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  • Curlew River (work by Britten)

    Benjamin Britten: With the church parable Curlew River (1964), his conception of musical theatre took a new direction, combining influences from the Japanese Noh theatre and English medieval religious drama. Two other church parables, The Burning Fiery Furnace (1966) and The Prodigal Son (1968), followed. An earlier church-pageant opera, Noye’s Fludde…

  • Curlewis, Ethel (Australian author)

    Ethel Turner, Australian novelist and writer for children, whose popular novel Seven Little Australians (1894) was filmed (1939), twice dramatized for television, once in Great Britain (1953) and once in Australia (1973), and made into a musical (1978). Turner’s parents immigrated with her to

  • Curley, James Michael (American politician)

    James Michael Curley, American politician, one of the best known and most colourful big-city Democratic bosses, who dominated Boston politics throughout the first half of the 20th century. Reared in an Irish tenement neighbourhood, Curley never forgot the needs of new immigrants, and he owed much

  • curling (sport)

    Curling, a game similar to lawn bowls but played on ice. Two teams of four players (given the titles lead, second, third, and skip) participate in a curling match. Each player slides round stones, concave on the bottom and with a handle on the top, across the ice of a rink or a natural ice field

  • Curll, Edmund (English bookseller)

    Edmund Curll, English bookseller remembered for his long quarrel with the poet Alexander Pope. Curll became a bookseller in 1705 and was set up in his own business by 1708. In 1716 he published Court Poems and suggested that Pope was one of the contributors. Pope, in an effort to suppress this

  • curly grass fern (plant)

    fern: Annotated classification: …thickened cells; 2 genera (Schizaea and Actinostachys) with about 30 species, mostly tropical. Family Lygodiaceae Rhizomes long-creeping, hairy; leaves indeterminate in growth, climbing and often twining, the primary divisions alternate along the elongating stemlike rachis; sporangia often in two rows, densely spaced along specialized slender lobes of the ultimate…

  • curly mesquite (plant)

    Curly mesquite, (genus Hilaria), genus of about 10 species of grasses in the family Poaceae, native primarily to warm dry areas of southern North America. All the species are important range grasses; common curly mesquite (Hilaria belangeri) and James’s galleta (H. jamesii) are particularly

  • curly pondweed (plant)

    pondweed: …Europe and southern Asia, and P. crispus, of Europe but naturalized in the eastern United States and California. Cape pondweed, or water hawthorn (Aponogeton distachyos), of the family Aponogetonaceae, is native to South Africa and is grown as an ornamental in pools and greenhouses. Many species of those families serve…

  • Curly Sue (film by Hughes [1991])

    John Hughes: …he directed his last film, Curly Sue, in 1991. He produced Miracle on 34th Street (1994), a remake of the classic 1947 film, and New Port South (2001), a film written by his son James. Among the films he was credited with writing (under his pseudonym) were Maid in Manhattan…

  • curly top (plant disease)

    Curly top, viral disease affecting numerous cultivated and wild plants worldwide. Diseased plants are usually stunted or dwarfed and have thickened, yellowed, and bunched or curled leaves that frequently die early. Young plants often die quickly, and the disease can cause significant crop losses.

  • Curly Top (film by Cummings [1935])

    Irving Cummings: …success to that time with Curly Top (1935), a remake of Mary Pickford’s Daddy-Long-Legs (1919). The family musical featured child star Shirley Temple, and the director and actress had another hit with Poor Little Rich Girl (1936), one of Temple’s strongest vehicles, thanks in part to the superior support of…

  • curly-coated retriever (breed of dog)

    Curly-coated retriever, breed of sporting dog bred and trained to retrieve game both on land and in the water. Developed in England from water spaniels and retrievers, it is one of the oldest retriever breeds, first exhibited in the United Kingdom in 1860. Its distinctive coat is either black or

  • Curme, George O. (American grammarian)

    George O. Curme, American grammarian and professor of German, best known for his Grammar of the German Language (1905, revised 1922) and for his Syntax (1931) and Parts of Speech and Accidence (1935)—the third and second volumes respectively of A Grammar of the English Language by Curme and Hans

  • Curme, George Oliver (American grammarian)

    George O. Curme, American grammarian and professor of German, best known for his Grammar of the German Language (1905, revised 1922) and for his Syntax (1931) and Parts of Speech and Accidence (1935)—the third and second volumes respectively of A Grammar of the English Language by Curme and Hans

