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  • Cuniculus taczanowskii (rodent)

    paca: The mountain paca (C. taczanowskii) is smaller and has a long dense coat. Found high in the Andes Mountains from western Venezuela to northwestern Bolivia, it lives at the upper limits of mountain forest and in alpine pastures.

  • Cunila origanoides (plant)

    dittany: (gas plant; Dictamnus albus), American dittany (common dittany; Cunila origanoides), and dittany of Crete (Cretan dittany, or hop marjoram; Origanum dictamnus). European dittany is in the rue family (Rutaceae), while the other two species are in the mint family (Lamiaceae). All three species are bushy perennials cultivated for their…

  • Cunjai (Chinese philosopher)

    Lu Jiuyuan, Idealist neo-Confucian philosopher of the Southern Song and rival of his contemporary, the great neo-Confucian rationalist Zhu Xi. Lu’s thought was revised and refined three centuries later by the Ming dynasty neo-Confucian Wang Yangming. The name of their school is the Learning of the

  • Cunliffe of Headley, Walter Cunliffe, 1st Baron (English banker)

    Walter Cunliffe, 1st Baron Cunliffe, English banker who established in London the merchant banking business of Cunliffe Brothers (afterward Goschens and Cunliffe). The son of Roger Cunliffe, a banker of the City of London, he was educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge, and became a

  • Cunliffe, Walter Cunliffe, 1st Baron (English banker)

    Walter Cunliffe, 1st Baron Cunliffe, English banker who established in London the merchant banking business of Cunliffe Brothers (afterward Goschens and Cunliffe). The son of Roger Cunliffe, a banker of the City of London, he was educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge, and became a

  • Cunning Man, The (novel by Davies)

    Robertson Davies: The Cunning Man (1994), set in Toronto, spans the 20th century through the memoirs of a doctor; characters from Davies’ earlier works also appear in this novel. His later nonfiction included The Mirror of Nature (1983).

  • Cunning-Man, The (opera by Rousseau)

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Formative years: …and one of his operas, Le Devin du village (1752; “The Village Soothsayer”), attracted so much admiration from the king (Louis XV) and the court that he might have enjoyed an easy life as a fashionable composer, but something in his Calvinist blood rejected that type of worldly glory. Indeed,…

  • Cunningham (film by Kovgan [2019])

    Merce Cunningham: …the subject of the documentary Cunningham (2019).

  • Cunningham of Hyndhope, Baron (British naval officer)

    Andrew Browne Cunningham, British naval officer who was an outstanding combat commander early in World War II and served as first sea lord of the Admiralty from 1943 to 1946. Cunningham became a naval cadet on HMS Britannia in 1897, rose steadily through the ranks in the following years, and

  • Cunningham, Agnes (American musician)

    Agnes Cunningham, (“Sis”), American folk-song composer (born Feb. 19, 1909, Watongo, Okla.—died June 27, 2004, New Paltz, N.Y.), cofounded in 1962 the small but inspirational folk-song journal Broadside with her husband, Gordon Friesen. Although its circulation never topped four figures, the j

  • Cunningham, Alexander (Scottish noble)

    Alexander Cunningham, 5th earl of Glencairn, Scottish Protestant noble, an adherent of John Knox and a sometime supporter of Mary, Queen of Scots. He was a more pronounced reformer than his father, the 4th earl, whose English sympathies he shared, and was among the intimate friends of John Knox. In

  • Cunningham, Allan (British explorer)

    Australia: An authoritarian society: …the future Queensland (1823), while Allan Cunningham was the great pioneer of that state’s hinterland (1827). Meanwhile, in 1824–25, Hamilton Hume and William Hovell went overland southward to the western shore of Port Phillip. Charles Sturt in 1828–30 won still greater fame by tracing the Murray-Murrumbidgee-Darling river system down to…

  • Cunningham, Allan (Scottish poet)

    Allan Cunningham, Scottish poet, a member of the brilliant circle of writers that included Thomas De Quincey, Charles Lamb, William Hazlitt, John Keats, and Thomas Hood, who were contributors to the London Magazine in its heyday in the early 1820s. His father was a neighbour of Robert Burns, and

  • Cunningham, Andrew Browne (British naval officer)

    Andrew Browne Cunningham, British naval officer who was an outstanding combat commander early in World War II and served as first sea lord of the Admiralty from 1943 to 1946. Cunningham became a naval cadet on HMS Britannia in 1897, rose steadily through the ranks in the following years, and

