italian-born painter, architect, and sculptor who was active in Spain. Carducci studied architecture and sculpture under Bartolommeo Ammannati and painting under Federico Zuccari. He accompanied Zuccari to Madrid, where he painted the ceiling of the Escorial library, assisting

  • Carducci, Giosuè (Italian poet)

    Giosuè Carducci, Italian poet, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1906, and one of the most influential literary figures of his age. The son of a republican country doctor, Carducci spent his childhood in the wild Maremma region of southern Tuscany. He studied at the University of Pisa and

  • Carducci, Vincenzo (Italian painter)

    Vincenzo Carducci, Italian-born painter. Carducci was the brother of artist Bartolommeo Carducci, whom he accompanied to Spain in 1585. Vincenzo succeeded his brother in 1609 as court painter to Philip III. Trained by his brother in the style of Italian Mannerism, he was one of the leading artists

  • Carducho, Bartolomé (Italian architect and sculptor)

    Bartolommeo Carducci, Italian-born painter, architect, and sculptor who was active in Spain. Carducci studied architecture and sculpture under Bartolommeo Ammannati and painting under Federico Zuccari. He accompanied Zuccari to Madrid, where he painted the ceiling of the Escorial library, assisting

  • Carducho, Vicente (Italian painter)

    Vincenzo Carducci, Italian-born painter. Carducci was the brother of artist Bartolommeo Carducci, whom he accompanied to Spain in 1585. Vincenzo succeeded his brother in 1609 as court painter to Philip III. Trained by his brother in the style of Italian Mannerism, he was one of the leading artists

  • Carduelidae (bird family)

    Carduelidae, formerly accepted name of a family of songbirds, order Passeriformes, consisting of about 112 species of gregarious, active little songbirds found in woodlands and brushlands worldwide, except in the Pacific islands. Notable members counted among this family were goldfinches and

  • Carduelinae (bird family)

    Carduelidae, formerly accepted name of a family of songbirds, order Passeriformes, consisting of about 112 species of gregarious, active little songbirds found in woodlands and brushlands worldwide, except in the Pacific islands. Notable members counted among this family were goldfinches and

  • Carduelis cannabina (bird, Carduelis species)

    Linnet, (Carduelis, sometimes Acanthis, cannabina), seed-eating European finch of the family Fringillidae (order Passeriformes). It is 13 cm (5 inches) long and brown streaked, with a white-edged forked tail; the crown and breast of the male are red. It is a hedgerow singer, and flocks forage for

  • Carduelis carduelis (bird)

    goldfinch: 5-inch) European goldfinch (C. carduelis) of western Eurasia has been introduced into Australia, New Zealand, Bermuda, and the United States (where it has not become established). It is brownish and black, with a red–white–black head pattern and gold in the wings (sexes alike). The 13-cm (5-inch)…

  • Carduelis chloris (bird)

    greenfinch: 5-inch) European greenfinch (C. chloris) has been introduced into Australia. The Chinese, or Oriental, greenfinch (C. sinica) of eastern Asia is a dooryard bird in Japan.

  • Carduelis pinus (bird)

    siskin: 5-inch) pine siskin (C. pinus) of North America has yellow wing and tail bars. The common siskin (C. spinus) of Europe has a black cap and yellow-tinged breast.

  • Carduelis psaltria (bird)

    goldfinch: The 10-cm (4-inch) dark-backed goldfinch (C. psaltria) ranges from the western U.S. (where it is called lesser goldfinch) to Peru.

  • Carduelis sinica (bird)

    greenfinch: The Chinese, or Oriental, greenfinch (C. sinica) of eastern Asia is a dooryard bird in Japan.

  • Carduelis spinus (bird)

    siskin: The common siskin (C. spinus) of Europe has a black cap and yellow-tinged breast.

  • Carduelis tristis (bird)

    goldfinch: The 13-cm (5-inch) American goldfinch (C. tristis), also called wild canary, is found across North America; the male is bright yellow, with black cap, wings, and tail. The 10-cm (4-inch) dark-backed goldfinch (C. psaltria) ranges from the western U.S. (where it is called lesser goldfinch) to Peru.