  • Curnow, Allen (New Zealand author)

    Allen Curnow, one of the major modern poets of New Zealand. The son of an Anglican clergyman, Curnow briefly attended Canterbury College before simultaneously studying theology at the College of St. John the Evangelist in Auckland and attending Auckland University College of the University of New

  • Curnow, Thomas Allen Monro (New Zealand author)

    Allen Curnow, one of the major modern poets of New Zealand. The son of an Anglican clergyman, Curnow briefly attended Canterbury College before simultaneously studying theology at the College of St. John the Evangelist in Auckland and attending Auckland University College of the University of New

  • Curonian (people)

    Courland: …inhabitants, the Latvian tribe of Curonians (Kurs, Cori, Cours; Latvian: Kursi). The duchy of Courland, formed in 1561, included this area as well as Semigallia (Zemgale), a region located east of Courland proper.

  • Curonian Lagoon (gulf, Baltic Sea)

    Curonian Lagoon, gulf of the Baltic Sea at the mouth of the Neman River, in Lithuania and Russia. The lagoon, with an area of 625 square miles (1,619 square km), is separated from the Baltic Sea by a narrow, dune-covered sandspit, the Curonian Spit (Lithuanian: Kuršiu Nerija; Russian: Kurskaya

  • Curonian Spit (spit, Baltic Sea)

    Curonian Lagoon: …a narrow, dune-covered sandspit, the Curonian Spit (Lithuanian: Kuršiu Nerija; Russian: Kurskaya Kosa), 60 miles (100 km) long and 1–2 miles (1.5–3 km) wide. A road along the spit connects resort and fishing villages. At its north end, the lagoon is connected to the Baltic Sea by a navigable strait,…

  • Currach, An (plain, County Kildare, Ireland)

    The Curragh, plain, or down, County Kildare, Ireland, noted for its excellent soils. Some 8 square miles (22 square km) in area, the down of Kildare apparently was an ancient meeting place, and The Curragh has been just such a common since at least the 12th century. The rich pastureland is renowned

  • Currachee (Pakistan)

    Karāchi, city and capital of Sindh province, southern Pakistan. It is the country’s largest city and principal seaport and is a major commercial and industrial centre. Karāchi is located on the coast of the Arabian Sea immediately northwest of the Indus River Delta. The city has been variously

  • curragh (boat)

    Coracle, primitive, light, bowl-shaped boat with a frame of woven grasses, reeds, or saplings covered with hides. Those still used, in Wales and on the coasts of Ireland, usually have a canvas and tar covering. American Indians used the similar bullboat, covered with buffalo hides, on the Missouri

  • Curragh, The (plain, County Kildare, Ireland)

    The Curragh, plain, or down, County Kildare, Ireland, noted for its excellent soils. Some 8 square miles (22 square km) in area, the down of Kildare apparently was an ancient meeting place, and The Curragh has been just such a common since at least the 12th century. The rich pastureland is renowned

  • Curral del Rey, Serra do (mountain ridge, Brazil)

    Belo Horizonte: …wide plateau encircled by the Curral del Rey Mountains, a hilly ridge forming the “beautiful horizon” for which the city was named. Belo Horizonte lies on the eastern edge of the sertão, or dry interior, of Brazil. The site was chosen in the late 19th century after the city of…

  • Curran, John Philpot (Irish statesman)

    John Philpot Curran, Irish lawyer and statesman who is remembered as a great advocate and as a champion of Irish liberties. Although handicapped by small stature and a speech impediment, he soon became celebrated for his quick wit and courage in defending apparently hopeless cases. Though not a

  • Curran, Sir Charles John (British broadcasting administrator)

    Sir Charles John Curran , British broadcasting administrator best known for his leadership at the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). Curran was a graduate of Magdalene College, Cambridge. He served in the Indian army during World War II and joined the BBC in 1947 as a producer of informative

  • currant (shrub)

    Currant, shrub of the genus Ribes of the gooseberry family (Grossulariaceae), the piquant, juicy berries of which are used chiefly in jams and jellies. There are at least 100 species, natives of temperate climates of the Northern Hemisphere and of western South America. The Rocky Mountains in

  • currant borer (insect)

    clearwing moth: The currant borer (Synanthedon tipuliformis) is the most widely distributed species of the family. Originating in Europe, it is now found in Asia, North America, Australia, and New Zealand. It is a serious pest of currants, gooseberries, black alders, and sumacs. The larvae overwinter in the…

  • currant family (shrub family)

    Ribes: …the gooseberries, constituting the family Grossulariaceae. They are native to the temperate regions of North America, extending southward into the Andes. Some authorities separate the gooseberries as the genus Grossularia. Currants usually lack spines, while gooseberries are usually prickly. Flowers of currants are generally clustered, those of gooseberries more often…

  • currant tomato (fruit)

    tomato: Physical description and cultivation: The tiny currant tomato (S. pimpinellifolium) is a closely related species and has been used by breeders to hybridize several pest- and disease-resistant tomato varieties.