  • Cunningham, Emory Orgustus (American publisher)

    Emory Orgustus Cunningham, American publisher (born March 17, 1921, Kansas, Ala.—died Jan. 24, 2000, Birmingham, Ala.), founded Southern Living magazine in 1966, a publication that highlighted the hospitality of the American South and was credited with increasing appreciation of the region’s c

  • Cunningham, Evelyn (American journalist)

    Evelyn Cunningham , (Evelyn Elizabeth Long), American journalist (born Jan. 25, 1916, Elizabeth City, N.C.—died April 28, 2010, New York, N.Y.), as a pathbreaking newspaperwoman for the Pittsburgh Courier, a black weekly, covered some of the most prominent stories of the civil rights era, notably

  • Cunningham, Glenn (American athlete)

    Glenn Cunningham, American middle-distance runner who repeatedly broke world and national records for the mile in the 1930s. At the age of 7, Cunningham and his older brother Floyd were badly burned in a schoolhouse fire; Floyd died and Glenn was not expected to be able to walk. Cunningham overcame

  • Cunningham, Harry B. (American businessman)

    Kmart: …program designed by company president Harry B. Cunningham, Kresge’s entered the large-scale discount retail market with construction of the first Kmart store outside Detroit. With its success, the company expanded aggressively, erecting an average of 85 discount stores per year over the next two decades throughout the United States and…

  • Cunningham, Imogen (American photographer)

    Imogen Cunningham, American photographer who is best known for her portraits and her images of plant life. Cunningham studied at the University of Washington in Seattle, where she developed an interest in photography. Her earliest prints were made in the tradition of Pictorialism, a style of

  • Cunningham, J. V. (American poet and critic)

    J.V. Cunningham, American poet and antimodernist literary critic whose terse, epigrammatic verse is full of sorrow and wit. His antimodernist stance is evident in his detailed criticisms of his own poetry. Cunningham grew up in Montana and studied poetry with Yvor Winters at Stanford University

  • Cunningham, James Vincent (American poet and critic)

    J.V. Cunningham, American poet and antimodernist literary critic whose terse, epigrammatic verse is full of sorrow and wit. His antimodernist stance is evident in his detailed criticisms of his own poetry. Cunningham grew up in Montana and studied poetry with Yvor Winters at Stanford University

  • Cunningham, Jane (American journalist)

    Jane Cunningham Croly, English-born American journalist and clubwoman whose popular writings and socially conscious advocacy reflected, in different spheres, her belief that equal rights and economic independence for women would allow them to become fully responsible, productive citizens. Jane

  • Cunningham, Kate Richards O’Hare (American reformer)

    Kate Richards O’Hare Cunningham, American socialist and reformer whose vocal political activism led to a brief prison stint and a longer subsequent career as a prison-reform advocate. After brief attendance at a normal (teachers) school in Nebraska, Kathleen Richards taught for a short time in a

  • Cunningham, Laurie (British athlete)

    Laurie Cunningham, professional football (soccer) player. In 1977 Cunningham joined West Bromwich Albion as a forward/striker. Albion featured two other players of African descent, Brendan Batson and Cyrille Regis, and the three of them were known as the “Three Degrees.” The presence of three black

  • Cunningham, Merce (American dancer and choreographer)

    Merce Cunningham, American modern dancer and choreographer who developed new forms of abstract dance movement. Cunningham began to study dance at 12 years of age. After high school he attended the Cornish School of Fine and Applied Arts in Seattle, Washington, for two years. He subsequently studied

  • Cunningham, Mercier Philip (American dancer and choreographer)

    Merce Cunningham, American modern dancer and choreographer who developed new forms of abstract dance movement. Cunningham began to study dance at 12 years of age. After high school he attended the Cornish School of Fine and Applied Arts in Seattle, Washington, for two years. He subsequently studied

  • Cunningham, Philip (Irish rebel)

    Castle Hill Rising: The rebel leader, Philip Cunningham, was captured on March 5 and immediately hanged (martial law was in effect for the area from March 5 until March 10). Later, eight other convicts were tried and hanged as well.