  • Carduus (plant)

    thistle: …the genus Carduus, sometimes called plumeless thistles, have spiny stems and flower heads without ray flowers. Canadian thistle (Cirsium arvense) is a troublesome weed in agricultural areas of North America, and more than 10 species of sow thistle (Sonchus) are widespread throughout Europe. Some species of globe thistle (Echinops) are…

  • Cardwell of Ellerbeck, Edward Cardwell, Viscount (British statesman)

    Edward Cardwell, Viscount Cardwell, British statesman who, as secretary of state for war (1868–74), was considered to be the greatest British military reformer of the 19th century, modernizing the organization and equipment of the British army in the face of strenuous opposition at home. The son of

  • Cardy, John (British physicist)

    Stanislav Smirnov: In 1992 British physicist John Cardy postulated a formula for the final value of the critical probability. In 2001 Smirnov showed that percolation in the scaling limit for a two-dimensional triangular lattice was conformally invariant—that is, was not changed if the lattice was stretched or squeezed. This result proved…

  • Čardžou (Turkmenistan)

    Türkmenabat, city and administrative centre, Lebap oblast (province), Turkmenistan, on the Amu Darya (ancient Oxus River). The second largest city in Turkmenistan, it was founded as a Russian military settlement when the Transcaspian Railway reached the Amu Darya in 1886. It is now a rail junction

  • Čardžou (oblast, Turkmenistan)

    Lebap, oblast (province), southeastern Turkmenistan. It lies along the middle reaches of the Amu Darya (ancient Oxus River), with the Karakum Desert on the left bank and the Kyzylkum and Sundukli deserts on the right. It is largely flat, but in the extreme southeast the spurs of the Gissar

  • CARE (charitable organization)

    CARE, international aid and development organization that operates in some 35 countries worldwide. CARE was formed in 1945 as an umbrella organization for a group of U.S. and Canadian associations working to help rebuild war-torn western Europe. Rather than disband after Europe had recovered, the

  • care ethics (ethics and philosophy)

    Ethics of care, feminist philosophical perspective that uses a relational and context-bound approach toward morality and decision making. The term ethics of care refers to ideas concerning both the nature of morality and normative ethical theory. The ethics of care perspective stands in stark

  • care proceeding (law)

    juvenile justice: Great Britain: …in what is called a care proceeding, which is based on the idea that the child is in need of court-ordered care, protection, or control because one of a number of conditions is satisfied. Reasons for care proceedings can include neglect or assault by parents, but they always stem from…

  • careen (shipping)

    harbours and sea works: Floating dry docks: …waterline, can be reached by careening, a process that involves filling the water ballast tanks along one side to induce a list that lifts those on the other side part of the way out of the water. On completion, the process can be reversed for the other side.

  • career counseling
  • career criminal (criminology)

    Recidivism, tendency toward chronic criminal behaviour leading to numerous arrests and re-imprisonment. Studies of the yearly intake of prisons, reformatories, and jails in the United States and Europe show that from one-half to two-thirds of those imprisoned have served previous sentences in the

  • career education

    Vocational education, instruction intended to equip persons for industrial or commercial occupations. It may be obtained either formally in trade schools, technical secondary schools, or in on-the-job training programs or, more informally, by picking up the necessary skills on the job. Vocational

  • Career Girls (film by Leigh [1997])

    Mike Leigh: After Career Girls (1997), which affectionately depicts a reunion between two former roommates, Leigh wrote and directed Topsy-Turvy (1999). In a departure from his work to that point, which typically followed wholly fictional characters in present-day contexts, the film centres on the famous 19th-century partnership of…

  • Career of Evil (novel by Rowling)

    J.K. Rowling: …entries in the series included Career of Evil (2015) and Lethal White (2018). A television series based on the books premiered in the United Kingdom in 2017 and in the United States the following year.

  • Career of Philosophy in Modern Times (work by Randall)

    John Herman Randall, Jr.: His Career of Philosophy in Modern Times, 2 vol. (1962–65), is an analysis of the historical context surrounding the 17th- and 18th-century assimilation of science into traditional interpretive frameworks.

  • Carefree (film by Sandrich [1938])

    Fred Astaire: Astaire and Rogers: Only once—in Carefree (1938)—did Astaire and Rogers share an on-screen kiss, and then only in a dream sequence.