  • currawong (bird)

    Currawong, any of several songbirds of the Australian family Cracticidae (order Passeriformes). They are large, up to 50 centimetres (20 inches) long, with black, gray, or black-and-white plumage and yellow eyes. All have resounding, metallic voices. Found in woodlands and occasionally flocking

  • currency (economics)

    Currency, in industrialized nations, portion of the national money supply, consisting of bank notes and government-issued paper money and coins, that does not require endorsement in serving as a medium of exchange; among less developed societies, currency encompasses a wide diversity of items

  • Currency Act (Great Britain [1764])

    United States: The tax controversy: …economic prospects by passing a Currency Act (1764) to withdraw paper currencies, many of them surviving from the war period, from circulation. This was not done to restrict economic growth so much as to take out currency that was thought to be unsound, but it did severely reduce the circulating…

  • Currency and Foreign Transactions Reporting Act (United States [1970])

    Bank Secrecy Act, U.S. legislation, signed into law in 1970 by Pres. Richard Nixon, that requires banks and other financial entities in the United States to maintain records and file reports on currency transactions and suspicious activity with the government. The Bank Secrecy Act (BSA), sometimes

  • currency board (economics)

    money: After Bretton Woods: …19th-century system known as a currency board. In such a case there is no central bank and the exchange rate is fixed. Local banks increase the number of Hong Kong dollars only when they receive additional U.S. dollars, and they reduce the stock of Hong Kong dollars when U.S. dollar…

  • currency of intervention (economics)

    international payment and exchange: The IMF system of parity (pegged) exchange rates: …it to be called a currency of “intervention.”

  • current (physics)

    Electric current, any movement of electric charge carriers, such as subatomic charged particles (e.g., electrons having negative charge, protons having positive charge), ions (atoms that have lost or gained one or more electrons), or holes (electron deficiencies that may be thought of as positive

  • current (fluid flow)

    jetty: …be narrowed to concentrate the current and thus help maintain a navigable channel. These structures—variously termed spurs, spur dikes, and groins—may also be projected from the concave side of a river to retard bank erosion.

  • current account (accounting)

    international payment and exchange: Balance-of-payments accounting: …of accounts used are the current account and the capital account.

  • current asset (accounting)

    corporate finance: …basic categories of investments are current assets and fixed assets. Current assets include cash, inventory, and accounts receivable. Examples of fixed assets are buildings, real estate, and machinery. In addition, the resource allocation function is concerned with intangible assets such as goodwill, patents, workers, and brand names.

  • current density (physics)

    electromagnetism: Effects of varying electric fields: …the total flux of the current density J through any surface surrounded by the closed path. In Figure 6A, the closed path is labeled P, and a surface S1 is surrounded by path P. All the current density through S1 lies within the conducting wire. The total flux of the…

  • current gain (electronics)

    semiconductor device: Bipolar transistors: The current gain for the common-base configuration is defined as the change in collector current divided by the change in emitter current when the base-to-collector voltage is constant. Typical common-base current gain in a well-designed bipolar transistor is very close to unity. The most useful amplifier…

  • current liability (accounting)

    accounting: The balance sheet: …liabilities are similarly divided into current liabilities and noncurrent liabilities. Most amounts payable to the company’s suppliers (accounts payable), to employees (wages payable), or to governments (taxes payable) are included among the current liabilities. Noncurrent liabilities consist mainly of amounts payable to holders of the company’s long-term bonds and such…

  • current mark (geology)

    sedimentary rock: Deformation structures: Current marks can form by the action of water currents on upper surfaces of the beds or by “tools” (such as wood and fossils) that are transported by currents over soft sediment.