  • Cunningham, R. Walter (American astronaut)

    R. Walter Cunningham, American astronaut and civilian participant in the Apollo 7 mission (October 11–22, 1968), in which the first crewed flight of Apollo Command and Service modules was made. Cunningham enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1951 and transferred to the Marine Corps, where he served as a

  • Cunningham, Randall (American football player)

    Philadelphia Eagles: …Eagles made two significant additions: Randall Cunningham, a fleet-footed quarterback who would set the career record for rushing yards from his position, and Reggie White, a dominant defensive end who would retire as the NFL’s all-time sack leader. However, their stellar individual play never translated to team postseason success, as…

  • Cunningham, Ronnie Walter (American astronaut)

    R. Walter Cunningham, American astronaut and civilian participant in the Apollo 7 mission (October 11–22, 1968), in which the first crewed flight of Apollo Command and Service modules was made. Cunningham enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1951 and transferred to the Marine Corps, where he served as a

  • Cunningham, Sir Alan Gordon (British army officer)

    Sir Alan Gordon Cunningham, British army officer who scored important victories over Italian forces in eastern Africa during World War II, enabling the exiled emperor Haile Selassie to return to power in Ethiopia. A commissioned officer from 1906, Cunningham had been promoted to major general by

  • Cunningham, Sir Alexander (British army officer and archaeologist)

    Sir Alexander Cunningham, British army officer and archaeologist who excavated many sites in India, including Sārnāth and Sānchi, and served as the first director of the Indian Archaeological Survey. At age 19 he joined the Bengal Engineers and spent 28 years in the British service in India,

  • Cunningham, Sir Josias (British politician)

    Sir Josias Cunningham, Northern Irish politician (born Jan. 20, 1934, County Antrim, N.Ire.—died Aug. 9, 2000, Belfast, N.Ire.), was a key figure for more than 25 years in the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), Northern Ireland’s largest Protestant political party, and was president of the UUP’s g

  • Cunningham, Sis (American musician)

    Agnes Cunningham, (“Sis”), American folk-song composer (born Feb. 19, 1909, Watongo, Okla.—died June 27, 2004, New Paltz, N.Y.), cofounded in 1962 the small but inspirational folk-song journal Broadside with her husband, Gordon Friesen. Although its circulation never topped four figures, the j

  • Cunningham, Ward (American computer programmer)

    wiki: …1995, when American computer programmer Ward Cunningham created a new collaborative technology for organizing information on Web sites. Using a Hawaiian term meaning “quick,” he called this new software WikiWikiWeb, attracted by its alliteration and also by its matching abbreviation (WWW).

  • Cunningham, William (British economist)

    William Cunningham, British economist and clergyman who was largely responsible for the establishment of economic history as a scholastic discipline in British universities. Cunningham was ordained in the Church of England in 1873 and became vicar of Great St. Mary’s, Cambridge (1887), and

  • Cunningham, William (Scottish conspirator)

    William Cunningham, 4th earl of Glencairn, Scottish conspirator during the Reformation. An early adherent of the Reformation, he was during his public life frequently in the pay and service of England, although he fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Solway Moss (1542), where he was taken

  • Cunninghamia lanceolata (plant)

    China fir, (Cunninghamia lanceolata), coniferous evergreen timber tree of the cypress family (Cupressaceae), native to East Asia. The China fir may grow to a height of 50 metres (160 feet), with a circumference of about 5.5 metres (18 feet); it is covered with fragrant, reddish brown bark that is

  • Cuno, Wilhelm (German chancellor)

    Wilhelm Cuno, German politician and business leader, general director of the Hamburg-American Line, and chancellor of the Weimar Republic during the Franco-Belgian invasion of the Ruhr (1923). Appointed government assessor in the German imperial treasury department (1907), Cuno subsequently served

  • Cuno, Wilhelm Carl Josef (German chancellor)

    Wilhelm Cuno, German politician and business leader, general director of the Hamburg-American Line, and chancellor of the Weimar Republic during the Franco-Belgian invasion of the Ruhr (1923). Appointed government assessor in the German imperial treasury department (1907), Cuno subsequently served

  • Cunobelinus (British ruler)

    Cunobelinus, ruler of a large area of southeastern Britain from roughly ad 10 to 42. He is the Cymbeline in William Shakespeare’s play of that name, but the play’s fanciful plot bears no relation to the events in Cunobelinus’s career. Cunobelinus succeeded his father, Tasciovanus, as chief of the

  • Cunonia capensis (tree)

    Cunoniaceae: …species with crimson flowers, and Cunonia capensis, a small southern African tree with clusters of small white flowers.