  • Carefree Children (French theatre)

    Enfants sans Souci, (French: Carefree Children), one of the largest of the sociétés joyeuses of medieval France, an association of the merchants, craftsmen, and students of Paris, founded for the purpose of staging theatrical entertainments and other amusements. Such societies are thought to be

  • Careless Love (painting by Murray)

    Elizabeth Murray: …1990s, in works such as Careless Love (1995–96), she constructed her canvases to extend a bit from the wall, giving them sculptural and spatial qualities. She designed two mosaic murals for the New York City subway system: Blooming (1996), at 59th Street and Lexington Avenue, Manhattan, and Stream (2001), at…

  • Carell, Steve (American comedian and actor)

    Steve Carell, American comedian and actor known for both his television work—most notably on The Daily Show and The Office—and his numerous films. After graduating from Denison University in Granville, Ohio (1984), Carell moved to Chicago, where he joined the improvisational troupe Second City in

  • Carell, Steven John (American comedian and actor)

    Steve Carell, American comedian and actor known for both his television work—most notably on The Daily Show and The Office—and his numerous films. After graduating from Denison University in Granville, Ohio (1984), Carell moved to Chicago, where he joined the improvisational troupe Second City in

  • Carême, Antonin (French chef)

    Marie-Antoine Carême, French chef who served the royalty of Europe, wrote several classic works on cuisine, and advanced the notion of cuisine as both an art and a science. He is often cited as the founder of French gastronomy and was a pioneer of grande cuisine. Carême was born into a poor family.

  • Carême, Marie-Antoine (French chef)

    Marie-Antoine Carême, French chef who served the royalty of Europe, wrote several classic works on cuisine, and advanced the notion of cuisine as both an art and a science. He is often cited as the founder of French gastronomy and was a pioneer of grande cuisine. Carême was born into a poor family.

  • Careproctus (fish genus)

    snailfish: …pink-coloured species of the genus Careproctus, inhabit the deep sea.

  • Caresses (The Sphinx), The (painting by Khnopff)

    Fernand Khnopff: In 1896 he painted The Caresses (The Sphinx), his best-known work. The painting’s subject is an interpretation of Moreau’s Oedipus and the Sphinx (1864) and features a hybrid human-leopard nestled next to an androgynous Oedipus.

  • Caretaker, The (play by Pinter)

    The Caretaker, three-act play by Harold Pinter, published and first produced in 1960. The work is Pinter’s second full-length play and it concerns the delicate balance between trust and betrayal in familial relationships. The action of the play occurs in the flat of Aston and Mick, two brothers.

  • Caretta caretta (turtle)

    sea turtle: Physical features and feeding habits: Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and green (Chelonia mydas) sea turtles have adult shell lengths between 0.9 and 1.2 metres (3 and 4 feet) long. The loggerhead is carnivorous and prefers coastal marine environments. It has the proportionately largest head of the sea turtles; this feature may…

  • Carettochelys insculpta (reptile)

    Pitted shell turtle, (species Carettochelys insculpta), any member of a single species in the turtle family Carettochelyidae. The species lives in rivers in southern New Guinea and in a limited region in northern Australia. A combination of characteristics separates C. insculpta from other

  • Carew of Clopton, Baron (English administrator)

    George Carew, earl of Totnes, English soldier, administrator, and antiquary noted for his service in Ireland during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England. He was the son of George Carew, dean of Windsor. In 1574 he went to Ireland as a soldier and distinguished himself in 1577 in defending

  • Carew, Richard (English scholar)

    Richard Carew, English scholar and antiquary known especially for a history of Cornwall that gives an interesting picture of a country gentleman’s life about 1600. Entering Christ Church, Oxford, at age 11, Carew later spent three years studying law and subsequently traveled abroad. He entered

  • Carew, Rod (American baseball player)

    Rod Carew, Panamanian professional baseball player who was one of the great hitters of his generation. He retired following the 1985 season after 19 years in the major leagues with a .328 career batting average and 3,053 hits. Carew began playing baseball as a schoolboy in Panama. In 1962 he went

  • Carew, Rodney Cline (American baseball player)

    Rod Carew, Panamanian professional baseball player who was one of the great hitters of his generation. He retired following the 1985 season after 19 years in the major leagues with a .328 career batting average and 3,053 hits. Carew began playing baseball as a schoolboy in Panama. In 1962 he went

  • Carew, Sir George (English administrator)

    George Carew, earl of Totnes, English soldier, administrator, and antiquary noted for his service in Ireland during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England. He was the son of George Carew, dean of Windsor. In 1574 he went to Ireland as a soldier and distinguished himself in 1577 in defending