  • current meter (instrument)

    V. Walfrid Ekman: The Ekman current meter, an instrument with a simple and reliable mechanism, has been used, with subsequent improvements, to the present, while the Ekman reversing water bottle is used in freshwater lakes and sometimes in the ocean to obtain water samples at different depths with a simultaneous…

  • current mode (radiation detection)

    radiation measurement: Current mode: One way to provide an electrical signal from such a detector is to connect its output to an ammeter circuit with a slow response time. If this response time is long compared with the average time spacing between current bursts, then the ammeter…

  • current ratio (business)

    business finance: Financial ratio analysis: This is known as a liquidity ratio. Financial leverage ratios (such as the debt–asset ratio and debt as a percentage of total capitalization) are used to make judgments about the advantages to be gained from raising funds by the issuance of bonds (debt) rather than stock. Activity ratios, relating to…

  • Current River (river, United States)

    Current River, river of southeastern Missouri and northeastern Arkansas, U.S. It rises in Montauk Spring in the Ozark Mountains, in Dent county, Missouri, and is fed by the Welch, Cave, Pulltite, Big, Blue, and Round springs as it flows about 225 miles (360 km) generally southeast into the Black

  • Current TV (American company)

    Al Gore: …achievement in interactive television for Current TV, a user-generated-content channel he cofounded in 2005; the channel was sold to Al Jazeera, an Arabic-language cable television news network, in 2013. That year Gore also published The Future: Six Drivers of Global Change, which analyzed the impact of various sociopolitical, technological, and…

  • Current War, The (film by Gomez-Rejon [2019])

    Benedict Cumberbatch: Doctor Strange and The Grinch: …Britain from the European Union; The Current War (completed in 2017 and released two years later), about the contest between Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse to determine which electrical system would power the United States; and the World War I drama 1917, which was directed by Sam Mendes.

  • current-awareness service (library science)

    library: Current-awareness service: The purpose of a current-awareness service is to inform the users about new acquisitions in their libraries. Public libraries in particular have used display boards and shelves to draw attention to recent additions, and many libraries produce complete or selective lists for circulation…

  • curricle (carriage)

    Curricle, open, two-wheeled gentleman’s carriage, popular in England from about 1700 to 1850. It was pulled by two matched horses yoked abreast and was therefore equipped with a pole, rather than shafts. The pole had to be very strong because it both directed the carriage and bore its weight. To

  • curricular validity (examination)

    psychological testing: Primary characteristics of methods or instruments: …simply to see if its content seems appropriate to its intended purpose. Such content validation is widely employed in measuring academic achievement but with recognition of the inevitable role of judgment. Thus, a geometry test exhibits content (or curricular) validity when experts (e.g., teachers) believe that it adequately samples the…

  • curriculum (education)

    multiculturalism: Multiculturalism’s impact on education: …are found in revisions of curricula, particularly in Europe and North America, and the expansion of the Western literary and other canons that began during the last quarter of the 20th century. Curricula from the elementary to the university levels were revised and expanded to include the contributions of minority…

  • Currie Cup (rugby trophy)

    rugby: South Africa: …between provincial teams for the Currie Cup, first given in 1891 by Sir Donald Currie.

  • Currie, Brainerd (American legal scholar)

    conflict of laws: Contemporary developments: …by the American legal scholar Brainerd Currie, began to emerge in the 1950s. Currie’s approach sought to determine whether a “true” or “false” conflict exists between the law of the forum state and that of the other involved state. A false conflict exists if the laws of both states do…

  • Currie, Sir Arthur William (Canadian military commander)

    Sir Arthur William Currie, the first Canadian commander, from 1917, of Canada’s overseas forces in World War I. Currie taught school before going into business in Victoria, B.C. He enlisted in the militia and rose from the ranks to become lieutenant colonel of artillery. In spite of this minimum of

  • Currie, Sir Donald (British shipowner and politician)

    Sir Donald Currie, shipowner and politician, founder of the Castle Line of steamers between England and South Africa, and later head of the amalgamated Union–Castle Line. After a number of years with the Cunard Steamship Line, Currie established the Castle Line of sailing ships between Liverpool

  • Currier & Ives (American company)

    Currier & Ives, firm whose lithographs were among the most popular wall hangings in 19th-century America. The prints of Nathaniel Currier (b. March 27, 1813, Roxbury, Massachusetts, U.S.—d. November 20, 1888, New York, New York) and James Merritt Ives (b. March 5, 1824, New York, New York, U.S.—d.