  • Cunoniaceae (plant family)

    Cunoniaceae, family of leathery-leaved plants, in the order Oxalidales, comprising 26 genera of shrubs and trees, native primarily to tropical areas of the Southern Hemisphere. Several of the trees are cultivated as ornamentals, including Geissois racemosa, a New Zealand species with crimson

  • Cuntarar (Hindu poet and musician)

    Nayanar: the poets Nanachampantar, Appar, and Chuntaramurtti (often called “the three”) are worshipped as saints through their images in South Indian temples. The Nayanars were approximately contemporary with their Vaishnavite (Vishnu-worshipping) counterparts, the Alvars. In the 10th century Nambi Andar Nambi collected the hymns of the Nayanars in an anthology called…

  • cunto de li cunti, Lo (work by Basile)

    Giambattista Basile: Basile’s collection, Lo cunto de li cunti (1634; “The Story of Stories”; best Italian translation B. Croce, 1925; best English translation N.B. Penzer, The Pentamerone, 2 vol., 1932), was published posthumously under the anagrammatic pseudonym Gian Alesio Abbattutis and referred to by its first editor as Il…

  • Cunucunuma River (river, South America)

    Orinoco River: Physiography of the Orinoco: Ocamo, Padamo, and Cunucunuma rivers on the right.

  • CUNY (university, New York City, New York, United States)

    City University of New York, The, system of higher education institutions in New York, New York, U.S. It was created in 1961 to combine New York City’s municipally supported colleges (now numbering 21, including the CUNY Baccalaureate Program). The university includes the Graduate School and

  • Cunza (people)

    Atacama, extinct South American Indian culture of the Andean desert oases of northern Chile and northwestern Argentina. The last surviving groups of the Atacama have been assimilated by Spanish and Aymara culture. In their widely scattered settlements the Atacama cultivated crops such as corn

  • Cunza language

    Atacama: …of the Atacama was called Cunza, or Lincan Antai, of which a vocabulary of about 1,100 words has been recorded.

  • Cuoco, Vincenzo (Italian historian)

    Vincenzo Cuoco, Italian historian noted for his history of the Neapolitan Revolution of 1799. At the age of 17, Cuoco went to Naples to study law and became a partisan of the French Jacobins when the French Revolution broke out in 1789. After taking an active part in the revolution of the Kingdom

  • Cuomo, Andrew (American politician)

    Andrew Cuomo, American politician and attorney who served as the governor of New York (2011– ) after first having served as secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD; 1997–2001) under Pres. Bill Clinton and as New York’s attorney general (2007–10). As a teenager in Queens, New York, Cuomo put

  • Cuomo, Andrew Mark (American politician)

    Andrew Cuomo, American politician and attorney who served as the governor of New York (2011– ) after first having served as secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD; 1997–2001) under Pres. Bill Clinton and as New York’s attorney general (2007–10). As a teenager in Queens, New York, Cuomo put

  • Cuomo, Mario (American politician)

    Mario Matthew Cuomo, American lawyer and politician (born June 15, 1932, Queens, N.Y.—died Jan. 1, 2015, New York, N.Y.), served (1983–94) as the three-term governor of New York and gained national political stature after he delivered (1984) an electrifying keynote speech at the Democratic National

  • Cuomo, Mario Matthew (American politician)

    Mario Matthew Cuomo, American lawyer and politician (born June 15, 1932, Queens, N.Y.—died Jan. 1, 2015, New York, N.Y.), served (1983–94) as the three-term governor of New York and gained national political stature after he delivered (1984) an electrifying keynote speech at the Democratic National

  • Cuon alpinus (canine)

    Dhole, (Cuon alpinus), wild Asian carnivore of the dog family (Canidae), found in central and southeastern wooded areas and distinguished structurally by the lack of one pair of lower molars. Its length ranges between 76 and 100 cm (30 and 40 inches), exclusive of the 28–48-centimetre (11–19-inch)

  • Cuong De (Vietnamese prince)

    Cuong De, Vietnamese prince who was cultivated by Vietnamese nationalists at the turn of the 20th century to serve as a symbol of a free Vietnam. As a direct descendant of the emperor Gia Long, Cuong De had a legitimate claim to the throne of Vietnam but was excluded by the French, who held a

  • Cuore (work by De Amicis)

    Edmondo De Amicis: , The Heart of a Boy, 1960), written in the form of a schoolboy’s diary. It was translated into more than 25 languages.