  • Carew, Thomas (English poet)

    Thomas Carew, English poet and first of the Cavalier song writers. Educated at the University of Oxford and at the Middle Temple, London, Carew served as secretary at embassies in Venice, The Hague, and Paris. In 1630 Carew received a court appointment and became server at table to the king. The

  • Carex (plant genus)

    Cyperaceae: Distribution and abundance: …three-quarters of the total species: Carex (sedges; see photograph), with about 2,000 species; Cyperus, with nearly 650 species; Rhynchospora (beak rushes), with roughly 250 species; and Fimbristylis, Eleocharis (spike rushes), and Scleria (nut rushes), each with about 200 species. Other large genera are Bulbostylis, with approximately 100 species;

  • Carey Treatment, The (film by Edwards [1972])

    Blake Edwards: Films of the 1970s: The Carey Treatment (1972), a mystery set in a Boston hospital, was taken out of Edwards’s hands by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) in postproduction, and his efforts to remove his name from it were fruitless.

  • Carey v. Piphus (law case)

    Carey v. Piphus, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on March 21, 1978, ruled (8–0) that public school officials can be financially liable for violating a student’s procedural due process rights under the Fourteenth Amendment if the student can prove the officials were unjustified in their actions

  • Carey, George (archbishop of Canterbury)

    George Carey, archbishop of Canterbury from 1991 to 2002, theologian noted for his evangelical beliefs. Carey left school at age 15 and served as a radio operator in the Royal Air Force from 1954 to 1956. By 20 he had undergone a religious conversion—not Paul’s experience on the road to Damascus,

  • Carey, Harry, Jr. (American actor)

    Harry Carey, Jr., (Henry George Carey, Jr.), American actor (born May 16, 1921, Saugus, Calif.—died Dec. 27, 2012, Santa Barbara, Calif.), brought an aura of youthful naivete and likability to a series of classic movie westerns directed by John Ford, many of them starring John Wayne. Carey was

  • Carey, Henry (British writer and musician)

    Henry Carey, English poet, playwright, and musician chiefly remembered for his ballads, especially “Sally in Our Alley,” which appeared in a collection of his best poems set to music, called The Musical Century (1737). Despite the popularity of his work, Carey suffered great poverty, largely

  • Carey, Henry C. (American economist)

    Henry C. Carey, American economist and sociologist, often called the founder of the American school of economics, widely known in his day as an advocate of trade barriers. The son of Mathew Carey, an Irish-Catholic political refugee, writer, and publisher, the American-born Carey became a partner

  • Carey, Henry Charles (American economist)

    Henry C. Carey, American economist and sociologist, often called the founder of the American school of economics, widely known in his day as an advocate of trade barriers. The son of Mathew Carey, an Irish-Catholic political refugee, writer, and publisher, the American-born Carey became a partner

  • Carey, Hugh (American politician)

    Hugh Leo Carey, American politician (born April 11, 1919, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died Aug. 7, 2011, Shelter Island, Long Island, N.Y.), served as the Democratic governor of New York state for two terms (1975–82); during that time he cut jobs and spending, raised taxes and unemployment benefits, and

  • Carey, Lucius, 2nd Viscount of Falkland (English noble)

    Lucius Cary, 2nd Viscount of Falkland, English royalist who attempted to exercise a moderating influence in the struggles that preceded the English Civil Wars (1642–51) between the royalists and the Parliamentarians. He is remembered chiefly as a prominent figure in the History of the Rebellion by

  • Carey, MacDonald (American actor)

    Days of Our Lives: MacDonald Carey, who appeared in many Hollywood motion pictures in the 1940s and ’50s, played Alice’s husband, Dr. Tom Horton, and was the soap’s main attraction for many years.