  • Currier, Nathaniel (American lithographer)

    Currier & Ives: The prints of Nathaniel Currier (b. March 27, 1813, Roxbury, Massachusetts, U.S.—d. November 20, 1888, New York, New York) and James Merritt Ives (b. March 5, 1824, New York, New York, U.S.—d. January 3, 1895, Rye, New York), which typically depict the history and customs of the American…

  • Currier, Ruth (American dancer and choreographer)

    Ruth Currier, (Ruth Miller), American dancer and choreographer (born Jan. 4, 1926, Ashland, Ohio—died Oct. 4, 2011, Brooklyn, N.Y.), steered the José Limón Dance Company to ongoing acclaim as director (1972–78) at a time when dance troupes were not expected to survive the loss of their founder.

  • curry (food)

    Curry, (from Tamil kari: “sauce”), in Western usage, a dish composed with a sauce or gravy seasoned with a mixture of ground spices that is thought to have originated in India and has since spread to many regions of the world. The foundation of many Indian curries is a mixture of onion, ginger, and

  • Curry (county, New Mexico, United States)

    Curry, county, eastern New Mexico, U.S., a farming region in the High Plains, bordered on the east by Texas. It is an extremely flat area, varied only by a few canyons and dry creek beds. Black-Water Draw National Archaeological Site and Cannon Air Force Base are located in the county. The area has

  • Curry, Dell (American basketball player)

    New Orleans Pelicans: …guard Muggsy Bogues and sharpshooter Dell Curry, but, like most expansion teams, they won few of their games. The team drafted forward Larry Johnson in 1991 and centre Alonzo Mourning in 1992, and the pair helped Charlotte to its first playoff appearance (and postseason series win) in the 1992–93 season.…

  • Curry, Haskell Brooks (American mathematician)

    Haskell Brooks Curry, American mathematician and educator whose research in logic led to his theory of formal systems and processes as well as to the formulation of a logical calculus using inferential rules. Curry graduated from Harvard University in 1920 and received postgraduate degrees from

  • Curry, John (British figure skater)

    John Curry, English figure skater who redefined the sport with his elegant balletic style. Known as “the Nureyev of the ice,” he won the gold medal at the 1976 Olympic Games in Innsbruck, Austria. Curry had an early interest in ballet, but his father would not allow him to take dance lessons

  • Curry, John Anthony (British figure skater)

    John Curry, English figure skater who redefined the sport with his elegant balletic style. Known as “the Nureyev of the ice,” he won the gold medal at the 1976 Olympic Games in Innsbruck, Austria. Curry had an early interest in ballet, but his father would not allow him to take dance lessons

  • Curry, John Steuart (American painter)

    John Steuart Curry, American painter whose art reflects the social attitudes of the 1930s. Curry studied at the Kansas City Art Institute and School of Design and the Art Institute of Chicago. In 1918 he started his artistic career as an illustrator of pulp magazines, particularly westerns. In 1926

  • Curry, Kid (American outlaw)

    Kid Curry, American gunslinger who became notorious as the most quick-tempered killer of the Wild Bunch, a group of Western outlaws. His brothers, Lonny and Johnny, also gained reputations as Western badmen, as did their uncle, George Sutherland (“Flat Nose”) Curry. Kid Curry, primarily a bank and

  • Curry, Michael Bruce (American bishop)

    Prince Harry, duke of Sussex: Marriage to Meghan Markle: …power of love, delivered by Michael Bruce Curry, the first African American presiding bishop and primate of the Episcopal Church.

  • Curry, Steph (American basketball player)

    Stephen Curry, American professional basketball player who led the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to championships in 2014–15, 2016–17, and 2017–18 and to the best regular-season record in league history (73–9) in 2015–16. Curry grew up immersed in basketball as

  • Curry, Stephen (American basketball player)

    Stephen Curry, American professional basketball player who led the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to championships in 2014–15, 2016–17, and 2017–18 and to the best regular-season record in league history (73–9) in 2015–16. Curry grew up immersed in basketball as

  • Curry, Wardell Stephen, II (American basketball player)

    Stephen Curry, American professional basketball player who led the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to championships in 2014–15, 2016–17, and 2017–18 and to the best regular-season record in league history (73–9) in 2015–16. Curry grew up immersed in basketball as

  • curse (magic)