  • cuore arido, Un (work by Cassola)

    Italian literature: Other writings: …Forest), Un cuore arido (1961; An Arid Heart), and Un uomo solo (1978; “A Man by Himself”).

  • CUP (Turkish history)

    Associations for the Defense of Rights: …whom were members of the Committee of Union and Progress, which was dissolved in 1918). In 1919 Mustafa Kemal (later Atatürk) arrived in Anatolia as inspector general of the 3rd Army and established contacts with the groups there. Mustafa Kemal resigned his post that July and persuaded the Association for…

  • cup (measurement)

    Cup, unit of volume in the British Imperial and United States Customary systems of measurement. The U.S. liquid cup is equal to 14 716 cubic inches, or 236.59 cubic cm; the more rarely used U.S. dry cup is equal to 1.164 liquid cups. In Great Britain a single cup is used for both types of

  • CUP (pathology)

    Cancer of unknown primary (CUP), rare condition in which the initial site of cancer development in a patient’s body cannot be identified. In the vast majority of cases, cancer cells share identifiable features in common with the normal cells that make up the tissue in which the cancer initially

  • CUP (political movement, Spain)

    Catalonia: History: The antiausterity Popular Unity Candidacy, which won 10 seats, entered into a coalition with Junts pel Sí to give pro-independence parties a narrow parliamentary majority. Those who favoured independence interpreted the result as a victory, while those who opposed it emphasized the fact that pro-independence parties received…

  • cup fungus

    Cup fungus, any member of a large group of fungi (kingdom Fungi) in the order Pezizales (phylum Ascomycota) and typically characterized by a disk- or cup-shaped structure (apothecium) bearing spore sacs (asci) on its surface. Some of the cup fungi are important plant pathogens, such as Monilinia

  • cup lichen

    Cup lichen, (genus Cladonia), widely distributed yellow, gray, or brown lichens usually found on the ground or on rocks in the north. The thallus varies in shape from simple and pointed to cup-shaped. One of the most commonly collected lichens, it contains a gummy or starchy material. When boiled

  • Cup of Gold (work by Steinbeck)

    American literature: Hemingway, Faulkner, and Steinbeck: …began with a historical novel, Cup of Gold (1929), in which he voiced a distrust of society and glorified the anarchistic individualist typical of the rebellious 1920s. He showed his affinity for colourful outcasts, such as the paisanos of the Monterey area, in the short novels Tortilla Flat (1935), Of…

  • Cup of Nations (football)

    African Cup of Nations: …a new trophy called the Cup of Nations was introduced.

  • Cup of Solomon (Iranian metalwork)

    ancient Iran: Art and literature: …of Khosrow I—known as the Cup of Solomon and, according to one tradition, a gift from the caliph Hārūn al-Rashīd to Charlemagne—is perhaps the most sumptuous specimen of Sāsānian metalworking. The art of gem engraving produced many fine intaglio stamp seals and cameos. The coins invariably bear a Pahlavi inscription;…

  • Cup Series (auto racing championship)

    Jimmie Johnson: …Series and, in 2008, the Sprint Cup Series.) He also earned his first Busch Series win in 2001, at Chicagoland Speedway, winding up eighth in that series’s point standings. In 2002 he began his rookie season in the Cup Series, winning three races and ending the season ranked fifth. Two…

  • Cup’ik (people)

    Nunivak Island: The Nuniwarmiut are believed to have lived on the island for at least 2,000 years; an expedition of Russian explorers reached the island in 1821. Because shoals around the island made landing difficult, the Nuniwarmiut were able to maintain their traditions for a much longer period…

  • cup-and-saucer drama (theatre)

    Thomas William Robertson: …broader style known as “cup-and-saucer” drama that exerted significant influence over the development of the English theatre during the second half of the 19th century.