  • Carey, Mariah (American singer)

    Mariah Carey, American pop singer, noted for her remarkable vocal range. She was one of the most successful female performers of the 1990s and remained popular into the early 21st century. Carey, whose mother was a vocal coach and former opera singer, began performing as a child. After graduating

  • Carey, Peter (Australian author)

    Peter Carey, Australian writer known for featuring the surreal in his short stories and novels. Carey attended the prestigious Geelong Grammar School and studied for a year at Monash University in Clayton, Victoria. He worked as an advertising copywriter and at various other odd jobs in Australia

  • Carey, Peter Philip (Australian author)

    Peter Carey, Australian writer known for featuring the surreal in his short stories and novels. Carey attended the prestigious Geelong Grammar School and studied for a year at Monash University in Clayton, Victoria. He worked as an advertising copywriter and at various other odd jobs in Australia

  • Carey, Philip (fictional character)

    Philip Carey, fictional character, a disabled young medical student who is the protagonist of W. Somerset Maugham’s novel Of Human Bondage

  • Carey, Ron (American labour leader)

    Ron Carey, American labour leader and general president, from 1991 to 1997, of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), the first Teamsters president elected by direct vote of rank-and-file members. Carey, the son of a Teamster, joined the union in 1956 as a United Parcel Services (UPS)

  • Carey, Ronald Robert (American labour leader)

    Ron Carey, American labour leader and general president, from 1991 to 1997, of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), the first Teamsters president elected by direct vote of rank-and-file members. Carey, the son of a Teamster, joined the union in 1956 as a United Parcel Services (UPS)

  • Carey, S. Warren (Australian geologist)

    plate tectonics: Dissenters: In 1958 the Australian geologist S. Warren Carey proposed a rival model, known as the expanding Earth model. Carey accepted the existence and early Mesozoic breakup of Pangea and the subsequent dispersal of its fragments and formation of new ocean basins, but he attributed it all to the expansion of…

  • Carey, William (British missionary)

    William Carey, founder of the English Baptist Missionary Society (1792), lifelong missionary to India, and educator whose mission at Shrirampur (Serampore) set the pattern for modern missionary work. He has been called the “father of Bengali prose” for his grammars, dictionaries, and translations.

  • Careysburg (Liberia)

    Careysburg, city, western Liberia, western Africa. It was first settled in 1859 by freed North American slaves (mainly from Barbados and the United States); the city, named for the Reverend Lott Carey (an American black who settled in Monrovia), is inhabited mainly by their descendants. The Voice

  • Carfagno, Edward (American art director and designer)
  • cargo

    ship: Cargo handling: A commercial ship is usually a link in a “trade route” between distant points. Goods flowing in the route must be transferred to and from the sea link; they must also be given care while aboard the ship, and in turn they must…

  • cargo (North Mexican Indian office)
  • cargo cult (religion)

    Cargo cult, any of the religious movements chiefly, but not solely, in Melanesia that exhibit belief in the imminence of a new age of blessing, to be initiated by the arrival of a special “cargo” of goods from supernatural sources—based on the observation by local residents of the delivery of s

  • cargo insurance

    insurance: Ocean marine insurance: Cargo insurance is usually written on an open contract basis under which shipments, both incoming and outgoing, are automatically covered for the interests of the shipper, who reports periodically the values exposed and pays a premium based upon these values. By means of a negotiable…

  • Cargo of Orchids (novel by Musgrave)

    Susan Musgrave: Fiction and essays: …Dancing Chicken was followed by Cargo of Orchids (2000) and Given (2012). She also wrote several children’s books: Gullband (1974), a series of poems; Hag’s Head (1980), a Halloween story; Kestrel and Leonardo (1991); Dreams More Real Than Bathtubs (1998); and Kiss, Tickle, Cuddle Hug (2012). Her essays and humorous…

  • cargo ship

    ship: Early rowed vessels: …functions of the warship and cargo ship determined their design. Because fighting ships required speed, adequate space for substantial numbers of fighting men, and the ability to maneuver at any time in any direction, long, narrow rowed ships became the standard for naval warfare. In contrast, because trading ships sought…

  • cargolada (food)

    Roussillon: Cargolada is a dish of escargots. Notable wines come from Banyuls-sur-Mer, Rivesaltes, and Maury.

  • Carham, Battle of (Scottish history)

    Alba: …by Malcolm II at the Battle of Carham (1016/18). When Malcolm’s grandson and successor Duncan I came to the throne in 1034, he united Alba with Strathclyde, Cumbria, and Lothian. Thereafter, the name Alba began to fade away; and every king, at least in retrospect, was normally styled “king of…

  • Carhenge (sculpture, Nebraska, United States)

    Nebraska: Services and labour: A rather unconventional attraction is Carhenge, a re-creation of England’s Stonehenge but made out of cars, which lies on the western Nebraska plains near the town of Alliance.

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