    Roman religion: Purpose of sacrifice and magic: Among them curses figured prominently, and curse inscriptions from c. 500 bc onward have been found in large numbers. There were also numerous survivals of taboo, a negative branch of magic: people were admonished to have no dealings with strangers, corpses, newborn children, spots struck by lightning,…

  • curse of Artemisia (manuscript)

    calligraphy: Ptolemaic period: …350–330 bce) or in the curse of Artemisia in Vienna (4th century bce), the writing is cruder, and ω is in transition to what is afterward its invariable written form. Similar features can be seen in the earliest precisely dated document, a marriage contract of 311 bce. It has been…

  • Curse of Frankenstein, The (film by Fisher [1957])

    Christopher Lee: …title character’s monstrous creation in The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) that Lee began to garner attention. That role inaugurated an extended relationship with Hammer Films, a production company that—with the help of Lee and his frequent costar Peter Cushing—was credited with revolutionizing horror film making. Though his lanky frame and…

  • Curse of the Demon (film by Tourneur [1957])

    Jacques Tourneur: Later films: Stars in My Crown, Nightfall, and Curse of the Demon: …the Demon (1957; also called Curse of the Demon), a superb adaptation of M.R. James’s supernatural story “Casting the Runes,” starring Dana Andrews. In The Fearmakers (1958) an adman (Andrews) returns from the Korean War to find that his firm has been taken over by communists, and in Timbuktu (1959)…

  • Curse of the Pink Panther (film by Edwards [1983])

    Blake Edwards: Later films: …the Pink Panther (1982) and Curse of the Pink Panther (1983), both of which suffered badly from the absence of the recently deceased Sellers. A 1983 remake of François Truffaut’s The Man Who Loved Women with Andrews and Burt Reynolds in the lead roles, Micki & Maude (1984), with Moore…

  • Curse of the Starving Class (play by Shepard)

    Sam Shepard: Curse of the Starving Class (produced 1977; film 1994), the Pulitzer Prize-winning Buried Child (produced 1978), and True West (produced 1980) are linked thematically in their examination of troubled and tempestuous blood relationships in a fragmented society.

  • cursillo (Roman Catholicism)

    Cursillo, in Roman Catholicism, a three-day period of spiritual renewal stressing the dynamic, communitarian, and personalistic aspects of the Christian faith. The cursillo de cristianidad (Spanish: “little course in Christianity”), founded in 1949 by Bishop Juan Hervas of Ciudad Real, Spain,

  • cursive minuscule (calligraphy)

    calligraphy: Uncials, half uncials, and cursive minuscule: …uncials, although the frequency in cursive minuscule of ligatures between letters tends to conceal the fundamental likeness between the two hands.

  • cursive script (writing system)

    calligraphy: Origins to the 8th century ce: …this writing is often termed cursive. Scribes also made frequent use of abbreviations. When the scribe was skillful in reconciling clarity and speed, such writing may have much character, even beauty; but it often degenerates into a formless, sometimes indecipherable, scrawl.

  • cursorial locomotion (locomotion)

    dog: Skeletal structure: Dogs are running animals, with the exception of those bred specifically for different purposes. For instance, the bulldog, with its large head and short, “bowed” legs, cannot be called a creature born to chase game. Most dogs, however, are well equipped to run or lope over long…

  • Cursoriinae (bird)

    Courser, any of 9 or 10 species of Old World shorebirds belonging to the family Glareolidae (order Charadriiformes), which also includes the pratincoles. Most live in semideserts, where they chase insects afoot; they can, however, fly strongly with their short wings. The best-known species is the

  • Cursorius coromandelicus (bird)

    courser: The Indian courser (C. coromandelicus) is brown with a strong face pattern. The bronze-winged courser (Rhinoptilus chalcopterus), largest of several species in sub-Saharan Africa, frequents woodlands and is chiefly nocturnal. It is about 30 cm (12 inches) long.