  • cup-plant (plant)

    Silphium: The base of each oval cup-plant (Silphium perfoliatum) leaf surrounds the square stem and may hold water. Compass plant, or pilotweed (S. laciniatum), is a prairie plant with large, deeply cut, lance-shaped leaves. It may grow to 3.5 metres (about 12 feet) and has a tall flower stalk with solitary…

  • Cupar (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Cupar, royal burgh (town) and market centre in northeastern Fife council area and historic county, eastern Scotland. It is situated on the banks of the River Eden in the fertile valley known as the Howe of Fife. During the 13th century Cupar emerged as the centre of the administration of justice

  • cupboard (furniture)

    Cupboard, type of furniture that originated in the Middle Ages as a board or table for cups. The word also may have been used for a stepped sideboard and later for open shelves, both to display plate. Since the 16th century the name has referred to a case fitted with doors. Byzantine and Romanesque

  • Cupboard, The (novel by Tremain)

    Rose Tremain: The Cupboard (1981) explores the relationship between an older, neglected writer and the journalist sent to interview her.

  • Cupedidae (insect family)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Cupesidae (Cupedidae; reticulated beetles) Small and little-known; found under bark; about 30 species widely distributed. Family Jurodidae 1 species, Sikhotealinia zhiltzovae. Family Micromalthidae Rare; 1 to 2

  • cupellation (metallurgy)

    Cupellation, separation of gold or silver from impurities by melting the impure metal in a cupel (a flat, porous dish made of a refractory, or high-temperature-resistant, material) and then directing a blast of hot air on it in a special furnace. The impurities, including lead, copper, tin, and

  • Cupesidae (insect family)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Cupesidae (Cupedidae; reticulated beetles) Small and little-known; found under bark; about 30 species widely distributed. Family Jurodidae 1 species, Sikhotealinia zhiltzovae. Family Micromalthidae Rare; 1 to 2

  • cupey (shrub)

    Clusiaceae: Scotch attorney, or cupey (C. rosea), which is native to the Caribbean area, grows to about 10 metres (30 feet) and is often planted as a beach shrub in areas exposed to salt spray. It has leaves 10 cm (4 inches) long, flatly open flowers…

  • Cuphea (plant genus)

    Cuphea, genus of more than 200 species of chiefly tropical American herbs or shrubs of the family Lythraceae. Four species—native to Mexico and Central America—are commonly grown indoors for their attractive flowers. Cuphea hyssopifolia, elfin herb, is a small hairy shrub with many branches. The

  • Cuphea hyssopifolia (plant)

    Cuphea: Cuphea hyssopifolia, elfin herb, is a small hairy shrub with many branches. The small stalkless leaves are crowded and narrow; the flowers are tubular and violet white. C. llavea grows to a height of 60 centimetres (2 feet), is covered with stiff hairs, and has nearly stalkless,…

  • Cuphea ignea (plant)

    Cuphea: ignea), commonly called the cigar flower, grows 20–37 cm tall and has lance-shaped leaves. The tubular flowers are reddish, with a dark ring near the tip and an ashy-white mouth.

  • Cuphea llavea (plant)

    Cuphea: C. llavea grows to a height of 60 centimetres (2 feet), is covered with stiff hairs, and has nearly stalkless, oval, rough leaves. The tubular flowers are red. C. micropetala grows 30–120 cm tall, with oblong leaves; its tubular yellow flowers are scarlet near the…

  • Cuphea micropetala (plant)

    Cuphea: C. micropetala grows 30–120 cm tall, with oblong leaves; its tubular yellow flowers are scarlet near the base. C. platycentra (sometimes C. ignea), commonly called the cigar flower, grows 20–37 cm tall and has lance-shaped leaves. The tubular flowers are reddish, with a dark ring…

  • Cuphea platycentra (plant)

    Cuphea: ignea), commonly called the cigar flower, grows 20–37 cm tall and has lance-shaped leaves. The tubular flowers are reddish, with a dark ring near the tip and an ashy-white mouth.

  • Cupid (Roman god)

    Cupid, ancient Roman god of love in all its varieties, the counterpart of the Greek god Eros and the equivalent of Amor in Latin poetry. According to myth, Cupid was the son of Mercury, the winged messenger of the gods, and Venus, the goddess of love. He often appeared as a winged infant carrying a

  • Cupid and Death (work by Locke)

    Matthew Locke: …music for James Shirley’s masque Cupid and Death (1653), possibly the most elaborate masque of the period. He also wrote part of the music for Sir William Davenant’s The Siege of Rhodes (1656), which is usually considered the first English opera. Other stage works were music for Thomas Shadwell’s Psyche…

  • Cupid and Psyche (painting by Gérard)

    François, Gérard: …and Gérard’s famed salon entry Cupid and Psyche (1798) were among the pictures that established a style that became widely imitated at the turn of the 18th century. Gérard’s painting was closely related to David’s in its intellectualism, cool classicism, highly finished surfaces, and sculptural definition of form. Gérard’s works,…