  • Cursorius cursor (bird)

    courser: The best-known species is the cream-coloured courser (Cursorius cursor) of Africa, a pale-brown bird with white underparts, bold eye stripes, and black wing tips. The Indian courser (C. coromandelicus) is brown with a strong face pattern. The bronze-winged courser (Rhinoptilus chalcopterus), largest of several species in sub-Saharan Africa, frequents woodlands…

  • cursus honorum (Roman government)

    ancient Rome: Citizenship and politics in the middle republic: …moved swiftly through the senatorial cursus honorum (“course of honors”) to win the consulship and command against Philip V at the age of 30. Such cases prompted laws to regulate the senatorial cursus: iteration in the same magistracy was prohibited, the praetorship was made a prerequisite for the consulship, and…

  • Cursus Philosophicus (work by John of Saint Thomas)

    John of Saint Thomas: …his principal works are the Cursus Philosophicus, 9 vol. (1632–36; “Course in Philosophy”) and the Cursus Theologicus, 7 vol. (1637–44; “Course in Theology”), explicating questions on major speculative themes such as the nature of theology and divine revelation, the demonstrability of God’s existence, human freedom, and the rationale for morality,…

  • cursus publicus (Roman postal system)

    postal system: Message-relay systems of the ancient world: …need was met by the cursus publicus, the most highly developed postal system of the ancient world. The relay stages of the cursus publicus, established at convenient intervals along the great roads of the empire, formed an integral part of its complex military and administrative system. The speed with which…

  • cursus rapidi (Roman transportation)

    roads and highways: The Roman roads: …divided into two classes: (1) cursus rapidi, the express service, and (2) agnarie, the freight service. In addition, there was an enormous amount of travel by private individuals. The two most widely used vehicles were the two-wheeled chariot drawn by two or four horses and its companion, the cart used…

  • Cursus Theologicus (work of John of Saint Thomas)

    John of Saint Thomas: …“Course in Philosophy”) and the Cursus Theologicus, 7 vol. (1637–44; “Course in Theology”), explicating questions on major speculative themes such as the nature of theology and divine revelation, the demonstrability of God’s existence, human freedom, and the rationale for morality, Christian worship, and the church. The Cursus Philosophicus includes an…

  • curtain (interior decoration)

    Curtain, in interior design, decorative fabric commonly hung to regulate the admission of light at windows and to prevent drafts from door or window openings. Curtains, usually of a heavy material, arranged to fall straight in ornamental folds are also called draperies. Portieres are heavy curtains

  • Curtain Call: The Hits (album by Eminem [2005])

    Eminem: … (2004) and a greatest-hits set, Curtain Call: The Hits (2005), both of which sold well but failed to garner as much attention as his previous albums had. He then stepped out of the public eye, resurfacing briefly in 2006 to eulogize friend and D12 member Proof, who was killed outside…

  • Curtain of Green, A (work by Welty)

    Eudora Welty: …steadily after the publication of A Curtain of Green (1941; enlarged 1979), a volume of short stories that contains two of her most anthologized stories—“The Petrified Man” and “Why I Live at the P.O.” In 1942 her short novel The Robber Bridegroom was issued, and in 1946 her first full-length…

  • Curtain Theatre (historical theatre, London, United Kingdom)

    Curtain Theatre, playhouse opened in 1577 in Curtain Close, Finsbury Fields, Shoreditch. The Curtain was the second such public playhouse (after The Theatre) to be built in the London environs. Henry Lanman, who was the theatre’s manager from 1582 to 1592, may have been responsible for its

  • curtain wall (construction)

    Curtain wall, Nonbearing wall of glass, metal, or masonry attached to a building’s exterior structural frame. After World War II, low energy costs gave impetus to the concept of the tall building as a glass prism, an idea originally put forth by Le Corbusier and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe in their

  • curtained platform (stage design)

    theatre: Staging conventions: …least is known, was the curtained platform. Toward the end of the Middle Ages itinerant professional actors who performed interludes required only a curtain behind them for staging.

  • curtal (musical instrument)

    Curtal, Renaissance-era musical instrument and predecessor of the bassoon, with a double-back bore cut from a single piece of wood and built in sizes from treble to double bass (sometimes called the double curtal in England and the Choristfagott in Germany). The curtal was developed in the 16th c

  • curtal (weapon)

    naval ship: Gun-armed warships: …or five short-barreled cannon, or curtals, a similar number of demicannon, and culverins. The average cannon, a short-range gun, hurled an iron ball of about 50 pounds (23 kg), and the demicannon one of 32 pounds (14 kg). The culverin, a longer and stronger gun, fired a smaller shot over…

  • curtal sonnet (literature)

    Curtal sonnet, a curtailed or contracted sonnet. It refers specifically to a sonnet of 11 lines rhyming abcabc dcbdc or abcabc dbcdc with the last line a tail, or half a line. The term was used by Gerard Manley Hopkins to describe the form that he used in such poems as “Pied Beauty” and “Peace.”

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