  • Cupisnique (pre-Inca pottery style)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: The pottery of Chavín and Paracas: …coast, where it is called Cupisnique. Until the end of the period, the ware was monochrome—dull red, brown, or gray—and hard and stonelike. Vessels were massive and heavy, especially in the early part of the period. The main forms are open bowls with vertical or slightly expanding sides and flat…

  • cupola (architecture)

    Cupola, in architecture, small dome, often resembling an overturned cup, placed on a circular, polygonal, or square base or on small pillars or a glassed-in lantern. It is used to crown a turret, roof, or larger dome. The inner vault of a dome is also a cupola. Cupolas, usually bulbous or pointed,

  • cupola furnace (metallurgy)

    Cupola furnace, in steelmaking, a vertical cylindrical furnace used for melting iron either for casting or for charging in other furnaces. René-Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur built the first cupola furnace on record, in France, about 1720. Cupola melting is still recognized as the most economical

  • cuprammonium rayon (textile)

    rayon: …process for making fibres from cuprammonium rayon. This material was based on the Swiss chemist Matthias Eduard Schweizer’s discovery in 1857 that cellulose could be dissolved in a solution of copper salts and ammonia and, after extrusion, be regenerated in a coagulating bath. In 1908 the German textile firm J.-P.…

  • Cupressaceae (tree family)

    Cupressaceae, the cypress family (order Pinales), 30 genera with 133 species of evergreen ornamental and timber shrubs and trees, distributed throughout the world. The leaves of these plants are opposite or whorled and usually paired or in threes. Adult leaves are narrow, scalelike, and pressed

  • Cupressocyparis leylandii (tree)

    cypress: The hybrid or Leyland cypress (Cupressocyparis leylandii) is an ornamental windbreak developed by crossing the Monterey cypress with the yellow cypress (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis).

  • Cupressus (plant)

    Cypress, any of 12 species of ornamental and timber evergreen conifers constituting the genus Cupressus of the family Cupressaceae, distributed throughout warm-temperate and subtropical regions of Asia, Europe, and North America. Many resinous, aromatic evergreen trees called cypress belong to

  • Cupressus goveniana (tree)

    conifer: Diversity of size and structure: …are also conifers: the natural bonsai cypresses (Cupressus goveniana) and lodgepole pines (Pinus contorta) of the pygmy forests (adjacent to the towering redwood forests) of the northern California coasts. On the sterile hardpan soils of those astounding forests, the trees may reach full maturity at under 0.2 metre (0.7 foot)…

  • Cupressus macrocarpa (tree)

    cypress: …from the Bhutan, Italian, and Monterey cypresses (C. torulosa, C. sempervirens, and C. macrocarpa, respectively). Their wood is light, moderately hard, and very durable in contact with the soil but is usually knotty and has an odour sometimes considered offensive. These three trees, together with the Arizona (C. arizonica and…

  • Cupressus sempervirens (tree)

    cypress: …is obtained from the Bhutan, Italian, and Monterey cypresses (C. torulosa, C. sempervirens, and C. macrocarpa, respectively). Their wood is light, moderately hard, and very durable in contact with the soil but is usually knotty and has an odour sometimes considered offensive. These three trees, together with the Arizona (C.…

  • Cupressus torulosa (tree)

    cypress: …wood is obtained from the Bhutan, Italian, and Monterey cypresses (C. torulosa, C. sempervirens, and C. macrocarpa, respectively). Their wood is light, moderately hard, and very durable in contact with the soil but is usually knotty and has an odour sometimes considered offensive. These three trees, together with the Arizona…

  • cupric carbonate (chemical compound)

    copper: Principal compounds: Other important copper(II) compounds include cupric carbonate, Cu2(OH)2CO3, which is prepared by adding sodium carbonate to a solution of copper sulfate and then filtering and drying the product. It is used as a colouring agent. With arsenic it forms cupric acetoarsenite (commonly known as Paris green), a wood preservative and…

  • cupric chloride (chemical compound)

    copper: Principal compounds: Cupric chloride is a yellowish to brown powder that readily absorbs moisture from the air and turns into the greenish blue hydrate, CuCl2∙2H2O. The hydrate is commonly prepared by passing chlorine and water in a contacting tower packed with metallic copper. The anhydrous salt is…

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